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Full text of "1967 Census of Manufactures. Industry Statistics"

1967 

CENSUS OF 

MANUFACTURES 



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1967 

CENSUS DF 

MANUFACTURES 



Vol. 



INDUSTRY STATISTICS, 

Part 1 Major Groups 20-24 • 




Issued January 1971 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
Maurice H. Starts, Secretary 

Rocco C. Siciliano, Under Secretary 

Harold C. Passer. Assistant Secretary for Economic Affairs 

11 BUREAU OF THE CENSUS^ George Hay Brown, Director 



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BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 
LIBRARY ,j 



Acknowledgments 




BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

George Hay Brown, Director 
Robert F. Drury, Deputy Director 
Walter F. Ryan, Associate Director 
Dino S. Villa, Deputy Associate Director 



INDUSTRY DIVISION 
Owen C. Gretton, Chief 



The 1967 Census of Manufactures was conducted under the direction of Owen C 
Gretton, Chief, and Milton Eisen, Assistant Chief. Elmer S. Biles, assisted by John S. 
Berube, Clifford Bennett, and Kenneth I. Hansen, was responsible for the overall 
management of the census and was the Industry Division's liaison officer with other 
Divisions. 

Program responsibility along industry lines was shared by the following individuals who 
participated importantly in the entire census program: Robert J. Nealon, Foods, 
Textiles, and Apparel; Cyril M. Wildes, Chemicals and Wood Products; and Paul F. 
Berard, Metals and Metal Products. Willis K. Jordon was responsible for preparation of 
the introductory text and appendix materials. Edward A. Robinson made significant 
contributions to the basic concepts and content of the census. Donald F. Clark and Carl 
J. Bostrom, under the direction of Jack L. Ogus, developed the mathematical- techniques 
utilized in editing the data and in sampling the respondents. Louis J. Owen, assisted by 
William R. Gray was responsible for the inquiries relating to fuel, electric energy, and 
water data. William Cooper had staff responsibility for industry classification and the 
system of classifying products and materials. Wayne M. McCaughey and Angela R. Daly 
also participated importantly in various phases of the project. 

Professional personnel in the commodity areas of the Industry Division developed the 
report forms for the various industries, reviewed the tabulations, and prepared the 
industry texts that accompanied the data. The respective areas and the individuals in 
charge during the census were as follows: Foods, Charles H. W. Sedgewick and Carole A. 
Klein; Textiles, Evelyn O. Denny; Apparel, Bennie A. Daniels; Wood Products, Kenneth 
E. McBeth; Pulp and Paper, Lonnie M. Conner; Chemicals, Reese R. Morgan; Metals, 
Malcolm E. Bernhardt; Machinery, John P. McNamee; and Electrical Machinery and 
Transportation, Dale W. Gordon. The names of the supporting statisticians in the 
commodity areas who made significant contributions are shown in the acknowledgment 
statements appearing in the 80 industry reports published separately prior to their 
assembly into the Industry Volume. 

Systems and procedures were developed in the Systems Division, Sol Dolleck, Chief, by 
Eugene Wendt assisted by Samuel Schweid. Clerical procedures were developed by Alvin 
Barten, Evelyn V. Williams, Carmen Taylor, Geraldine Manuel, Carl Mueller, Thomas 
Lowenstein, and Jack Margolis. Electronic computer programs for check-in, geographic 
coding, and administrative records were developed and supervised by Charles Venters 
and Terence McDowell under the direction of Zigmund Decker and Andrew Grieco. 
James Moyers, Gene Haggy, Paul Poissant, and Stephan Potemkin developed and 
supervised the electronic computer editing and tabulation programs under the direction 
of Mary H. Johnson. Quality control plans and procedures were developed and 
supervised by Maxwell D. Jeane, assisted by John Powell and Carl Jablin. Data input 
procedures were developed and supervised by Leonard Tauber assisted by Paul Black mer. 
Production controls were established under the supervision of Francis Boucher and 
James R. Pepal. 

Processing of reports was performed in the Jeffersonville Census Operations Division, 
Joseph F. Arbena, Chief, by James S. Werking assisted by Margaret Rommel and Jordan 
Home. Clerical processing was supervised by Charles Adams and quality control 
plans and procedures were implemented and monitored under the direction of Kathern 
Clay. 

Data processing and related operations were performed by the Processing Division, M. 
Douglas Fahey, Chief, assisted by R. M. Micoly, James Shores, and E. R. Bourdon. 

Report planning and editorial review were provided by Geraldine Censky and Frances 
Bresnahan of the Administrative and Publications Services Division. 

Arthur Horowitz, in his capacity as the coordinator of the economic censuses, made 
important contributions to the planning and operational phases of the work. Robert 
Parker contributed in the analysis of reports for the large and complex corporate 
organizations. James Corbett developed the computer systems for disclosure analysis, 
assisted by Robert Reynolds. 

Special acknowledgment is due to the many businesses whose cooperation has 
contributed to the publication of the data. 



Library of Congress Card No. 74-609524 



Suggested Citation 

U.S. Bureau of the Census, Census of Manufactures, 1967 
Volume II, Industry Statistics, Part 1, Major Groups 20-24 

U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1971 

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, 
Washington, D.C. 20402, or any Department of Commerce field office. Price $8.75 



Preface 



This is one of a series of volumes presenting the final results 
of the 1967 Census of Manufactures, which was part of the 
economic censuses covering that year. In addition to the 
manufacturing sector, the 1967 economic censuses included 
wholesale and retail trade, certain services, transportation, 
construction, commercial fishing, and mining. The censuses 
measured the activities of nearly 4,000,000 business estab- 
lishments, including 300,000 engaged in manufacturing. 

As in previous census years, the advice and counsel of trade 
and professional associations, individual companies, Federal 
and State agencies, labor unions, and research and educa- 
tional organizations were most valuable in planning the 
content of the census reports. The Advisory Council on 
Federal Reports, comprised of representative businessmen, 
provided special assistance in determining the feasibility of 
collecting the various types of data. Other advisory com- 
mittees which counsel the Census Bureau regularly con- 
tributed significantly in the planning and preparatory 
stages. Timely publicity was given by chambers of com- 
merce, newspapers, trade periodicals, and television and 
radio stations. 

As essential element in the Census of Manufactures was the 
excellent cooperation of the many thousands of manu- 
facturing companies which completed the necessary census 
questionnaires. 



Ill 



r 



Contents 



page 

Preface Ill 

Industry Chapter Descriptions VII 

Introduction 1 

General Summary Tables 25 

Major Groups 

Food and Kindred Products 20-1 

Tobacco Manufactures 21-1 

Textile Mill Products 22-1 

Apparel and Other Textile Products 23-1 

Lumber and Wood Products 24-1 

Appendixes 

A Explanation of Terms A-1 

B Industry Descriptions B-1 

C Composition of Industries in the 1967 Standard Industrial Classification . C-1 

D Census Report Forms D-1 

E Authority for Census: Title 13, United States Code E-1 

F Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas F-1 

G Comparability of Product Classes Between the 1967 and 1963 Census of 

Manufactures G-1 

H Alphabetic Index of Manufactured Products H-1 



The chapters of this volume were published earlier as separate reports in the 1967 Census of 
Manufactures series MC67(2). 

Data in this volume include all significant corrections uncovered after publication of the separate 
reports. The 1963 and other historical data include all significant corrections made since the latest 
publication of these figures. 



V 



Industry Chapter Descriptions 



Chapters in this volume are coded to industries as classified 
in the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. Pages 
are numbered with a chapter identification prefix; for 
example, the chapter on Weaving Mills in Major Group 22 
will begin on page 22A— 1. The list below shows the prefix 
identification for each chapter and the SIC industries 
included under each title. Chapters for each part of this 
volume are shown. 



Major Group 21-TOBACCO MANUFACTURES 

21 A Tobacco Products 

2111 Cigarettes 

2121 Cigars 

2131 Chewing and smoking tobacco 

2141 Tobacco stemming and redrying 



PART I 



lajor Group 22-TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS 



Major Group 20-FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 

20 A Meat Products 

2011 Meatpacking plants 

2013 Sausages and other prepared meats 

2015 Poultry dressing plants 

20B Dairy Products 

2021 Creamery butter 

2022 Cheese, natural and processed 

2023 Condensed and evaporated milk 

2024 Ice cream and frozen desserts 
2026 Fluid milk 

20C Canned, Cured, and Frozen Foods 

2031 Canned and curred seafoods 

2032 Canned specialties 

2033 Canned fruits and vegetables 

2034 Dehydrated food products 

2035 Pickles, sauces, and salad dressings 

2036 Fresh or frozen packaged fish 

2037 Frozen fruits and vegetables 

20D Grain Mill Products 

2041 Flour and other grain mill products 

2042 Prepared feeds for animals and fowls 

2043 Cereal preparations 

2044 Rice milling 

2045 Blended and prepared flour 

2046 Wet corn milling 

20E Bakery Products 

2051 Bread, cake, and related products 

2052 Cookies and crackers 

20F Sugar and Confectionery Products 

2061 Raw cane sugar 

2062 Cane sugar refining 

2063 Beet sugar 

2071 Confectionery products 

2072 Chocolate and cocoa products 

2073 Chewing gum 



22A Weaving Mills 

2211 Weaving mills, cotton 
2221 Weaving mills, synthetics 
2231 Weaving and finishing mills, wool 
2241 Narrow fabric mills 

22B Knitting Mills 

2251 Women's hosiery, except socks 

2252 Hosiery, n.e.c. 

2253 Knit outerwear mills 

2254 Knit underwear mills 
2256 Knit fabric mills 
2259 Knitting mills, n.e.c. 

22C Dyeing and Finishing Textiles, Except Wool Fabrics and Knit 
Goods 

2261 Finishing plants, cotton 

2262 Finishing plants, synthetics 
2269 Finishing plants, n.e.c. 

22D Floor Covering Mills 

2271 Woven carpets and rugs 

2272 Tufted carpets and rugs 
2279 Carpets and rugs, n.e.c. 

22E Yarn and Thread Mills 

2281 Yarn mills, except wool 

2282 Throwing and winding mills 

2283 Wool yarn mills 

2284 Thread mills 

22F Miscellaneous Textile Goods 

2291 Felt goods, n.e.c. 

2292 Lace goods 

2293 Paddings and upholstery filling 

2294 Processed textile waste 

2295 Coated fabrics, not rubberized 

2296 Tire cord and fabric 

2297 Scouring and combing plants 

2298 Cordage and twine 

2299 Textile goods, n.e.c. 



20G Beverages 

2082 Malt liquors 

2083 Malt 

2084 Wines, brandy, and brandy spirits 

2085 Distilled liquor, except brandy 

2086 Bottled and canned soft drinks 

2087 Flavoring extracts and sirups, n.e.c. 

20H Fats and Oils 

2091 Cottonseed oil mills 

2092 Soybean oil mills 

2093 Vegetable oil mills, n.e.c. 

2094 Animal and marine fats and oils 

2096 Shortening and cooking oils 

201 Miscellaneous Foods and Kindred Products 

2095 Roasted Coffee 

2097 Manufactured ice 

2098 Macaroni and spaghetti 

2099 Food preparations, n.e.c. 



Major Group 23-APPAREL AND OTHER TEXTILE 
PRODUCTS 

23A Men's and Boys' Apparel 

231 1 Men's and boys' suits and coats 

2321 Men's and boys' shirts and nightwear 

2322 Men's and boys' underwear 

2323 Men's and boys' neckwear 

2327 Men's and boys' separate trousers 

2328 Men's and boys' work clothing 

2329 Men's and boys' clothing, n.e.c. 

23B Women's and Misses' Outerwear 

2331 Women's and misses' blouses and waists 
2335 Women's and misses' dresses 
2337 Women's and misses' suits and coats 
2339 Women's and misses' outerwear, n.e.c. 



VII 



23C Women's and Children's Underwear, Headwear, Children's 
Outerwear 

2341 Women's and children's underwear 

2342 Corsets and allied garments 

2351 Millinery 

2352 Hats and caps, except millinery 
2361 Children's dresses and blouses 
2363 Children's coats and suits 
2369 Children's outerwear, n.e.c. 



23D Miscellaneous Apparel and Accessories 

2371 Fur goods 

2381 Fabric dress and work gloves 

2384 Robes and dressing gowns 

2385 Waterproof outer garments 

2386 Leather and sheep-lined clothing 

2387 Apparel belts 

2389 Apparel and accessories, n.e.c. 



Major Group 26-PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS 

26A Pulp, Paper, and Board Mills 

2611 Pulpmills 

2621 Papermills, except building paper 

2631 Paperboard mills 

2661 Building paper and board mills 



26B 



and Paperboard Products, Except Con- 



Converted Paper 
tainers and Boxes 

2641 Paper coating and glazing 
Envelopes 

Bags, except textile bags 
Wallpaper 

Die-cut paper and board 
Pressed and molded pulp goods 
Sanitary paper products 
Converted paper products, n.e.c. 



2642 
2643 
2644 
2645 
2646 
2647 
2649 



23E Miscellaneous Fabricated Textile Products 

2391 Curtains and draperies 

2392 Housefurnishings, n.e.c. 

2393 Textile bags 

2394 Canvas products 

2395 Pleating and stitching 

2396 Automotive and apparel trimmings 

2397 Schiffli machine embroideries 
2399 Fabricated textile products, n.e.c. 



26C Paperboard Containers and Boxes 

2651 Folding paperboard boxes 

2652 Setup paperboard boxes 

2653 Corrugated and solid fiber boxes 

2654 Sanitary food containers 

2655 Fiber cans, drums, and related materials 

Major Group 27-PRINTING AND PUBLISHING 



Major Group 24-LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS 

24A Logging Camps, Sawmills, and Planing Mills 

241 1 Logging camps and logging contractors 
2421 Sawmills and planing mills, general 
2426 Hardwood dimension and flooring 
2429 Special product sawmills, n.e.c. 

24B Millwork, Plywood, and Prefabricated Structural Wood 
Products 

2431 Millwork 

2432 Veneer and plywood 

2433 Prefabricated wood structures 

24C Wooden Containers and Miscellaneous Wood Products 

2441 Nailed wooden boxes and shook 

2442 Wirebound boxes and crates 

2443 Veneer and plywood containers 
2445 Cooperage 

2491 Wood preserving 

2499 Wood products, n.e.c. 



27A Newspapers, Periodicals, Books, and Miscellaneous Publishing 

271 1 Newspapers 
2721 Periodicals 

2731 Book publishing 

2732 Book printing 

2741 Miscellaneous publishing 

27B Commercial Printing and Manifold Business Forms 

2751 Commercial printing, except lithographic 

2752 Commercial printing, lithographic 

2753 Engraving and plate printing 
2761 Manifold business forms 



27C Greeting Cards; Bookbinding; Printing Trade Services 

2771 Greeting card publishing 

2782 Blankbooks and I ooseleaf binders 

2789 Bookbinding and related work 

2791 Typesetting 

2793 Photoengraving 

2794 Electrotyping and stereotyping 



lajor Group 28-CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS 



PART II 

Major Group 25-FURNITURE AND FIXTURES 

25A Household Furniture 

2511 Wood household furniture 

2512 Upholstered household furniture 

2514 Metal household furniture 

251 5 Mattresses and bedsprings 
2519 Household furniture, n.e.c. 

25B Office, Public Building, and Miscellaneous Furniture; Office 
and Store Fixtures 

2521 Wood office furniture 

2522 Metal office furniture 
2531 Public building furniture 

2541 Wood partitions and fixtures 

2542 Metal partitions and fixtures 
2591 Venetian blinds and shades 
2599 Furniture and fixtures, n.e.c. 



28A Industrial Chemicals 

2812 Alkalies and chlorine 

2813 Industrial gases 

2815 Cyclic intermediates and crudes 

2816 Inorganic pigments 

2818 Industrial organic chemicals, n.e.c. 

2819 Industrial inorganic chemicals, n.e.c. 

28B Plastics Materials, Synthetic Rubber, and Manmade Fibers 

2821 Plastics materials and resins 

2822 Synthetic rubber 

2823 Cellulosic manmade fibers 

2824 Organic fibers, noncellulosic 

28C Drugs 

2831 Biological products 

2833 Medicinals and botanicals 

2834 Pharmaceutical preparations 

28D Soap, Cleaners, and Toilet Goods 

2841 Soap and other detergents 

2842 Polishes and sanitation goods 

2843 Surface active agents 

2844 Toilet preparations 



VIII 



~"!M 



28E Paints and Allied Products; Gum and Wood Chemicals 

2851 Paints and allied products 
2861 Gum and wood chemicals 

28F Agricultural Chemicals 

2871 Fertilizers 

2872 Fertilizers, mixing only 
2879 Agricultural chemicals, n.e.c. 

28G Miscellaneous Chemical Products 

2891 Adhesives and gelatin 

2892 Explosives 

2893 Printing ink 
2895 Carbon black 

2899 Chemical preparations, n.e.c. 

MajorGroup29- PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS 

29A Petroleum and Coal Products 

291 1 Petroleum refining 

2951 Paving mixtures and blocks 

2952 Asphalt felts and coatings 
2992 Lubricating oils and greases 

2999 Petroleum and coal products, n.e.c. 

Major Group 30-RUBBER AND PLASTICS PRODUCTS 
N.E.C. 

30A Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastics Products 

301 1 Tires and inner tubes 

3021 Rubber footwear 

3031 Reclaimed rubber 

3069 Fabricated rubber products, n.e.c. 

3079 Miscellaneous plastics products 



32E Abrasive, Asbestos, and Miscellaneous Nonmetallic Mineral 
Products 

3291 Abrasive products 

3292 Asbestos products 

3293 Gaskets and insulations 

3295 Minerals, ground or treated 

3296 Mineral wool 

3297 Nonclay refractories 

3299 Nonmetallic mineral products, n.e.c. 



Major Group 33-PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES 

33A Blast Furnaces, Steel Works, and Rolling and 
Finishing Mills 

3312 Blast furnaces and steel mills 

3313 Electrometallurgical products 

3315 Steel wire and related products 

3316 Cold finishing of steel shapes 

3317 Steel pipe and tubes 

33B Iron and Steel Foundries 

3321 Gray iron foundries 

3322 Malleable iron foundries 

3323 Steel foundries 

33C Smelting and Refining of Nonferrous Metals and Alloys 

3331 Primary copper 

3332 Primary lead 

3333 Primary zinc 

3334 Primary aluminum 

3339 Primary nonferrous metals, n.e.c. 

3341 Secondary nonferrous metals 



Major Group 31-LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS 33D "°£ err r ous Meta ' MiM and Foundry Products 



31 A Tanning; Industrial Leather Goods; and Shoes 

3111 Leather tanning and finishing 
3121 Industrial leather belting 
3131 Footwear cut stock 

3141 Shoes, except rubber 

3142 House slippers 

31 B Leather Gloves; Luggage; and Miscellaneous Leather Goods 

3151 Leather gloves and mittens 
3161 Luggage 

3171 Women's handbags and purses 

3172 Personal leather goods 
3199 Leather goods, n.e.c. 

Major Group 32-STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS PROD- 
UCTS 

32A Glass Products 

3211 Flat glass 

3221 Glass containers 

3229 Pressed and blown glass, n.e.c. 

3231 Products of purchased glass 

32B Cement and Structural Clay Products 

3241 Cement, hydraulic 

3251 Brick and structural clay tile 

3253 Ceramic wall and floor tile 

3255 Clay refractories 

3259 Structural clay products, n.e.c. 

32C Pottery and Related Products 

3261 Vitreous plumbing fixtures 

3262 Vitreous china food utensils 

3263 Fine earthenware food utensils 

3264 Porcelain electrical supplies 
3269 Pottery products, n.e.c. 



33E 



3351 Copper rolling and drawing 

3352 Aluminum rolling and drawing 

3356 Nonferrous rolling and drawing, n.e.c. 

3357 Nonferrous wiredrawing and insulating 

3361 Aluminum castings 

3362 Brass, bronze, and copper castings 
3369 Nonferrous castings, n.e.c. 

Forgings and Miscellaneous Primary Metal Products 

3391 Iron and steel forgings 

3392 Nonferrous forgings 

3399 Primary metal products, n.e.c. 



PART III 

Major Group 34-FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS 

34A Metal Cans, Cutlery, Handtools, and General Hardware 

341 1 Metal cans 

3421 Cutlery 

3423 Hand and edge tools, n.e.c. 

3425 Handsaws and saw blades 

3429 Hardware, n.e.c. 

34B Heating Apparatus (Except Electric) and Plumbing Fixtures 

3431 Metal sanitary ware 

3432 Plumbing fittings and brass goods 

3433 Heating equipment, except electric 

34C Fabricated Structural Metal Products 

3441 Fabricated structural steel 

3442 Metal doors, sash, and trim 

3443 Fabricated platework (boiler shops) 

3444 Sheet metalwork 

3446 Architectural metalwork 

3449 Miscellaneous metalwork 



32D Concrete, Plaster, and Cut-Stone Products 

3271 Concrete block and brick 

3272 Concrete products, n.e.c. 

3273 Ready-mixed concrete 

3274 Lime 

3275 Gypsum products 

3281 Cut stone and stone products 



34D Screw Machine Products, Fasteners and Washers; Metal 
Stampings; and Metal Services 

3451 Screw machine products 

3452 Bolts, nuts, rivets, and washers 
3461 Metal stampings 

3471 Plating and polishing 

3479 Metal coating and allied services 



IX 



34E Miscellaneous Metal Products 

3481 Miscellaneous fabricated wire products 

3491 Metal barrels, drums, and pails 

3492 Safes and vaults 

3493 Steel springs 

3494 Valves and pipe fittings 

3496 Collapsible tubes 

3497 Metal foil and leaf 

3498 Fabricated pipe and fittings 

3499 Fabricated metal products, n.e.c. 

MajorG roup 35-MACHINERY, EXCEPT ELECTRICAL 

35A Engines and Turbines and Farm Machinery and 
Equipment 

351 1 Steam engines and turbines 

3519 Internal combustion engines, n.e.c. 

3522 Farm machinery 

35B Construction, Mining, and Materials Handling Machinery and 
Equipment 

3531 Construction machinery 

3532 Mining machinery 

3533 Oilfield machinery 

3534 Elevators and moving stairways 

3535 Conveyors and conveying equipment 

3536 Hoists, cranes, and monorails 

3537 Industrial trucks and tractors 

35C Metalworking Machinery and Equipment 

3541 Machine tools, metal-cutting types 

3542 Machine tools, metal-forming types 

3544 Special dies, tools, jigs, and fixtures 

3545 Machine tool accessories 
3548 Metalworking machinery, n.e.c. 

35D Special Industry Machinery, Except Metalworking Machinery 

3551 Food products machinery 

3552 Textile machinery 

3553 Woodworking machinery 

3554 Paper industries machinery 

3555 Printing trades machinery 

3559 Special industry machinery, n.e.c. 



36B Household Appliances 

3631 Household cooking equipment 

3632 Household refrigerators and freezers 

3633 Household laundry equipment 

3634 Electric housewares and fans 

3635 Household vacuum cleaners 

3636 Sewing machines 

3639 Household appliances, n.e.c. 

36C Electric Lighting and Wiring Equipment 

3641 Electric lamps 

3642 Lighting fixtures 

3643 Current-carrying wiring devices 

3644 Noncurrent-carrying wiring devices 

36D Communication Equipment, Including Radio and TV, and 
Electronic Components and Accessories 

3651 Radio and TV receiving sets 

3652 Phonograph records 

3661 Telephone and telegraph apparatus 

3662 Radio and TV communication equipment 

3671 Electron tubes, receiving type 

3672 Cathode ray picture tubes 

3673 Electron tubes, transmitting 

3674 Semiconductors 

3679 Electronic components, n.e.c. 

36E Miscellaneous Electrical Equipment and Supplies 

3691 Storage batteries 

3692 Primary batteries, dry and wet 

3693 X-ray apparatus and tubes 

3694 Engine electrical equipment 
3699 Electrical equipment, n.e.c. 

Major Group 37-TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT 

37A Motor Vehicles and Equipment 

3711 Motor vehicles 

371 2 Passenger car bodies 

3713 Truck and bus bodies 

3714 Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

3715 Truck trailers 



35E General Industrial Machinery and Equipment 

3561 Pumps and compressors 

3562 Ball and roller bearings 

3564 Blowers and fans 

3565 Industrial patterns 

3566 Power transmission equipment 

3567 Industrial furnaces and ovens 
3569 General industry machinery, n.e.c. 

35F Office, Computing, and Accounting Machines 

3572 Typewriters 

3573 Electronic computing equipment 

3574 Calculating and accounting machines 
3576 Scales and balances 

3579 Office machines, n.e.c. 

35G Service Industry Machines and Machine Shops 

3581 Automatic merchandising machines 

3582 Commercial laundry equipment 

3585 Refrigeration machinery 

3586 Measuring and dispensing pumps 
3589 Service industry machines, n.e.c. 

3599 Miscellaneous machinery, except electrical 

Major Group 36-ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT AND SUP- 
PLIES 

36A Electrical Measurement and Distribution Equipment 

361 1 Electric measuring instruments 

3612 Transformers 

361 3 Switchgea'r and switchboard apparatus 

3621 Motors and generators 

3622 Industrial controls 

3623 Welding apparatus 

3624 Carbon and graphite products 
3629 Electrical industrial apparatus, n.e.c. 



37B Aircraft and Parts 

3721 Aircraft 

3722 Aircrafr engines and engine parts 

3723 Aircraft propellers and parts 
3729 Aircraft equipment, n.e.c. 



37C 



Ship and Boat Building 
portation Equipment 

3731 Ship building and repairing 

3732 Boat building and repairing 
3741 Locomotives and parts 

Railroad and street cars 
Motorcycles, bicycles, and parts 
Trailer coaches 
Transportation equipment, n.e.c. 



Railroad and Miscellaneous Trans- 



3742 
3751 
3791 
3799 



Major Group 38-INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PROD- 
UCTS 



38A 



Instruments; Surgical, 
and Supplies 



Dental, and Ophthalmic Equipment 



38B 



381 1 Engineering and scientific instruments 

3821 Mechanical measuring devices 

3822 Automatic temperature controls 
3831 Optical instruments and lenses 

3841 Surgical and medical instruments 

3842 Surgical appliances and supplies 

3843 Dental equipment and supplies 
3851 Ophthalmic goods 

Photographic Equipment; Clocks, Watches, and Watchcases 

3861 Photographic equipment and supplies 

3871 Watches and clocks 

3872 Watchcases 



X 



Major G roup 39-MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURING 
INDUSTRIES 

39A Jewelry, Silverware, and Plated Ware 

3911 Jewelry, precious metal 

3912 Jewelers' findings and materials 

3913 Lapidary work 

3914 Silverware and plated ware 

39B Musical Instruments and Parts; Toys and Sporting Goods 

3931 Musical instruments and parts 

3941 Games and toys 

3942 Dolls 

3943 Children's vehicles, except bicycles 
3949 Sporting and athletic goods, n.e.c. 

39C Office Supplies, Costume Jewelry, and Notions 

3951 Pens and mechanical pencils 

3952 Lead pencils and art goods 

3953 Marking devices 

3955 Carbon paper and inked ribbons 



3961 Costume jewelry 

3962 Artificial flowers 

3963 Buttons 

3964 Needles, pins, and fasteners 

39D Miscellaneous Manufactures 

3991 Brooms and brushes 

3993 Signs and advertising displays 

3994 Morticians' goods 

3996 Hard-surface floor coverings 
3999 Manufactures, n.e.c. 

Major Group 19-ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES 

19A Ordnance and Accessories 

191 1 Guns, howitzers, and mortars 

1925 Complete guided missiles 

1929 Ammunition, except for small arms, n.e.c. 

1931 Tanks and tank components 

1941 Sighting and fire control equipment 

1951 Small arms 

1961 Small arms ammunition 

1999 Ordnance and accessories, n.e.c. 



XI 



NTRODUCTION 



I. GENERAL BACKGROUND 



III. COMMENTS ON STATISTICAL MEASURES AND TABLES 



1. The Economic Censuses 

2. Characteristics of the Industrial Sector 

3. Role of the Census of Manufactures 

4. Industry and Product Classification 

5. Geographic Classification 

II. METHODS 

6. Planning and Preparation 

7. Reporting Forms 

8. The Mailing Lists 

9. Geographic Area Coding 

10. Data Collection 

1 1. Data Processing 

12. Coverage and Accuracy 



13. Employment and Payrolls in Administrative Offices and Auxiliary 
Establishments 

14. Materials 

15. Value of Shipments by Multiunit Companies 

16. Duplication in Cost of Materials and Value of Products 

17. Value Added by Manufacture 

18. Capital Expenditures 

19. Plant Specialization 

20. Operating Ratios 

2 1 . Subject Reports Shown in Volume I , Summary and Subject 
Statistics 

22. Confidentiality 

23. Abbreviations 



I. GENERAL BACKGROUND 



1. THE ECOMOMICCEMSUSES 

General.— The economic censuses proviae a comprehensive statis- 
tical profile of a large segment of the national economy. In 1967, 
these censuses accounted for nearly 70 percent of the S555 
billion of national income originating in the private sector. The 
principal industry groups not covered were finance, insurance, 
and real estate; agriculture and forestry; communications; and 
electric, gas, and sanitary services. 



.-iistory.— The first statistical survey which can be called an 
economic census covered the year 1809, when inquiries on 
manufacturing were included with the 1 81 G census of popula- 
tion. Although the results of this pioneer effort were unsatisfac- 
tory by modern standards, 1 continued interest in measurement 
of the Nation's economic progress led to successive improve- 
ments during the 19th century. By 1890, the statistical standards 
and procedures followed in conducting the censuses were of a 
fully professional quality. 



Uses and Users of Census Data.— Tne economic censuses are the 
primary source of facts about the structure and functioning of 
the economy and therefore provide information essential both 
for government and business. They furnish an important part of 
the framework for such composite measures as the national 
accounts. The census measures aiso provide weights and serve as 
benchmarks for current surveys of industrial activity and for 
indexes of industrial production, productivity, and price, all of 
which are essential in developing the general background for 
understanding particular economic situations. 



All of the decennial censuses from 1810 through 1940, 
with the exception of 1830, included questions on manufac- 
turing. Inquiries on mining first appeared in 1840, and censuses 
of mineral industries were conducted decennially through 1940. 
Although some business-related data were collected in 1840, the 
first census of business was taken for the year 1929. This 
included retaii trade, wholesale trade, and construction: selected 
service trades were covered beginning with 1933. Dates of these 
and other economic censuses from 1809 are shown in table A. 



There is widespread use of the economic censuses by 
manufacturers and distributors who need to establish measures of 
their potential markets in terms of areas, kinds of business, and 
kinds of products; and by management in various industries and 
trades which need facts for purposes of economic or sales 
forecasting, for analysis of sales performance, for the iayout of 
sales territories, for the allocation of advertising budgets, and for 
the location of plants, warehouses, and stores. For these business 
purposes, census facts are invaluable. Likewise, trade ana 
professional associations need census information to learn how 
their industry is changing; chambers of commerce need to know 
how their community is changing. State and local governments 
need to understand the business structure and changes occurring 
in their areas. Business magazines rely on census facts as 
background for many of their articles. 

Following every census, reports are purchased by thousands 
of business and other users; likewise, census facts are widely 
disseminated by trade associations, Dusiness journals, and the 
daiiy press; census volumes are available in all tne major public 
and college libraries. 



Enterprise Statistics.— The coordinated collection and tabulation 
of comparable data for several sectors beginning with 1954 has 
permitted the Census Bureau to develop its enterprise statistics 
program, which relates census company-level data to the estab- 
lishment data. Thus, a measurement of the integration and 
diversification of the American enterprise system becomes 
available. Also, through the enterprise statistics program, it has 
become possible to link census establishment-based data on a 
modified basis to other statistical systems such as the Internal 
Revenue Service's "Statistics of Income" for corporations. 

Legal Provisions.— Title 13 of the United States Code specifies 
the frequency of tne censuses, the kinds of activities to be 
covered, the obligation to report, the penalties for failure to 
report, and the confidentiality of returns. It aiso authorizes the 
use of sampling techniques in conducting censuses. As amended 



1 For an appraisal of early censuses of manufacturing, see Meyer H. Fishbein, The 
Censuses of Manufactures 7 810-1890. National Archives Publication No. 63-22, June 
1963. Government Printing Office. 



TABLE A. Years Covered by U.S. Economic Censuses: 1809 to 1967 



Year 

covered 


Manufactures 


Minerals 


Fisheries 


Construction 


Retail and 
wholesale trade 


Selected 
services 


Transportation 


1809 


X 
X 
X 

X 

X 
X 

X 

X 
X 

X 

X 

X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 

x 

X 
X 
X 

X 

- 

X 
X 
X 
X 


X 

X 
X 
X 

X 
X 

X 

X 
X 

X 

X 
X 

X 
X 
X 

X 


X 
X 

X 

- 

X 
X 


X 

X 
X 

X 


X 

X 
X 

X 

X 

X 
X 
X 
X 


X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 




1819 




1839 




1840 




1849 




1850 




1859 




1860 




1869 




1870 




1 87 9 




1880 

1889 


- 


1899 




1902 




1904 . 




1908 




190 9 




1914 




1919 




1921 




1923 




1925 

1927 


- 


1929 




1931 




1933 




1935 




1937 

1939 


- 


1947 




1948 




1954 




1958 

1963 


X 


1 967 


X 



in 1964, Title 13 requires the economic censuses to be taken at 
5-year intervals, covering the years ending in "2" and "7." The 
next censuses will cover the year 1972. The pertinent portions of 
Title 13 are quoted in appendix E. 

2. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR 

General.— In terms of the major industry divisions established in 
the national accounts, manufacturing is the largest sector of the 
economy. In 1967, manufacturing plants employed 19 million 
persons, 26 percent of the civilian labor force of 74 million. Over 
the past 20 years, as shown in table B, national income 
originating in manufacturing has averaged 30 percent of the total. 
The next largest sector, wholesale and retail trade, declined from 
19 percent in 1947 to 15 percent in 1967. 

Cyclical Changes.— The need for frequent and comprehensive 
statistics on manufacturing derives as much from its sensitivity to 



cyclical influences as from its relative size. Cyclical changes in 
income originating in manufacturing tend to be relatively larger 
than in the economy as a whole. 

Within manufacturing, durable goods industries accounted 
for about 58 percent of all manufactures during recent periods. 
This category tends to be more volatile than nondurable goods, 
generally accounting for a smaller percentage of all manufactures 
during periods of contraction and a larger percentage during 
periods of expansion. In the early thirties, for example, as shown 
in table C, durable goods manufacturing amounted to only about 
one-third of the total. 



Geographic Distribution.— In the 19th century, manufacturing 
activity was concentrated in the Northeast. Over the past 
hundred and twenty years, as shown in table D, there has been a 
steady decline in the proportion accounted for by the North- 
eastern States, and a marked arowth in the South and West. 



I ABLE 6 National Income by Industry Division for Selected Years 



Industry 



All industry divisions, total 

Manufacturing 

Nondurable goods 

Durable goods 

Wholesale and retail trade 

Government and government enterprises... 

Services 

Finance, insurance, and real estate 

Contract construction 

Transportation 

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries.... 
Electric, gas. and sanitary services.... 

Communication 

Mining 

R.est of the world 

All industry divisions, total 

Manufacturing 

Nondurable goods 

Durable goods 

Wholesale and retail trade 

Government and government enterprises . . . 

Services 

Finance, insurance, and real estate 

Contract construction 

Transportation 

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries.... 
Electric, gas. and sanitary services.... 

Communication 

Mining 

Rest of the world 



1929 



1939 1947 



1954 



1958 



1963 



86.8 



21 

10, 

11. 

13 
5, 
8, 

12 
3, 
6, 
8, 
1 , 
1 . 
2 
0, 



,9 
.6 ! 
.3 

.5 

,1 



100.0 

25.2 
12 .2 
13.0 



15, 
5. 
10, 
14, 
4, 
7 
9, 
1, 
1, 
2, 
0, 



Millions of dollars 



72.6 

18.1 
9.1 
9.0 

12.6 
8.5 
7.6 
8.0 
2.3 
4.6 
6.0 
1.8 
1.1 
1.6 
0.3 



199.0 

59.5 
28.0 
31.5 



303.1 

94.6 
39.7 
54.9 



37.6 


48.3 


18.7 


36.1 


18.1 


27.8 


16.1 


32.0 


8.4 


15.6 


11.6 


14.6 


18.9 


16.4 


2.8 


5.9 


2.3 


5.1 


4.2 


5.3 


0.8 


1 .6 



367.8 

107.8 
45.7 
62.0 

58.2 
46.9 
38.4 

40.9 

19.0 

16.6 

18.0 

7.4 

7.0 

5.7 

2.0 



481.9 

143.8 
57 .5 
86.3 



73, 
64, 
54, 
53, 
24, 



1 
6 

1 

20.0 

18.6 

10- 3 

9.8 

6.0 

3.4 



Percent of total 



100.0 

24.9 
12.5 

12.4 



17 
11 
10 
11 
3 
6 



3 
7 

4 

2 
3 
8.3 
2.4 
1 .4 
2.2 
0.4 



100.0 

29.8 
14.0 
15. 8 



4 

5.8 
9.4 
1 .4 
1 .1 
2.1 
0.4 



100.0 

31.2 
13.0 
18.1 



15, 
11, 
9, 
10 
5, 
4, 
5, 
1 , 
1, 



1.7 
0.5 



100.0 

29.2 
12.4 
16.8 



15, 
12 
10 
11 

5 

4 

4 

2 

1 

1 , 





100.0 

29.8 
12.0 
17 .8 

15.2 

13.4 

11.2 

11 .0 

5.0 

4.2 

3.8 

2.1 

2.0 

1.2 

0.6 



1967 



653.3 

195.2 

75 .5 

119.7 

97.5 

93.8 

78.5 

71. 

33, 

25, 

21, 

12, 

13. 

6 

4, 



100.0 

29.9 
11 .6 
18.3 

14.9 
14.4 
12.0 
11 .0 
5.1 
9 
3 
9 


7 



Source: Survey of Current Business. August 1965. pp. 42-45; July 1966. p. 15; and July 1970. p. 21 



Size Distribution.— While there are many small manufacturing 
plants, they account for a relatively small part of the total output 
of goods. As shown in table E, over half of the plants covered in 
the 1967 census had less than 10 employess but they accounted 
for less than 3 percent of the total value added by manufacture. 



fuels, and water. Many of these statistics are available at frequent 
intervals and on a timely basis. Sophisticated indicators of 
economic progress have also been developed such as price and 
production indexes, gross national product, and national income, 
published at monthly or quarterly intervals. 



3. ROLE OF THE CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES 

In the farm-oriented economy of the 19th century, industrial 
statistics played a relatively small role in government policy 
formation. A few series on physical output of commodities 
originated either from private sources (flour, iron, and steel, etc.) 
or as a byproduct of tax collection or other government 
functions (liquors, beer, tobacco products, etc.). Other than 
these, the only sources of information on the manufacturing 
sector were the censuses of manufactures, then taken at 
10-year intervals. Today, the need for industrial statistics has 
greatly increased, and the user finds a vast array of detailed 
information covering virtually every measurable aspect of indus- 
trial activity including employment, payrolls, hours worked, 
production, prices, inventories, orders, investment in structures, 
machinery, and equipment, and consumption of raw materials, 



In this setting, the census of manufactures still plays an 
essential role since no other source provides such comprehensive 
and detailed information on the structure of the industrial sector. 
In effect, the census obtains, for every manufacturing plant with 
one employee or more, data on its input of labor, materials, and 
capital, its output of products and services, its location, and the 
legal form of organization of the owning firm. 2 These facts are 
obtained in sufficient detail to permit classification by industry, 
by size of plant, by homogeneity of output and, where desirable, 
by type of operation, extent of vertical integration, kind of 
equipment, relationship to other plants of the same firm, and 
other characteristics. 



2 For 1967, some of this information for 120,000 small companies was not obtained 
directly but estimated from administrative records. See the discussion of coverage of 
establishments in sections 4 and 6 below. 



TABLE C, Total National Income and Amounts Originating in Durable and Nondurable Manufactures for Selected Years 

(Dollar values in billions) 





National 
income 


National income originating in manufacturing 


[Vianufacturing 
as a percent of 
national income 


Durable goods 


Year 


Total 


Nondurable goods 
industries 


Durable goods 
industries 


industries as a 
percent of total 
manufacturing 


1 967 


653.6 
620.6 
564.3 
518.1 
481.9 
457 .7 
427.3 
414.5 
400.0 
367.8 

366.1 
350.8 
331.0 
303.1 
304.7 
291.4 

278.0 
241.1 
217.5 
224.2 
199.0 
170.3 

72.6 
57.2 
40.3 
42.8 
86.8 


195.2 
191.5 
172.6 
155.6 
143.8 
137.0 
125.1 
125.8 
124.0 
107.7 

116.3 
113.1 
107.9 

94.6 
100.4 

92.5 

90.2 
76.2 
64. S 
68.7 
59.5 
58.3 

18.1 

13.4 

7.7 

7.3 

21.9 


75.5 
72.9 
66.5 
61.9 
57.5 
55.6 
52.8 
52.2 
51.1 
45.7 

46.4 
46.2 
44.0 
39.7 
40.3 
38.2 

38.4 
33.3 
30.5 
32.9 
28.0 
19.6 

9.1 
7.3 
4.9 
5.2 
10. 6 


119.7 
118.5 
106.1 
93.6 
86.3 
81.4 
72.3 
73.6 
72.9 
62.0 

69.9 
66.8 
63.8 
54.9 
60.1 
54.3 

51.8 
42.9 
34.2 
35.8 
31.5 
38.6 

9.0 
6.1 
2.8 
2.1 
11.3 


30 
31 
31 
30 
30 
30 
29 
30 
31 
29 

32 
32 
33 
31 
33 
32 

32 
32 
30 
31 
30 
34 

25 
23 
19 
17 
25 


61 


1966 


69 


1965 


61 


1964 


60 


1963 


60 


1962 


59 


1961 


58 


1960 


59 


1959 


59 


1958 


58 


1957 


60 


1956 


59 


1955 


59 


1954 


58 


1953 


60 


1952 


59 


1951 


57 


1950 


56 


1949 


53 


1948 


52 


1947 


53 


1943 


66 


1939 


50 


1935 


46 


1933 


36 


1932 


29 


1929. . . . ; 


52 







Source: Survey of Current Business. 
August 1970, p. 21. 



August 1965. pp. 42-45; July 1966, p. 15; July 1968, p. 23; and 



General statistics (that is, total employment, payroll, 
production-worker employment, man-hours, wages, cost of mate- 
rials, value of shipments, inventories, capital expenditures, and 
value added by manufacture) from the census of manufactures 
are published by industry, by area, by employment size of 
establishment, by degree of product specialization within plant, 
and by type of ownership. Information is supplied on the 
detailed industrial characteristics of each State and large standard 
metropolitan statistical area (SMSA); and overall measures of 
manufacturing activity are shown at the county and individual 
city level down to cities of 10,000 or more population. The 
compilation entitled "Location of Manufacturing Plants" shows, 
for each of the 3,100 counties in the United States, the number 
of manufacturing plants, by size, for each of 420 industries. 
Information such as this constitutes a periodic inventory of the 
Nation's manufacturing economy that provides a benchmark for 
measuring the changes in its structure. 

The census of manufactures also provides benchmarks from 
which more frequent surveys can be developed on a sample basis. 
In fact, the present legislation specifying that censuses be 
conducted every 5 years authorizes an Annual Survey of 
Manufactures (ASM) on a sample basis during the intervening 
years. After each 5-year census, a new sample is drawn utilizing 
the characteristics recorded for each company in the census. The 
sample, constituting about one-fifth of the establishments but 
with complete coverage of all large ones, provides an annual 



updating of the census of manufactures in terms of broad 
measures of economic activity. It provides the same basic 
measures of economic activity of the plant such as employment, 
payrolls, value of shipments, value added by manufacture, as 
does the census of manufactures, but contains less detailed 
information on products, materials consumption, and equip- 
ment.' 

The census of manufactures not only is a benchmark for 
many of the surveys conducted by the Census Bureau itself on a 
more frequent basis but also is the means of updating other 
indicators of economic activity. It provides very important 
information on the manufacturing segment used in the national 
income accounts. Census data on materials consumed and 
product output are basic to the manufactures sector of the 
input-output studies of the Office of Business Economics. The 
information derived from the census of manufactures is also used 
to develop indexes of industrial production for census years. 
These indexes are used as benchmarks for the monthly Federal 
Reserve Board Index of Industrial Production— a key indicator of 



3 Since the ASM is based on a sample, the cross-classifications by industry and by 
area are fewer than in the census of manufactures. At the U.S. level, statistics are 
published in the annual survey for practically all of the 420 industries. However, at the 
State and SMSA levels, statistics are published only for 3-digit and 2-digit industry 
groupings, respectively. At the county level, information is published for about 10 
percent of the 3,100 counties. These 300-odd counties are the larger ones in terms of 
manufacturing activity and account for about 80 percent of total manufacturing 
employment. No information is published at the city level. 



TABLE D. Employment in Manufacturing Establishments, 
by Region: 1849 to 1967 



Year 


United 
States 


Northeast 


North 
Central 


South 


West 




Number of employees 


(thousa 


rids) 


1967 


18,492 


5,573 


6,059 


4,553 


2,305 


1963 


16,235 


5,190 


5,239 


3.780 


2.025 


1958 


15,423 


5,242 


5,017 


3.382 


1,779 


1947 


14,294 


5,429 


5,109 


2,710 


1,054 


1939 


9,527 


3,87 9 


3.184 


1.852 


612 


1929 


10,198 


4,246 


3,516 


1,758 


675 


1899 


5,077 


2,629 


1.474 


7 93 


181 




957 


696 


110 


146 


4 






Percent of U.S. 


total 




1967 


100 


30 


33 


25 


12 


1963 


100 


32 


32 


23 


13 


1958 


100 


34 


33 


22 


12 


1947 


100 


38 


36 


19 


7 


1939 


100 


41 


34 


20 


6 


1929 


100 


42 


35 


17 


7 


1899 


100 


52 


29 


16 


4 


1849 


100 


73 


12 


15 


- 



Source: Census of Manufactures. 

Note: Detail may not add to totals because of 
independent rounding. 1849 data include hand and 
neighborhood industries, which were excluded from 
the censuses of manufactures beginning with 1899. 



TABLE E. Cumulative Percentage of Number of Manufacturing 

Establishments and Value Added by Manufacture, by Size Class 

of Establishment: 1967 



Size class 


Number of 
establish- 
ments 


Value added 
by manufac- 
ture 




38.4 
51.3 

64.9 
80.9 

89.0 
95.5 
98.0 
99.2 
99.7 

100.0 


l .i 


1 to 9 employees 


2.3 


1 to 19 employees 


5.1 


1 to 49 employees 


12.1 


1 to 99 employees 


20.0 


1 to 249 employees 


34.9 


1 to 499 employees 


48.7 


1 to 999 employees 


62.0 


All establishments, total... 


77.0 
100.0 



4. INDUSTRY AND PRODUCT CLASSIFICATION 

Structure of the Standard Industrial Classification.— The basic 
classification system employed in the economic censuses is the 
Standard Industrial Classification (SIC). The SIC was developed 
for use in the classification of establishments by type of activity 
in which engaged. It covers the entire field of economic activities, 
subdivided as follows: 



ndustriai 




Major 


division 


Title 


groups 


A 


Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries 


01-09 


B 


Mining 


10-14 


C 


Contract construction 


15-17 


D 


Manufacturing 


19-39 


E 


Transportation, communication, electric. 






gas, and sanitary services 


40-49 


F 


Wholesale and retail trade 


50-59 


G 


Finance, insurance, and real estate 


60-67 


H 


Services 


70-89 


1 


Government 


91-94 


J 


Nonclassifiable establishments 


99 



Below the major group level, the SIC provides for 3-digit 
groups and finally for 4-digit industries. To illustrate— 

Division D.— Manufacturing 

Major Group 20 Food and kindred products 

Industry group 202 Dairy products 

Industry 2023 Condensed and evaporated milk 

The SIC is the responsibility of an intragovernmental 
technical committee headed by the Office of Management and 
Budget (formerly Bureau of the Budget). The system is used by 
all Federal Government agencies engaged in the classification of 
establishments. To facilitate comparison with Federal statistics 
and the filing of reports, many state and local governments and 
business concerns organize their own records along SIC lines. 

The first SIC manual was issued in 1939. For the manu- 
facturing sector, the nucleus of the manual was the census of 
manufactures industry classifications developed over a period of 
many years. 4 



Structure of the SIC Manufacturing Division.— For the manu- 
facturing division, the 21 2-digit SIC Major Groups (19 to 39) are 
subdivided into 149 3-digit SIC Groups (191 to 399) and into 
422 4-digit industries (1911 to 3999). While the SIC contains 
422 industries, the Bureau of the Census has combined two small 
industries with others for a total of 420 industries. 



Most of the 422 manufacturing industries are defined in 
terms of a specific group of related products. Usually, the 
products are made of similar materials and by similar processes, 
and are competitive. In determining the boundaries of product- 



current economic activity. The census and ASM also provide 
benchmarks for hundreds of monthly and quarterly surveys of 
commodity output conducted by the Census Bureau, other 
government agencies, and by manufacturers' associations. 



4 For the manufacturing industries, a revised manual was issued in 1945 which, with 
minor modifications, was used in the 1947 census of manufactures. For the 1954 
census, the classification structure used in 1947 was again employed, again with minor 
modifications. In 1957, the SIC system was extensively revised for manufacturing 
industries and historical comparability of some data was seriously affected. This 
revision and its effects on census series are described in the introduction and 
appendixes to the 1958 census volumes. Minor revisions of the SIC between 1958 and 
1967 introduced some 4-digit industry changes but none of them crossed 3-digit group 
lines. Another extensive revision of the SIC, now under way, is scheduled to be 
effective with 1972. 



defined industries, 5 it is essential that each industry comprise a 
group of establishments whose output of products defining the 
industry (primary products) accounts for a relatively high 
proportion of the total shipments of the industry as well as of 
the total shipments of these primary products by establishments 
in all manufacturing industries. Some industries are defined in 
terms of the processes or equipment used regardless of the final 
product of the establishment. A small number of industries are 
basically defined by material used as well as final product of the 
plant. 

There are wide differences among industries in the extent 
to which the establishments classified in the industry (a) account 
for the total production of commodities "primary" to the 
industry, (b) produce products or services "belonging" to other 
industries (that is, secondary products), and (c) use similar 
materials or processes. While these variations are frequently 
construed to be shortcomings, the fact is that the limitations 
observed in the classification structure arise from the inherent 
complexity of our economic system and from the disparity in the 
methods of production among the individual producing units of 
which it is comprised. The data collected in the census of 
manufactures provide a statistical basis for a critical evaluation of 
the classification system; that is, for assessing the boundaries 
between industries, the growth and decline of industries, and the 
impact of technological change on the classification of indus- 
tries. 6 

No general-purpose system of industrial classification can 
hope to satisfy all users of census data. Some business users will 
be interested primarily in data relating only to themselves and to 
their competitors in the production of a narrow range of 
products; others will wish data relating to all products, including 
complementary and substitutable products, competing in a 
particular market; others may wish data relating to the con- 
sumers of one or more types of materials. Some may be 
interested only in the data for plants producing a specific 
product; others only for those plants producing a "full line" of 
products. The large number of SIC industries provides the analyst 
with the "building blocks" for obtaining useful approximations, 
if not "clean" data, relevant to many of these problems. But, at 
best, a single general-purpose system of classification can only 
partially satisfy these diverse needs; a point is soon reached 
beyond which the adaptation of a system to serve one use 
somewhat better will reduce its ability, often disproportionately, 
to serve an alternative use. 

Accordingly, users of data frequently regroup detailed SIC 
industries into broad groupings along lines different from those 
in the SIC 2- and 3-digit categories. The Federal Reserve Board 
for many years has made combinations to stress such criteria as 
durable, nondurable, consumers, producers, finished, inter- 
mediate goods, etc. Other public and private agencies also 
recombine the detailed classes. By and large, the 4-digit industries 
are susceptible to allocation to such categories, while the 2-digit 
SIC groups are not. 

Subindustries.— To increase the usefulness or improve the editing 
of the data, the Census Bureau frequently has further classified 
the basic 4-digit SIC industries into "subindustries." This device 
is employed where there are wide disparities in the operating 



5 Frequently, business analysts and other data users look at a group of products 
from more than one point of view. For example, modern high-speed computers are 
classified as office machines. This describes the purpose of the product. In a physical 
sense, however, such computers would be described as electronic devices. Similarly, 
paper bags, wooden boxes, glass bottles, tin cans, and steel barrels may all be classified 
as containers or they may be individually grouped with other products of similar 
materials such as converted paper products, wood products, glass products, etc. 

6 See Industry Classification and Sector Measures of Industrial Production by James 
W. McKie, Bureau of the Census Working Paper No. 20, 1965, and Historical 
Comparability of Census of Manufactures Industries, 19291958 by Harold T. 
Goldstein, Bureau of the Census Working Paper No. 9, 1959. 



ratios of the plants in the industry because of differences among 
plants in the degree of vertical integration, technology, methods 
of distribution, geographic location, types of materials used, etc. 
This technique was used for about 65 manufacturing industries 
for editing purposes and many were regarded as significant 
enough to be used for publication: For example, the bakery 
industry (SIC 2051) is subdivided into wholesale bakeries, 
chain-store bakeries, home-service bakeries, and retail multi- 
outlet bakeries and many apparel industries (Group 23) are 
subclassified into manufacturers, contractors, and jobbers. 

To provide a further measurement of variations within 
4-digit industries, the Bureau also subclassifies establishments by 
the degree to which they produce the primary products or 
specific classes of primary products of the 4-digit industry. This 
is in effect a subindustry classification based on degree of 
product specialization which is published in table 8 of the 
industry chapters. 



Definition of Manufacturing.— As defined in the SIC, manu- 
facturing is the mechanical or chemical transformation of 
inorganic or organic substances into new products. The assembly 
of component parts of products is also considered to be 
manufacturing if the resulting product is neither a structure nor 
other fixed improvement. These activities are usually carried on 
in plants, factories, or mills, which characteristically use power- 
driven machines and materials-handling equipment. 

Manufacturing production is usually carried on for the 
wholesale market, for transfer to other plants of the same 
company, or to the order of industrial users rather than for direct 
sale to the household consumer. However, some manufacturers 
(for example, baking, milk bottling, etc.) sell chiefly at retail to 
household consumers through the mail, through house-to-house 
routes, or through salesmen. Some activities of a service nature 
(enameling, binding, platemaking, etc.) are included in manu- 
facturing when they are performed primarily for trade; but they 
are considered nonmanufacturing when they are performed 
primarily to the order of the household consumer. On the other 
hand, some manufacturing industries include business firms 
which perform only the entrepreneurial functions of buying the 
materials and designing and marketing the product, but have the 
actual production done on contract (for example, apparel 
jobbers). 



Auxiliary Units.— In addition to the production of goods and 
manufacturing services, manufacturing plants engage in related 
and diverse supporting activities. These activities encompass the 
acquisition of materials to be processed, their movement into the 
manufacturing facility, their storage at the manufacturing site, 
the operation and maintenance of plant and equipment, the 
design of flow of work through the production process, and 
necessary arrangements for shipment of output to customers. Also 
included are a host of subsidiary activities associated with the 
operation of the establishment as a manufacturing entity (for 
example, management and policy formation, product and market 
orientation, engineering and quality control, recordkeeping and 
accounting, physical security of plant and equipment, and the 
like). Such subsidiary activities may be performed by personnel 
located at the manufacturing facility or at an auxiliary unit 
serving one or more manufacturing locations of the same 
company. Where these activities are carried on at a different 
physical location or are performed for more than one plant, they 
are excluded from the figures for operating manufacturing 
establishments and are included in the data shown for central 
administrative offices and auxiliaries. (See the description of the 
questionnaire used for these establishments, Form NC-X6, in 
section 7, below.) 



Marginal Activities.— The following types of activities, while 
having some of the characteristics usually found in manu- 
facturing, are considered as nonmanufacturing and, therefore, are 
excluded from the census: 

(a) Processing on farms when the raw materials are 
grown on the farm and the manufacturing activities (poultry 
dressing, milk and butter production, logging) are on a small 
scale without extensive use of paid labor. Also custom 
milling, cotton ginning, egg hatching, and similar activities 
closely associated with agriculture are excluded. 

(b) Mineral preparation such as the crushing, screen- 
ing, and concentrating of ores. However, mining performed 
as a secondary activity in conjunction with manufacturing is 
included in the census unless a separate report for the 
mining activity was filed; for example, stone and clay 
mining at cement, lime, and clay products plants. 

(c) Custom work to the individual order of household 
consumers. Examples are custom tailoring, woodworking, 
lettering on monuments, setting of diamonds, and the 
making of orthopedic appliances. 

(d) Repair and other service activities, except specified 
services performed "for the trade." Repair shops of rail- 
roads are also excluded. 

(e) Production of coke for own use by establishments 
owned by public utility companies. 

In the 1967 census, no attempt was made to measure the 
extent of manufacturing at locations which are not primarily 
manufacturing plants, such as retail establishments which sell 
most of their products on the premises directly to household 
consumers (retail bakeries, 7 ice cream stores, etc.), or manu- 
facturing by construction contractors at the site (for example, 
production of paving mixtures). 

Conversely, it is not unusual for manufacturing establish- 
ments to engage also in nonmanufacturing activities such as 
repair work, merchandising of products without further proc- 
essing, and installation work. Ordinarily, these nonmanufacturing 
receipts are small in relation to the manufacturing activities and, 
therefore, it is not difficult to determine that the establishments 
should be included in the manufactures area. However, if the 
nonmanufacturing activities account for a significant proportion 
of total receipts of an establishment, the classification of that 
establishment into the appropriate major economic sector is 
more difficult. 

In the 1967 economic censuses, an establishment engaged in 
a combination of manufacturing and merchandising was assigned 
either to the manufacturing or the trade industries depending on 
which of these activities was estimated to account for the larger 
share of its "value added" or "income produced." This criterion, 
even though based on approximation, was considered preferable 
to reported dollar volume of receipts from each type of activity 
in determining the primary industry, since manufacturing 
requires considerably more man-hours, salaries and wages, and 
capital inputs per dollar of receipts than either wholesaling or 
retailing. However, in classifying establishments engaged in 
manufacturing and also in mining, repair work, installation, 
construction, or other nonmanufacturing services, dollar receipts 
were used as the basis of classification because these activities 
require substantially comparable input per dollar of receipts. 



Establishment Basis of Reporting.— The SIC is an establishment 
classification system, and the census of manufactures is con- 
ducted on an establishment basis. That is, a company operating 
establishments at more than one location is required to submit a 
report for each location; also, a company engaged in distinctly 
different lines of activity at one location is required to submit 
separate reports if the plant records permit such a separation and 
if the activities are substantial in size. 

The requirement that distinct lines of activity at the same 
location be separately reported was selectively applied where the 
establishment produced and shipped significant amounts of 
products classified in different SIC industries. In widely varying 
degrees, this product overlap exists in many manufacturing 
establishments. Generally, the amounts involved are not signifi- 
cant enough to warrant the filing of separate reports, even if 
feasible. However, there are a number of locations at which large 
numbers of employees are engaged in each of two or more 
distinct lines of manufacturing as defined in the SIC. Frequently, 
companies organize their operations and their records separately 
where diverse activities are large (for example, with- more than 
100 employees in each line of activity) and choose to report 
them as separate plants. When they do not do so on their own 
initiative, the Census Bureau requests separate reports. For the 
most part, companies have responded favorably, particularly for 
very large operations where failure to "split out" the different 
activities would significantly distort the relationship of the 
industry and product statistics. Not infrequently, though, the 
two groups of products were made on the same production lines 
by many of the same employees and could not be distinguished 
sufficiently in company records to provide establishment-type 
reporting. 

SIC industry defintions take account of special situations 
where otherwise separately classifiable activities are frequently 
combined at one location. For example, in the lumber area the 
definition of industry 2421, Sawmills and Planing Mills, General, 
recognizes the situation that sawmills may include logging 
operations. Similarly, in the pulp and paper area, pulpmills 
operated in combination with papermills are included in one 
report. 



Coverage of Establishments.— The censuses of manufactures for 
1947 to date have included establishments with one employee or 
more. In the 1967 census, for the first time, reports were not 
obtained directly from all such establishments. Approximately 
120,000 small manufacturing firms 8 were excused from filing 
reports; under special arrangements which safeguarded the 
confidentiality of both tax and census records, limited data on 
payrolls, sales, and industry classification from the administrative 
records of the Social Security Administration (SSA) and the 
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) were made available to the 
Census Bureau for use in the 1967 economic censuses. Estimates 
for data other than payrolls and sales for these small establish- 
ments were constructed from historical industry ratios. The 
effect on industry aggregates is slight in most industries; for 
manufacturing as a whole, they account for only 1.2 percent of 
the value added. Detailed product and materials data for these 
small establishments were not estimated; the entire value of 
product shipments and cost of materials was imputed to a "not 
specified by kind" category. 

In the censuses of 1921 through 1939, establishments with 
less than $5,000 value of products were excluded. For 1899 to 
1919, the limit was $500. The change in the minimum size limit 
to an employment basis in 1947 did not appreciably affect the 
overall comparability of earlier census figures, except for the 
number of establishments. 9 



7 Separate data for retail bakeries with baking on the premises were included in the 
retail census publications, however. 



b The characteristics of these firms are discussed below in section 15. 

9 This point is discussed at greater length in the Introduction to the 1947 volumes. 



A sample survey of manufacturing plants with no paid 
employees was conducted in conjunction with the 1958 census. 
While there were nearly 52,000 establishments in this category in 
that year, they accounted for only about one-quarter of 1 
percent of the total value of shipments of all manufacturing 
industries. The proportion was higher for certain industry groups 
such as lumber and wood products and printing and publishing. 

As indicated above, report forms were not mailed to 
120,000 very small establishments. These establishments were 
assigned the industry classifications to which they had been 
coded in the 1963 Census of Manufactures, or if they had begun 
in business after 1963, on the basis of brief descriptions of the 
general activity of the establishment as reported to the Social 
Security Administration. Where the description is incomplete or 
there are relatively fine lines of demarcation between industries 
or between manufacturing and nonmanufacturing activity, the 
code assigned to an establishment could differ from that which 
would have been assigned on the basis of more complete product 
information. Therefore, the total establishment count should be 
viewed as an approximation rather than a precise measurement. 
The counts for establishments with 20 or more employees are far 
more reliable than the total number of establishments. 



Primary and Secondary Products.— As applied in the economic 
censuses, the SIC coding system operates in such a way that the 
definitions become progressively narrower with successive addi- 
tions of numerical digits. At one extreme are the 21 very broad 
2-digit groups and at the other about 10,500 individual 7-digit 
products. In between are approximately 150 3-digit groups, 420 
4-digit industries, and 1,200 5-digit product classes. The 7-digit 
products and 5-digit product classes are considered the primary 
products of the industry with the same first four digits as the 
product code. Accordingly, an establishment is classified in a 
particular industry if its production of the primary products of 
that industry exceeds in value its production of products of any 
other single industry. The industry code assigned to the 
establishment is derived from a summation of values for 7-digit 
product codes to their 4-digit industry and the selection of the 
largest such value as the establishment's industry classification. 
However as mentioned earlier, the industry classification of an 
establishment may be determined not only by the products it 
makes but also by the processes employed or materials used in 
making those products. 

While some establishments produce only the primary 
products of the industry in which they are classified, it rarely 
happens that all the establishments in an industry specialize to 
this extent. Therefore, the general statistics (employment, 
payrolls, inventories, value added by manufacture, total value of 
shipments, capital expenditures, etc.) shown for an industry 
(tables 1 to 4 of the industry chapters in Volume II) reflect not 
only the primary activities of the establishments in that industry 
but also their activities of a secondary nature. The product 
statistics in table 6 of the industry chapters represent the total 
output of specific products whether they are produced by 
establishments classified in the same industry as the product or 
not. For this reason, in relating the industry statistics in the 
industry chapters, especially the industry total value of ship- 
ments (tables 1 to 4), to the product statistics (table 6), the 
composition of the industry's output as shown in tables 5A and 
5B should be considered. 

The extent to which industry and product statistics may be 
matched with each other is measured by the two ratios which are 
computed from tables 5A and 5B. The first of the ratios, called 
the primary product specialization ratio, describes the proportion 
of product shipments ,(both primary and secondary) of the 
industry represented by primary products. The second, defined 
as the coverage ratio, is the proportion of primary products 



shipped by the establishments classified in the industry to total 
shipments of such products by all manufacturing establishments. 

Degrees of Integration.— In many industries, establishments 
making products falling into the same industry category use a 
wide variety of processes and materials to produce them. Also, 
within the same industry classification based on end products, 
may be included those establishments which are vertically 
integrated and those which put only the finishing touches on an 
already highly fabricated purchased item. For example, in the 
refrigeration industry, there are instances of almost complete 
process integration in which the production of the compressor 
and condensing unit, electric motor, and even the castings for 
those intermediate products, as well as the stamping of the case 
and the final assembly, are all carried on at one plant. In other 
plants, the condensing unit, the motor, and the case may be 
purchased and merely assembled into the finished product. 

In some instances, non integrated plants have been placed in 
separate industry categories from the integrated plants. In many 
industries, the census provides separate statistics on departmental 
operations or on the production of intermediate commodities 
made and used in the producing plant. When an industry includes 
plants which ship a significant proportion of their output to 
other plants of the same company, separate figures are usually 
shown on the interplant transfers. 

These differences in the integration of production processes, 
types of operations, and types of materials used should be taken 
into account when relating the general items (employment, 
payrolls, value added, etc.) to the product and materials data. 
For those industries where the integrated type of operations is of 
consequence, that fact is pointed out in the explanatory text for 
the industry. 



Industry Code Resistance.— The production of many establish- 
ments is so evenly divided among two or more industry-deter- 
mining product groups that the predominant groups (which can 
represent less than half of the total value if there are three or 
more groups) changes from year to year. In the ASM, these 
plants are prevented from shifting back and forth among 
industries due to minor shifts in product mix, by the application 
of a "resistance formula" in assigning industry classifications. 

A resistance formula of the ASM type was first used in the 
1963 Census of Manufactures and again applied in the 1967 
census. In the 1967 census, the formula was applied only to 
establishments included in the 1966 ASM sample panel with 
certainty (that is, included with a probability of "1"). In general, 
certainty cases included all establishments of companies with at 
least one manufacturing plant with 100 employees or more (250 
employees or more in the apparel manufacturing and printing 
and publishing industries). The formula gives approximately 
equal weight to the need for maintaining continuity in the 
establishment composition of an industry, thus improving the 
measurement of change, and the need for reflecting the 
industry's exact status at a point in time. 

In the 1967 census, the industry classification of a certainty 
case was allowed to change from that assigned in 1966 under one 
of the following conditions: 

(1) The value of the 1967 primary products consti- 
tuted 60 percent or more of its total value of product 
shipments, or 

(2) The value of the 1967 primary products, while less 
than 60 percent, was at least twice the value of the 1966 
primary products in 1967, or 



8 



TABLE F. Value Added by Manufacture, by Regions, Divisions, and States: 1967 



Region, division, and State 



Value added 
by manu- 
facture, 1967 



Percent of 
U.S. total 



Region, division, and State 



Value added 
by manu- 
facture, 1967 



Percent of 
U.S. total 



United States, total... 

Northeast Region 

New England Division 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic Division. . . 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region 

East North Central Division 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Division 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Division.... 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 



261, 983.8 



76.233.8 



18.972.1 
1.069.5 
931.9 
515.0 
8.715.0 
1.350.9 
6.389.8 

57.261 .7 
25.246.7 
12.738.2 
19.276.8 

91.788.1 
75.015.6 
20.435.4 
10.308.0 
20.016.5 
17.241.6 
7.014.1 

16.772.5 
4.080.2 
3. 250.9 
5.895.0 
112.8 
171.3 
1.150.0 
2.112.4 

59.647.3 
29.312.8 

958.4 
3.781.3 

332.8 



100.0 

29.1 

7.2 

.4 

.4 

.2 

3.3 

.5 

2.4 

21.9 
9.7 
4.9 
7.4 



35 

28 
7 
3 
7 
6 
2 



6.4 
1.6 
1.2 
2.3 

.1 
.4 



22.8 
11.2 

.4 

1.4 

.1 



South Region--Con. 
South Atlantic Div.--Con. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central Division 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central Division 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Division 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Ari zona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific Division 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

Alaska 

Hawaii 



4,067.7 
2,169.5 
6,606.5 
3,030.3 
4,683.6 
3,682.7 

13,717.9 
3,636.0 
4,921.1 
3.525.5 
1.635.3 

16.616.6 
1.557.7 
2,790.3 
1,346.2 

10, 922.4 



34 . 1 96 . 8 
4,521.9 
311.6 
503.4 
86.2 
1,509. 
204. 
995. 
777. 
133. 



29,674 

3,764 

2.060 

23,393 

130 

326 



1.6 
.8 
2.5 
1.2 
1.8 
1.4 

5.2 
1.4 
1.9 

1.4 



6.3 
.6 

1.1 
.5 

4.2 

13.1 

1.7 

.1 

.2 

.6 
.1 
.4 
.3 
.1 

11.3 

1.4 
.8 

8.9 
.1 
.1 



(3) The value of 1967 primary products, while not 
meeting either of the two prior conditions, exceeded the 
value of the 1966 primary industry's products in both 1967 
and 1966 by at least 20 percent. 



The Classification of Products and Materials.— In census industrial 
statistics, a commodity classification system based on the SIC is 
employed. The code numbers used in this system relate the 
commodity to the industry in which it is produced. For example, 
the 7-digit product code number 2023212 refers to canned 
evaporated milk. The first five digits of this code number, 20232, 
refer to the "product class" canned milk, and the first four digits, 
2023, refer to the industry in which these products are made 
(the condensed and evaporated milk industry). The system is also 
applied to the coding of materials insofar as the first four digits 
are concerned; for example, the code number 013205 refers to 
whole milk used as a materials, and the first four digits of this 
code number, 0132, refer to the agricultural industry, dairy 
farms, where this product originates. 

This SIC-based system is simpler than other systems for the 
coding of industrial products and materials used, since there is a 



direct numerical relationship between commodities and indus- 
tries. Complications occur in the few SIC industries defined in 
terms of processes or equipment used as well as products made. 
As an example, women's sweaters are produced in knitting mills 
(industry 2253) and also in cut-and-sew shops (industry 2339). 
To retain the industry-of-origin concept, therefore, it is necessary 
to assign different product code numbers to women's sweaters, 
depending on where they are made. 

The SIC-based commodity classification is used in the 
Census Bureau's entire industrial statistics program, including 
monthly, quarterly, and annual surveys, and also in the census of 
wholesale trade. The Bureau also publishes data on imports and 
exports in terms of SIC-based categories as well as the traditional 
Schedule B and TSUSA systems. 1 ° 



5. GEOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATION 

Census Divisions and Regions.— In order to present census data at 
a level intermediate between the U.S. total and those for the 



-•Schedule B is the U.S. export classification while TSUSA is applied to imports. 



TABLE G. The 50 Largest SMSA's Ranked by Value Added by Manufacture: 1967 and 1963 



Standard metropolitan 
statistical area 



Number of 
employees 
(thousands) 



Value added 
by manufac- 
ture 



1967 
rank 



1963 
rank 



Standard metropolitan 
statistical area 



Number of 
employees 
(thousands 



Value added 
by manufac- 
ture 



1967 
rank 



1963 
rank 



New York, N.Y 

Chicago, 111 

Los Angeles-Long Beach, 

Calif 

Detroit , Mich 

Philadelphia, Pa.-N.J.. 



Cleveland, Ohio... 
St. Louis. Mo. -Ill 

Boston, Mass 

Newark, N.J 

Pittsburgh, Pa. ... . 



San Francisco-Oakland, 

Calif 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Rochester, N.Y 

Houston, Tex 

Baltimore, Md 



Minneapolis-St . Paul, 
Minn 

Cincinnati, Ohio-Ky.- 
Ind 

Buffalo, N.Y 

Pater son- CI if ton- 
Passaic, N.J 

Louisville. Ky.-Ind.. 



Kansas City, Mo.-Kans, 
Seattle-Everett, Wash, 
Anaheim- Santa Ana- 
Garden Grove, Calif., 

Dayton, Ohio 

San Jose, Calif , 



1,147.4 
983.1 

855.4 
584.5 
573.8 

306.8 
295.5 
316.2 
263.7 
299.6 



197.8 
216.5 
145.7 
138.1 
209.7 



203.7 

166.8 
176.2 

190.0 
110.0 



129.4 
162.2 

125.8 
126.2 
120.3 



13,803.5 
13,755.3 

12.088.2 
8,498.1 
7.958.8 

4.297.0 
4,158.9 
4 155.5 
4,071.1 
3,838.1 



3,160.1 
2, 982.5 
2. 914.9 
2,873.0 
2,858.8 



2,819.4 

2,704.1 
2 653.5 

2.506.6 
2,082.5 



2,070.7 
2.038.5 

1,963.8 
1, 908.4 
1 , 907 . 5 



1 
2 

3 

4 
5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



11 
12 
13 
14 
15 



16 

17 
18 

19 
20 



21 

22 

23 
24 
25 



1 
2 

3 

4 
5 

6 
7 
9 
8 
10 



11 
13 
19 
18 
12 



17 

15 
14 

16 
22 



23 
21 

27 
26 
29 



Ind 



Indianapolis . 

Dallas, Tex 

Gary-Hammond- East 

Chicago , Ind , 

Atlanta, Ga , 

Jersey City, N.J 

Greensboro-Winston- 

Salem-High Point, N.C., 
Providence- Pawtucket- 

Warwick . R.I 

Hartford, Conn , 

Akron , Ohio , 

Youngs town- Warren, Ohio, 



Toledo, Ohio-Mich. . . . 

Fort Worth, Tex 

Beaumont- Port Arthur - 

Orange, Tex 

Columbus , Ohio 

Bridgeport, Conn 



Denver , Colo 

Portland, Oreg.-Wash. 
Al lent own- Beth lehem- 

Easton, Pa.-N.J 

Grand Rapids, Mich... 
Spring fi eld- Chicopee- 

Holyoke, Mass. -Conn. 



Syracuse, N.Y 

Birmingham, Ala 

Canton, Ohio , 

Albany- Schenectady- 

Troy, N.Y , 

New Orleans , La 



134.7 
148.9 

105.0 
117.2 
107.2 



110.9 

138.0 

110.6 

101.1 

82.9 

77.7 
78.4 

33.2 

83.0 
79.5 

74.1 
79.8 

102.6 
75.7 

73.3 

68.2 
68.0 
62.5 

65.3 
55.5 



1,855.6 
1,810.8 

1,806.6 
1,604.0 
1,584.9 



1,567.0 

1,533.9 
1,432.3 
1,400.8 
1,260.5 

1,200.8 
1,200.7 

1.166.4 
1,162.2 
1,150.0 

1,121.5 
1,115.4 

1,093.2 
1,091.4 

947.7 

941.1 
906.5 
896.6 

892.5 
860.1 



26 
27 

28 
29 
30 



31 

32 
33 
34 
35 

36 
37 

38 
39 

40 

41 
42 

43 
44 

45 

46 
47 
48 

49 
50 



25 

28 

20 
30 
24 



32 
35 
33 
38 

37 



34 

41 

36 

44 

40 
42 

47 

43 
39 
48 

46 
50 



Note: The Flint, Mich., SMSA falls within the top 50 SMSA's, but is excluded from this table to avoid 
disclosing figures for individual companies. 



individual 50 States and the District of Columbia, the Census 
Bureau has used regional groupings for over a century. Since the 
1909 Census of Manufactures, the present nine geographic 
divisions have been used. Beginning with the 1939 census, the 
nine divisions were also classified into four geographic regions: 
Northeast, South, North Central, and West. 

Not only are these groupings convenient for the summary 
presentation of census data below the U.S. level, but they are 
also essential to presenting a maximum of geographic infor- 
mation where the individual State data cannot be shown without 
disclosing figures for individual companies. (See section 22, 
"Confidentiality".) The relative importance of manufacturing 
among the regions, divisions, and States is shown in table F. 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas.— In addition to the data 
for the legally constituted geographic units (States, counties, and 
cities), all manufacturing totals are shown for approximately 230 
standard metropolitan statistical areas (SMSA). 11 In the 1967 
tables, detail for 2-, 3-, and 4-digit industries is shown for any 



See appendix F for a description of each SMSA. 



SMSA when it would not disclose data for individual companies 
and the industry had at least 250 manufacturing employees. Prior 
to 1967, detail had not been shown for SMSA's with under 
40,000 total manufacturing employment and only industry 
group figures were shown for SMSA's with 40,000 to 190,000 
employees. 

Standard metropolitan statistical areas are integrated eco- 
nomic and social units with a large volume of daily travel and 
communication between the central city (having 50,000 or more 
population) and outlying parts of the area. Each area (except in 
New England) consists of one or more whole counties. An area 
may contain not only highly industrialized counties but also 
adjoining counties which, though primarily residential in char- 
acter, contribute significantly to the industrial counties' labor 
force and are socially and economically integrated with the 
central city. These areas were defined by the Federal Committee 
on Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas for general-purpose 
use in presenting economic and social data. In the New England 
States, similar integration criteria have been applied in defining 
standard metropolitan statistical areas, but on a city and town 
basis, because towns are regarded as the significant unit in this 
region of the country. 



10 



The requirement that each SMSA consist of county units 
(except in New England) sometimes results in the inclusion in an 
area of a considerable amount of territory which would not 
ordinarily be considered "metropolitan," much less "industrial." 
It is recognized that metropolitan areas could be more accurately 
defined in terms of smaller area segments such as minor civil 
divisions, but the usefulness of areas so defined would be limited 
by the fact that many types of economic and social data are 
available only on a county basis. 

Each SMSA is designated by the name of the principal city 
of the area. In addition to the name of the principal city, the area 
title may include one or two additional city names. 



Industrial Counties.— In addition to industry statistics for stand- 
ard metropolitan statistical areas, table 7 of each State report, 



presents data by county for each industry group (2- and 3-digit) 
that had at least 450 manufacturing employees where it would 
not result in disclosure of figures reported by individual 
companies. 



Cities with 450 Manufacturing Employees or More.— Summary 
totals and industry detail at the 2-digit level are shown for 
individual cities with 450 manufacturing employees or more, 
provided the data do not disclose information for individual 
companies. 



Value added by manufacture in all SMSA's accounted for 
76 percent of the U.S. total in 1967. The relative importance of 
the 50 largest SMSA's is shown in table G. 



II. METHODS 



6. PLANNING AND PREPARATION 

General.— The Census Bureau has an obligation to meet public 
needs for timely and reliable information while holding costs and 
the burden on respondents to, a minimum. During the planning 
stages of the 1967 economic censuses, the advice of trade and 
professional associations, Federal and State government agencies, 
individual companies, labor unions, and research and educational 
organizations was solicited in an effort to reach both the users of 
data and the respondents who supply the basic figures. Simulta- 
neously, studies of the problems encountered in the 1963 
censuses were undertaken, and proposals to improve the methods 
of collection, processing, and tabulation were explored. 



A Major Processing Innovation.— Beginning with the 1954 eco- 
nomic censuses, the basic mailing lists have been obtained from 
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Social Security Administra- 
tion (SSA) records. 12 These records were also sampled to 
develop statistics for retail and service establishments with no 
employees. After the 1963 censuses, it was decided to investigate 
the feasibility of making greater use of the data in the IRS-SSA 
records. This effort led, in the 1967 censuses, to the exemption 
of over 2,000,000 firms from the filing requirement, including 
120,000 small manufacturers. Instead, census-type statistics for 
this group were developed from IRS-SSA records. Well in 
advance of the data collection phase of the censuses, plans for 
using these records for small employers were developed in close 
cooperation with those agencies. Specific procedures for this use 
and for assuring confidential treatment of individual tax returns 
were set forth in Executive Order No. 10911, dated January 17, 
1961, and Treasury Decision No. 6547 of the same date. The 
basic records used were business income tax returns (IRS forms 
1040C, 1065, 1120, and 1120S) and payroll tax returns (IRS 
form 941). The information obtained from these reports was the 
name and address, payrolls, and gross business receipts. In 
addition, an SIC industrial activity code was assigned by use of 
the permanent SSA records which indicate the industry or kind 
of business of each employer. Other census statistics for these 
small firms were imputed, using industry average ratios to 
payrolls and sales. 1 3 



1 2 The 1947 Census of Manufactures list was also obtained from the SSA. 
13 As discussed elsewhere in this introduction, the amount of imputation 
introduced by this procedure was only about 1 percent of the overall totals. 



Planning the Content of Questionnaires.— As in previous censuses, 
the content of the 1967 questionnaires was developed in 
consultation with a large number of organizations and indi- 
viduals, representing both the manufacturers who supply the 
basic data and those who use the resulting statistics. Those 
consulted included government agencies, individual firms, labor 
unions, the American Statistical Association, the American 
Economic Association, the American Marketing Association, the 
National Association of Manufacturers, and all national manu- 
facturers' associations covering specific industries. 



A special effort was made to obtain the advice of individual 
manufacturers and their trade associations as to the content of 
the sections of the report forms dealing with the output of 
specific products. Drafts of the proposed 1967 product sections 
were circulated among 800 trade associations and about 4,000 
manufacturing companies, both large and small. These inquiries 
followed the pattern of the 1963 census inquiries, with the 
introduction of new product detail reflecting suggestions received 
by the Census Bureau after the 1963 canvass. Small items (those 
valued at $5 million or less) were not retained in the list unless 
they were needed to simplify the classification of other products 
or were of strategic importance. The manufacturers and others 
consulted in this clearance procedure were requested to comment 
particularly as to whether the proposed detail was readily 
reportable from business records, and whether it represented the 
most appropriate set of items for the industry. A restriction was 
placed on proposals for additional detail; it was stipulated that 
the 1967 value of any new product category should exceed $15 
million. 

The thousands of comments and suggestions received in this 
clearance procedure were analyzed by the census staff. Finally, a 
detailed account of the review procedure and the decisions 
reached was forwarded to the Office of Statistical Standards, 
Bureau of the Budget, along with the Census Bureau's recom- 
mendations for the content of the product sections. 

• The final review of the content was performed by the Office 
of Statistical Standards with the assistance of the Advisory 
Council on Federal Reports. The latter organization is a group of 
business executives representing a cross section of industries and 
various professions within companies such as controllers, econo- 
mists, and market research directors. 



11 



7. REPORTING FORMS 

A representative selection of the reporting forms used in the 
1967 census is reproduced in appendix D. The uses of each of 
them are discussed below. 



General Forms.— This group of forms was used in the economic 
censuses generally, either as companywide reports or as reports 
for establishments whose classification was not known precisely 
in advance of mailing. 

MC-X1A, Report of Company Organization.— This com- 
panywide report and its companion form NC-X1B were used in the 
precanvass of multiunit companies conducted in 1967. A more 
detailed account of their use is given in section 8, "The Mailing 
Lists." 

NC-X3, General Schedule.— This questionnaire was designed 
to obtain information from small companies for which the 
industry code available in the SSA records was not precise 
enough to indicate which one of the standard census question- 
naires should be mailed. The information provided on form 
NC-X3 was used to classify these companies by industry and 
tabulate their data in the appropriate census. 1 4 

NC-X6, Central Administrative Offices or Auxiliary Estab- 
lishments.— Many multiunit companies maintain separate estab- 
lishments to provide centralized administrative, management, or 
other supporting services for other establishments of the same 
company, but not for the general public or other companies. 
These establishments were asked to complete form NC-X6. The 
form contained questions on approximate employment for such 
functions as centralized administration, research and develop- 
ment, warehousing, and other auxiliary activities, and on the cost 
of research and development work performed by these nonmanu- 
facturing establishments. 



Annual Survey of Manufactures Forms. 

MA-100.— This form is the establishment report used in the 
ASM since 1949 (with modifications). As mentioned above, this 
form was used in 1967 as the first sheet of the census of 
manufactures report for the establishments included in the ASM 
sample. The establishment's 1966 data were imprinted on the 
report form before mailing, thus aiding the respondent in 
following the instructions for the census. Item 9, "Quantity and 
value of products shipped and other receipts," on form MA-100 
corresponds to item 18 on the census form MC-36B and its 
companion forms, the difference being that item 18 called for 
more detailed information on product shipments. 

MA- 101, Expenditures for Plant and Equipment for Manu- 
facturing Establishments Under Construction.— This form was 
designed to obtain data on capital expenditures by large 
manufacturing firms for new plants not yet in operation at the 
end of the year. It was mailed to all multiunit companies with 
250 employees or more. It was also mailed to any other company 
which indicated on one of its establishment report forms, in a 
special check-box section, that it had a plant under construction 
but not yet in operation. Each such plant was coded geograph- 
ically and to a 4-digit industry from the description given of its 
expected activity. The information obtained on form MA- 101 
was included in the capital expenditures figures in the 1967 
census tabulations. (For further discussion, see section 18, 
"Capital Expenditures.") 



Other Related Forms.-Form CB-51J-1, "Manufacturers Sales 
Branches and Sales Offices," which is reproduced in appendix D, 
is typical of the several forms used for these establishments in the 
census of business. The forms differed only in the kinds of 
products sold as listed in item 12. In item 5, line b provided 
verification of the classification of the establishment as a sales 
branch or sales office. If the line-b percentage indicated that 
more than half of the goods sold were not manufactured by the 
parent company, the establishment was reclassified into one of 
the merchant wholesaler categories. 

NC-K1, Company Summary Report.— Each multiunit com- 
pany with 250 employees or more received a form NC-K1, 
Company Summary Report, along with the appropriate question- 
naires for its establishments. The NC-K1 requested consolidated 
company totals for key data items, such as receipts, new capital 
expenditures, inventories, and fixed assets. In addition, each 
company was asked to distribute the 1967 employment reported 
on its establishment questionnaires by its IRS-SSA employer 
identification numbers (El numbers) and to compare these totals 
to the figures reported on its Treasury Form 941 tax returns. 
This comparision provided assurance that all domestic establish- 
ments of each large multiunit firm and its subsidiaries would be 
included in the censuses. Form NC-K1 served this operational 
purpose and also provided essential data for the enterprise 
statistics program described above in section 1. 

Census of Manufactures. Forms.— The questionnaire reproduced 
in the appendix, form MC-36B, is typical of the 180 forms used 
for operating manufacturing establishments. Each of these forms 
was designed to be used for a specific group of industries. For 
establishments included in the Annual Survey of Manufactures 
sample, form MA-100 was substituted for the front sheet of form 
MC-36B and its companion forms, since the content was virtually 
the same and it was desired to maintain continuity of reporting 
in the ASM. Whether or not form MA-100 was used, the inquiries 
on the 180 forms were identical except for the detailed questions 
on products shipped, materials used, and miscellaneous topics 
such as operations performed, equipment used, and delivery of 
products. 

MC-171, Department of Defense Establishments, and 
MC-D4, Penal institutions.— These forms were used to collect 
information on government-owned and government-operated 
manufacturing establishments. They were used for two types of 
establishments: (1) Manufacturing facilities owned and operated 
by the Department of Defense, and (2) prison industries 
(Federal, District of Columbia, and State). The data were 
prepared with the cooperation of the Department of Defense, the 
Department of Justice, and the District of Columbia and State 
prison systems. For Department of Defense installations, infor- 
mation was provided on employment, man-hours, payrolls, cost, 
and value of work done, by industry group and by State. For 
prison industries, however, only product data was requested. The 
data are presented in a special report included in Volume I and 
are not included in the totals for operating manufacturing 
establishments. 

8. THE MAILING LISTS 

General.— As discussed in section 6 above, the basic lists for 1967 
were obtained from IRS-SSA records, supplemented importantly 
by the inclusion of the ASM list of 60,000 establishments. Since 
the IRS-SSA lists consist essentially of the names and addresses 
of companies rather than establishments, 15 however, it was 



'The use of Form NC— X3 is also discussed in section 8, "The Mailing Lists.' 



15 The SSA records for multiunit companies identify "reporting units," which in 
many instances correspond to census establishments. The differences are such, however, 
that it was found necessary to obtain up-to-date lists of establishments as described in 
this section. Also, the Census Bureau concept of a company differs from the I RS-SSA 
definition, since the Census company includes all establishments under common 
ownership or control; in the IRS-SSA records, subsidiary corporations are often 
treated as independent companies. 



12 



necessary to follow separate procedures for multiunit companies 
(those operating at more than one location). 



The Precanvass.— Multiunit companies were required to file at 
least one establishment report 16 covering each location. In order 
to select the appropriate questionnaires, it was necessary to 
determine in advance the nature of operations at each location. 
Beginning early in 1967, therefore, a "Report of Company 
Organization" (form NC-X1A) 17 was obtained from firms 
known to be multiunits from previous census records. All 
multiunit firms included in the ASM reported on form NC-X1A. 
A shorter questionnaire, form NC-X1B, 1 7 was also sent to other 
firms which were regarded as possible multiunits, including all 
manufacturers with 500 employees or more who were not on the 
NC-X1A list. 

Both of these forms consisted essentially of a report on 
company affiliation and a list of the domestic establishments 
operated by the company. Before the forms were mailed, the 
company's establishments as identified in census records were 
prelisted. In the instructions for form NC-X1A, the respondents 
were asked to make any necessary corrections to this list. In 
addition, they were asked to supply descriptions of any new 
establishments not already listed, including their approximate 
size. 

Approximately 700 large multiunit companies were segre- 
gated for special handling in the precanvass because problems 
involving overlap and duplication were anticipated. Many of 
these companies were active in retail and wholesale trade as well 
as in manufacturing. The instructions for the precanvass were 
reviewed with these firms in personal discussions with officials of 
their accounting departments, in order to make certain that the 
procedure was understood and the establishments properly 
described on form NC-X1A. 

Initial Control File.— This file, consisting of about 7 million 
names and addresses of companies, was assembled from IRS-SSA 
records and other sources including the 1963 economic census 
records. For manufacturing, the ASM records were incorporated 
in the file. 

Single-Unit Companies.— The mailing lists for single-unit com- 
panies (those operating at only one location) were developed 
from the initial control file by removing out-of-scope companies 
(those whose activities were not to be surveyed in the economic 
censuses) and those identified as multiunits in the precanvass. A 
special survey of out-of-scope companies with more than 50 
employees in selected industries was conducted to doublecheck 
their eligibility, and some names were added to the mailing list as 
a result. 

The final step was to set aside the records of the small 
companies for which census-type statistics were to be developed 
from administrative records. The remaining records constituted 
the mailing lists for single-unit companies. 



General Schedule. -While the lists assembled in these ways were 
generally adequate in providing sufficient industry information 
to determine the proper form for mailing, a number of the 
records did not have precise industry information associated with 
them. Form NC-X3, "General Schedule," which is reproduced in 
appendix D, was mailed to all such companies. Since it was 



1 6 lf two or more distinct lines of activity were carried on at one location, separate 
reports were obtained under some circumstances. (For a complete discussion, see 
"Establishment Basis of Reporting" in section 4, above.) 

' 7 This form is reproduced in appendix D. 



assumed that these companies were quite small, only a few key 
figures were requested. On the basis of the information reported, 
these reports were coded and included in the basic tabulations. If 
form NC-X3 indicated that the company was actually large, it 
was later requested to file one or more of the appropriate 
standard questionnaires. 



9. GEOGRAPHIC AREA CODING 

Accurate and complete information on the physical location of 
each establishment is required in order to tabulate the census 
data by SMSA's, counties, and cities. As in previous censuses, the 
post office address and ZIP code of the establishment were not 
always accepted as defining the physical location, but respond- 
ents were required to describe the actual location in terms of 
street address, city, town or village, county, and State. For 
establishments located in rural territory, the name or number of 
the nearest highway was requested and the distance from the 
nearest town or other urban place. 

In censuses prior to 1963, clerks assigned geographic code 
numbers to each establishment based on the description fur- 
nished by the respondent. This process was slow and required 
careful verification. Beginning with 1963, a computerized system 
was developed which assigned an area code number and a prefix 
symbol to the mailing address before the questionnaires were 
mailed. The prefix symbol indicated whether or not the mailing 
address was clearly acceptable as describing the physical location. 
If there was any question about its acceptability, the respond- 
ent's description was later carefully reviewed after the question- 
naire was received. The assignment of tentative code numbers by 
the computer was based on extensive reference files containing 
nearly a million business names and addresses. 

The geographic coding system used in the 1967 economic 
censuses was based on the 1963 system with some improvements 
and revisions. The major changes included expanding the address 
reference file, and use of the ZIP code as part of the procedure 
for matching addresses against the reference file. 



10. DATA COLLECTION 

General.— Although the greater use of administrative records in 
1967 substantially reduced the number of companies canvassed 
directly, there remained nearly 2 million which were required to 
file, including about 175,000 manufacturers. The assembly of 
several hundred different questionnaires into mailing packages, 
correctly labeled and coded, combined with the correct instruc- 
tion booklets, was an extensive operation. 



Instructions. -Several general instruction booklets were prepared 
to assist respondents in completing questionnaires for the 1967 
economic censuses. In addition, separate detailed instruction 
manuals were printed for establishments in a few kinds of 
business and in certain mineral industries with peculiar reporting 
problems, as well as for manufacturing establishments reporting 
on the detailed standard forms. 

Timing.— The bulk of the 1967 questionnaires were mailed in 
mid-February 1968 with a due date of April 30, about 2 months 
later than the corresponding due date for the 1963 censuses. 
Adoption of the April 30 due date, which had been urged by 
accountants, was based on the assumption that reports would be 
filed more promptly if their preparation followed that of Federal 
income tax returns, which were due April 15, and that the "lost" 
2 months would be gained back. This turned out not to be the 
case. The collection phase was not completed until early 
November 1968, about 2 months behind the 1963 record. 



13 



Followup.— Companies which did not return their questionnaires 
by the due date had to be reminded that their returns were 
overdue. A reminder card was used for the first followup, and 
form letters used in the five subsequent mailings. Two basic letter 
formats were used, one for multiunit companies that had 
returned questionnaires for some but not all establishments, and 
the other for companies that had not responded at all. 

The last followup letter was mailed in October 1968. 
Estimates based on data from administrative records were 
included in the census tabulations for the relatively small number 
which had not responded by the closeout date in November 
1968. Thus, all companies and establishments included in the 
original mailing list (except those determined to be inactive 
during 1967) were represented in the final statistical results, 
either by actual returns or by proxy returns generated from 
administrative records. A special effort was made to obtain actual 
returns from all large firms, so that the volume of business 
represented by proxy returns was relatively very small. 



11. DATA PROCESSING 

General.— The editing, 1 8 coding, and tabulation of data for the 5 
million establishments represented in the 1967 economic cen- 
suses was a complicated task requiring extensive advance plan- 
ning and careful coordination among the Census Bureau's 
organization subdivisions. Automatic data processing and other 
advanced techniques were used in all phases to a considerable 
extent. 

Facilities.— In the mail collection phase, the questionnaires were 
returned by respondents to the Census office at Jeffersonville, 
Ind., where most noncomputer (that is, clerical) processing 
operations were performed. The Jeffersonville functions con- 
sisted mainly of preliminary screening of questionnaires, carrying 
on routine correspondence with respondents, punching cards, 
and transmitting the punched data to Washington on a high speed 
transmission system. The Washington staff handled computer 
operations, and all operations in connection with the use of IRS 
and SSA records. 



Preliminary Screening.— After checking in against control lists 
and assigning geographic codes, the questionnaires were reviewed 
clerically to see that they conformed to certain minimum 
requirements before further processing. In the case of multiunit 
companies, the sum of employment and payrolls reported on its 
establishment questionnaires was compared with the control 
totals reported on form NC-K1, "Company Summary Report." 
Questionnaires received from ostensibly single-unit firms were 
reviewed to ascertain whether they had become multiunits 
through merger or acquisition. All questionnaires were reviewed 
to see that the entries were legible and punchable, and that 
entries appeared for a number of key items. For manufacturing 
establishment returns, the key items were payrolls and value of 
shipments. Questions arising in the screening operation were 
resolved by writing or telephoning the respondents. Complex 
problems involving multiunit companies were either handled by a 
special task force of experienced analysts in Jeffersonville or 
were referred to the Washington office. 



Computer Editing.— All of the establishment records from the 
1967 censuses of manufactures and mineral industries underwent 
computerized processes of screening and detailed testing of data. 
While most of these programs were newly devised in 1967, they 



1 8 ln data processing, the term "editing" means the review of information collected 
on questionnaires or from other sources, with the objective of locating and correcting 
erroneous entries. 



were largely based on similar programs in use during the 1963 
censuses. As in 1963, average values and tolerance limits for key 
operating ratios (for example, cost of materials per dollar of 
shipments, payroll per employee, production-worker wages per 
man-hour, etc.) played a fundamental role in the editing process. 
However, more extensive testing and more sophisticated routines 
for adjusting data which failed the tests were incorporated into 
the 1967 programs. The need for computer editing may be 
judged by the fact that more than half of all 4-digit SIC 
industries had one or more data cells changed by more than 5 
percent as a result of application of these programs. 

In sequence, the computer programs used included a 
Housekeeping and Screening Edit, a Coverage Control and 
Matching Edit, a Magnitude Edit, a General Statistics Edit, an 
Intercard Intercolumn Edit, a Product and Materials Edit, a 
Duplicate Removal Program, and various programs of referral and 
of aggregate testing. These programs are described in outline 
form below. Also included within this sequence were programs of 
geographic coding and of industry coding, which are described 
elsewhere in this introduction. 

The Housekeeping and Screening Edit was designed to 
inspect each record for the presence of basic information such as 
identification numbers, geographic codes, and source codes (that 
is, ASM, census of manufactures, or census of minerals). This 
program also included some simple data adjustments, such as the 
replacement of a missing total by a corresponding sum of detail. 

The Coverage Control and Matching Edits were a system of 
programs which checked the consistency of clerically assigned 
coverage codes with reported information on the ownership 
status of the establishment. For ASM establishments, the 
program included matching with the 1966 ASM record file to 
identify corresponding prior-year records. In the 1967 Census of 
Manufactures, nearly 339,000 establishments were initially 
defined as being within the scope of manufacturing. Of this 
number, approximately 26,000 were identified as having no 
activity during 1967. Of the remainder, more than 11,000 were 
rejected from the combined output of the Housekeeping and 
Screening Edit and from the Coverage Control and Matching 
Edit. This latter number was clerically reviewed, corrected where 
necessary, and recycled back into the computer. 

The Magnitude Edit was designed to test the size of two key 
items, payrolls and value of shipments. For ASM establishments, 
these items were compared with the corresponding entries for 
1966, and were accepted if satisfactory. If not accepted, the 
ASM records were channeled through the standard edit, which 
compared payrolls to a historical employment-size code. Payroll 
figures passing the test were then used, in conjunction with cost 
of materials, in testing the value of shipments. 

When failures in the magnitude tests were encountered, a 
fixed sequence of attempts to adjust the data were performed, 
which included dividing a reported figure by 1,000 (a common 
error was the reporting of values in dollars rather than in 
thousands of dollars as requested), or replacing a total by a sum 
of detail where these differed. If the corrective procedures of the 
Magnitude Edit were unsuccessful, the schedule was rejected for 
clerical inspection, correction where necessary, and recycling. 
This occurred for about 18,000 establishments. 

The General Statistics Edit tested key operating ratios and 
adjusted the record or flagged it for later attention if it failed the 
test. Fifty-two such ratios were assigned for use in testing census 
of manufactures records, and 41 1966-67 ratios of change were 
used in testing the ASM reports. The tolerance limits and average 
values for these 93 ratios were based on the limits used for the 
corresponding tests in the 1963 census, with some correction and 
updating based on more recent ASM information. 



14 



«H 



In the presence of ratio failures, the computer program was 
designed to determine the component of the ratio which was 
most likely to have caused the failure. This was done by a process 
of inspecting other ratios containing each of the suspect 
components, and by computing an overall weighted-reliability 
index for each. The component with the lowest reliability index 
was judged to be incorrect. The computer then attempted to 
adjust the questionable figure by a process of "rounding" 
(multiplying or dividing by successive powers of 10), substitution 
of a total by a sum of detail, or by imputation based on one of 
the several ratios in which the suspect component was contained. 
After each such attempted adjustment, the new figure was 
accepted if it resulted in an improved reliability index. 

In addition to testing and correction of reported infor- 
mation, the General Statistics Edit was the vehicle for the 
imputation of data for the 120,000 companies designated as 
administrative-record cases, as well as data for companies which 
failed to report in the mail canvass. Imputation for all reasons, 
failure to report as well as administrative records, accounted 
overall for about 3 percent of the total value of shipments. 
Records were not rejected and removed from the computer tapes 
in the General Statistics Edit, but were flagged and printed out 
for review by an analyst whenever the computer made a large 
adjustment, found a large year-to-year change, or could not make 
an acceptable adjustment after test failure. Excluding administra- 
tive records, about 40,000 such cases were printed out for review 
and possible correction. 

The Intercard Intercolumn Edit was designed to test specific 
relationships among products, materials, and special inquiries. 
The record was flagged for inspection if the test failed; some 
64,000 records were printed out for review from this edit. 

The Product and Materials Edits were performed after the 
data on products and materials had been extracted from the basic 
establishment records, and assembled in product (or material) 
sequence. The edits were designed to inspect the reported 
quantities of production and of consumption after the corre- 
sponding values were tested and found acceptable. Unit values, in 
terms of dollar value per unit of quantity, were computed and 
ranked from highest to lowest. The most extreme values were 
removed, and the truncated data were used in the formulation of 
parameters (average deviation, central value, and upper and lower 
tolerance limits) which were printed out for review by analysts. 
This routine differs from those in other edits in that the 
parameters for editing were developed from the data at hand 
rather than from historic data or predetermined reasonableness 
limits. 

The Duplicate Removal program was designed to identify 
and eliminate duplicate establishment records from the census. 



The sources of duplication were many; imputed records which 
were followed by the late receipts of a report from the 
respondent was typical. The program resulted in the elimination 
of nearly 6,000 duplicate establishment records from the census 

file. 

As in the 1963 census, this preliminary round of computer 
editing and professional correction was followed by a more 
detailed review of establishment records. Among the devices used 
at this stage were an "outlier" program which printed out 
establishment reports of dubious quality in terms of their 
internal consistency. The outlier program used some of the same 
ratios as the General Statistics Edit, but with parameters updated 
to reflect the characteristics of 1967, rather than earlier, data. 
Records with one or more suspicious ratios were printed out for 
review. In addition, aggregates of records at the industry and the 
geographic cell level were inspected with ratio tolerance limits 
adjusted to reflect the number of establishments contributing to 
the cell. 



12. COVERAGE AND ACCURACY 

Since the list of companies obtained from IRS and SSA records 
was considered to be complete, no field coverage check was 
conducted. The precanvass and other special procedures for 
multiunit companies described in section 8, "The Mailing Lists," 
and section 10, "Data Collection," were designed to secure 
complete lists of establishments, thereby amplifying the IRS-SSA 
company list. Control totals in terms of employment and 
payrolls of multiunit companies were also used to verify the 
completeness of establishment coverage. This procedure is 
discussed in section 1 1, "Data Processing." 

Comparison of statistics tabulated from the census of 
manufactures with the Census Bureau's Current Industrial 
Reports series, or with data originating with other agencies was 
possible in many instances, thus providing a further confirmation 
of completeness and accuracy. These figures range from employ- 
ment and wage totals compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics 
to detailed commodity output figures published by the Internal 
Revenue Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. In the industry reports in Volume II, 
differences between the census of manufactures and other 
statistics are explained wherever possible. Census of manu- 
factures comparability with broad measures such as national 
income, new capital expenditures, and production indexes are 
discussed elsewhere in this introduction. The Census Bureau's 
other procedures designed to improve the accuracy of the census 
data are discussed above in the sections on data collection and 
processing. Comments on the valuation of intracompany ship- 
ments by multiunit companies are included in section 15. 



III. COMMENTS ON STATISTICAL MEASURES AND TABLES 



(Explanations and definitions of the various measures of activity 
for which statistics are compiled in the census of manufactures 
are presented in appendix A. In the following sections, the 
limitations and other characteristics of some of these measures 
are discussed, the content of the statistical tables is described, 
and comparisons with other statistical series are presented.) 

13. EMPLOYMENT AND PAYROLLS IN ADMINISTRATIVE 
OFFICES AND AUXILIARY ESTABLISHMENTS 

In the industry chapters of Volume II, the data on employment 
and payrolls refer to operating manufacturing establishments and 



are so described. In the summary tables, the employment and 
payrolls of central administrative offices and auxiliary establish- 
ments are also included. However, whereas the operating estab- 
lishments were coded to a 4-digit manufacturing industry, the 
administrative offices and auxiliaries were coded only to the 
2-digit industry group of the establishments they served. In most 
of the tables with industry detail, the administrative offices and 
auxiliaries are shown as a separate industry group, but statistics 
for them by 2-digit industry appear in each volume in the 
General Summary tables. The relative importance of administra- 
tive offices and auxiliaries has increased substantially in recent 
years, because of a tendency to centralize functions formerly 



15 



performed in manufacturing plants. Such functions include 
accounting (particularly where computerized), warehousing, 
repair services, and miscellaneous others. As indicated in table H, 
this tendency was quite marked between 1954 and 1963, but 
there was less relative increase between 1963 and 1967. 

TABLE H. Employment in Central Administrative Offices and 
Auxiliaries and in Operating Manufacturing Plants: 
1967 and Earlier Census Years 



Census 
year 


Employees in 
operating manufac- 
turing establishments 


Employees in 

central administrative 

offices and auxiliaries 


Thous- 
ands of 
em- 
ployees 


Ffercent 

change 

from 

previous 

Census 

year 


Thous- 
ands of 
em- 
ployees 


Percent 
change 

from 
previous 
Census 

year 


Percent 

of 

total 

employ- 
ment 1 


1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 


18,492 
16,235 
15,423 
15,645 


+ 14.0 
+5.3 
-1.4 

(NA) 


830 
7 26 
602 
453 


+14.3 

+20.6 

2 +32. 9 

(NA) 


4.3 
4.3 
3.8 

2.8 



Source: Census of Manufactures. 

Standard notes: (NA) Not available. 

1 The total includes manufacturing establishments, 
central administrative offices, and auxiliaries. 

2 The apparent increase from 1954 to 1958 is be- 
lieved to be somewhat overstated, because coverage 
of administrative offices and auxiliaries was more 
complete in the 1958 census. 

14. MATERIALS 

In addition to the total cost of materials which every establish- 
ment was requested to report, quantity and cost information was 
collected for approximately a thousand specific materials. 19 
About 360 of these were "complete coverage" materials; i.e., 
every industry that consumed appreciable quantities of the 
material was canvassed so that the data would represent at least 
90 percent of manufacturing consumption. For the remaining 
materials, information on consumption was obtained on a more 
limited basis, generally only in those industries in which the 
materials were important inputs. Detailed consumption infor- 
mation was collected in the standard materials inquiry, in the 
product inquiries (for items which were produced and consumed 
in the same plant), or in a few instances in special inquiries. The 
resulting statistics are presented mainly in tables 6A and 7A of 
the industry chapters, Volume II. 

Because American industry uses an enormous variety of 
materials, the choice of materials for which "complete coverage" 
consumption data (90 percent or higher) were obtained had to be 
strictly limited. The selection of a particular material for such 
coverage was based on the following criteria: 

(1) The importance of the material as measured by the 
total value of U.S. consumption of the material; 

(2) The percentage of total consumption accounted for by 
manufacturing establishments; 



19 See 1967 Censuses of Manufactures and Mineral Industries, List of Materials 
Consumption Items, MC67-6, for a more detailed account of the collection of data on 
materials consumed. 



(3) The availability of consumption information from 
manufacturers' records; and 

(4) In certain instances, other factors such as the strategic 
importance of the material or the availability of 
historical data on the use of the material. 

The materials included on a limited-coverage basis were 
chosen not only because they constituted important inputs for 
particular industries but frequently because they provided 
information necessary to classify plants by SIC industry. In using 
the detailed data on materials consumed which appear in table 
7A in the industry chapters of Volume II, the following 
limitations should be noted: 

(1) Materials were reported for the establishment as a 
whole and no attempt was made to ascertain how much 
of the material was used in each of various products. 
Thus, the industry totals appearing in table 7A 
represent consumption in secondary products as well as 
primary products of the industry represented. The 
extent of secondary production is measured by the 
specialization and coverage ratios shown in table 5A of 
the industry chapters. 

(2) Attention should be paid to the codes ending in "000" 
and captioned "materials, parts, containers, and 
supplies, not specified by kind." The amounts appearing 
on these lines represent imputed totals for establish- 
ments whose statistics were developed by use of 
administrative records, and totals for other establish- 
ments which failed to report their consumption in 
specific terms. Thus, for most industries, the specific 
categories are understated. A judgment on the statistical 
significance of the understatement for each industry 
may be made on the basis of the relationship of the 
value shown for the "not specified by kind" (code 000) 
line compared with the total of materials, components, 
parts, containers, and supplies for the industry. 



(3) Establishments consuming less than a specified amount 
of material were not requested to report consumption 
of the material separately. For the majority of indi- 
vidual materials, the minimum amount was $5,000. The 
use of this cutoff is not believed to have had a 
significant effect on the totals. 



15. VALUE OF SHIPMENTS BY MULTIUNIT COMPANIES 

General.— Except for a few industries as indicated in appendix A, 
the respondents were instructed to report net selling values, f.o.b. 
plant, after discounts and allowances and excluding freight 
charges and excise taxes. Multiunit companies were instructed to 
report for each establishment as if it were a separate economic 
unit and, in particular, to report interplant transfers at their full 
economic value, including not only the cost of production but 
also a reasonable proportion of company overhead and profits. 
Since there is no advertising or other selling cost involved, it 
would be expected that the value per unit of such transfers 
would be less than that for commercial sales. The plant receiving 
the transferred goods was instructed to include them in its cost 
of materials, valued as at the shipping point plus the cost of 
freight and other handling charges. 

In the case of goods transferred to sales branches, or sold 
through separate sales offices, the implication of the "f.o.b. 
plant" instruction is that the value is at a somewhat lower level 
than the final invoice value, because the cost of selling (mainly 
the cost of operating the sales branch or office) is excluded. 



16 



In practice, there is reason to believe that these instructions 
were not followed by all companies. In a recordkeeping practices 
study of 54 multiunit companies conducted a few years ago, it 
was found that about half of them had reported interplant 
transfers of semifinished products at commercial or market 
prices, which tend to be somewhat higher than the "cost plus 
overhead and profit" requested in the census instructions. In the 
case of finished products transferred to separate selling organiza- 
tions, half of the companies interviewed valued the products at 
their final or invoice price, which again would be somewhat 
higher than the "f.o.b. plant" transfer value requested. It appears 
from this study and other observations that the value of 
shipments of products reported by multiunit companies tends to 
be overstated. For products characterized by a substantial 
amount of interplant shipments, separate quantity and value 
figures were requested on the census forms. Data on these 
shipments, the unit value of which is less accurate than the unit 
value for shipments outside the company, are presented sepa- 
rately in table 6A in the industry chapters of Volume II. 

Individual Products.— In the 1967 census program, information 
was collected on the output of approximately 10,500 individual 
product items. 20 The term "product" as used in the census of 
manufactures represents the finest level of detail for which 
output information was requested. Consequently, it is not 
necessarily synonymous with the term product as used in the 
marketing sense. In some cases it may be much more detailed and 
in other cases it is more aggregative. For example, pharmaceutical 
preparations were reported in terms of 160 products, while 
canned meats was a single product. Frequently, large aggregative 
values at the product level indicated that detailed production 
figures were available from other government sources or reliable 
private surveys. 

Some 5,500 of the product items were listed separately on 
the 1967 census report forms. Data for the remaining 5,000 
products were obtained in the monthly, quarterly, or annual 
commodity surveys comprising the Current Industrial Reports 
series of the Census Bureau. Totals for the year 1967 for these 
items as derived from the commodity surveys are shown in the 
"product shipped" table (table 6) in the industry chapters of 
Volume II together with the tieline total value collected in the 
census for reconciliation. 

Typically, both quantity and value of shipments infor- 
mation was collected. However, if there was no meaningful 
physical quantity measure that could be reported by manu- 
facturers, only value of shipments was collected. For products 
which are used to a large degree within the same establishment as 
materials or components in the fabrication of other products, 
total quantities produced and often the quantities consumed 
within the plant were collected. Typically, the information on 
production was also collected for products for which there are 
significant differences between total production and shipments in 
a given year because of wide fluctuations in finished goods 
inventories. Alternate measures of output of products, such as 
value of work done for products with long production cycles, 
were used as appropriate and feasible. 

Classes of Products.— For the purpose of summarizing the 
product information, the separate products were aggregated into 
classes of products which were, in turn, grouped into all primary 
products of each industry. The code structure used is a 7-digit 
number for the individual product, a 5-digit code for the class of 
product, and a 4-digit code for the total primary products in an 
industry (see section 4 for application of coding structure to the 
assignment of SIC codes for establishments). 



20 See 1967 Census of Manufactures, MC67-1, Numerical List of Manufactured 
Products, and MC67-2, Alphabetic List of Manufactured Products. 



The 10,500 product items in the 1967 census (including 
products from the Current Industrial Reports program) were 
grouped into approximately 1,200 separate classes. Products 
were grouped into product classes to bring out significant 
differences in the broad types of products within a 4-digit 
industry. General similarity of the kind or purpose of the 
products or of the manufacturing processes, type of markets, or 
of materials used, were the basis for product combinations. The 
economic significance of the class was also taken into account; 
residual products of an industry were grouped when the products 
were not sufficiently significant in dollar value to warrant 
separate classes. 

As a result of the increased number of respondents included 
in the product-class shipments totals, these categories lend 
themselves to many more cross tabulations than do the 7-digit 
products, without disclosing information about the operations of 
individual companies. In the industry chapters of Volume II, 
table 6B provides information on the value of shipments of 
product classes by State; and table 5B, by industry of the 
establishment producing them. The latter table is the best vehicle 
for showing the primary and secondary product mix of an 
industry, as well as the interrelationship between the 4-digit 
industry value of shipments and the 4-digit product group value 
of shipments. In table 8, the product class is used to provide finer 
industry-type general statistics by classifying establishments 
within an industry according to the degree to which they 
specialize in producing a specific class of products. 

The class-of-product concept was incorporated by the 
Census Bureau into its own program with the 1947 Census of 
Manufactures after it developed the technique in the compilation 
of World War II production statistics. Product classes formed the 
basis of collecting product information in the annual survey of 
manufactures when that survey was initiated in 1949. The classes 
have been revised over the succeeding years to improve the 
balance and significance of product combinations within each 
industry and to keep abreast of the growth and decline of 
products. 



Effect of Use of Administrative Records on Product Data.— As 

noted elsewhere in this introduction, 1967 census statistics for 
about 120,000 small manufacturers were developed by use of 
IRS and SSA records. Since the SSA records were coded only to 
the 4-digit SIC level, it was not considered feasible to estimate 
the product output of these small companies in terms of specific 
5-digit product classes or 7-digit products. The total value of 
output was therefore coded to the 4-digit level and published 
separately in table 6A of the industry chapters of Volume II. In 
table I, page 18, these data have been summarized together with 
other undistributed 4-digit totals reported by the larger com- 
panies. It will be seen from table I that the contribution of the 
small companies to product totals was of little importance except 
in lumber, furniture, and printing and publishing (groups 24, 25, 
and 27). The large companies which for various reasons reported 
only in terms of group totals were of somewhat more impor- 
tance, accounting overall for about 3 percent of the total value of 
product shipments. 

Nominally, the shipments of "small companies" as shown in 
table I represent the output of all establishments with less than 
10 employees. Actually, less than half of the value of shipments 
of establishments with less than 10 employees was obtained from 
administrative records. This was due to several factors, the most 
important of which were— 

(1) Many of the establishments with less than 10 
employees were owned by multiunit companies and 
were covered in the mail canvass. 



17 



TABLE I. Value of Products Not Specified by Kind: 1967 
(Millions of dollars) 









Products not specified by kind 




Product group code 


Total value of 
product shipments 








Total 


Large 


Small 


Percent attributable 








companies 


companies 1 


to small companies 


Total 


539,470.1 


23,387.2 


17,884.6 


5,430.6 


1.0 


20 


78,650.9 


4,088.2 


3.326.7 


761.5 


1.0 


21 


4,589.7 


46.4 


44.2 


2.2 


.1 


22 


20,141.0 


691.2 


550.1 


69.1 


.3 


23 


19,748.9 


1,992.5 


1,686.0 


306.5 


1.6 


24 


10,585.7 


1,614.7 


774.7 


840.0 


7.9 


25 


8,110.2 


702.6 


485.7 


216.9 


2.7 


26 


20,049.3 


575.3 


512.4 


62.9 


.3 


27 


20,878.9 


1,805.2 


923.1 


882.1 


4.2 


28 


40,013.1 


1,030.3 


851.9 


178.4 


.5 


29 


20, 992.8 


159.2 


130.0 


29.2 


.1 


30 


12,236.8 


512.5 


414.6 


97.9 


.8 


31 


4,849.8 


238.8 


180.8 


58.0 


1.2 


32 


13,596.9 


585.6 


404.3 


181.3 


1.3 


33 


55,926.8 


670.6 


607.9 


62.7 


.1 


34 


32,928.9 


2,720.7 


2,342.1 


378.6 


1.2 


35 


46,076.8 


2,874.8 


2,223.4 


651.4 


1.4 


36 


39,429.2 


937.8 


7 93.5 


144.3 


.4 


37 


64,976.3 


854.7 


718.3 


136.4 


.2 


38 


8,759.5 


340.2 


263.3 


76.9 


.9 


39 plus 19 


16,928.6 


945.9 


651.6 


294.3 


1.7 



Note: Based on preliminary data. These values represent product shipments, irrespective of the 
industry in which the products were made, and therefore differ from the industry group totals shown in 
the General Summary tables . 

1 Estimates derived from administrative records. See text for further discussion. 



(2) Questionnaires were mailed to about 6,000 of the 
companies identified as having less than 10 employees. 
Part of these were the small companies included in the 
ASM sample; the rest were included in the mail canvass 
to improve the estimates of general statistics, products, 
and materials. 

(3) Some companies identified originally as having 10 
employees or more turned out to have less than 10 in 
1967. 

(4) Some companies identified originally as having less than 
10 employees were found to have been out of business 
in 1967. 

Another factor tended to reduce the value of products not 
specified by kind attributed to small companies, thus affecting 
tabel I particularly. This was the fact that some 4-digit industries 
were represented by only one product category (an example is 
industry 3273, Ready-Mixed Concrete). Administrative-record 
estimates for products such as this were treated as specific 
information and not tabulated under the "not specified by kind" 
heading. 

These factors taken together explain why the value of 
products "not specified by kind" attributed to small companies 
in table I is only 1 percent of the total, while the 157,000 



establishments with less than 10 employees account for 2.3 
percent of the total. 

The data for many of the specific 7-digit products shown in 
table 6A are understated. 



16. DUPLICATION 
OF PRODUCTS 



IN COST OF MATERIALS AND VALUE 



The aggregate of the cost of materials and value of shipments 
figures for industry groups and for all manufacturing industries 
includes large amounts of duplication since the products of some 
industries are used as materials by others. With some important 
exceptions, such as SIC 3312, Blast Furnaces and Steel Mills, this 
duplication is not significant within individual 4-digit industries. 
However, it is significant at the 2-digit and 3-digit industry level 
because these group totals often include industries which 
represent successive stages in the production of a finished 
manufactured product. Examples are the addition of flour mills 
to bakeries in the total value of shipments of SIC Major Group 
20 and the addition of pulpmills to papermills in Group 26. 
Economists have estimated that the value of manufactured 
products exclusive of such duplication— the value of finished 
manufactures— tends to approximate two-thirds of the total value 
of shipments reported in the census of manufactures. 



18 



Because the amounts of duplication contained in the cost of 
materials and value of products figures cannot be measured with 
any degree of precision, caution is urged with their use when 
they are provided at the 2- and 3-digit industry group level. 

Even where no significant amount of duplication is 
involved, value of shipments figures are of limited use as 
measures of the relative economic importance of individual 
manufacturing industries or geographic areas because of the wide 
variation in ratio of materials, labor, and other processing costs 
to value of shipments, both among industries and within the 
same industry. To a large extent, value added by manufacture 
does not have these limitations and is therefore a better measure 
for comparison. 



products and work-in-process inventories between the beginning 
and end of the year. 2 ] 

Value added avoids the duplication in the value of ship- 
ments figure which results from the inclusion of the shipments of 
establishments producing materials and components along with 
the shipments of establishments producing finished products. It 
does not exclude purchased business services, as does the national 
income concept described below. 2 2 Nevertheless, it is considered 
to be the best value measure now available for comparing the 
relative economic importance of manufacturing among industries 
and geographic areas. 



17. VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURE 

General.— Value added by manufacture is derived by subtracting 
the total cost of materials (including materials, supplies, fuel, 
electric energy, cost of resales, and miscellaneous receipts) from 
the value of shipments (including resales) and other receipts and 
adjusting the resulting amount by the net change in finished 



21 For a few industries (for example, aircraft, ship building) where value of work 
done is substituted for value of shipments, no adjustment is made for change in 
inventories. In a few other industries where value of production is collected, the 
inventory adjustment is made only on the basis of change in work-in-process 
inventories. 

22 Collection of data on the cost of purchased business services at the plant level 
presents many problems. Advertising by multiunit companies, for example, is 
frequently charged at the company level and the cost either not allocated, to plants or 
if allocated, only as part of a broader company overhead category. National income 
data, on the other hand, are compiled in part from company rather than plant data, 
such as the I RS Statistics of Income in which advertising is presented as a separate cost 
item based on company reports. 



TABLE J. Comparison of National Income Originating and Value Added by Major Industry Group: 1967 

(Billions of dollars) 



SIC 

code 



Industry group description 



National income 

originating 1 
(U 



Value added by 
manufacturing 
(2) 



Col. (1) divided 
by col. (2) 



20 
21 
22 

23 
26 
27 

28 
29 
30 
31 



24 
25 
32 

33 
34 
35 
36 



19 
37 

38 
39 



Manufacturing 

Nondurable goods 

Food and kindred products 

Tobacco manufactures 

Textile mill products 

Apparel and otber fabricated textile products 
Paper and allied products 

Printing, publishing, and allied industries.. 

Chemicals and allied products 

Petroleum refining and related industries.... 
Rubber and miscellaneous plastics products... 
Leather and leather products 

Durable goods 

Lumber and wood products, except furniture... 

Furniture and fixtures 

Stone, clay, and glass products 

Primary metal industries 

Fabricated metal products 

Machinery, except electrical 

Electrical machinery 

C Transportation equipment and ordnance, except 

< motor vehicles 

^ Motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment... 

Instruments 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 



195.2 



75.5 



119.7 



262.0 



109.5 



16.3 


26.6 


1.3 


2.0 


6.2 


8.2 


7.5 


10.1 


6.7 


9.8 


9.9 


14.4 


14.1 


23.6 


6.5 


5.4 


4.7 


6.8 


2.2 


2.6 



152.7 



4.2 


5.0 


3.2 


4.2 


5.8 


8.4 


15.3 


20.0 


13.4 


18.0 


21.8 


27.8 


18.6 


24.5 


15.3 
13.6 


| 33.8 


5.2 


6.4 


3.3 


4.6 



0.75 

.69 

.61 
.65 
.76 

.74 
.68 
.69 

.60 

1.20 

.69 

.85 



.78 

.84 
.76 
.69 

.77 

.74 
.78 
.76 



86 

.81 
.72 



'Source: Survey of Current Business, July 1970, 



19 



National income originating in the manufacturing sector, as 
developed in the national accounts maintained by the Office of 
Business Economics (OBE) is somewhat similar to value added in 
concept, but there are important differences. National income is 
the aggregate earnings of labor and capital which arise in the 
current production of goods and services in the manufacturing 
sector. Thus it measures the total factor costs incurred, and is a 
more "net" conception of value added than that which it has 
been found feasible to compile in the economic censuses, on an 
establishment basis. National income excludes, in addition to 
cost of materials, such other costs as depreciation charges. State 
and local taxes (other than corporate income taxes), allowance 
for bad debts, and purchases of services from nonmanufacturing 
enterprises, such as contract costs involved in maintenance and 
repair, services of development and research firms, services of 
engineering and management consultants, advertising, telephone 
and telegraph expense, insurance, royalties, patent fees, etc. 

In part, the national income estimates are prepared from 
company rather than establishment data. This method results in 
the inclusion of some part of the net value added by nonmanu- 
facturing establishments of companies classified as being pri- 
marily manufacturing, and conversely, in the exclusion of some 
part of the net value added by manufacturing establishments of 
companies classifed as primarily nonmanufacturing. It is believed 
that for manufacturing as a whole the net effect increases national 
income. In the Petroleum and Coal Products major industry 
group, nonmanufacturing activities of manufacturing companies 
are so significant that this is the one group in which national 
income exceeds value added, as shown in table J. 

Historical Comparison.— Whatever changes have taken place in 
the relative importance of the costs included in value added but 
excluded from national income have been gradual. As shown in 
table K, the ratio between the two figures has been fairly 
constant over the past decade, and the 1967 ratio is rather close 
to that for 1939. 



TABLE K. National Income Originating in Manufacturing and Value 
Added by Manufacture: 1939 to 1967 





(Billions of dollars) 




Year 


National income 
originating in 
manufacturing 


Value added by 
manufacture 


Col. (1) 

divided by 
col. (2) 




(1) 


(2) 




1967 


195.2 


262.0 


0.75 


1966 


191.5 


250.9 


.76 


1965 


172.6 


226.9 


.76 


1964 


155.6 


206.2 


.75 


1963 


143.8 


192.1 


.75 


1962 


137.0 


179.3 


.76 


1961 


125.1 


164.2 


.76 


1960 


125.8 


164.0 


.77 


1959 


124.0 


161.3 


.77 


1958 


107.7 


141.5 


.76 


1957 


116.3 


147.8 


.79 


1956 


113.1 


144.9 


.78 


1954 


94.6 


117.0 


.81 


1947 


59.5 


J 74. 3 


.80 


1939 


18.1 


x 24. 5 


.74 



Sources: National income, Survey of Current 
Business; value added, Census of Manufactures and 
Annual Survey of Manufactures. 

Unadjusted. 



Reconciliation with National Income Components.— Figures are 

not available to permit a reconciliation of the estimates for value 
added in manufacturing and the national income originating in 
manufacturing for the current period. However, in 1957, the 
Census Bureau conducted a special survey, MC-D11, "Selected 
Costs and Assets of Manufacturing Establishments," which 
collected information on some of the costs included in value 
added for services purchased from other sectors or excluded from 
the national income estimates. These specific costs which 
accounted for about $15 billion of the $148 billion of value 
added in 1957 were maintenance and repairs, $4.5 billion; 
insurance, $.7 billion; property taxes, $1.5 billion; rental 
payments, $1.4 billion; and depreciation, $7.3 billion. The 
residual value added, $132 billion, was approximately $16 billion 
in excess of national income of $1 16 billion. 

Table L presents an approximate reconciliation of national 
income and value added figures for manufacturing in 1957. The 
national income estimates for payrolls and other factor income in 
that year are based on the unrevised national income figures 
which are somewhat lower than the revised estimate appearing in 
table K. It should be noted that the labor costs included in 
national income and value added are reasonably close despite the 
fact that they are computed on a slightly different basis. If the 
proprietary and profit incomes of the company-based national 
income estimates are allocated to the establishments included in 
the census of manufactures, value added exceeds national income 
by $35 billion of which $15 billion is attributable to costs 
reported on survey MC-D11. Somewhat more than half of the 
$35 billion excess represents the inclusion in value added by 
manufacture of purchased business services arising in other 
economic sectors; the remainder reflects conceptual differences 
arising from the inclusion, in value added, of indirect business 
taxes and depreciation which are excluded by definition from 
national income. 



18. CAPITAL EXPENDITURES 

Under this heading, manufacturers were instructed to report 
expenditures of the type chargeable to fixed assets accounts, for 
which depreciation reserves are normally maintained. Actual 
capital outlays during the year were requested, not the final value 
of equipment put in place or structures completed during the 
year. 

The Census Bureau estimates of capital expenditures tend to 
be lower than those published in the joint Office of Business 
Economics-Securities and Exchange Commission survey. In 
addition to normal sampling variation, a major source of 
difference is to be found in the scope of the two series. Census 
data relate only to manufacturing establishments, whereas the 
OBE-SEC series covers all establishments of manufacturing 
companies— nonmanufacturing as well as manufacturing. This 
factor is particularly important in the petroleum industry where 
company expenditures for developing new wells and new 
distribution facilities are ordinarily much larger than their capital 
expenditures at refineries. On the other hand, manufacturing 
establishments of companies engaged primarily in nonmanu- 
facturing activities are excluded from the OBE-SEC series but 
included in census figures. The OBE-SEC and census data for 
recent years are shown in tables M and N. 

19. PLANT SPECIALIZATION 

As discussed in section 4 above, the primary products of a plant 
are those which determine its industry classification; all other 
products are referred to as secondary products. The value of a 
plant's primary products in comparison to its total production is 
referred to as its degree of specialization. For each plant, two 



20 



TABLE L. 1957 Comparative Statistics on Value Added and National Income in Manufacturing 

(Billions of dollars) 



Item 



Value added National income 1 



Total 

Pay ro lis 

Payrolls of operating manufacturing establishments 

Supplements to wages in operating manufacturing establishments 

Payrolls of central administrative offices and auxiliaries, sales 
branches and offices of manufacturing companies 

Other factor incomes (Corporate profits, proprietary income) 

Costs of manufacturing establishments reported on MC-D11 

Not part of national income: 

Depreciation 

Property taxes 

Probably included in other sectors : 

Maintenance and repairs 

Rental payments 

Insurance 

Other costs (company overhead other than payrolls included above; e.g., 
depreciation, business taxes, and services purchased at the company level, and 
services purchased directly by plants: advertising, legal, accounting, and 
other professional services; communications, patent fees, royalties, travel 
costs, etc 



147.8 


112.5 


89.4 


87.9 


76.4 


^ 


6.0 


1 2 80.6 




| 3 7.2 


4 7.0 


J 


24.6 


24.6 


15.4 


(X) 


7.3 


(x) 


1.5 


(x) 


4.5 


(x) 


1.4 


(x) 


.7 


(x) 



18.4 



(x; 



Standard notes: (X) Not applicable. 

■"■Prior to 1958 revisions of national income. The revised total was $116.3 billion. 2 Payrolls 
Supplements to wages. 4 Estimate based on figures reported in the 1958 economic censuses. 



TABLE M. Expenditures for New Plant and Equipment-OBE-SEC 
Series and Census: 1967 and Earlier Years 

(Billions of dollars) 



Year 


OBE-SEC 
series l 1 


Census 
(census of manu- 
factures and ASM) 


Col. (2) 

divided by 

col. (1) 




(1) 


(2) 




1967 


26.7 


2 21.4 


2 0. 80 


1966 


27.0 


20.2 


.75 


1965 


22.5 


16.6 


.74 


1964 


18.6 


13.3 


.72 


1963 


15.7 


11.4 


.73 


1962 


14.7 


10.0 


.68 


1961 


13.7 


9.8 


.72 


1960 


14.5 


10.0 


.69 


1959 


12.1 


9.3 


.77 


1958 


11.4 


9.6 


.84 


1954 


11.0 


8.2 


.74 


1 947 


8.7 


3 6.0 


.69 



1 Source: 1969 Business Statistics, Office of 
Business Economics, issued September 1969. 

2 Preliminary . 

3 Excludes data for establishments under construc- 
tion but not yet in operation. 



measures of specialization were computed: (1) A 4-digit primary 
product-specialization ratio, which is the sum of the values of all 
the plant's primary products divided by the sum of all its primary 
and secondary products; and (2) a 5-digit primary product-class 
specialization ratio, which is the sum of the largest 5-digit 
product-class value divided by the sum of its primary and 
secondary products (the miscellaneous receipts of the establish- 
ment were not included in these calculations). For example, 
assume that an establishment reported the following: 

Total value of shipments and other receipts $1,000 

Miscellaneous receipts (resales, etc.) 15 

Total value of products shipped 985 

32721 Concrete pipe products 100 

32722 Precast concrete products 785 
32730 Ready-mixed concrete 100 

This plant would be coded into SIC industry 3272, Concrete 
Products, with a primary product specialization ratio of 90 
percent ($885^985); it would be subclassified into the 5-digit 
class 32722, Precast Concrete, with a primary product class 
specialization ratio of 80 percent ($785^985). 

In the 1967 census, selected general statistics (number of 
establishments, employment, payrolls, value added, cost of 
materials, value of shipments, and capital expenditures) were 
tabulated to primary product-class levels by assigning the plant 
totals to the principal 5-digit codes. These data are presented in 
table 8 of the industry chapters, Volume II. For most product 



21 



TABLE N. Expenditures for New Plant and Equipment-OBE-SEC 
Series and Census of Manufactures, by Industry Group: 1967 



(Billions of dollars) 






Industry groups 


OBE- 

SEC 

series 

(1) 


Census 
of Manu- 
factures, 

1967 

(2) 


Column 

(2) 

divided by 

column 

(1) 






(prelim.) 


(prelim.) 


All manuf acturing, total. 


26.69 


21.44 


0.80 




13.70 


11.70 


.85 




3.21 
1.24 


3.03 
1.56 


.94 




1.26 


Machinery, except electric... 


2.95 


1.88 


.64 




2.75 
.73 


1.81 

.87 


.66 
1.19 




2.83 
13.00 


2.55 
9.72 


.90 


Nondurable goods, total.... 


.75 




1.41 

.89 

1.64 


1.73 

.74 
1.59 


1 .23 


Textiles 


.83 




.97 




2.88 


2.88 


1.00 




4.65 

.49 

1.04 


1.00 

.68 

1.10 


.22 




1.39 




1 .06 







Source: 1969 Business Statistics, Office of 
Business Economics, issued September 1969, and 
census of manufactures. 



classes, table 8 also provides general statistics for establishments 
specializing in the class to the extent of 75 percent or more. 

Table 8 permits analysis of an industry in terms of the 
differences introduced by variation among establishments in the 
degree of specialization in the products of the industry or a 
subgroup (5-digit). For example, where the ratios among various 
statistics tend to be different for establishments specializing to 
different degrees in the products of the industry or in different 
product classes, the ratios for the industry as a whole would be 
significantly affected by changes in its product mix. 



20. OPERATING RATIOS 

Since all of the data collected in the census on establishment 
reports are interrelated, comparisons of the various measures of 
activity are of considerable interest. Beginning with the 1963 
census, several ratios have been routinely computed and pre- 
sented in the industry chapters of Volume II. For 1967 and 
earlier years, the following nine ratios were published for each 
4-digit industry: 

Payroll per employee 

Production workers as percent of total employment 

Annual man-hours of production workers 

Average hourly earnings of production workers 

Cost of materials per dollar of shipments 

Cost of materials and payrolls per dollar of shipments 

Value added per employee 

Payrolls as percent of value added 

Value added per man-hour of production worker 



21. SUBJECT REPORTS SHOWN IN VOLUME I, SUMMARY 
AND SUBJECT STATISTICS 

Volume I includes 3 tables representing summaries of rearrange- 
ments of data appearing in the industry and area volumes, and 2 
special reports presenting statistics which are not published 
elsewhere. The contents of Volume I are as follows: 

Chapter 1. General Summary.— This chapter, which appears 
in other volumes as well as Volume I, provides summary 
tabulations of data presented in greater detail in other 
census tables. 

Chapter 2. Size of Establishments.— This chapter provides a 
summary of the general statistics by size of establishment 
which appear in table 4 of the industry chapters, Volume II. 
Also included are data on central administrative off ices and 
auxiliary establishments, classified by size. 

Chapter 3. Type of Organization.— This report presents data 
for manufacturing establishments classified as to the legal 
form of ownership (corporate, individual proprietor, or 
partnership) and as to whether the owner was a multiunit or 
single-unit company. 

Chapter 4. Manufacturers' Inventories.— These tables sum- 
marize the inventory data published in table 3 of the 
industry chapters, Volume II. A description of the statistics 
is given in appendix A. 

Chapter 5. Expenditures for Plant and Equipment— These 

tables summarize the expenditures data published in table 3 
of the industry chapters, Volume II. A description of the 
data is given in appendix A and in section 18, "Capital 
Expenditures." 

Chapter 6. Materials Consumed.— This chapter consists of a 
compilation of detailed statistics on consumption of mate- 
rials, fuels, and electricity. These figures also appear in 
Volume II, Industry Statistics, as tables 7A and 7B. 

Chapter 7. Water Use in Manufacturing.— This report 
presents the results of a survey of the 1968 consumption of 
water in establishments consuming 20 million gallons or 
more annually. A more detailed description of the report 
and definitions of the terms employed, is given in the 
introduction to chapter 7. 

Chapter 8. Selected Metalworking Operations.— This report 
presents the results of an inquiry concerning employment in 
metalworking plants such as foundry, forge shop, die casting 
department, heat treating, etc. The number of establish- 
ments in which these facilities are operated is presented, as 
well as the number of production workers engaged. 

Chapter 9. Concentration Ratios.— This special report 
presents concentration ratios and other information on the 
share of industrial activity accounted for by the largest 
companies, both for the United States as a whole and for 
each of the 420 manufacturing industries. A more detailed 
description of the report, and explanations of the terms 
employed, is given in the introduction to chapter 9. 

Chapter 10. Manufacturing Activity in Government 
Establishments.— This special report presents data on manu- 
facturing activities in selected types of government estab- 
lishments in the United States. The statistics are not 
included in other census of manufactures tables, which cover 
only privately operated establishments. A more detailed 
description of the report is given in the introduction to 
chapter 10. 



22 



22. CONFIDENTIALITY 

The Bureau of the Census is prohibited by law from publishing 
any statistics that disclose information reported by individual 
companies. In suppressing figures to avoid disclosing information 
of individual companies, geographic region and division totals are 
given precedence over individual States; States are given prece- 
dence over standard metropolitan statistical areas; standard 
metropolitan statistical areas over counties; and counties over 
cities. In tables showing industry detail, major industry group 
(2-digit) totals take preference over industry group (3-digit) 
totals which, in turn, take precedence over individual (4-digit) 
industries. Similarly, in product tables, 4-digit product groupings 
take precedence over 5-digit product classes and the latter over 
individual 7-digit products. 



Such order of precedence was used because (1) it was 
considered preferable to show regional data for an industry, even 
at the cost of withholding data for another (usually the least 
significant) State in a region, rather than to show all publishable 
data for the individual States and group the disclosure States 
throughout the United States in an "all other" category as was 
done in the 1939 and earlier censuses; and (2) by giving 
preference to industry-group statistics over individual industries 
within each State, the extent to which individual States can be 
compared within the SIC industry classification framework is 
greatly increased. 



23. ABBREVIATIONS 

The following abbreviations and symbols occur frequently in text, 
tables, and footnotes: 



— 


Zero 


X 


Not applicable 


NA 


Not available 


n.e.c. 


Not elsewhere classified 


n.s.k. 


Not specified by kind 


lin. 


Linear 


equiv. 


Equivalent 


hp 


Horsepower 


kw.-hrs. 


Kilowatt-hours 


D 


Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individ 




ual companies 


SIC 


Standard Industrial Classification 


IRS 


Internal Revenue Service 


SSA 


Social Security Administration 


ASM 


Annual Survey of Manufactures 


CIR 


Current Industrial Reports 


OBE 


Office of Business Economics 


SEC 


Securities and Exchange Commission 



Other abbreviations, such as lb., gal., yd., doz., and bbl., are used 
in the customary sense. Where the term "tons" only is used, it 
refers to short tons of 2,000 pounds; where the figures are 
expressed in tons of 2,240 pounds, the unit of measure is 
specified as "long tons" or "gross tons." 



23 



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24 



General Summary Tables 



page 

Table 1. General Statistics for Operating Manufacturing Establishments: 1967 and Earlier Years 26 

2. Manufacturing Employment: 1967, 1963, and 1958 27 

3. General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 1967 and 

1963 28 

4. Selected Statistics on Central Administrative Offices and Auxiliaries, by Major 

Industry Groups of Establishments Serviced: 1967 44 

5. Detailed Statistics by Industry Groups: 1967 45 

6. Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958 . 48 

7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years .... 62 



25 



26 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table i. General Statistics for Operating Manufacturing Establishments: 1967 and Earlier Years 



Year 



iy<5 7. 

19b6'' 
1965' 
196-1° 
L963. 
1962° 
I96t p 
1960° 
1959° 
1958 7 



;G 



1957 

1936 

195S C 

195-1. 

1953° 

I952 e 

1951 G 

19SO c 

19-!9 G 

19-17, 

1939 

1937. 

1935. 
1933. 
1931. 
1929. 
1927 . 
1925, 
1923. 
1921, 
1919. 
1914. 
1909. 
1904. 



1899. 
1899 l 
1889. 
1879. 
1869. 
1859. 
1849. 



Establishments 


Proprietors 


All cmp loyees ' 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 


Capital 
expendi- 


Index of 
















industrial 
production 5 


Total 


With 20 
employees 


and 
partners 


Number" 


Payroll 


Number 2 


Man-hours 


Wages 


manufac- 
ture 3 


tures, 
new 4 




or more 






(million 






(million 


(million 


(million 


1957-1959= 


(number) 


(number) 


(number) 


(1.000) 


dollars) 


(1,000) 


(millions) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


100 


305.680 


107 . 138 


(NA) 


18 .492.0 


123 180.6 


13.955.3 


27.837.6 


81.393.6 


261 983.8 


21 503.0 


158 


i NA ! 


NA) 


:NA) 


18.200.3 


117 157.4 


13.826.5 


28.102.5 


78,256.4 


250.880. 1 


20,235,8 


156 


,NA) 


(NA) 


'NA) 


17 250.5 


106 .643.2 


13.076.0 


26, j67.8 


71.361.5 


226,939.9 


16,615.0 


143 


MA) 


NA) 


NA ) 


16 ,485. 7 


98.085.3 


12,403.3 


25.245.5 


65,838.9 


206.193.6 


13.294,3 


132 


306.617 


99.352 


168.6 74 


16.231. 9 


93 .283.3 


12.232.0 


24 .509.4 


62.093.6 


192,082.9 


1 1 .370.0 


124 


NA) 


NA) 


NA ) 


16. 154, 7 


89.819.2 


12, 126. 5 


24,269,5 


59.134. 1 


179.071. 1 


10.436. 2 


118 


NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


15.729.6 


83,677.4 


11 .778. 5 


23 ,289.4 


54,764.6 


164.281. 1 


9. 779. 8 


110 


NA) 


'NA) 


NA ) 


16. 149.9 


83.672. 5 


12.209.5 


24.174.4 


55,555,5 


163.998. 5 


10,097. 8 


109 


NA) 


.NA ) 


,NA) 


16.062.9 


8 1 . 203 . 6 


12,272.6 


24.443.6 


54.714. 1 


161.535.8 


9,140,0 


106 


299 .017 


95 .278 


185.732 


15.423. 1 


73.875.2 


1 1 .681. 1 


22,679,2 


19.605.2 


141 .540.6 


9, 543. 5 


94 


NA) 


NA) 


NA ! 


16 .621. 1 


76.314.6 


12.838.9 


25,208.0 


52 ,569.0 


14 7,838.4 


12. 144 .0 


101 


,NA) 


- NA ) 


NA) 


16 ,69 1 . 1 


74.015.1 


13. 131.3 


26.088. 5 


..2.040.8 


144 ,909.3 


1 1 .233.2 


100 


.NA ) 


NA) 


.nA ) 


16 . 335 . 5 


69,096.6 


12. 95-1.-1 


25.898.3 


49.217.9 


135.022. 5 


8.233. 1 


97 


286.814 


90.4 70 


197.850 


15,64 5.5 


62.962. 7 


12,372.0 


24 , 334 . 1 


44,590.5 


117.032.3 


8,200. 7 


86 


285 .000 


.NA) 


NA) 


16.693. 1 


66.492.9 


13. 500.9 


27,065.6 


48.979. 1 


121.659.1 


8.047.9 


91 


26 7.000 


-NA) 


NA ) 


15. 732. 7 


59,598. 2 


12. 706.0 


25,617.6 


43,763.6 


109, 162. 1 


7.883.4 


84 


262 .000 


l.NA) 


INA) 


15,309.6 


54, 741 , 5 


12.508.9 


25.263.8 


40.654.8 


102.085.8 


7. 781 . 7 


81 


260.000 


(NA) 


I NA ) 


14.467. 1 


46 .642.8 


11 .778.8 


23, 716.5 


34 ,600.0 


89.749.8 


5 , 04 1 , 3 


75 


NA ) 


-AN) 


MA ) 


13. 566. 9 


41 . 182.0 


11 .016.3 


21 .769.7 


30,254,0 


75.366. 5 


5,066.9 


65 


24 .807 


(NA) 


188 .948 


14 .294.0 


39.695.6 


11 .917,9 


24 ,316.5 


30.244.0 


74.290.5 


5,998.1 


66 


173.802 


(NA) 


D l23.6^j 


I0 9.527.3 


■-12.706. 1 


7.808.2 


(NA) 


8.997. 5 


24 ,487.3 


(NA) 


38 


166.794 


NA) 


99 .268 


9. 786.4 


12.829.7 


8.569.2 


(NA) 


10. 112. 9 


25.173.5 


(NA) 


40 


167 .916 


NA 


81 .521 


8.262 .3 


9.564 .8 


7 .203.8 


NA 


7.311 .3 


18.552.6 


na; 


31 


139.325 


NA : 


72 .267 


' '6 .557 .9 


''6.237 .8 


5,787 .6 


MA 1 


4.940.1 


14 ,007 .5 


NA . 


24 


171 . 150 


NA 


NA 


NA 


NA 


6, 163. 1 


NA l 


6 ,688,5 


18.600.5 


NA 


27 


206 .663 


NA 


132 .686 


9.659.7 


14 .284 .3 


8.369.7 


NA ,' 


10.884.9 


30.591 .4 


NA ) 


38 


187 .629 


NA 


132 . 151 


9.072.1 


13 . 123 . 1 


7.848.1 


NA ) 


10,099.5 


26 ,325 .4 


NA i 


33 


183.877 


NA 


132.971 


9. 1-12.4 


12.957.7 


7.871.4 


' NAj 


9,979.6 


25.667 .6 


NA ) 


32 


192.096 


NA ) 


147 .958 


9.4 74.7 


12.996.5 


8, 194 .2 


(NA) 


10. 148.6 


24 ,569.5 


(MA) 


30 


192.059 


NA) 


172 . 291 


7.557.4 


9.870. 2 


6,475.5 


IMA) 


7.451.3 


17,252.8 


NA) 


20 


270.231 


(NA) 


249 865 


9.836.8 


12.426.9 


8.464.9 


' NA ) 


9,664.0 


23 841.6 


(NA) 


25 


268.436 


(NA) 


258.560 


7.514. 2 


5 016.0 


6,602.3 


(MA) 


3.782.3 


9,385.6 


MA) 


(NA) 


264 810 


NA) 


272.421 


7.021. 1 


1 105.5 


6,261.7 


(NA) 


3.205,2 


8.160.1 


NA) 


'MA) 


213. 1 14 


(NA) 


225. 1.15 


5,674.9 


2 . 990 . 9 


5.181.7 


l.NA) 


2.440.9 


6,019.2 


(NA) 


NA) 


204 .754 


.NA) 


(NA) 


4 .850, 


2.258.7 


4,501.9 


NA) 


1 . 892.6 


4 .647. 


MA) 


(NA) 


509.490 


.NA) 


iNA) 


5.478.3 


2 ,595.6 


5,097.6 


(NA) 


2,206,5 


5,4 74.9 


NA) 


(NA) 


353.864 


NA) 


(NA) 


4 . 586 . 5 


2.209. 1 


4. 129.4 


(NA) 


1,820.9 


4 . 102.3 


.NA) 


(MA) 


253.852 


1 NA ) 


NA) 


INA) 


(NA) 


2. 732.6 


(MA) 


948.0 


1.972.8 


; MA) 


(MA) 


252. 148 


NA! 


NA) 


NA! 


NA ) 


2.054.0 


(NA) 


620. 5 


1,395.1 


(MA) 


(NA) 


140,433 


1 MA) 


, NA ) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


1.311.2 


(NA) 


378.9 


854.3 


INA) 


(MA) 


123.025 


NA) 


(NA) 


iNA) 


(NA) 


957.1 


(NA) 


236.8 


464.0 


I'NA) 


(MA) 



Mote: See appendix A for an explanation of terms used. 

Standard Motes: - Represents zero. Dl Withhold to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. N'A) Not available. X) Not applicable. 

'The figures for 1939 to 1967 include data for employees at manufacturing- establishments who were engaged in distribution and in construction work. 
The extent to which data for such employees were Included in the figures for earlier years is not known. In addition to the employment and payroll 
tor operating manuf acturir.g establishments. ma"n tacturing concerns ordinarily reported separately for central administrative offices or auxiliary units 

e.g.. research laboratories, storage warehouses, power plants, garages, repair shops, etc.) which service the manufacturing establishment (s ) of a 
company, rhe.se figures were collected by the Bureau of the Census tor 1967. 1963, 1958, and 1954. Ihe data for 1967. 1963. and 1958 are shown in table 2. 

"'The method of compiling these figures has varied, as follows: All employees: for 1955-1967, figures represent the average of the number of prod- 
uction workers for the payroll period ended nearest the 15th of March. May, August and November, plus all other employees for the payroll period ended 
nearest the 15th of ..(arch ; for 1949-1954. they represent an average of all employees for the payroll period ended nearest the 15th of March. May, 
August, and November; for 1947, an average of 12 monthly figures for all employees; and for 1939 and prior years, the average number of production 
workers (-.ased on 12 monthly figures, plus the number of nonproduc t ion workers for one payroll period (usually in October). Production workers : for 
1949-1963. figures are based on employment for the payroll period ended nearest the 15th of March, May, August, and November; and for 1947 and prior 
years, they represent the average of 12 monthly figures. 

3 For the period 1954 to 1967 value added by manufacture represents adjusted value added and for earlier years, unadjusted value added. Unadjusted 
value added is obtained by subtracting the cost of materials, supplies and containers, fuel, purchased electric energy, and contract work from the 
value of shipments for products manufactured plus receipts for services rendered. Adjusted value added also takes into account (a) value added by 
merchandising operations (that is, the difference between the sales value and cost of merchandise sold without further manufacture, processing, or 
assembly), plus (b) the net change in finished goods and work-in-process inventories between the beginning and end of the year. For 1849-1933, cost 
of contract work was not subtracted from value of shipments in calculating value added by manufacture. 

'the t igures for 1951 to 1967 include expenditures for plants under cons t ruct ion and not yet in ope rat ion. 1 his informal ion was not collected prior to 1951 . 

5 Based on current Federal Reserve Board bulletins. 

e These figures represent estimates derived from a representative sample of manufacturing establishments canvassed in the annual survey of manufac- 
tures. These estimates, therefore, may differ from the results that would have been obtained from a complete canvass of all manufacturing establish- 
ments. The standard errors associated with these estimates are published in the annual survey of manufactures volumes for this period. 

7 The 1958 and subsequent years figures include establishments classified in industry 3273, Ready Mixed Concrete, and establishments classified in 
industry 3599, Miscellaneous Machinery, that were engaged exclusively or almost exclusively in machine shop repair work. The data for such establish- 
ments are excluded from the figures for the period 1939 to 1957, but are included for 1929 and earlier years. The 1954 to 1967 figures include data 
for establishments engaged in the processing and distribution of fluid milk, industry group 202, dairies. These establishments were not included in 
the figures for earlier census years. In addition, beginning with 1954, the figures include data for Logging Camps and Contractors, industry 2411, 
which were not included within the scope of the 1947 census. There were also a number of changes in the definition of manufacturing industries during 
earlier census years that affect the comparability of the historical series. Among the more important of these were the following: Figures for 1935 
and later years exclude data for railroad repair shops and manufactured gas which were included in 1899 to 1933 figures; the minimum size of estab- 
lishment included for 1947 to 1967 was 1 employee; for 1921 to 1939, manufacturing establishments reporting value of shipments of $5,000 or more were 
within scope whereas for 1919 and earlier years the cutoff was $500. (These changes in procedure have not appreciably affected the comparability of 
the historical data except for the figures on number of establishments.) 

The figures for 1939, but not for earlier years, have been revised on the basis of retabulation of the returns to exclude data for establishments 
classified as manufacturing in 1939 and prior years but classified as nonmanuf acturing beginning with 1947. Value added by manufacture for 1939, 
prior to revision and on a basis comparable with 1937 and previous years, was $24.7 billion. 

"Not revised to exclude da ta f or es labl ishmen ts classified as manufacturing in 1939 and prior years but classified as nonmanuf acturing beginning with 1947 . 
10 The 1939 figures for "all employees" were revised on the basis of estimates rather than by retabulation of the 1939 reports. The estimates 
were made in the following manner: for number of employees, by multiplying the retabulated figure for number of production workers by the ratio of 
all employees to production workers computed from the unrevised 1939 statistics; for salaries and wages, by multiplying the retabulated wage figure 
by the ratio for salaries and wages also derived from the unrevised 1939 statistics. 

Mot including data for salaried officers of corporations and their salaries and, therefore, not strictly comparable with figures for other years. 
These figures for 1899 and earlier years represent hand and neighborhood manufacturing operations. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



27 



table 2 Manufacturing Employment: 1967, 1963, and 1958 



Code 



Major industry group 



Year 



All establishments 



Employees 
(1J0OO) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices 
and auxiliaries 



Employees 
1 1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



All industries, total. 



Food and kindred products. 



Tobacco manufactures. 



Textile mill products. 



Apparel and other textile products. 



Lumber and wood products . 



Furniture and fixtures . 



Paper and allied products . 



Printing and publishing. 



Chemicals and allied products. 



Petroleum and coal products . 



Rubber and plastics products, n.e.c. 



Leather and leather products . 



Stone, clay, and glass products . 



Primary metal industries. 



Fabricated metal products , 



Machinery, except electrical. 



Electrical equipment and supplies. 



Transportation equipment. 



Instruments and related products. 



Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 
and ordnance and accessories 



1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 1 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 1 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 

1958 



19,322.9 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 

1,725.9 
1,714.6 
1,781.4 

83.1 
83.8 
92.0 

954.0 
883.1 
918.6 

1,37 2.9 
1,290.5 
1,188.5 

561.7 
568.7 
591.0 

430.0 
381.2 
357.2 

670.7 
613.8 
573.6 

1,052.1 
9 25.1 
871.7 

982.7 
853.1 
783.9 

210.7 
219 .9 
247 .4 

531.0 
426.7 
356.1 

336.6 
335 .0 
358.5 

620.6 
602.8 
574.8 



329.1 
167.0 
129.5 

375.1 
110.6 
090.3 

929 .4 
520.6 
385.8 

980.6 
612.2 
218.6 

935.5 
689.7 
641 .9 

409.6 
316.4 
293.8 

831.6 
645.8 
569.5 



132,208.5 
99,898.8 
78,348.9 

10,841.5 
9,233.9 
8,064.4 

451.2 
381.3 
341.7 



610.6 
538.0 
043.1 

722.2 
508.8 
637.7 

872.6 
385.4 
042.2 

305.1 

767 .1 
436.0 

786.7 
746.4 
9 20.9 

323.5 
611.5 
533.9 

932.1 
013.6 
604.5 

960.5 
762.9 
655.9 

421.8 
470.8 
785.5 

518.2 
278.0 
192.2 

133.8 
462.5 
754.0 

395.7 
149.0 
600.3 

670.0 
644.0 
634.2 

930.2 
146.6 
577.6 

106.5 
207 .1 
323.4 

342.4 
7 35.6 
793.2 

980.8 
010.4 
564.0 

903.5 
851.3 
838.6 



18,492.3 
16,231.9 
15,423.1 

1,649.6 
1,643.1 
1,718.1 

75.1 
77 .3 
84.5 

929.0 
863.2 
903.2 

1,356.7 
1,279 .5 
1,181 .0 

554.0 
563.1 
585.4 

425.3 
376.5 
354.2 

638.9 
588.0 
551.3 

1,031.0 
913.2 
864.6 

841.4 
737.4 
69 8.3 

141.6 
153.5 
179.1 

516.7 
415.0 
347 .8 

328.7 
327 .5 
349.2 

589.9 
573.9 
552.5 



281.0 
126.5 
091.9 

341.8 
082.1 
060.5 

864.5 
459.4 
350.3 

874.9 

511 .8 
140.8 



834. 
601 
562 

394 
305 
286 



823.5 
639.3 
560.5 



123,480.6 
93,283.3 
73,875.2 

10,076.8 
8,637.2 
7,622.3 

376.8 
330.5 
294.6 



390.9 
385 .0 
942.9 

582.2 
423.0 
586.6 

798.9 
338.7 
007.5 

258.3 
726.7 
413.7 

436.2 
508.2 
759.4 

151.5 
514.8 
489.2 

443.0 
969.8 
940.5 

216.1 
133.8 

116.7 

286.5 
364.0 
723.3 

458.8 
227.8 
146.0 

825.5 
212.5 
586.4 

850.9 
7 34.1 
280 .5 

319 .5 
387.5 
425.3 

226.3 
571.0 
314.3 

968.0 
284.3 
755.2 

173.7 
858.2 
185.7 

821.6 
912.5 
509.5 

819.4 
794.5 
770.1 



830.9 
726.5 
602.1 

76.3 
71.5 
63.3 

8.0 
6.5 
7.5 

25.0 
19.9 
15.4 

16.2 

11.0 

7 .5 

7 .7 
5.6 
5.7 

4.7 
4.7 
3.0 

31.8 
25.8 
22.3 

21.1 

11.8 
7 .1 

141.3 

115.7 

85.6 

69.1 
66.4 
68.3 

14.3 

11.8 

8.3 

7.9 
7.6 
9.3 

30.7 
28.9 
22.3 



29.8 

64.9 
61.2 
35.5 

105.7 

100.4 

77.8 

101.4 
88.6 

79.4 

15 .3 

11 .0 

7.4 

8.1 
9.2 
9 .0 



8,727 


.9 


6,615 


.5 


4,47 3 


.7 


764 


.7 


596 


.8 


442 


.1 


74 


.4 


50 


.8 


47 


.1 


219 


.7 


152 


.9 


100 


.2 


140 


.0 


85 


.8 


51 


.2 


73 


.7 


46 


.7 


34 


.8 


46 


.8 


40 


.4 


22 


.3 


350 


.5 


238 


2 


161 


.5 


172 


.0 


96 


.7 


44 


.6 


1,489 


.1 


1,043 


.8 


664 


.0 


744 


.4 


629 


.1 


539 


.2 


135 


.3 


106 


.7 


62 


.2 


59 


.4 


50 


.2 


46 


.2 


308 


.3 


250 


.0 


167 


.6 


544 


8 


414 


8 


319 


8 


350 


5 


256 


5 


208 


9 


703 


9 


575 


6 


263 


4 


1,138 


5 


9 22 


9 


568 


2 


1,168 


7 


877 


4 


607 


5 


159 


2 


98 





54 


5 


84 


1 


82 


3 


68 


4 



Note: See appendix A for explanation of terms uaea. 

The 1967,1963, and most of the 1958 figures represent data for establishments located in the conterminous United States, Alaska, and Hawaii. How- 
ever when the 195S figures were previously published they did not include data for Alaska and Hawaii since these areas did not achieve statehood until 
1959. The addition of the 1958 Alaska and Hawaii figures to the previously published figures for major industry groups 26 and 29 would have resulted 
in a disclosure. Therefore the 1958 Alaska and Hawaii data are excluded from these major groups but are included at the "all industries" level. 



28 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967 



Companies 



(number) 



Establishments 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 

(number) 



All employees 



Number 



(1,000) 



Production workers 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Number 



(1,000) 



(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 

(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



20 
21 
22 
23 

24 

25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

30 
31 
32 
33 

34 

35 
36 
37 
38 
39 



20 

201 
2011 
2013 
2015 

202 

2021 

2022 

2023 

2024 

2026 

203 

2031 

2032 

2033 

2034 

2035 

2036 

2037 

204 

2041 

2042 

2043 

2044 

2045 

2046 

205 

2051 

2052 

206 
2061 
2062 
2063 

207 
2071 
2072 
2073 

208 

2082 
2083 
2084 
2085 
2086 
2087 

209 

2091 
2092 
2093 
2094 
2095 
2096 
2097 
2098 
2099 



ALL MFG. ESTABS. INCL. C.A.O. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES 

TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS 

APPARELl OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS, i 
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS 

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES 

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS 

PRINTING AND PUBLISHING 

CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS. . . 
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS. . . . 

RUBBER AND PLASTICS PRODUCTS i NEC. 
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS . . . 
STONE. CLAY. AND GLASS PRODUCTS. . 

PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES 

FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS 

MACHINERY. EXCEPT ELECTRICAL . . . 
ELECTRICAL EQUIP. AND SUPPLIES . . 

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT 

INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS . 
MISC. MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES . . 



ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES 3 . . 
ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUXILIARY" 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. 



MEAT PRODUCTS 

MEATPACKING PLANTS 

SAUSAGES AND OTHER PREPARED MEATS. 
POULTRY DRESSING PLANTS 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 

CREAMERY BUTTER 

CHEESE. NATURAL AND PROCESSED. 
CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK. 
ICE CREAM AND FROZEN DESSERTS. 
FLUID MILK 



CANNED! CUREDi AND FROZEN FOODS, 
CANNED AND CUkED SEAFOODS. .... 

CANNED SPECIALTIES i 

CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES . . , 

DEHYDRATED FOOD PRODUCTS 

PICKLES. SAUCES. AND SALAD DRESSINGS 
FRESH OR FROZEN PACKAGED FISH. . , 
FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES . . 



GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 

FLOUR AND OTHER GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 
PREPARED FEEDS FOR ANIMALS AND FOWLS 

CEREAL PREPARATIONS 

RICE MILLING 

BLENDED AND PREPARED FLOUR 7 . . . 
WET CORN MILLING 



BAKERY PRODUCTS • 

BREAD. CAKE. AND RELATED PRODUCTS. 
COOKIES AND CRACKERS 



SUGAR 

RAW CANE SUGAR . . . 
CANE SUGAR REFINING. 
BEET SUGAR 



CONFECTIONERY AND RELATED PRODUCTS 

CONFECTIONERY PRODUCTS 

CHOCOLATE AND COCOA PRODUCTS . . . . 
CHEWING GUM 



BEVERAGES 

MALT LIQUORS 

MALT 

WINES. BRANDY. AND BRANDY SPIRITS. 
DISTILLED LIQUOR. EXCEPT BRANDY. . 
BOTTLED AND CANNED SOFT DRINKS . . 
FLAVORING EXTRACTS AND SIRUPS. NEC 

MISC. FOODS AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 

COTTONSEEO OIL MILLS 

SOYBEAN OIL MILLS 

VEGETABLE OIL MILLS. NEC 

ANIMAL AND MARINE FATS AND OILS. . 

ROASTED COFFEE 

SHORTENING AND COOKING OILS. . . . 

MANUFACTURED ICE 

MACARONI AND SPAGHETTI 

FOOD PREPARATIONS. NEC 



26 749 

209 

5 773 

24 500 

35 57 3 

9 518 

3 913 

36 431 
8 556 
1 200 

5 624 

3 262 
13 044 

5 5 38 

25 262 

36 008 
8 799 

6 563 

4 020 
13 6!4 

324 
( NA) 



4 492 
2 529 

1 294 

709 

5 141 
510 
891 
179 
713 

2 988 

2 800 
268 

150 
930 
134 
479 
463 
495 



32 


518 


13 


514 




329 




195 


7 


080 


4 


453 


26 


393 


12 


705 


36 


795 


5 


803 


10 


008 


3 


449 


5 


890 


3 


812 


37 


989 


8 


035 


11 


799 


4 


348 


1 


880 




704 


6 


4j6 


3 


122 


3 


685 


1 


967 


15 


580 


4 


911 


6 


837 


4 


082 


27 


418 


10 


742 


37 


892 


10 


627 


10 


706 


5 


57 2 


7 


483 


3 


354 


4 


45 3 


1 


614 


14 


072 


3 


845 




417 




285 


5 


460 


3 


119 



32 518 

4 91" 

S 2 697 

1 374 

843 

6 188 
540 

1 026 
291 
850 

3 481 

3 528 
320 

175 
1 223 
178 
527 
497 
608 



2 463 


3 


202 


438 




541 


1 835 


5 2 


355 


30 




45 


54 




68 


126 




"148 


32 




45 


3 720 


4 


390 


3 445 


4 


042 


286 




348 


93 




182 


61 




83 


22 




J 34 


15 




65 


1 128 


1 


240 


1 091 


1 


183 


27 




34 


19 




23 


3 827 


4 


37 6 


125 




185 


32 




43 


175 




205 


70 




112 


3 057 


3 


400 


401 




J 431 


3 569 


4 


498 


91 




150 


60 




102 


34 




41 


477 




588 


206 




268 


63 




115 


688 




947 


190 




205 


1 824 


2 


082 



2 029 
955 
560 
514 

2 506 

138 
238 

169 

325 

1 636 

1 843 
161 
83 
7 32 
81 
182 
241 
36 3 

1 087 

213 
721 
28 
46 
56 
23 

1 808 

1 608 
200 

162 
74 
27 
61 

463 

424 

23 

16 

2 144 
150 

30 

68 

95 

1 691 

110 

1 472 
112 

78 

18 
226 
126 

92 
109 

75 
636 



! 6 49.6 
75. 1 

929.0 
1 356.7 

554.0 

425.3 
638.9 
! 031.0 
84! .4 
141.6 

516.7 

328.7 

589.9 

! 28 ! . 

I 341.8 

1 864.5 

! 874.9 

1 834.1 

394.3 

423. 1 

400.4 
830.9 



310. 1 

170.5 

54.4 

85.2 

231.7 

8.7 

20.0 

13.2 

24.6 

165.2 

259.9 

15.8 
27.2 
100.1 
11.1 
19.8 
21.4 
64.5 

111.8 
20.5 
53.3 
)2.2 
4.2 
7.5 
14.1 



264, 

221. 

42, 



83.1 

67.9 

8.4 

6.8 

220.7 

59.6 

2.0 

6.8 

19.4 

123.3 

9.7 



137, 

5, 



1.7 
13.7 
16.3 
15.0 
7.9 
7.5 
61.6 



10 076. S 
376.8 

4 390.9 

5 582.2 
2 798.9 

2 258.3 
4 436.2 
7 151.5 

6 443.0 
1 216.1 

3 286.5 
1 458.8 
3 825.5 
9 85C.9 
9 319.5 

14 226.3 

12 968.0 



173.7 
821.6 
291.0 

528.4 
727.9 



1 953.5 

1 258.1 

378.4 

317.1 

1 449.3 

45.4 

103.6 

83.4 

156.4 

1 060.5 

1 231.1 
69. ! 

157.3 

473.8 
58.0 

100.5 
77.2 

295.2 

758.2 

142.9 

325.9 

93.8 

24.4 

55.0 

116.1 

1 664.8 
1 414.0 
250. 8 ! 

209.6 
48.5 
92.7 
68.4 

434.2 

338.7 

53.9 

41.6 

1 525.4 

519.7 

17.1 

47.3 

141.6 

726.7 

73.0 

850.7 
26.5 
54.9 
10.8 
91.3 

119.5 

113.2 
38.0 
43.2 

353.3 



1 121.7 
66.2 

828.2 
1 20C.4 

495.7 

357.5 
507.7 
631.6 
541.4 
99.4 

410.1 

293.3 

46 9.3 

1 041.5 

! 056.9 

1 349.0 
1 323.8 
1 336.5 

265.9. 

344.4 

214.8 



246.9 


130.8 


40.4 


77.7 


107.3 


6.4 


16.6 


10.0 


13.8 


60.5 


226.7 


14.0 


22.4 


88.9 


9.4 


16.2 


19.4 


56.4 


77.9 


14.8 


34.6 


10.1 


3.2 


5.5 


9.8 


159.6 


125.3 


34.2 


24.9 


6.2 


8.7 


10. 1 


68.7 


57.1 


6.6 


4.9 


113.5 


40.0 


1.5 


4.3 


15.6 


46.6 


5.5 


94.3 


4.2 


5.5 


1.4 


9.5 


9.4 


10.5 


5.4 


5.4 


42.9 



2 259.4 
125.5 

1 689.7 

2 178.6 
977.0 

7 15.7 
1 07 1 .2 
1 196.1 

1 086 . 1 
202. 1 

815.5 
549.2 
946.4 

2 088V7 

2 160.9 

2 785.0 

2 611.3 

2 745.6 

5 30.2 

662.0 

439.4 



508.0 

274. 1 

84.0 

149.9 

222.1 

13.9 
33.9 
20 



27.2 


126.4 


435.9 


23.6 


45.0 


174.0 


18. 1 


3! .7 


32.8 


110.7 


167.5 


33.2 


75.3 


20.2 


7.2 


11.3 


20.3 


320. 1 


252.3 


67.8 


53.5 


14.5 


18.7 


20.3 


132.4 


109.3 


13.4 


9.7 


226.8 


76.8 


3. 1 


8.6 


31.9 


95.3 


11 .0 



193. 1 
9.4 
12.2 
3. 1 
21.7 
19.0 
22.7 
10.4 
! 1 .0 
83.7 



6 062.6 
303.6 

3 556.6 

4 340.6 

2 290.6 

1 653.7 

3 205.5 

4 011.3 
3 555.2 

786.4 

2 312.5 

1 '47.0 

2 784.1 

7 457.3 

6 541.6 

9 2 36.1 

7 607.0 
9 918.2 
1 569.0 
1 552.5 

1 502.2 



435. 1 
920.8 
250.8 
263.5 

604.5 
31.3 
80.0 
59.3 
77.2 

356.7 

952.3 

54.8 

115. 1 

376.0 

44.0 

72.0 

60.0 

230.4 



26 620.9 
2 032.0 

8 153.2 
10 064.4 

4 973.4 

4 169.5 

9 756.3 
14 355.1 

23 5',0. 1 

5 425.8 

6 799.5 
2 626.5 
8 333.4 

19 978.2 
18 042.6 

27 836.4 

24 487.3 

28 173.9 
6 418.4 

4 599.4 

5 587.8 



3 551.0 

2 220.5 
742.5 
588.0 

3 466.4 
113.2 
226.5 
37 3 . 1 
403.0 

2 350.7 



588.2 
6 181.0 



602 

B l 413 

167 

s 295 

6 164 

6 763 



480. 1 


2 881.9 


95.5 


491 .3 


187. ! 


1 226.8 


71.9 


473.3 


15.0 


103.8 


35.4 


233. 1 


75.2 


353.6 


89! .5 


3 494.6 


710.8 


2 753.0 


180.7 


741 .6 


160.9 


652.0 


35.4 


133.8 


69.2 


308.5 


56.3 


209.7 


312. ! 


1 248.0 


246.4 


86! .5 


39.2 


196.2 


26.5 


190.3 


725.4 


4 790.1 


331.4 


1 545.7 


12.7 


47 . 5 


25. 1 


196.8 


104.0 


6 7 36.7 


219.3 


1 679.4 


33.0 


584.0 


500.5 


2 948.7 


17. i 


65.4 


34.4 


215.4 


7.9 


41.8 


58.2 


206.0 


62. 1 


726.4 


74.0 


390.7 


23.2 


75.7 


25.4 


119.7 


198.3 


1 107.5 



83 975.2 

2 4 903.6 

2 19 815.2 
2 2! 326.9 

2 11 205.7 

*7 749.8 

2 20 969.9 
2 2 1 7 38 . 4 

2 42 148.3 
2 22 043.4 

2 12 758.6 

2 5 169.0 
2<4 449.4 
2 46 7 30.9 
2 34 5/7.8 

2 48 477.2 

2 43 361.0 
2 68 512.3 

2 9 907.2 

2 8 310.7 

2 9 267.7 



83 975.2 

2 2! 520.1 
15 576.3 

3 007.7 
2 936.1 

2 12 815. ! 

958.8 

1 707.8 

1 263.0 

1 059.4 
7 826.0 

2 9 231.5 
S 523.1 

6 ! 361.9 

G * 467.8 

420.8 

6 818.9 

6 557.4 

*2 08 ! . 6 

6 9 894.5 

2 457.4 

4 796.9 





548.4 




547.5 




751 .3 


6 


46h.5 


5 


102.7 


'- 


363.8 


2 


305.0 




368.5 


1 


375.7 




560.7 


2 


694.4 


1 


870.2 




520.5 




303.7 


9 


102.8 


2 


929.7 




216.5 




410.2 


•\ 


364.2 


3 


173.2 


1 


009. 1 


9 


945.3 




405.9 


2 


!48.3 




2 36.7 




557.9 


2 


092.2 


1 


725.6 




9 Q .5 




266.0 


2 


413.3 



footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



29 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963 -Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 







1967- 


Continued 












1963 






Capital expenditures 


new' 


Inventories end of- 


Special- 
ization 
ratio 


Cover- 
age 
ratio 


All employees 


Value 

added by 

manufacture 


Value of 
shipments 




Total 


Structures 

and 
additions 
to plant 


Machinery 

and 
equipment 


1967 


1966 


Number 


Payroll 


Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 


(million 


(mil lion 


(million 


(million 


(million 


(per- 


(per- 




(million 


(million 


(million 


(million 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


cent) 


cent) 


(1.000) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


?! 507.0 


5 714.0 


15 73O.0 


84 405.5 


77 726.9 


!na) 


(na) 


16 958.4 


99 S98.8 


192 082.9 


420 973.0 


11 370.0 


' 7 30 . ! 


466. 1 


1 264.0 


7 748.8 


7 240.2 


t NA 1 


( NA 1 


1 643.4 


8 637.2 


21 825.2 


68 466.5 


1 249.2 


52.9 


11.1 


4 1.9 


2 377.9 


2 303.7 


( NA 1 


(NA I 


77.4 


330.5 


1 680.6 


4 519.9 


53.8 


733. 1 


166.2 


566.9 


3 0^3.2 


2 967.3 


( NA 1 


( NA ) 


863. 3 


3 385.0 


6 122.9 


15 740.5 


382.4 


203. 3 


57.9 


150.5 


2 753.0 


2 672.5 


(NA 1 


( NA ) 


1 279.0 


4 423.0 


7 860.9 


17 096.9 


123.6 


H26.0 


88.0 


338. 


1 465.7 


1 466.4 


( NA ) 


( NA 1 


563.3 


2 333.7 


4 020.7 


9 200.0 


394.7 


19S.0 


35.2 


1 12.9 


1 129.8 


1 08 0.4 


( NA 1 


I NA ) 


376.4 


1 726.7 


3 068. 3 


5 ->r!4. I 


110.2 


1 585.3 


301.6 


1 283.8 


2 262.8 


2 176.0 


(NA I 


(NA ) 


587.9 


3 503.2 


7 395.7 


16 357. 1 


708.5 


783. 1 


209.8 


578.3 


1 359.8 


1 667.2 


( NA 1 


( NA ) 


913. 1 


5 514.8 


10 476.3 


16 165.7 


463.9 


2 936. 1 


659.0 


2 277. 1 


5 348.7 


4 997.2 


( NA ) 


( NA ) 


737. 4 


4 969.8 


17 585.9 


31 718.5 


1 545.7 


999.3 


560.3 


4 33.9 


2 029.6 


1 360.9 


I NA ) 


(NA 1 


152.5 


1 133.8 


3 713.9 


17 995.4 


413.7 


677.2 


139.6 


537. 6 


1 670.0 


1 600.9 


( NA 1 


( NA ) 


414.9 


2 364.0 


4 65 4.0 


9 116.2 


343.4 


62. 1 


19.8 


42. 3 


653.7 


667. 4 


( NA ) 


( NA ] 


327. 3 


1 227.8 


2 078.6 


4 209.6 


34.6 


820.9 


193. 


627.3 


1 351 .2 


1 303.5 


1 NA ) 


1 NA 1 


573.9 


3 212.5 


7 043.8 


12 289. 1 


607.6 


3 134. 1 


689.9 


2 444.3 


8 001. 4 


7 470.5 


( NA ) 


( NA ) 


1 126.4 


7 734. 1 


15 068.0 


35 428.4 


1 446.3 


1 1 18.4 


284.2 


834.2 


5 654. 4 


5 429.9 


1 NA 1 


( NA 1 


1 131.1 


6 834.4 


12 69 1. 1 


24 883.3 


610.2 


I 868. 1 


506.5 


1 361.5 


10 917.0 


10 1 39 . 1 


(NA ) 


(NA ) 


1 459.6 


9 570.9 


17 495.4 


31 082.9 


783. 1 


1 537.2 


449. 3 


1 087.9 


3 526. 5 


7 916.3 


( NA 1 


( NA ) 


1 511.6 


9 234.3 


17 010.5 


29 840.2 


701.9 


1 822.4 


545. 1 


1 277.3 


12 323.4 


9 996.4 


( NA ) 


( NA ) 


1 548.4 


11 380.6 


21 817.8 


53 505.5 


981. 1 


392.2 


145.2 


247. 


1 978. 1 


1 333. 1 


( NA 1 


( NA 1 


305.4 


1 912.5 


3 992.2 


6 117.9 


191. 1 


213.5 


73.4 


140.0 


1 447.2 


1 359.7 


( NA I 


( NA ) 


390. 7 


1 312. 1 


3 562.5 


6 495.7 


131.0 


200.0 


63.0 


137. 


1 313.5 


1 073.4 


( NA ) 


( NA ) 


248. 6 


1 982.4 


2 913. 6 


4 859.6 


88.2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


( X 1 


(X ) 


726.5 


6 615.5 


- 


- 


- 


1 730. 1 


466. 1 


! 264.0 


7 7 43.8 


7 240.2 


( NA ) 


1 NA ) 


1 643.4 


3 637.2 


21 325.2 


58 466.5 


1 249.2 


197.0 


73.7 


123.4 


742.9 


697.9 


(NA ) 


(NA ) 


299.6 


1 640.8 


2 882.6 


16 806.6 


136.0 


109.4 


45.2 


64.2 


478.0 


446. 1 


98 


85 


180.2 


1 146.9 


1 908.3 


12 435.5 


80.2 


30. 4 


7.9 


22.5 


129. 3 


130. 4 


96 


46 


48.6 


239.4 


563.4 


2 130.3 


21.4 


57.2 


20.6 


36.7 


135.6 


121.4 


99 


98 


70. i 


204. 4 


410.9 


2 240.9 


34. 3 


19U. 11 


51.4 


143.0 


490. 


463. 1 


( NA ) 


(NA ) 


256.9 


1 394.2 


3 134.3 


11 199.9 


196.0 


9.5 


2.0 


7. 4 


31.8 


34.9 


71 


75 


12.0 


52.9 


132.7 


988.3 


9.9 


17. 3 


5.2 


12. 1 


135.0 


142. 4 


93 


°3 


13.0 


78.7 


179.7 


1 170.8 


15.9 


20.8 


8.2 


12.6 


74.8 


69.3 


82 


71 


12.3 


67.0 


236.2 


937.9 


12. 1 


26.6 


5.7 


20.9 


66.9 


64.4 


97 


73 


29.6 


162.8 


433.0 


1 076.5 


31.9 


120.3 


30.2 


90.0 


181.4 


152. 1 


90 


96 


135. 


1 032.9 


2 203.2 


7 025.9 


126. 1 


252.9 


69.6 


183.2 


2 162.0 


1 968.9 


( NA 1 


1 NA ) 


244.9 


959.7 


2 778.8 


7 300.3 


176.3 


9.4 


2. 3 


7. 1 


129. 1 


116.5 


92 


95 


17.3 


66.2 


174. 6 


452.5 


6.3 


28. 1 


7.2 


20.9 


248. 3 


224. 6 


32 


91 


25.2 


127.2 


540.8 


1 169.3 


25.6 


101.9 


25.0 


76.9 


1 035.9 


972. 6 


80 


93 


102. 4 


332. 1 


1 029.5 


2 742.8 


66.6 


111.6 


3.4 


11.1 


108.6 


102. 1 


94 


86 


9.2 


41.6 


115.8 


313.7 


16.2 


111. 9 


4. 1 


10.8 


153. 2 


131.8 


31 


SO 


19.0 


83.7 


249.4 


677.3 


11.0 


8. 7 


2.8 


5.8 


75.2 


69.7 


97 


94 


20. 1 


56.5 


1 18.5 


391.2 


6. 1 


75.2 


24.7 


50.5 


361.7 


35 1.6 


92 


90 


51.7 


202.4 


550.2 


1 548.7 


44.6 


181. 1 


47. 3 


133.8 


762.5 


762.4 


( NA 1 


(NA ) 


113. 1 


646.9 


2 271.0 


8 161.2 


127.7 


26.3 


6.3 


20.0 


192.4 


212.0 


93 


78 


22.4 


137.7 


373. 1 


2 176.5 


23.5 


75.6 


21.4 


54.2 


277.6 


270.7 


97 


94 


54.6 


278.7 


983.7 


3 330. 1 


53.4 


18.H 


3.3 


15. 1 


54. 7 


52.9 


81 


32 


11.4 


75. 1 


365.0 


625. 1 


15.3 


9.8 


4.5 


5. 3 


123.0 


112.3 


100 


93 


4.3 


20.3 


80. 5 


423.0 


3. 3 


10.5 


2.2 


8. 3 


37.5 


37. 1 


73 


63 


7.2 


45. 4 


177. 3 


434. 


6. 1 


UO. 5 


9.7 


30.8 


77. 3 


7 7.4 


84 


96 


13.2 


39. 7 


290.9 


622.4 


26. 1 


152. 


29. 1 


122.9 


213. 1 


201.7 


( NA ) 


1 NA 1 


280.2 


1 513.4 


3 030.8 


5 656. 1 


121.7 


127.9 


23.8 


104.2 


139. 1 


129.4 


97 


99 


237.0 


1 300.3 


2 403.8 


4 506.0 


95. 3 


20.0 


5. 3 


18.7 


74. 


72.0 


97 


93 


43.2 


213.0 


627.0 


1 150.1 


26.4 


81.1 


12. 1 


69.0 


39 1. 4 


359.5 


( NA ) 


(NA ) 


32.0 


189.2 


590.8 


2 214.0 


73.6 


21. 4 


4.9 


16.5 


33. 6 


27. 1 


100 


100 


8.3 


38.8 


135.7 


378.7 


19. 3 


2U. 1 


2.9 


21.2 


165.5 


133.4 


100 


100 


12.4 


90.8 


254.4 


1 271.2 


16.2 


35.7 


4. 4 


31. 3 


192. 3 


193.9 


100 


100 


11.3 


59. 6 


200.7 


564. 1 


38. 1 


75.6 


20.3 


54.8 


395. 4 


379.8 


( NA 1 


(NA ] 


77.9 


350.0 


956.0 


2 158.4 


39.3 


53.0 


14.2 


38.8 


229. 7 


213. 1 


97 


94 


63.6 


269.7 


635.4 


1 454.5 


28. 1 


9.3 


2. 7 


6.6 


102. 1 


102.3 


96 


75 


8.7 


49. 3 


184.8 


479. 1 


8.4 


13. 3 


3.9 


9.4 


63.6 


59. 4 


86 


95 


5.6 


31.0 


135.8 


224.8 


2.9 


370.2 


105.2 


265.0 


1 507.9 


1 38H.6 


( NA 1 


( NA 1 


204.5 


1 225.5 


3 724.8 


6 398.0 


225. 1 


1110. 4 


45.2 


95. 1 


166.5 


158.8 


100 


100 


62.6 


470. 8 


1 236.0 


2 315.1 


36.2 


7. 1 


2.8 


4.2 


87.9 


86.4 


97 


100 


1 .9 


15. 1 


44.0 


183.5 


3.0 


10.3 


3.5 


6.8 


16.2 


138.2 


97 


94 


6. 1 


35. 1 


137. 3 


368.3 


7.3 


27.0 


9.6 


17. 4 


791.2 


741 .5 


93 


98 


18.0 


110.2 


623.7 


1 090.5 


15.5 


163. 1 


40. 6 


127.5 


136.8 


153. 1 


98 


96 


106.8 


537.7 


1 233.6 


2 210.9 


100.8 


17.4 


3.5 


13.9 


113.3 


105.6 


94 


35 


9. 1 


56.6 


400.2 


729.7 


12.3 


225.7 


56.8 


168.9 


1 083.7 


1 013. 3 


(NA ) 


(NA I 


134.3 


717.6 


2 405.6 


8 07 1.9 


153.6 


4.9 


1.0 


3.9 


99. a 


103. 1 


35 


35 


8.4 


38.2 


100.8 


555.2 


12.5 


21.2 


3.2 


17.9 


347. 7 


280.3 


86 


96 


6.5 


39.9 


152. 1 


1 473.4 


10.2 


1.9 


. 4 


1 .5 


51.0 


46.0 


SO 


74 


2.0 


11.5 


42.7 


234.2 


1.6 


21.7 


4. 4 


17. 4 


28.9 


32.3 


94 


67 


14. 3 


78. 3 


193.3 


474. 


13.7 


50.0 


3.5 


4 1.5 


155.0 


153.6 


91 


99 


17.2 


111.4 


616. 4 


1 868. 1 


23.5 


29.3 


6. 1 


23. 1 


164.3 


183.0 


87 


86 


13.5 


88.6 


264.5 


1 324.4 


19.5 


4.8 


1.4 


3. 4 


2. 4 


1.9 


100 


99 


10.8 


42.9 


90.2 


122.5 


5.7 


5.2 


.6 


4.6 


20.9 


18.4 


97 


98 


7. 3 


35.5 


96.0 


222.9 


4.8 


86. 7 


31.2 


55.5 


214. 1 


199.7 


90 


82 


54. 3 


27 1.3 


849.6 


1 797.3 


62. 1 



ALL MFG. ESTABS. INCL. C.A.O.'Si 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 

25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

30 
31 
32 
33 
34 

35 
36 
37 
38 
39 



20 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. • . . 

TOBACCO MANUFACTURES 

TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS 

APPAREL' OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS. 
LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS . . . . 



FURNITURE AND FIXTURES . . . . 
PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS. . . 
PRINTING ANO PUBLISHING. . . . 
CHEMICALS AMD AuLIED PRODUCTS. 
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS. . 



RUBBER AND PLASTICS PRODUCTS I NE 
LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS . . 
STONE. CLAY. AND GLASS PRODUCTS. 
PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES . . . . 
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS. . . . 



201 
2011 
2013 
2015 

202 

2021 

2022 

2023 

2024 

2026 

203 

2031 

2032 

2033 

2034 

2035 

2036 

2037 

204 

2041 

2042 

2043 

2044 

2045 

2046 

205 

2051 

2052 

206 
2061 
2062 
2063 

207 
2071 
2072 
2073 

208 

2082 

2083 

2084 

2085 

2086 

2087 

209 

2091 

2092 

2093 

2094 

2095 

2096 

2097 

2098 

2099 



MACHINERY. EXCEPT ELECTRICAL . . 
ELECTRICAL EQUIP. AND SUPPLIES . 
TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT .... 
INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS 
MISC. MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES . 

ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES .... 
ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUXILIARY . . 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. . . . 

MEAT PRODUCTS 

MEATPACKING PLANTS . 

SAUSAGES AND OTHER PREPARED MEATS. . 
POULTRY DRESSING PLANTS 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 

CREAMERY BUTTER 

CHEESE. NATURAL AND PROCESSED. . . . 
CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK. . . . 
ICE CREAM AND FROZEN DESSERTS. . . . 
FLUID MILK 

CANNED. CURED. AND FROZEN FOODS. . 

CANNED AND CURED SEAFOODS 

CANNED SPECIALTIES 

CANNEO FRUITS AND VEGETABLES . . . . 

DEHYDRATED FOOD PRODUCTS 

PICKLES" SAUCES. AND SALAD DRESSINGS 
FRESH OR FROZEN PACKAGED FISH. . . . 
FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES . . . . 

GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 

FLOUR AND OTHER GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS. 
PREPARED FEEDS FOR ANIMALS AND FOWLS 

CEREAL PREPARATIONS 

RICE MILLING 

BLENDED AND PREPARED FLOUR .... 
WET CORN MILLING 

BAKERY PRODUCTS 

BREAD. CAKEi AND RELATED PRODUCTS. 
COOKIES AND CRACKERS 

SUGAR 

RAW CANE SUGAR 

CANE SUGAR REFINING 

BEET SUGAR , 

CONFECTIONERY AND RELATED PRODUCT 

CONFECTIONERY PRODUCTS 

CHOCOLATE AND COCOA PRODUCTS . . . 
CHEWING GUM 

BEVERAGES 

MALT LIQUORS 

MALT 

WINES. BRANDY. AND BRANDY SPIRITS. 
DISTILLED LIQUOR. EXCEPT BRANDY. . 
BOTTLED AND CANNED SOFT DRINKS . . 
FLAVORING EXTRACTS AND SIRUPS. NEC 

MISC. FOODS AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 

COTTONSEED OIL MILLS 

SOYBEAN OIL MILLS 

VEGETABLE OIL MILLS. NEC 

ANIMAL AND MARINE FATS AND OILS. . 

ROASTED COFFEE 

SHORTENING AND COOKING OILS. . . . 

MANUFACTURED ICE 

MACARONI AND SPAGHETTI 

FOOD PREPARATIONS. NEC 



See footnotes at end of table. 



30 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967 



Companies 



(number) 



Establishments 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 

(number) 



All employees 



Number 



(1.000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1.000) 



Man-hours 



(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 

(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



21 

2111 
2121 
2131 
2141 



22 

2211 
2221 
2231 
2241 

225 

2251 

2252 

2253 

2254 

2256 

2259 

226 
2261 
2262 
2269 

227 
2271 
2272 
2279 

228 

2281 

2282 

2283 

2284 

229 

2291 

2292 

2293 

2294 

2295 

2296 

2297 

2298 

2299 



2311 

232 

2321 
2322 
2323 
2327 
2328 
2329 

233 

2331 

2335 

2337 

2339 

234 

2341 

2342 

235 

2351 

2352 

236 
2361 
2363 
2369 

2371 

238 

2381 

2384 

2385 

2386 

2387 

2389 

239 

2391 

2392 

2393 

2394 

2395 

2396 

2397 

2399 



TOBACCO MANUFACTURES 



CIGARETTES 

CIGARS 

CHEWING AND SMOKING TOBACCO. . 
TOBACCO STEMMING AND REDRYING. 



TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS. 



WEAVING MILLS. COTTON. . . . 
WEAVING MILLS. SYNTHETICS. . 
WEAVING AND FINISHING MILLS. 
NARROW FABRIC MILLS 



KNITTING MILLS 

WOMEN'S HOSIERY. EXCEPT SOCKS. 

HOSIERY. NEC 

KNIT OUTERWEAR MILLS 

KNIT UNDERWEAR MILLS 

KNIT FABRIC MILLS 

KNITTING MILLS' NEC 



TEXTILE FINISHING. EXCEPT WOOL 

FINISHING PLANTS. COTTON .... 

FINISHING PLANTS. SYNTHETICS . . 

FINISHING PLANTS. NEC 



FLOOR COVERING MILLS . 
WOVEN CARPETS AND RUGS . 
TUFTED CARPETS AND RUGS. 
CARPETS AND RUGS. NEC. . 



YARN AND THREAD MILLS. . 
YARN MILLS. EXCEPT WOOL. . 
THROWING AND WINDING MILLS 

WOOL YARN MILLb 

THREAD MILLS 



MISCELLANEOUS TEXTILE GOODS. . 

FELT GOODS. NEC 

LACE GOODS 

PADDINGS AND UPHOLSTERY FILLING. 

PROCESSED TEXTILE WASTE 

COATED FABRICS. NOT RUBBERIZED . 

TIRE CORD AND FABRIC 

SCOURING AND COMBING PLANTS. . . 

CORDAGE AND TWINE 

TEXTILE GOODS. NEC 



APPAREL. OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS 

MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS. . 

MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS. . . 
MEN'S AND BOYS' SHIRTS AND NIG 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 



SHIRTS AND NIGHTWEAR 
UNDERWEAR. . . . 
NECKWEAR .... 
SEPARATE TROUSERS 
WORK CLOTHING. . 
CLOTHING. NEC. , 



WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR. . . 
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' BLOUSES. WAISTS 
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' DRESSES. . , . 
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' SUITS AND COATS. 
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR. NEC 

WOMEN'S' CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS. 
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERWEAR . . 
CORSETS AND ALLIED GARMENTS. . . . . 



HATS' CAPS' AND MILLINERY. . . 
MILLINERY 

HATS AND CAPS. EXCEPT MILLINERY. 



CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR .... 
CHILDREN'S DRESSES AND BLOUSES 
CHILDREN'S COATS AND SUITS . . 
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR. NEC. . . 



FUR GOODS. 



MISC. APPAREL AND ACCESSORIES. 
FABRIC DRESS AND WORK GLOVES . . 
ROBES AND DRESSING GOWNS .... 
WATERPROOF OUTER GARMENTS. . . . 
LEATHER AND SHEEP LINED CLOTHING 

APPAREL BELTS 

APPAREL AND ACCESSORIES. NEC . . 



MISC. FABRICATED TEXTILE PRODUCTS 

CURTAINS AND DRAPERIES 

HOUSEFURNISHINGS. NEC 

TEXTILE BAGS 

CANVAS PRODUCTS 

PLEATING AND STITCHING 

AUTOMOTIVE AND APPAREL TRIMMINGS". 
SCHIFFLI MACHINE EMBROIDERIES. . . 
FABRICATED TEXTILE PRODUCTS' NEC . . 



218 
272 
262 

345 

483 
i02 
423 
156 

99 
489 

61 

590 
202 

212 

187 

333 

55 

210 

78 

572 
256 
150 
127 
63 

°84 

33 

134 

133 

132 

157 

12 

65 

147 

18° 



24 500 
904 

2 224 

570 
71 
296 
57 = 
277 
517 

8 078 
921 

5 008 
2 058 
1 048 

1 025 
7 78 
254 

817 

477 
340 

1 237 
575 
216 
456 

1 304 

1 323 

140 
237 
299 
135 
274 
243 

6 857 
1 303 
1 18° 

177 
846 
1 104 
762 
605 
7°9 



393 

s 396 

310 

384 

2 698 
s 355 

5 448 

1 !79 

113 

541 

5 62 

641 
216 
233 
192 

385 
61 

244 
80 

768 
377 
181 
135 
75 

1 105 

40 

142 

5 151 

141 

178 

20 

68 

169 

196 



1 003 

2 853 

768 

87 
297 
690 
462 
54C 

416 

5 O90 
5 5 225 
5 2 101 
5 1 100 

1 213 
800 
323 

s 843 
5 477 
5 366 

1 334 
623 
231 
480 

5 1 304 

1 397 

s 172 

241 

319 
130 
277 
240 

7 030 
1 430 
1 228 

198 

860 
1 107 

780 
5 608 

819 



331 
312 
217 
220 

o!9 
257 
290 
650 

97 
294 

31 

408 
136 

167 
105 

209 
24 

153 
32 

604 
328 

130 

107 

39 

533 
28 
48 
71 
60 

115 
19 
30 
83 
70 



649 

1 960 
569 
68 
113 
458 
394 
367 

5 615 

626 

3 008 

1 235 

656 

808 
567 
241 

290 
133 
157 

849 
428 
135 
286 



742 
110 
139 
212 
71 
108 
102 

1 695 
273 
421 

97 
147 
207 
244 

61 
245 



75.1 

36.6 
!9.0 



929.0 

202.8 

1 08 . 6 
4! .8 
26.2 

240.6 
57.9 
39.0 
73.8 
30.7 
36.3 
3.0 

7 3.7 
35.7 
25.7 
12.3 



31 .8 
3.1 

11°. 2 

74.5 
18.5 
14.7 
11.4 

72.4 
4.5 
5.0 
6.5 
4.5 

17.5 

10.1 
5.0 

10.2 
9.2 



»2! .3 

7 1.2 
1S.1 



938.4 
528.8 
216.3 

121.1 

035.8 
2 30.0 
136.9 
343.5 
115.2 
197.5 
12.7 

416.3 
193.0 
159.4 

63.9 

227.8 

47.2 

165.7 

14.9 

504 .9 

310.5 

78.6 

66.0 

49.8 

401 .4 
26.3 
23.7 
36. 
20.7 

121.3 
48. 7 
25. o 
48.5 
50.4 



344.5 


1 212.4 


114.4 


388.4 


13.4 


44 .8 


7.8 


37.3 


88.1 


316.7 


78.2 


254.7 


42.6 


170.6 


409.2 


1 755.8 


56. 1 


20O.0 


209.6 


889.4 


83.8 


423.3 


59.7 


234. 1 


113.5 


443.8 


75.5 


282.3 


38.0 


161.5 


23.7 


101 .7 


8.2 


36.9 


15.5 


64.8 


78.3 


298.2 


35.3 


134.6 


10.9 


45.0 


32.0 


117.7 


8.5 


59.4 


70.7 


284.5 


14.0 


48.7 


11.3 


42.0 


23.3 


95.3 


5.1 


23.9 


8.5 


38.6 


8.4 


35. 1 


172.7 


784.7 


25.7 


100.5 


46.3 


1°6.3 


0.1 


38.0 


15.2 


68.5 


13.5 


54.3 


30.6 


I8I.0 


5.4 


30.5 


26.8 


114.6 



66.1 

32.8 
17.2 

2.7 
13.5 



828.2 

189.3 
98.3 
36.6 
23.3 

213.0 
52.4 
35.8 



61.9 

30.0 
21.4 
10.5 

36. 
7.3 

26.1 
2.6 

110.0 
70.2 
16. o 
12.0 
10. 

50.7 
3.6 
4.4 
5.3 
3.° 

12.7 
o.2 
4 .4 
8. 7 
7.6 



119.9 

313. o 
104.0 
12.5 
6.6 
80.8 
72.0 
38. 1 

357.6 
50.5 

183. 7 
71.6 
51.7 



09 



20.O 

7.2 
13.7 

69.6 

31.2 

9.6 

28.8 

7.3 

62.2 
13.0 
10. 1 
20.2 

4.6 
7.2 
7. 1 

149.6 
22.7 
39.3 



12.9 
12.5 
25.9 
5. 
23.3 



125.5 

62.7 

31.7 

4.9 

26.2 



398. 
209, 



405, 
99, 
64, 

122, 

49, 

65, 

5, 



133.6 
64.3 
47.8 
21.5 

77.0 



221 .8 

142.1 

34.6 

25.8 

19.2 

121.5 

7.7 

8.4 

10.7 

8.0 

26.° 

18.4 



221.3 

572.6 

188.9 

23. 1 

11 .3 

151.5 

129.5 

68.2 

634.5 

90.4 

322.8 

127.4 

93. 9 

177.7 

120.0 

57.7 

37. 1 
12.3 
24.8 

125.8 
54.6 
17.7 
53.6 

13.2 



112.4 
24.5 
17.6 
36.0 
8.3 
12.7 
12.4 



284.0 
42.6 
76.4 
15.5 
24.0 
22.2 
48.5 
10.4 
44.4 



303.6 

187.6 
58.8 
11.3 
45.7 



831 .5 

445.6 

170.4 

96.3 

809.2 
190.9 
113.2 
261.4 

87.7 
145.6 

10.4 

316.7 

148.6 

119.9 

48.2 

165.4 
35.8 

118.4 
11.2 

431.0 

275.2 

64. o 

52.1 

38.7 

290.4 

19. 1 
10.5 
26.1 
15.4 
78. 1 
41 .7 
20.6 
36.3 
33.8 



509.1 

999.5 
322.7 
38.6 
23.5 
264.5 
216. o 
133.4 

1 335.6 
166.9 
687.1 
308.7 
172.9 

330.5 
221 .3 

109.1 

77.7 
29.1 
48.6 

232.8 

103.2 

34.3 

95.3 

47.4 

213.7 
41 .8 
33.1 
70.9 
18.7 
24.6 
24 .5 

594.4 
78.1 

144.5 
28.7 
48.7 
45.8 

136.8 
25.1 
86.7 



639.6 
195.8 
63.5 
133.1 



1 624.0 
921 .6 
428.6 
214.4 

1 914. 1 
413.0 
2 30.7 
604.9 
201.4 
441.8 
22.4 

710.0 
313.8 
271.4 
124.8 

599.4 

104.7 

440.4 

45.3 

946.1 
556.2 

173.2 

1 17,9 

98.9 

795. 
63.6 
36.6 
78. 
34.5 

255.2 
91.5 
35.7 
°5.4 

104.3 



2 181.2 
703.9 

82. 

69.4 

542.5 

465. U 

318.1 

3 182.5 
384.2 

1 588.5 
786.7 
423.2 

867.3 
515.9 
351.4 

164.2 

63.5 

100.7 

537.9 

242.4 

78.2 

217.3 

117.2 

510.1 
86.5 
81 .9 

174.4 
43.4 
68.0 
55.8 

1 456.5 
178.2 
353.7 

88.5 
126.0 

90.2 
334.8 

59.5 
224.6 



4 903.6 

3 044.6 
363.7 
122.2 

1 373.1 



19 815.2 

3 327.7 
2 289.6 
1 090.0 

445. 1 

2 4 519.3 

835.0 

550.1 

1 288.0 

445.3 

1 362.2 

38.8 

2 1 7 35.0 
893.9 
550.2 
290.9 

2 1 757.4 
240.2 

1 426.9 
90.3 

2 2 608.6 
1 422.5 

568.0 
361.5 
256.6 

2 2 042.4 
133.6 

65.7 
168.1 

91.5 
616.2 
4411. 1 

93. 
188.8 
240.5 



738. 1 
448.2 
180.2 
144.7 
132.4 
155.0 
677.7 



'b 534.1 

727.0 

3 086.3 

1 776.4 

944.3 

2 1 780.1 

1 116.8 

663.3 

2 306.9 
112.4 

194.5 

2 1 127.5 
496.0 
175.3 
456.2 

333.2 

2 1 097.1 
176.6 
200.2 
371.9 
98.8 
130.2 
119.5 

2 3 497.5 
418.7 
962.8 
291.1 
273.6 
139.3 
777.4 
99.6 
535.1 



See footnotes at end of 



able. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



31 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963 -Continued 



Industry group and industry 



1967--Continued 



Capital expenditures, new' 



Total 

(million 
dollars) 



Structures 
and 

additions 
to plant 
(million 
dollars) 



Machinery 

and 
equipment 

(million 
dollars) 



Inventories end of- 



1967 



(million 
dollars) 



1966 



(million 
dollars) 



Special- 
ization 
latio 

(per- 
cent) 



Cover- 
age 
ratio 



(per- 
cent) 



1963 



All employees 



Number 



(1.000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 

(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 

new 



TOBACCO MANUFACTURES . ■ . • 

CIGARETTES 

CIGARS 

CHEWING AND SMOKING TOBACCO. . . 
TOBACCO STEMMING AND REDRYING. , 

TEXTILE MILL PRODUCTS. . . . 

WEAVING MILLS. COTTON 

WEAVING MILLS. SYNTHETICS. . . . 
WEAVING AND FINISHING MILLS. WOOL 
NARROW FABRIC MILLS 

KNITTING MILLS 

WOMEN'S HOSIERY. EXCEPT SOCKS. . 

HOSIERY. NEC 

KNIT OUTERWEAR MILLS 

KNIT UNDERWEAR MILLS 

KNIT FABRIC MILLS 

KNITTING MILLS' NEC 

TEXTILE FINISHING. EXCEPT WOOL 
FINISHING PLANTS. COTTON .... 
FINISHING PLANTS. SYNTHETICS . . 
FINISHING PLANTS. NEC 

FLOOR COVERING MILLS 

WOVEN CARPETS AND RUGS ..... 

TUFTED CARPETS AND RUGS 

CARPETS AND RUGS. NEC 

YARN AND THREAD MILLS 

YARN MILLS. EXCEPT WOOL 

THROWING AND WINDING MILLS • . . 

WOOL YARN MILLS 

THREAD MILLS 

MISCELLANEOUS TEXTILE GOODS. . 

FELT GOODS. NEC 

LACE GOODS 

PADDINGS AND UPHOLSTERY FILLING. 

PROCESSED TEXTILE WASTE 

COATED FABRICS. NOT RUBBERIZED . 

TIRE CORD AND FABRIC 

SCOURING AND COMBING PLANTS. . . 

CORDAGE AND TWINE 

TEXTILE GOODS. NEC 



APPAREL. OTHER TEXTILE PRODUCTS' 
MEN'S AND BOYS' SUITS AND COATS. . i 



MEN'S AND BOYS' FURNISHINGS. 



MEN'S AND BOYS' 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 
MEN'S AND BOYS' 



SHIRTS AND NIGHTWEAR 

UNDERWEAR 

NECKWEAR 

SEPARATE TROUSERS. 
WORK CLOTHING. . , 
CLOTHING. NEC. . . 



WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR. . i 
WOMEN'S AND HISSES' BLOUSES' WAISTS 
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' DRESSES. ... 
WOMEN'S AND MISSES* SUITS AND COATS 
WOMEN'S AND MISSES' OUTERWEAR. NEC > 

WOMEN'S. CHILDREN'S UNDERGARMENTS 
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S UNDERWEAR . 
CORSETS AND ALLIED GARMENTS. ... 



HATS. CAPS. AND MILLINERY. . . 
MILLINERY 

HATS AND CAPS. EXCEPT MILLINERY. 



CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR .... 
CHILDREN'S DRESSES AND BLOUSES 
CHILDREN'S COATS AND SUITS . . 
CHILDREN'S OUTERWEAR. NEC. . . 



FUR GOODS. 



238 

2381 

2384 

2385 

2386 

2387 

2389 

239 

2391 

2392 

2393 

2394 

2395 

2396 

2397 

239V 



MISC. APPAREL AND ACCESSORIES. 
FABRIC DRESS AND WORK GLOVES . . 
ROBES AND DRESSING GOWNS .... 
WATERPROOF OUTER GARMENTS. . . . 
LEATHER AND SHEEP LINED CLOTHING 

APPAREL BELTS 

APPAREL AND ACCESSORIES. NEC . . 



MISC. FABRICATED TEXTILE PRODUCTS 

CURTAINS AND DRAPERIES 

HOUSEFURNISHINGS. NEC 

TEXTILE BAGS 

CANVAS PRODUCTS 

PLEATING AND STITCHING 

AUTOMOTIVE AND APPAREL TRIMMINGS . 
SCHIFFLI MACHINE EMBROIDERIES. . . 
FABRICATED TEXTILE PRODUCTS. NEC . 



5?.° 

33. e 
5.4 
1.5 

12.2 



733.1 

171.5 

111.1 

28.0 

15.7 

119.4 
27.5 

0.4 
28.5 

7.2 
45.5 

1.3 

55.9 

27.4 

20.2 

8.2 



6, 

33, 

5, 

127. 

89. 

18. 

B. 

11. 



58.1 
3.2 
2.0 
3.4 

1.6 
17.0 
15.2 

3.2 



4.4 
8.2 



2 08.3 
15.7 

53.5 
14.6 

5.9 

.8 

16.3 

10.7 

5.1 

42.3 
6.2 

IS. 6 
9.5 
8.1 

17. e 
11.0 
6.7 

2.3 
.5 

1.8 

9.1 
3.4 
1.4 
4.3 

1 .1 

10.5 
1.8 
1.5 
2.9 
.5 
.9 
2.9 

56.1 
3.9 

11.9 
1.9 
3.4 
1.5 

13.4 
.5 

19.6 



11.1 

4.2 

1.3 

.1 

5.5 



166.2 

35.7 

27.8 

5.7 

3.5 

25.1 
6.4 
2.1 
7.1 
1.6 
7.9 
(Z) 

10.6 
4.9 
4. 1 
1.6 

18.6 
2.0 

13.9 
2.7 

28. 3 

19.4 

5.8 

1.0 

2.2 

10.8 
. u 
.4 
.5 



57.9 
5.0 

16.3 
3.1 
1.7 
.2 
6.3 
3.6 
1.5 

10.4 
1.9 
3.8 
2.9 
1.9 

5.4 
3.4 
2.0 

.3 
.1 
.2 

2.2 
.5 
.3 

1.5 

.1 

2.2 
.6 
.2 

.5 
.1 
.1 



15.8 
1.5 
2.4 

.7 
1.4 

.3 
3.3 
(2) 
6.2 



4.1 
1.4 
6.8 



566.9 

135.8 
83.2 
22.2 
12.2 

94.2 
21.1 

7. 3 
21.4 

5.6 
37.6 

1.3 

45.3 

22.6 

16.2 

6.6 

26.9 
4.2 

19.8 
2.9 

99.6 
70.0 
12.2 



47.4 
2.7 
1 .6 
2.9 

l.r 

12.1 

13.5 

3.1 

3.6 

6.7 



150.5 

10.7 

37.1 

11.6 

4. 3 

.5 

10.0 

7.1 

3.7 

31.9 
4.3 

14.8 
6.6 
6.2 

12.4 
7.6 



2.0 

.4 

1.6 

6.9 
3.0 
1.1 
2.8 

1.0 



1.2 
1.3 
2.4 
.5 
.8 
2.3 

40. 3 
2.4 
9.5 
1.2 
2.1 
1.2 

10.1 
.4 



2 377." 

1 423.6 

54.4 

36.8 

863.0 



646.5 

385.7 

177.2 

70.0 

682.4 



141, 
92, 
176, 
101, 
166, 



4.8 

192.2 

117.0 
50.0 
25.2 



302, 
59, 

224, 
18, 



326.0 

175.4 

48.0 

56.9 

45.7 



310 
17 
11 
17 
14 

109 





49.2 
16.5 
42.1 
33.8 



2 753.0 
330.9 
777. 3 

22°. a 

27.5 

16.0 

178.4 

214.2 

111.4 

606.3 

85.0 

223.9 

153.0 
144. 3 

285.5 
169.2 
116.2 

34.7 

6.4 

28.3 

131.5 
47.2 
15.8 
68.5 

33.3 

138.6 
25.8 
18.4 
48.7' 
8.8 
15.6 
21.2 



132.5 
32.9 
43.3 

7.5 
81.2 

5.6 



360.6 
65.1 

37.4 
840.6 



566.7 

373.5 

186.5 

70.6 

662.6 

131.9 
89. 3 

180.1 
96.6 

159.9 
4.8 

185.4 

117.3 

44.8 

23.2 

296.4 
63.9 

216.4 
16.1 

320.1 

161.2 

50.2 

64.3 

44.5 

305.6 
18.2 
12.4 
18.4 
16.0 
97.9 
50.0 
19. 3 
40.8 
32.6 



2 672.5 

339.6 

7 32.9 
218.2 
21.7 
15.7 
174.9 
193.7 
108.7 

585.7 
72.3 
205.4 
165.0 
143.0 

288.3 
165.0 
123.3 

36.3 

6.7 

29.6 

129.1 
48.2 
17.3 
63.6 

33.7 

131.3 
20.1 
18.0 
46.7 
°.l 
16.0 
21.4 

395.6 

42.2 

131.3 

30.1 

38.5 

7.2 

73.6 

5.2 

67.5 



(NA) 

97 
100 

96 
100 



(NA) 

87 
85 
82 



(NA) 
97 
90 
93 
85 
97 
96 

(NA) 
75 
90 
84 

(NA) 
84 
96 
83 

(NA) 
95 



90 

(NA) 
76 
99 
86 
96 
87 
84 
85 
86 
82 



(NA) 



(NA) 
90 
94 
98 
89 
84 



(NA) 



(NA) 
94 
95 

(NA) 
99 
99 

(NA) 
92 



99 

(NA) 
91 
96 
95 
97 
89 
96 

(NA) 
97 
88 
94 
04 
97 
98 
98 



(NA) 

100 
98 

58 



(NA) 



(NA) 
95 
95 
65 
35 
92 



(NA) 
58 
45 
52 

(NA) 
84 
99 
69 

(NA) 
84 
91 
80 
90 

(NA) 
72 
94 
82 
92 
89 
90 
57 
85 



(NA) 



(NA) 
82 



82 
90 
61 

(NA) 
75 
95 
90 
59 

(NA) 
86 
97 

(NA) 
98 
90 

(NA) 
82 
84 
68 

100 

(NA) 
87 
05 
93 
86 
98 
85 

(NA) 
95 
52 
89 
95 
95 
93 
99 
83 



35.6 
20.7 



2 09.0 
88.2 

47.4 
23.2 

220.4 
51.5 
43.3 
68.6 
28.4 
25.0. 
3.6 

70.8 

42.1 

19.5 

9.2 

35.7 
13.4 
19.9 

2.4 

102.7 
61.6 
13.6 
17.4 
10.1 

65.9 
5.0 
4.9 
6.9 
".2 

13.7 
9.2 
5.8 
8.9 
7. 3 



1 279.3 
122.7 

305.6 
112.9 
12.1 
8.4 
73.8 
62.5 
35.9 

405.4 

57.6 

200. 

es. 3 
59.5 

113.8 
76.7 
37. 1 

30.8 

14.2 
16.6 



35.8 

11.8 
34.2 



61.5 

12.8 

11.8 

16.4 

3.4 

9.8 

7.2 

148.4 
22.0 
39.7 

7.2 
11.2 
16.4 
24.5 

6.1 
21.3 



330.5 

183.0 

68. 1 
18.2 
61 .0 



771.6 
366.0 
202.9 

91.9 

787.5 
170.9 
124.1 
266.6 

05.9 
117.5 

12.5 

336.9 
190.5 
106.0 

40.4 

152.4 
63.0 
80.5 

e.9 

359.1 
208.1 



19.7 
33.7 
17.8 
89.2 
35.1 
?4.7 



34.9 



4 423.0 
494.2 

699.5 
316.3 
32.6 
30.9 
224.4 
179.6 

1 15.7 

1 425.9 
177.9 
686.8 
361.0 
200.2 

378.7 

2 38.8 
139.9 

116.1 
55.6 
60.5 

265.1 

115.1 

43.0 

107.0 

56.0 



36.7 
37.4 
60.8 
12.8 
35.6 
25.6 

578.6 
75.1 

142.8 
28. 3 
44. 5 
55.5 

122.6 
30.5 
79.3 



1 680.6 

1 310.0 

193.0 

74.0 

10 3. 3 



6 122.9 

1 256.8 
661.5 
386.6 
172.5 

1 396.0 
296.3 
192.2 
463.6 
170.7 
252.0 
20. 3 

582. 3 

332.0 

176.8 

73.2 

394.0 

120.0 

25o. 3 

15.6 

652.3 
363.2 

03.6 
119.7 

75.8 

620.0 
58.6 
31.5 
65.6 
31.0 

170. 3 
72.3 
45.4 
57.6 



7 860.9 
831.0 

1 617.7 
590.4 

63.2 

58.1 

38 3.1 

330.7 

183.2 

2 450. B 
300.5 

1 180.9 
6 37.0 
340.5 

740.0 
430.8 
310. 1 

le4.8 
93.2 

91.6 

466.6 

205.6 

72.7 

188. 3 

110.6 

377.2 
68.4 
68.7 

111.3 
23.4 
62.2 
43.2 

1 071.4 

132.0 

285.8 

56.5 

73.5 

95.2 

227.8 

55.4 

145.2 



U 519.9 
2 655.3 



1 39.5 
366.6 



3 1 04 . 1 

1 722.4 

I 010.7 

349. 1 

3 326.1 
606.6 
451 .1 

1 045.5 

364.3 

8i7.4 

40.7 

1 400.4 
869.7 
323.7 
206.9 

1 i43.9 
312.5 
801.8 

29.6 

2 002.6 
1 067.0 

319.3 
422.2 
104.1 

1 681.5 
134.0 
53.0 
156.5 
87.5 
4^5. 7 
37 5.7 
110.9 
140. 3 
169.8 



17 096.9 
1 526.0 

3 507.8 

1 295.1 
134.9 
121.3 
824.2 
824.7 
397.6 

5 329.9 
610.2 

2 41 1.0 
1 522.7 

786.0 

1 570.0 
976. 1 
503.9 

3 34. 3 
163.2 

171.1 

1 025.8 
443.3 
162.9 
419.6 

334.4 

821.7 
149.5 
173.5 
235.5 
56.4 

ioe.6 

08.2 

2 557.0 
313.0 
716.7 
200.4 
166.4 
150.2 
570.6 

97.4 
342.3 



See footnotes at end of table. 



32 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967 



Companies 



(number) 



Establishments 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 

(number) 



All employees 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Numbei 



(1.000) 



Man-hours 



(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



24 11 

242 
2421 
2426 
2429 

243 
2431 
2432 
2433 

244 

2441 

2442 

2443 

2445 

249 

2491 

2499 



25 

251 

2511 

2512 

2514 

2515 

2519 

252 

2521 

2522 



254 

2541 

2542 

259 

2591 

2599 



2611 
2621 
2631 

264 

2641 

2642 

2643 

2644 

2645 

2646 

2647 

2649 

265 

2651 

2652 

2653 

2654 

2655 

2661 



LUMBER AND WOOD PROOUCTS ... 

LOGGING CAMPS. LOGGING CONTRACTORS 

SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS . . . 
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS' GENERAL 
HARDWOOD DIMENSION AND FLOORING, . 
SPECIAL PRODUCT SAWMILLS. NEC. . . 

MILLWORK. PLYWOODi RELATED PROD. 
MILLWORK 

VENEER AND PLYWOOD 

PREFABRICATED WOOD STRUCTURES. . . 



WOODEN CONTAINERS 

NAILED WOODEN BOXES AND SHOOK. 
WIREBOUND BOXES AND CRATES • . 
VENEER AND PLYWOOD CONTAINERS. 
COOPERAGE 



MISCELLANEOUS WOOD PRODUCTS. 

WOOD PRESERVING 

WOOD PRODUCTS. NEC 



FURNITURE AND FIXTURES 



HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE 

WOOD HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE . . . . 
UPHOLSTERED HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. 
METAL HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. . . . 
MATTRESSES AND BEOSPRINGS. . . . 
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. NEC . . . . 



OFFICE FURNITURE . . 
WOOD OFFICE FURNITURE. 
METAL OFFICE FURNITURE 



PUBLIC BUILDING FURNITURE. 



PARTITIONS AND FIXTURES. . . 
WOOD PARTITIONS AND FIXTURES . 
METAL PARTITIONS AND FIXTURES. 

MISC. FURNITURE AND FIXTURES 
VENETIAN BLINDS AND SHADES . . 
FURNITURE AND FIXTURES. NEC. . 



PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS. 



PULPMILLS 

PAPERMILLSt EXCEPT BUILDING PAPER. 
PAPER80ARD MILLS 



MISC. CONVERTED PAPER PRODUCTS 
PAPER COATING AND GLAZING. . . . 

ENVELOPES 

BAGS. EXCEPT TEXTILE BAGS. . . . 

WALLPAPER 

DIE-CUT PAPER AND BOARD 

PRESSED AND MOLDED PULP GOODS. . 

SANITARY PAPER PRODUCTS 

CONVERTED PAPER PRODUCTS i NEC, . 



PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES, i 
FOLDING PAPERBOARD BOXES 10 . . . . . 

SETUP PAPERBOARD BOXES i 

CORRUGATED AND SOLID FIBER BOXES • 

SANITARY FOOD CONTAINERS • 

FIBER CANS. DRUMSi RELATED MATERIAL 

BUILDING PAPER AND BOARD MILLS . . 



PRINTING AND PUBLISHING. 



2711 NEWSPAPERS . 
2721 PERIODICALS. 



273 

2731 

2732 

2741 

275 
2751 
2752 
2753 



BOOKS 

BOOK PUBLISHING. 
BOOK PRINTING. . 



MISCELLANEOUS PUBLISHING 



COMMERCIAL PRINTING 

COMMERCIAL PRINTING. EXC. LITHO. . 
COMMERCIAL PRINTING. LITHOGRAPHIC. 
ENGRAVING AND PLATE PRINTING . . . 



2761 MANIFOLD BUSINESS FORMS, 
2771 GREETING CARD PUBLISHING 



278 

2782 

2789 

279 
2791 
2793 
2794 



BLANKBOOKS AND BOOKBINDING , . 
BLANKBOOKS AND LOOSELEAF BINDERS 
BOOKBINDING AND RELATED WORK . , 



PRINTING TRADE SERVICES, • . 

TYPESETTING 

PHOTOENGRAVING 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING 



35 573 

16 265 

i 1 058 

10 016 

613 

454 

4 308 

3 292 

516 

519 

829 

567 

118 

81 

67 

3 319 

278 

3 044 



9 518 

5 948 

2 934 

1 582 

464 

9 39 

75 

334 
172 
166 



1 947 

1 463 

49 1 

898 
581 
317 



45 
203 
148 

2 030 

334 

172 

466 

74 

368 

43 

91 

566 

1 681 
476 
418 
568 
144 
165 

43 



7 


589 


2 


430 


1 


673 




963 




720 


1 


433 


19 


162 


11 


955 


6 


718 




569 




454 




203 


1 


409 




402 


1 


008 


2 


366 


1 


518 




7 32 




124 



16 334 

1! 461 

10 271 

665 

525 

4 558 

3 342 

667 

549 

905 
596 
134 



537 

375 
162 



6 306 
3 084 

1 644 

486 

1 013 

79 

365 

178 
187 



1 970 

1 470 
500 



929 
605 
324 



61 
354 
283 

2 492 
397 
228 
557 
77 
440 
58 
125 
610 

2 606 
569 
454 

1 071 
244 
268 

94 



8 094 
2 510 

1 766 

1 022 

744 

1 49 3 

19 497 
12 098 
6 822 

577 

542 
222 

1 462 
444 

1 018 

2 403 
1 535 

735 

133 



5 803 

598 

2 355 

1 916 

331 

108 

1 4^6 
767 
515 
214 

304 
182 
63 
39 
20 



366 

Oil 
727 
251 
34 1 
36 

189 

69 

120 



526 
338 

188 

180 
61 

1 19 



43 

313 
264 

1 284 

202 

163 

310 

31 

189 

45 

86 

258 

1 835 
39 3 
295 
803 
184 
160 

74 



2 029 
454 

603 
287 
316 

204 

3 216 
1 439 
1 648 

129 

295 
92 

527 
193 
334 

615 

365 

193 

57 



554. 

70. 6 

2 15.5 
180.5 

7. 1 

154.0 
64.8 
72.9 
16. 3 

31. 3 
15.9 



425. 3 

297.8 

157. 4 
75.2 
31 . 
31.2 

3.0 

35.2 
8.2 

27.0 



21. 6 
11.6 

10. 1 



15. 1 
140.0 

67. 

186. 6 
37. 1 
22.5 
46. 3 
2. 3 
18.6 
6.7 
22.0 
31. 1 

218.6 
49.3 
21.1 
97. 1 
35.3 
15.7 

11.7 



338.8 

1 028.3 

884. 6 

1 15. 1 

28.5 

89 6.3 
371.0 
420.6 
102.6 

134.5 
70.9 
36.5 
11.6 
15.5 

401.2 

61.9 

339.3 



2 25R. 3 

1 456. 1 
738. 1 
376.2 
155. 5 
171.5 
14.8 

225. 

46. 4 
178.5 



323.6 

170.7 
152.9 

121.4 
62. 1 
59.4 



125.6 

1 120.7 
533.5 

1 167.4 
260.8 
141.9 
278. 3 
14.6 
117.3 
44.8 
154.2 
175.5 

1 386.5 
322.6 
100.4 
656.0 
213.8 
93.7 

82.5 



335.9 


2 223.7 


79. 1 


633.7 


96.5 


688.0 


51.8 


390. 1 


44.7 


297.9 


31. 1 


197 .4 


330.6 


2 357.9 


175. 1 


1 186.0 


146.5 


1 113.2 


9.0 


58.7 


34.4 


240.2 


27.6 


150.6 


53.5 


294.2 


23.2 


130.3 


30.3 


163.9 


42.2 


365.8 


25.5 


208.3 


13.2 


126.2 


3.6 


31.3 



196, 
164. 
25. 



132. 

53. 
66. 
11. 



10. 3 

61.0 



357.5 

257. 3 
139.7 
64.8 
25.8 
24. 4 
2.6 

28.0 

6.9 

21.1 



37. 6 
20.7 
17.0 

17.0 
8.6 
8.4 



12. 


2 


112. 


3 


53. 


8 


146. 


8 


27. 





18. 


1 


37. 


1 


1 


8 


14 


7 


5 


4 


18 


.3 


24 


.4 


172 


.6 


39 


.5 


18 


.3 


73 





28 


5 


13 


.3 



169.2 
14.5 



13.2 
36.7 

15.0 

261.8 
142. 3 
112.2 

7.3 

25.3 

16.4 

46.6 
19.4 
27.2 

32.9 

20.9 

9. 4 

2.6 



385.0 
322. 7 

51.5 
10. a 



268.8 

106.6 

138.4 

23.8 

55. 6 

27.8 

1 1 . 2 

5.9 

4.7 



715."' 

513. 1 

283.9 

125.9 

50.3 

47.8 

5.2 

57.2 
14. 3 
42.9 



33.0 
15.9 
17.2 



25. 


4 


249. 


2 


1 18. 


2 


298. 


8 


56. 


4 


37. 


6 


75 


6 


3 


6 


29 


4 


1 1 


.4 


37 


.6 


47 


.2 


358 


.2 


8? 


. 1 


35 


4 


152 


.5 


60 


2 



302.0 
25.2 

98. 1 
24.7 
73.4 

25.6 

511.1 

273.2 

223.3 

14.6 

51.4 
31.3 

88.7 
38.4 
50.3 

62.7 

40.2 

17.5 

5.0 



754.8 
94. 4 
25. 4 

697. 3 

274. 1 

361.9 

61.2 

109.5 
56.9 
29.8 



302.5 

47. 1 

255.4 



101. 
582.8 
287.0 
109. 6 
110.7 
10.9 

160.9 

35.6 

125.3 



220, 
124. 
96. 



82. 5 
37.7 
44.3 



96.0 
849.2 
405.9 

819. 1 

165.6 

98.0 

197.4 

9.9 

79.9 

33.0 

119.2 

116.2 

967.9 
228.8 

73.3 
435.0 
157.8 

72.9 

67.4 



1 121.5 
80.5 

304.5 

76.6 

227.9 

79.7 

1 689.3 

880. 1 

766.5 

42.7 

158.9 

75.0 

225.6 
94.5 
131.0 

276.4 

164. 1 

89.8 

22.5 



695. 1 

1 78 3.9 

1 556.4 

176.8 

50. 7 

1 505.4 
636.4 
678. 1 
190.9 

233. 6 

123.0 

71.1 

13. 4 

26. 1 

750. 3 
135.6 
614.3 



649.5 
322.0 
670. 3 
291.3 
335.5 
30.4 

478. 1 
88. 3 
389.3 



587.0 
284.6 

302.5 

221.2 
122. 3 



333.7 
2 356. 3 

1 508.8 

2 333. 3 
728.0 
253. 1 
563.7 

27.0 
247.3 

97.8 
540.2 
376. 1 

2 540.5 
563.2 
160.2 

1 130.0 
506. 1 
181. 1 

183.7 



4 184.7 
1 868.7 

1 967.4 

1 456.5 

510.9 

417.5 

3 9 4 4.4 

1 9U7.9 

1 897.7 

98.8 

550.5 
372.3 

506.0 
245.4 
260.6 

543.7 
304. 3 
191.7 



11 2C5.7 
I 476. i 

2 3 997; 8 

3 506.4 
37 3.5 
1 17.9 

2 3 653.2 

1 687.2 

'! -f ', . 7 

2 5?9. 5 

273.8 

144.9 

32.0 

7.3.8 

2 1 543.8 

344.2 

1 204.6 



'49. S 

111.0 
'I 38 . 9 
266.4 
605.3 
745. 1 
55. 3 

2 781.2 
158. 3 
622.9 



2 1 10.7 
498. 6 
512. 

2 425. 7 
246.8 
179. C 



730.5 

4 844. 
2 907.0 

% 210. 1 

1 566.5 

470. 3 

1 375.6 

48.6 

577.5 

145.9 

1 293.4 

732.2 

2 5 937.3 

1 216.2 
282.4 

2 959.6 
1 093.9 

335.2 

341. 1 



5 757. 1 
3 095.9 

2 2 922. 1 

2 134.7 

787.4 



6 532.8 

3 255.5 

3 139.4 

137.9 

932.3 

517.9 

721.9 
381.3 
340.6 

653. 1 

356.7 

234.3 

62. 1 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



33 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Industry group and industry 



1967-Continued 



Capital expenditures, new' 



Total 



(million 
dollars) 



Structures 
and 

additions 
to plant 
(million 
dollars) 



Machinery 

and 
equipment 

(million 
dollars) 



Inventories end of~ 



1967 



(million 
dollars) 



1966 



(million 
dollars) 



Special- 
ization 
ratio 



(per- 
cent) 



Cover- 
age 
ratio 



(per- 
cent) 



1963 



All employees 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 

(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 



LUMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS . . . . 

2411 LOGGING CAMPS. LOGGING CONTRACTORS « 

SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS . . . . 
SAWMILLS AND PLANING MILLS" GENERAL. 
HARDWOOD DIMENSION AND FLOORING. . . 
SPECIAL PKODUCT SAWmILLSi NEC. . . . 

MILLWORK. PLYWOOD. RELATED PROD. . 
MILLWORK 

VENEER AND PLYWOOD 

PREFABRICATED WOOD STRUCTURES. . . . 

WOODEN CONTAINERS 

NAILED WOODEN BOXES AND SHOOK. . . . 

WIREBOUND BOXES AND CRATES 

VENEER AND PLYWOOD CONTAINERS. . . . 
COOPERAGE 

MISCELLANEOUS WOOD PRODUCTS. . . . 

WOOD PRESERVING 

WOOD PRODUCTS i NEC 

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES . . . . . 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE 

WOOD HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE 

UPHOLSTERED HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. . . 

METAL HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE 

MATTRESSES AND BEDSPRINGS 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. NEC 

OFFICE FURNITURE 

WOOD OFFICE FURNITURE 

METAL OFFICE FURNITURE 

PUBLIC BUILDING FURNITURE 

PARTITIONS AND FIXTURES. . . . . . 

WOOD PARTITIONS AND FIXTURES . . . . 

METAL PARTITIONS AND FIXTURES. . . . 

MISC. FURNITURE AND FIXTURES . . . 

VENETIAN BLINDS AND SHADES 

FURNITURE AND FIXTURES. NEC 

PAPER AND ALLIED PRODUCTS. . . . 

PULPMILLS 

PAPERMILLSt EXCEPT BUILDING PAPER. . 
PAPERBOARD MILLS 

MISC. CONVERTED PAPER PRODUCTS . . 

PAPER COATING AND GLAZING 

ENVELOPES 

BAGS. EXCEPT TEXTILE BAGS 

WALLPAPER 

DIE-CUT PAPER AND BOARD 

PRESSED AND MOLDED PULP GOODS. . . . 

SANITARY PAPER PRODUCTS 

CONVERTED PAPER PRODUCTS. NEC. , . . 

PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS AND BOXES. . 

FOLDING PAPERBOARD BOXES 

SETUP PAPERBOARD BOXES 

CORRUGATED AND SOLID FIBER BOXES . . 

SANITARY FOOD CONTAINERS 

FIBER CANS. DRUMS. RELATED MATERIAL. 

BUILDING PAPER AND BOARD MILLS . . . 



PRINTING AND PUBLISHING. . . 

NEWSPAPERS .... 

PERIODICALS 

BOOKS 

BOOK PUBLISHING 

BOOK PRINTING 

MISCELLANEOUS PUBLISHING .... 

COMMERCIAL PRINTING 

COMMERCIAL PRINTING. EXC. LITHO. 
COMMERCIAL PRINTING. LITHOGRAPHIC 
ENGRAVING AND PLATE PRINTING . . 

MANIFOLD BUSINESS FORMS 

GREETING CARD PUBLISHING .... 

BLANKBOOKS AND" BOOKBINDING . . 
BLANKSOOKS AND LOOSELEAF BINDERS 
BOOKBINDING AND RELATED WORK . . 



144 


9 


130 





12 


2 


2 


7 


105 


p 


24 


6 


71 


6 


9 


6 


10 





5 






PRINTING TRADE SERVICES. . . 

TYPESETTING 

PHOTOENGRAVING 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING 



63. Q 
10.7 
53.2 



198.0 

112.8 
74. 
'.7.1 

'.o. : 

10.3 
1 .3 

37.2 

5.7 

31.5 



28.0 

9.1 
1Q.9 

10.1 
6.5 
3.5 



121.8 
581. 3 
398.6 

225.8 
59.1 
13." 
45.6 
.5 
9.0 
17.6 
58.5 
22.2 

237.5 

42.2 

6.1 

'.27.7 

ue.i 

13.3 
20.3 



246.7 
58.0 

101.0 
55.1 
45.9 

10.0 

272.3 

112.9 

125.6 

3.8 

39.8 
14.9 

25.1 
11.6 
13.5 

20.2 

13.2 

6.3 



88.0 

13.6 

29.2 

25.1 

3.6 

.5 

30.2 

9.2 

16.3 



11.3 

1.1 

10.1 



13.7 
29.3 



2.7 

1. 3 



18.7 

2.8 

15.9 



11.5 

3.8 

10.7 

3.9 
2.9 

1.0 



10.8 
68.5 
89.0 

61.6 

16.3 

1.8 

9.5 

.1 

2.0 

1.5 

20.3 

7.1 

65.9 
10.2 

1.3 
38.6 
12.9 

2.9 



32.9 
22.2 
10.7 

2.8 

55.2 

34.3 

19.9 

1.0 

9.3 
1.1 

3.6 
2.1 
1.5 



.9 
(Z) 



115.7 
104.9 

8.5 
2.2 

75.6 

15.1 

55.4 

4.9 



3.1 

1.8 

.3 

1.5 

52.1 

9. 3 

42.9 



69.1 

44.7 

10.4 

7.1 

6.0 

.6 



18.5 

2.9 

15.6 



13.5 
4. 3 
9.2 



6.2 
3.7 
2.5 



111.0 
512.8 
309.5 

164.2 
42.6 
11.7 
36.1 
.4 
6.9 
13.1 
38.2 
15.1 

171.6 
32.0 
4.8 
89. 1 
35.2 
10.4 



172.4 
33.2 

68.1 
32.9 
35.2 

7.2 

217.0 
108.6 

105.7 
2.7 

30.5 
10.8 

21.5 

°.5 

12.0 

17.5 
11.5 



!0?.2 

603.3 

516.5 

65.6 

21.2 

465.8 
215.3 
192.9 

57.6 

71.4 
31.4 
16.1 
3.9 
20.0 

222.9 

77.0 

146.0 



714.9 
398.9 

83.6 

83.6 

6.2 

122.8 
27.0 
95.8 



131.9 
56.6 
75.3 

73.8 
49.8 
24.0 



96.7 
560.3 

191.9 

713.3 

200.0 
5e.4 

163.6 
11.5 
56.1 
16.2 
78.9 

128.6 

669.0 

172.7 

31.2 

258.0 

170.3 

36.8 



162.5 
164.9 

650.9 

582.5 

68.4 

41.1 

495.5 

275.6 

209.9 

10.0 

98.4 
147.8 

73.7 
52.7 
21.0 

25.1 

14.3 

8.5 

2.2 



1 466.4 

102.0 

609.3 

521.0 

66.0 

22.3 

469.3 
209.0 
206.3 

53.9 

69.1 
27.0 
14.9 
3.8 
23.4 

216.7 

71.3 

145.3 



699.2 

385.2 

136.8 

87.0 

83.9 

6.2 

112.6 
23.8 
88.8 



69.6 
48.3 
21.3 



90.3 
519.7 
182.9 

683.3 

194.1 
57.6 

156.9 
10.9 
57.1 
15.2 
72.1 

119.4 

666.5 
167.7 

30.9 
264. i 
165.5 

38.3 



137.3 
157.1 

570.1 
498.3 

71.8 

45.8 

465.3 

249.5 

206.8 

9.0 

92.6 
109.2 

69.1 
48.5 
20.7 

20.7 

12.8 

5.8 



(NA) 

99 

(NA) 
92 

e9 

98 

(NA) 
91 
90 
98 

(NA) 
88 
89 
81 
°9 

(NAl 
98 

93 

(NA) 

(NA) 
95 
°3 
90 
91 
83 

(NA) 



(NA) 
93 
90 

(NA) 
89 
87 



(NA) 

88 
92 
81 

(NA) 
79 
95 
86 
95 
86 
95 
94 
84 

(NA) 
84 
92 
98 
92 
96 



(NA) 



(NA) 
95 
81 

(NA) 

(NA) 
86 

82 
91 

91 



Oa) 
86 
94 

(NA) 
95 



(NA) 
01 

(NA) 
95 
86 
95 

(NA) 
94 
95 
98 

(NA) 
87 
92 
89 
98 

(NA) 
98 
91 



(NA) 

(NA) 
96 
94 
90 
91 
56 

(NA) 
86 
88 



(NA) 
89 
84 

(MA) 
94 
75 



(NA) 

71 
93 
91 

(NA) 
87 
96 
88 

S 99 
86 

9 95 
96 
79 

(NA) 
90 
87 
98 
86 
85 

96 



(NA) 

100 
97 

(NA) 
86 
70 

(NA) 

(NA) 
83 
80 
81 

90 
93 

(NA) 
88 

89 

(NA) 
92 
91 



563.3 

73. 1 

242.7 

207.4 

28.1 

7.2 

147.3 
65.3 
66.2 

15.8 

31.0 

14.5 

9.9 

4.0 

2.6 

69.2 

11.2 
58.0 



376.4 

270.3 

141.0 

67.8 

29.3 

30.1 

2.1 

26.4 

6.5 

19.9 



44.6 
24.3 
20.3 

18.2 

10.7 

7.5 



15.1 

129.8 

63.4 

166.6 
32.0 
20.7 

42.3 
2.2 

15.1 
5.7 

19.1 

29.5 



201. 
51, 
20. 
83. 
32. 
13. 

11 . 



306.4 
67.7 

82.9 
46.8 

36.1 

22.6 

300.3 

170.2 

121.1 

9.0 

28.8 
21.5 

42.2 
17.9 
24.3 

40.7 
21.0 

11.6 
5.1 



2 338.7 

281.8 

935.7 

611.6 

98.9 

25.2 

726.6 

320.8 

321.7 

81.1 

111.8 

55.9 
32.7 
11.6 

11.6 

282.7 

15.3 
237.4 



149.7 
574.6 
291.6 
128.8 
146.3 
8.4 

142.6 

30.6 

112.1 



261, 
142, 

119, 

89, 
49, 
39. 



107.4 
877.9 
429.0 

917.3 

200.8 

114.9 

219.1 

11.9 

83.4 

32.9 

112.5 

111.9 

1 106.9 
288.8 

32.2 
185.6 
182.7 

67.5 

69.6 



1 781.6 
461.1 

494. e 
280.7 
214.2 

130.4 

1 852.5 

1 007.5 

794.4 

50.7 

173.2 
105.6 

206.2 

91.2 

115.0 

306.3 

147.3 

119.7 

39.3 



4 02 0.7 

520.5 

1 572.6 

1 376.1 

155.1 

41.4 

1 239.8 
524.0 
559.2 
156.6 

174.2 
85.0 
55.6 
16.1 
17.5 

513.6 

93.3 

420.3 



047.5 
993.2 
506.7 
247.0 
285.5 
15.1 

285.3 

57.0 

228. 3 



433.5 
219.2 
214.3 

160.2 
94. 3 
65.9 



295.8 
1 857.2 
1 186.2 

1 962.4 
457.4 
189.0 
359.7 

20.9 
183.2 

70.0 
369.7 
302.5 



1 941, 
476, 
131. 
804, 
402. 
126. 



3 201.9 
1 349.0 

1 354.0 
995.7 
358.3 

252.9 

2 961.0 
1 578.3 
1 302.0 

80.7 

377.7 
204.6 

340.8 
168.5 
172.3 

4 34.4 

205.4 

171.8 

57.2 



9 200.0 
1 154.7 

3 597.6 

3 156.3 

345.2 

96.0 



013.6 
270.6 
339.6 
403. 3 

401.5 

206.0 

114.7 

27.9 

52.9 

032.7 
247.3 
785.4 



5 884.1 

4 035.4 

1 858.0 

983.2 

524.3 

641.0 
28.9 

491.5 
101.5 
390.0 



767.5 
389.6 
377.8 

321.1 
199.6 
121.6 



609.1 

3 824.9 
2 316.0 

4 686.4 
1 161.6 

363.2 
1 061.7 
36.5 
378.3 
110.1 
983.0 
591.7 



4 639.3 

1 081.1 
225.8 

2 166.1 
905.9 
260.3 

281.6 



4 483.6 
2 295.7 

2 081.2 

1 534.6 
546.6 

389.6 

4 905.8 

2 645.1 
2 149.7 

111.1 

637.7 
346.0 



496. 
268. 
228. 

529. 

241. 

212. 

76. 



391.7 

95.6 

181.5 

172.5 

7.1 

2.0 

70.6 

20.9 

11.9 

7.7 

8.5 

6.0 

1.6 

.3 

.6 

38.5 

5.5 

32.9 



110.2 

68.8 

10.4 

13.7 

6.8 

7. 3 

.6 

15.7 

1.5 

14.2 



15. 
6. 



38.9 
232.8 
159.5 

128.5 

45.6 

8.1 

26.7 

.4 

7.7 

11.6 

16.6 

11.9 

140.7 

36.0 

5.0 

54.1 

37.9 

7.7 



135.2 
33.8 

50.4 
25.4 
24.9 



7.1 



179 



9 
99.2 

76.9 
3.8 

23.1 
6.8 



14.1 
6.1 
8.0 



13.5 
6.7 
5.7 
1.0 



See footnotes at end of table. 



34 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967 



Companies 



(number) 



Establishments 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 

(number) 



All employees 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man-hours 



(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 



(million 
dollais) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



28 

281 

2812 

2813 

2815 

2816 

2818 

2819 

282 

2821 

2822 

2823 

2824 

283 
2831 
2833 
2834 

284 

2841 
2842 
2843 
2844 

2851 
2861 

287 
2871 
2872 
2879 

289 

2891 

2892 

2893 

2895 

2899 



29 

2911 

295 

2951 

2952 

299 

2992 
2999 

30 

3011 
3021 
3031 
3069 
3079 



3111 
3121 
3131 

314 

3141 

3142 

3151 
3161 

317 

3171 

3172 



32 

3211 

322 

3221 

3229 

3231 
3241 

325 

3251 

3253 

3255 

3259 



CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS. 



841 



INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS 

ALKALIES AND CHLORINE 

INDUSTRIAL GASES 

CYCLIC INTERMEDIATES AND CRUDES. . 

INORGANIC PIGMENTS 

INDUSTRIAL ORGANIC CHEMICALSt NEC. j 
INDUSTRIAL INORGANIC CHEMICALSi NEC 

PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS' 
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND RESINS. . . i 

SYNTHETIC RUBBER 

CELLULOSIC MANMADE FIBERS 

ORGANIC FIBERS" NONCELLULOSIC , . . . 



DRUGS 

BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS 

MEDICINALS AND BOTANICALS. . 
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. 



SOAP. CLEANERS. AND TOILET GOODS 

SOAP AND OTHER DETERGENTS 

POLISHES AND SANITATION GOODS. . . 

SURFACE ACTIVE AGENTS 

TOILET PREPARATIONS 



PAINTS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS 
GUM AND WOOD CHEMICALS . . 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS . . 

FERTILIZERS 

FERTILIZERS. MIXING ONLY . . 
AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALSi NEC. 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICAL PRODUCTS. 

ADHESIVES AND GELATIN 

EXPLOSIVES 

PRINTING INK 

CARBON BLACK 

CHEMICAL PREPARATIONS. NEC . . . . 



PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS. 
PETROLEUM REFINING 



PAVING AND ROOFING MATERIALS 
PAVING MIXTURES AND BLOCKS . . 
ASPHALT FELTS AND COATINGS . . 



MISC. PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS. 
LUBRICATING OILS AND GREASES . . . 
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS. NEC . 



RUBBER AND PLASTICS PRODUCTS. NEC 

TIRES AND INNER TUBES. 

RUBBER FOOTWEAR 

RECLAIMED RUBBER 

FABRICATED RUBBER PRODUCTS. NEC. . . 
MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS PRODUCTS. . . 



LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS . 

LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING. . . 
INDUSTRIAL LEATHER BELTING .... 
FOOTWEAR CUT STOCK 

FOOTWEAR. EXCEPT RUBBER 

SHOES. EXCEPT RUBBER 

HOUSE SLIPPERS 

LEATHER GLOVES AND MITTENS .... 
LUGGAGE 

HANDBAGS. PERSONAL LEATHER GOODS 
WOMEN'S HANDBAGS AND PURSES. . . . 
PERSONAL LEATHER GOODS 

LEATHER GOODS. NEC 

STONE. CLAY. AND GLASS PRODUCTS 

FLAT GLASS 

GLASS. GLASSWARE. PRESSED OR BLOWN 

GLASS CONTAINERS 

PRESSED AND BLOWN GLASS. NEC . . i 

PRODUCTS OF PURCHASED GLASS. . . , 
CEMENT. HYDRAULIC 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS ... 
BRICK AND STRUCTURAL CLAY TILE . 
CERAMIC WALL AND FLOOR TILE. . . 

CLAY REFRACTORIES 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS. NEC. . 



95-5 

19 



113 


507 


115 


177 


65 


98 


339 


488 


408 


718 


549 


771 


508 


660 


33 


48 


13 


23 


22 


40 


992 


1 129 


119 


128 


112 


126 


791 


875 


2 315 


2 508 


599 


668 


965 


1 004 


154 


164 


628 


67 2 


1 459 


1 701 


172 


184 


752 


1 278 


85 


213 


496 


721 


223 


344 


1 752 


2 196 


247 


337 


37 


92 


207 


360 


11 


34 


1 275 


1 373 


1 200 


1 880 


276 


437 


660 


1 098 


553 


872 


115 


226 


293 


345 


256 


298 


38 


47 



5 624 

119 

51 

19 

1 024 

4 495 



47 4 


519 


65 


67 


348 


379 


799 


1 083 


67 6 


951 


125 


132 


136 


147 


328 


333 


781 


792 


488 


496 


293 


296 



989 
40 
156 
107 
60 
268 
358 

423 

340 

28 

20 

35 

407 
44 
45 

318 

674 
207 
203 
71 
193 

680 
42 

509 
184 
210 
115 

624 
113 

52 
124 

29 
306 



293 
155 
138 

124 

109 

15 



182 


110 


65 


55 


24 


13 


189 


67 1 


996 


2 273 



258 
24 
189 

834 

742 

92 

71 
156 

352 
247 
105 



13 044 


15 580 


4 911 


39 


64 


39 


176 


305 


225 


39 


120 


112 


139 


185 


113 


845 


887 


258 


65 


197 


180 


610 


851 


624 


377 


482 


363 


57 


80 


59 


83 


145 


107 


110 


144 


95 



248.3 
19.2 

10.3 
30.0 
12.6 
95.1 
81.2 

172.3 
70.6 
12.6 
31.9 
57.2 

117.9 
7.4 
8.4 

102.0 

Q 6.9 
30.3 

19.4 

5.7 

41.5 

66. 1 
5.9 

"5.7 
20.8 
13.4 
11.5 

88. 3 



Z.t 
33." 



oa°. a 
155.7 

78.5 
251.1 

97.2 
844.9 
662.4 

292.3 
568.8 

110.4 
198.2 
415.9 

942. 3 
53.8 

67. 1 
821.4 

68 3.8 

243.0 

128.7 

49.9 

262.2 

492.0 
33.5 

280.5 
129.2 

70.6 
80.7 

627.8 
73.8 

227.0 
74.0 
22.8 

230.2 



26.5 

12.2 
14.4 


186.2 
°0.0 
96.3 


8.4 
7.3 
1. 1 


64.9 

58.0 
6.9 


516.7 


3 286.5 


92.7 

29. 1 

1.7 

141.6 

251.6 


774.5 

141. 1 

11.8 

923.0 

1 436.1 


328.7 


1 458.8 


30.7 

2.7 

13.7 


186.4 
15.9 
59.9 


211.1 

198.5 

12.5 


888.5 

835.3 

53.2 


6.3 
21.4 


22.4 
96.6 


36.8 
24.1 
12.7 


162.7 

104.5 

58.2 



589.9 


3 825.5 


23.9 


196.6 


109.2 


688.4 


66.7 


426.1 


42.5 


262.3 


29.2 


182. 1 


32.6 


247.7 


60.3 


343.9 


27.5 


143.8 


10.6 


60.6 


12.6 


84.3 


9.7 


55.2 



54] .4 

161.5 
12.8 

5.', 
20. 3 

8.9 
62.4 
51.8 

121.3 

4 6.8 

8.5 

25.3 

40.7 

65.6 
4.8 
5.6 

55.2 

61 .3 

20.0 
11.8 



36.3 
4.6 



15.2 
8.9 
6.9 



5.9 

24.1 

6.4 



99.2 

75.6 

19.0 
8.5 
10.4 

4.8 
3.9 



410. 1 

71.4 

25.7 

1.4 

107.6 

204.0 



26.4 

2.0 
12.2 

191.1 
180.0 

11 .0 

5.6 
18.4 

32.4 
21.7 
10.7 



469 


3 


19 


8 


95 


o 


59 


4 


36 


5 


23 


9 


26 


2 


49 


9 


23 


3 


a 


5 


10 


1 


8 


1 



',28.6 
25.5 

4 1.3 

17.7 

126.4 

106.2 

24". 3 
95.6 
16.8 
50.0 
80.° 

128.2 

9.', 

11 .7 

107.2 

119.2 

40. 1 

22.6 

6.3 

50.2 

7 3.i 
9.0 

63.6 

32.2 

17.8 
13.6 



13.6 

5.2 

42.0 



202.1 

151.6 



40.9 
18.0 



9.6 

7.9 
1.7 



815.5 

136.5 

46.5 

2.5 

215.1 

414.9 



52.8 

4.0 

22.7 

354.3 

333.7 

20.5 

9.9 

34.2 

61.4 
41.7 
19,7 



191.6 

119.4 

72.2 

iI7. 4 
52.5 



17.6 
19.2 

-16.5 



3 555.2 

1 228.3 

94.4 

36.6 

152.9 

63.2 

49Q.R 



66.5 
141.1 
257.° 

"05. 1 
25.1 
41. U 

338.6 

3U7.4 

145.3 
56. 5 
20.6 

125.0 

22 3.4 



162. 
86. 



367. 1 

36.1 



124.6 
58.4 

66.2 

29.6 

24.3 

5.2 



573.8 
112.8 
8.9 
618.3 
998.7 



2 784.1 

157.6 

573.9 
362.3 
211.6 

134.7 
184. 4 

253.7 

109.8 
41.8 
59.2 
42.9 



7 736.6 
419.2 
400.° 
7 29. 5 
316. 3 

3 57 5.3 

2 295.4 

3 7°8.6 
1 635.1 

4 04.° 

50 6.8 

! 252.8 

4 07?.° 
109.2 



403.7 
666.1 
129.5 
730.6 

3 18.5 
100.8 

005.8 
U34. 1 
195.3 
376.3 



211.3 
376.0 
166.6 
100.8 
732.4 



455.8 
234.7 
221.1 

225. 1 
200.7 

24. 4 



6 799.5 

1 823.0 

244.9 

23.4 

1 740.5 

2 967.7 



142.5 


319.4 


10.4 


31.5 


45.8 


109.2 


720.8 


1 619.9 


680.8 


1 525.7 


40.0 


94. 2 


17.9 


36.3 


69.4 


186.0 


121.2 


278,7 


82.8 


173.6 


38. 4 


105. 1 



8 333.4 

422.9 

1 501. 1 
842.2 
658.9 

393.9 
812.3 

611.9 
251. 1 
105.9 
151.4 
103.4 



4 


080 


7 




719 


8 




588 


7 


1 


596 


3 




549 


3 


6 


37 7 


8 


4 


248 


4 


7 


336 


3 


3 


47 3 


9 




926 


9 




90? 


8 


2 


033 


2 


5 


301 


6 




160 







445 


2 


4 


696 


4 


6 


511 


? 


2 


593 


4 


i 


1 08 







?94 


? 


2 


515 


6 



215.° 

2 2 745.0 
I 196.9 

7 31.1 
817.0 

2 3 045.7 
473.6 
647.0 
37 5.6 
167.8 

1 381.6 



22 43.4 
20 293.9 



1 182.4 
584.6 



567. 1 
487.3 

79.8 



2 1? 758.6 

3 733.9 

427.0 

43.8 

3 139.4 

5 414.5 



870. 1 

53.8 

262.8 

2 2 951.5 

2 770.5 

181.0 

86.7 
334.2 

2 513.5 
327.2 
186.2 



' 2 238.6 
1 352.4 

886.2 

794.7 
1 246.5 

2 921.5 
362.0 
160.5 
246. 1 
152.9 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



35 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963 -Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967--Continued 



Capital expenditures, new' 



Total 



(million 
dollars) 



Structures 
and 

additions 
to plant 
(million 
dollars) 



Inventories end of-- 



Machinery 

and 
equipment 

(million 
dollars) 



1967 

(million 
dollars) 



1966 



(million 
dollars) 



Special- 
ization 
ratio 1 

(per- 
cent) 



Cover- 
age 
ratio 



(per 
cent; 



1963 



All employees 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 

(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 

new 

(million 
dollars) 



28 

281 

2812 

2813 

2815 

2816 

2818 

2819 

282 
2821 
2822 
2823 

2821 



CHEMICALS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS. 



INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS 

ALKALIES AND CHLORINE 

INDUSTRIAL GASES , 

CYCLIC INTERMEDIATES AND CRUDES. . i 

INORGANIC PIGMENTS . 

INDUSTRIAL ORGANIC CHEMICALS' NEC. i 
INDUSTRIAL INORGANIC CHEMICALSt NEC, 

PLASTICS MATERIALS AND SYNTHETICS, 
PLASTICS MATERIALS AND RESINS. . . , 

SYNTHETIC RUBBER 

CELLULOSIC MANMADE FIBERS 

ORGANIC FIBERSi NONCELLULOSIC . . . , 



283 DRUGS 

2831 BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS 

2833 MEDICINALS AND BOTANICALS. . 

2834 PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. 



284 

2841 

2842 

2843 

2844 

2851 
2861 

287 
2871 
2872 
2879 

289 

2891 

2892 

2893 

2895 

2899 



29 

2911 

295 

2951 

2952 

299 

2992 

2999 

30 

3011 
3021 
3031 
3069 
3079 



3111 
3121 

3131 

314 

3141 

3142 

3151 
3161 

317 

3171 

3172 



32 

3211 

322 

3221 

3229 

3231 
3241 

325 

3251 

3253 

3255 

3259 



soap. cleaners. and toilet goods 

soap and other detergents 

polishes and sanitation goods. . . 

surface active agents 

toilet preparations 



PAINTS AND ALLIED PRODUCTS 
GUM AND WOOD CHEMICALS . . 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS . . 

FERTILIZERS 

FERTILIZERS. MIXING ONLY . . 
AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS. NEC. 



MISCELLANEOUS CHEMICAL PRODUCTS. 

ADHESIVES AND GELATIN 

EXPLOSIVES 

PRINTING INK 

CARBON BLACK 

CHEMICAL PREPARATIONS. NEC . . . . 



PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS. 
PETROLEUM REFINING 



PAVING AND ROOFING MATERIALS 
PAVING MIXTURES AND BLOCKS . . 
ASPHALT FELTS AND COATINGS . . 



MISC. PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS. 
LUBRICATING OILS AND GREASES . . . . 
PETROLEUM AND COAL PRODUCTS. NEC . . 



RUBBER AND PLASTICS PRODUCTS. NEC 



TIRES AND INNER TUBES 

RUBBER FOOTWEAR 

RECLAIMED RUBBER 

FABRICATED RUBBER PRODUCTS' NEC. 
MISCELLANEOUS PLASTICS PRODUCTS, 



LEATHER AND LEATHER PRODUCTS 

LEATHER TANNING AND FINISHING. , 
INDUSTRIAL LEATHER BELTING . . . 
FOOTWEAR CUT STOCK 



FOOTWEAR. EXCEPT RUBBER. 
SHOES. EXCEPT RUBBER . . . 
HOUSE SLIPPERS 



LEATHER GLOVES AND MITTENS 
LUGGAGE 



HANDBAGS' PERSONAL LEATHER GOOOS 
WOMEN'S HANDBAGS AND PURSES. . . . 
PERSONAL LEATHER GOODS 



LEATHER GOODS' NEC 

STONE. CLAY. AND GLASS PRODUCTS. 

FLAT GLASS 

GLASS' GLASSWARE' PRESSED OR BLOWN 
GLASS CONTAINERS 

PRESSED AND BLOWN GLASS. NEC . . . . 



PRODUCTS OF PURCHASED GLASS. 
CEMENT. HYDRAULIC. . . . . . 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS . . 
BRICK AND STRUCTURAL CLAY TILE 
CERAMIC WALL AND FLOOR TILE. . 

CLAY REFRACTORIES 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS' NEC. 



20.8 
781 .2 
261 . " 



51 .6 
^Qo.7 

217.0 
12.1 
36.2 

169.6 

125.2 
48.1 
16.4 



70.7 
20.5 

205.2 

133.1 

13.0 

54.0 

128.7 
22.0 
21.8 

7. 1 
23." 
54.5 



ooo, 3 
956.3 



32.6 
23.8 



10.3 
8.5 
l.fl 



677.2 

198.8 

9.6 

1.6 

134.6 

332.6 



16.7 
1.1 
2.7 

26.4 
25.2 



4.2 

2.1 



70.8 
81.° 

21.9 

°0.5 

59.3 
27.1 

4.7 
17.0 

9.7 



286.4 

13. 3 

17.5 

24 . 6 

3.1 

152.6 
75. ? 

1 30.5 
59 . 2 
12.3 
10.6 
48. u 

91.9 
5.2 



40.4 
11.5 

8.2 

1.3 

28.4 

28.8 
3.7 

32.9 

15. 3 

6.0 

11.6 

35.3 
9.2 
4.2 
2.0 
3.6 

15.3 



560. 3 
547.8 



o.5 
7.9 



3. 1 

2.9 

.1 

1 39 . 6 

29.5 

1. 1 

.3 

30.8 

77.9 



6.9 

6.7 

.3 



193.0 

o.2 

33. 6 
1 8. 3 

20.4 

5.5 
21.7 

14.0 

7.1 

. 6 

4.1 

2.2 



84.7 
106.2 
111.6 

17.7 
623.5 
186.1 

616.0 

250.8 

62.9 

41.0 

261. 3 



75. 
36. 



6. 
24. 



172.2 

1 17.8 
11 .9 



93.4 

12.6 
17.5 
5.1 
19.8 
38.2 



438.9 

408.6 

23.1 

15.9 

7.2 

7.3 

1 .7 

537.6 

169. 3 

8.5 

1.3 

103.8 

254.7 

42. 3 

11.6 

.8 

1.9 

19.5 

18.5 

1.0 

. 3 
4.0 

3.4 
1.7 



627.8 

50.7 

114.1 
52.6 

61.5 

16.4 
68.0 

45.3 
20.0 

". 1 

13.8 

7.5 



5 348.7 

1 7 37.8 
71.4 
21.2 
261.8 
108.6 
301.1 
473.8 

868.8 
395.3 
97. 
108.8 
267.7 

741 .5 
46. 1 
83.5 

61 1 .9 

680.2 
250.5 
114.0 
37.6 
278.0 

425.7 
46.2 

524.0 
245.2 
133.2 
145.6 

323.4 
59.6 
30.1 
44. 7 
16. 1 

163.9 



62.1 

10.7 
42.4 



53.3 
10.0 



526.0 

91.3 

5.4 

412.0 

635.3 



135.8 

7.6 

25.1 

361.2 

336.2 

25.0 

14.2 
45. 3 

52.2 
26.1 
26.0 



1 851.2 

03.I 

232.9 
154.3 
128.6 

133.6 

204. 3 

191.1 
60.6 
35.2 
65.6 
2°.7 



610.2 

'7.6 

19.5 

248.1 

'04.3 



742.6 


428. 1 


865. 1 


378.9 


06.6 


120.2 


269.4 


682.6 


37.5 


76.5 


568.6 


606.0 


231.0 


99 . 3 


35.1 


241.0 


4 06.1 


43.6 


477.6 


222.8 


131.7 


123.1 


305.1 


55.9 


38.6 


41.5 


15.o 


153.2 


1 860.9 


1 730.8 


63.9 


16.5 


47. 4 


66. 1 


53.2 


13.0 


1 600.9 


511 .7 


02.2 


6.8 


405.4 


584.8 


667.4 


147.8 


0.1 


25.3 


368.4 


343.° 


24.4 


15.3 


37.8 


51.5 


24.9 


26.5 


12.2 


1 803.5 


88.0 


288.0 


170.5 


117.5 


125.2 


105.5 


186.9 


56.6 


35.1 


64.8 


30.5 



(NA) 

(na) 



73 

84 
72 

21 86 

(NA) 
83 
80 

(na ! 
9? 

(na! 



(na ) 

S3 
80 



(NA) 

86 

37 

(NA ) 
34 
92 
03 
100 
82 



(NA) 

98 

(NA) 
03 
91 

(NA) 
04 



(NA ) 

95 
'NA) 
83 
88 
93 



(NA) 



(NA) 
98 



(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 
98 



(NA 

(NA 

75 

8 

66 
11.5 

31 
21 78 

(NA) 
60 
81 

(NA) 
o/l 

(NA) 
61 
56 
97 

(NA ) 
90 
75 
54 
80 

96 
76 

(NA) 
95 
97 
72 

(NA) 



03 

95 

(NA) 



(NA) 
95 
95 

(NA) 

12 32 

92 



(na! 
99 

(NA) 

75 
8° 
84 



(NA) 
98 



(NA) 
98 
92 

86 



(NA) 

(0) 

(NA) 

98 

(D) 
00 

(NA) 
90 

QO 

02 



2 36.6 
19.7 

9.8 
27.7 
11.5 
85.5 

82.4 

144.7 
61.4 
11.8 
30.1 
41 .4 

00. 
5.8 
8.1 

85.1 

85.5 
30.8 
16.3 
4. 1 
34.3 

61.3 
6.8 

42.9 

20.0 

13.3 

9.1 

60.6 
8.5 

14.8 
8.5 
3.0 

25.8 



152.5 

r 118.3 

24.3 
9.7 

14.6 

O. Q 
8.4 
1.5 

414.9 

85. 3 

2°.l 

2.0 

132.2 

166.3 



31.4 

2.9 

14.3 

212.7 

201.7 

11.0 



98.0 
60.0 
33.0 

26.2 
34.9 

65. 
28.6 
12.8 

11.4 



763.2 
138.2 

66.6 
201.9 

76.4 
677. 3 
603.0 



973.9 
4 37 . 6 
93.5 
167.0 
275.8 

673.8 
33.8 
59.3 

580.6 

525.8 

214.1 
96.6 
31.9 

183.3 

401.2 
32.7 

213.1 
102.3 

59.4 
51.5 

386.0 
54.9 
91.5 
55.0 
20.7 

162.9 



144.5 
62.1 
82.5 



66.9 


57.9 


9.0 


364.0 


621.7 


130.4 


13.6 


760.8 


8 37.6 


227.8 


163.3 


15.9 


53.4 


753.4 


713.6 


39.8 


24. 4 


62. 


135.8 


88.5 


47.4 


18.7 


212.5 


172.2 


535.2 


328.0 


207.3 


138. 3 


227.4 


320. 


1 30.4 


63.7 


64.8 


62.0 



17 585.9 

6 171.1 
389.2 
260.2 
605.3 
286.4 

2 727.4 

1 O02.6 

2 865.3 

1 202.3 
329.5 
411.5 
922.0 

2 8 07.4 

60.4 

151.3 

2 595.7 



2 866.4 

1 137.4 

420.4 

75.7 

1 2 32.9 

1 111.7 
100.3 

628.2 
287.8 
164.1 
176.3 

1 035.5 
147.0 
165.7 
125.1 
ol. 8 
505.9 



31 718.5 

11 109.1 
652.1 
425.4 

1 212.8 
484.8 

4 840.2 
3 493.9 

5 470.4 

2 571.5 
763.9 

731.8 

1 403.2 

3 715.9 

95.7 
305.8 

3 314. 3 

4 855.5 

2 127.8 
757.2 
177.8 

1 792.7 

2 456.4 
212.9 

1 963.9 
869.2 
623.1 
476.7 

1 983.8 
351.7 
283.3 
268.0 
149.1 
931.7 



17 995.4 



3 


138.2 




355.6 




165.6 




190.0 




220.1 




199.1 




21.0 


4 


654.0 


1 


321.7 




217.0 




27. 4 


1 


427.0 


1 


660.9 


2 


078.6 




273. 1 




32.9 




90.6 


1 


279.3 


1 


214.7 




64.6 




32.2 




112.8 




225.0 




142.6 




82.4 




32.7 


7 


043.8 




364.5 


1 


101.8 




629.6 




472.2 




309.7 




785.7 




553.7 




216.5 




110.6 




113.2 




108.4 



955.1 
427.5 
527.6 

542.8 
471.2 

71.5 



949.7 
354.2 



598. 
165. 



758.4 

51.9 
229.3 

2 372.7 

2 249.2 

123.5 

30.6 
21.0 

439.4 
280.3 
159.0 



12 289.1 

54T.4 

1 635.4 

1 004.5 

630.9 

627.3 
1 176.9 

841.7 
325.1 
164.7 
192.2 
159.7 



813.3 
57.5 
93.5 

106. a 

17.4 
401.0 
137.1 

378.6 

137.8 

32.3 

38.1 

170.3 

113.3 

10.1 
14.0 
89.3 



84.7 
44. 1 
13.3 
7.2 
20.2 

37.7 
5.6 

66.6 

45.5 

12.0 

9.1 

45.9 
9.8 
5.5 
4.6 
4. 

22.1 



22.0 

15.1 

7.0 

6.5 
4.7 
1.8 



343.5 

112.8 

6.9 

1.3 

65.0 

157.5 



19.6 

18.5 

1.1 

.3 
1.9 

3.2 
l.o 
1.3 



607.6 

28.2 

76.5 
53.8 
22.7 

13.2 
120.8 

42.2 

19.3 

9.1 

7.9 

5.o 



See footnotes at end of table. 



36 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967 



Establishments 



Companies 



(number) 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 

(number) 



All employees 



Number 



(1.000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



Man-hours 



(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



326 

3261 

3262 

3263 

3264 

3269 

327 

3271 

3272 

3273 

3274 

3275 

3281 



STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS 
PRODUCTS — CON. 

POTTERY AND RELATED PRODUCTS . . . 

VITREOUS PLUMBING FIXTURES 

VITREOUS CHINA FOOD UTENSILS ► ■ i t 
FINE EARTHENWARE FOOD UTENSILS . . . 
PORCELAIN ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES. . . . 
POTTERY PRODUCTSi NEC 

CONCRETE. GYPSUM> PLASTER PRODUCTS 
CONCRETE BLOCK AND BRICK ....... 

CONCRETE PRODuCTSi NEC 

READY-MIXED CONCRETE 

LIME 

GYPSUM PRODUCTS 

CUT STONE AND STONE PRODUCTS . . . . 



329 MISC. NONMETALLIC MINERAL PRODUCTS 

3291 ABRASIVE PRODUCTS. ... 

3292 [ASBESTOS PRODUCTS 

3293 .GASKETS AND INSULATIONS 

3295 
3296 
3297 
3299 



33 

331 

3312 

3313 

3315 

3316 

3317 



MINERALS. GROUND OR TREATED. . . . 

MINERAL WOOL 

NONCLAY REFRACTORIES 

NONMETALLIC MINERAL PRODUCTS" NEC. 



PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES . . . 

BLAST FURNACE. BASIC STEEL PROD. 
BLAST FURNACES AND STEEL MILLS . . 
ELECTROMETALLURGICAL PRODUCTS. . . 
STEEL WIRE AND RELATED PRODUCTS. . 
COLD FINISHING OF STEEL SHAPES . . 
STEEL PIPE AND TUBES 



332 IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES 

3321 GRAY IRON FOUNDRIES. . . . 

3322 MALLEABLE IRON FOUNDRIES . 

3323 STEEL FOUNDRIES 



333 

3331 
3332 
3333 

3334 
3339 

3341 

335 

3351 

3352 

3356 

3357 

336 
3361 
3362 
3369 

339 
3391 
3392 
3399 



3411 

342 

3421 

3423 

3425 

3429 

343 
3431 
3432 
3433 

344 

3441 

3442 

3443 

3444 

3446 

3449 

345 

3451 

3452 



347 

3471 

3479 



PRIMARY NONFERROUS METALS. . 

PRIMARY COPPER 

PRIMARY LEAD 

PRIMARY ZINC ......... 

PRIMARY ALUMINUM 

PRIMARY NONFERROUS METALS. NEC 



SECONDARY NONFERROUS METALS. 



NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING . . 

COPPER ROLLING AND DRAWING 

ALUMINUM ROLLING AND DRAWING . . . . 
NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING. NEC. 
NONFERROUS WIREDRAWING. INSULATING . 

NONFERROUS FOUNDRIES 

ALUMINUM CASTINGS 

BRASS. BRONZE. AND COPPER CASTINGS . 
NONFERROUS CASTINGS, NEC 

MISC. PRIMARY METAL PRODUCTS . . . 

IRON AND STEEL FORGINGS 

NONFERROUS FORGINGS 

PRIMARY METAL PRODUCTSi NEC 



FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS. . . . 

METAL CANS 

CUTLERY. HANDTOOLS. AND HARDWARE . 

CUTLERY 

HAND AND EDGE TOOLS. NEC 

HANDSAWS AND SAW BLADES 

HARDWARE. NEC 

PLUMBING AND HEATING EXC . ELECTRIC 

METAL SANITARY WARE 

PLUMBING FITTINGS AND BRASS GOODS. . 
HEATING EQUIPMENT. EXCEPT ELECTRIC . 

FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PROD.. 

FABRICATED STRUCTURAL STEEL 

METAL DOORS. SASH. AND TRIM" 

FABRICATED PLATEWORK (BOILER SHOPS). 

SHEET METALWORK 

ARCHITECTURAL METALWORK 

MISCELLANEOUS METALWORK 

SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS. BOLTS. ETC 

SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS 

BOLTS. NUTS. RIVETS. AND WASHERS . . 

METAL STAMPINGS 

METAL SERVICES. NEC 

PLATING AND POLISHING 

METAL COATING AND ALLIED SERVICES. . 



3481 MISC. FABRICATED WIRE PRODUCTS . 
See footnotes at end of table. 





574 




619 




34 




51 




35 




39 




20 




21 




65 




74 




424 




434 


8 


638 


10 


004 


1 


534 


1 


599 


3 


055 


3 


412 


4 


032 


4 


760 




78 




116 




55 




117 




776 




811 


1 


485 


1 


842 




320 




361 




81 




138 




288 




301 




382 




504 




77 




116 




59 




92 




325 




330 



563 
200 



123 

265 

969 

72 

256 

77 

u 

10 

li 



351 

527 
86 

155 
115 
206 

1 827 
970 
516 
352 



140 

248 

37 

868 



96 

1 810 

138 

630 

74 

979 

781 

83 

210 

496 

9 558 
1 865 
1 540 

1 346 

2 942 

1 360 
594 

2 415 
1 847 

577 



4 555 
3 170 
1 393 



861 

329 

34 

240 
107 
151 

1 438 

1 061 

81 

296 

144 
32 
19 
18 
25 
50 

403 

833 

125 
218 
142 
348 

1 886 
992 
534 
360 

1 272 

272 

41 

959 



299 

1 939 

146 

667 

85 

1 041 

838 

91 

214 

533 

10 151 

1 960 

1 646 

1 465 

3 054 

1 377 
649 

2 536 
1 874 

662 



s 4 684 
s 3 241 
5 1 443 



231 
40 
28 
17 
50 
96 

450 
349 
802 

150 
71 
78 

196 

708 

165 

99 

123 

130 

74 

64 

53 



673 
259 

31 
171 

86 
126 

1 097 

774 

75 

248 

121 
32 
18 
18 
24 
29 

182 

620 
108 
163 
74 
275 

798 
411 
207 
180 

591 

189 

31 

371 



241 

854 
69 

252 
49 

484 

389 
51 
90 

248 

3 705 
1 035 
597 
784 
311 
198 
280 

1 073 
681 
292 



1 204 
855 
349 



42.7 
8.4 
7.0 
5.9 

13.4 
7.9 

169.1 
21. 1 
56.8 
74.5 
6.8 
10.0 

16.6 

106.1 

27.2 

21.3 

18.5 

8.9 

15.1 

9.9 

5.3 



617.3 
533.1 
10.4 
19.5 
19.5 
27. 

232.6 

138.0 

25.4 

69.2 

53.4 

11.6 

2.7 

8.1 

23.8 

7.2 

17.2 

194.9 

40.3 
61.5 
21.3 
71.7 

89.6 
45.2 
17.9 
26.6 

76.0 
41.2 
10.1 
24.7 



60.3 

155.9 

13.0 

35.9 

6.3 

100.8 

65.2 
10.1 
14.5 
40.6 

387.9 
107.5 
63.9 
96.4 
68. 1 
19.3 
32.7 

116.1 
49.0 
67.2 



81.3 
55.1 
26.2 



246.9 
56.5 
36.1 
27.5 
89.9 
37.0 

1 103.3 

130.1 

351.1 

508.8 

42.6 

70.7 

90.8 

725.8 

197.5 

144.0 

115.3 

59.3 

106.9 

72.1 

30.6 



5 021.9 
4 385.3 

79.0 
194.8 
154.9 
207.9 

1 640.5 
965.3 
187.0 
488.2 

405.1 
80.6 
18.9 
57.8 

190.9 
56.9 

122.8 

1 438.4 
293.9 
479.4 
163.5 
501.6 

609.3 
312.9 
119.8 
176.7 

612.9 

345.9 

87.5 

179.4 



9 319.5 
474.4 

1 043.1 

80.2 
232.9 

43.4 
686.7 

427.9 
71.3 
92.6 

264.0 

2 686.8 
773.6 
378.5 
700.4 
490.7 
123.0 
220.7 

847.1 
349.1 
498.1 



481.4 
323.2 
158.2 



36.0 

7.0 
6.0 
5.3 

11.0 
6.7 

122.7 

14.6 

45.4 

49.2 

5.7 



14.1 

80.7 

18.9 

16.8 

14.1 

7.0 

12.2 

7.4 

4.3 



500.8 

434.0 

8.4 

21.7 

14.9 

21.8 

198.3 

119.3 
21.4 
57.6 

42.2 
9.2 
2.1 
6.4 

19.2 
5.2 

12.8 

151.1 
32.2 
48.7 
14.8 
55.3 

76.0 
38.8 

15.1 
22.1 

60.5 
33.4 

7.4 
19.7 



1 056.9 

52.3 

123.9 

10.4 

28.7 

4.8 

80.0 

48.5 

8.1 

11.4 

29.0 

292.5 

80.1 
47.9 
73.1 
5^. n 
15.4 
23.2 

93.7 
41.5 
52.2 



69.0 
46.8 
22.2 



70.1 
13.8 
11.2 
9.8 
Zi-.i- 
13.1 

255.0 
30.6 
94.2 

100.7 

12.0 
17.5 

28.3 

162.1 
36.3 
35.0 
27.8 
14.4 
25.5 
14.8 
8.3 



981.6 
845.4 
17.2 
44.1 
29.8 
45. 1 

402.1 
242.3 

43.0 
116.8 

85.4 

18.1 
4.3 
13.5 
38.4 
11.2 

26.6 

313.4 
64.5 

101.0 
30.9 

117.0 

154.5 
78.8 
30.6 

45.0 

125.0 
67.2 
16.5 
41.4 



112.7 

259.9 
20.5 
57.9 
10.1 

171." 

96.8 
16.4 
22.8 
57.5 

501.5 

163.6 

94.3 

150.4 

105.8 

29.5 

47.4 

196.7 

88.2 

108.5 

379.3 

137.4 
92.5 
44.9 



190.0 
45.7 
27.3 
22.6 
67.5 
27.0 

719.0 

77.0 

247.9 

308.6 

33.4 

52.2 

70.9 

499.7 
119.2 
107.5 
76.8 
41.7 
83.0 
49.5 
21.1 



3 829.2 

3 368.4 

58.6 

138.0 
108.8 
155.4 

1 306.7 
780.2 
147.3 
379.2 

300.5 
61.0 
13.3 
42.9 

145.2 
38.1 

78.4 

1 02 7.0 
219.0 
354. ° 
100.4 
352.7 

464.0 

243.6 

89.2 

131.2 

451.5 

265.6 

61.4 

124.5 



393.3 

742.2 
54.5 

165.8 
29.5 

492.4 

278.4 
53.5 
64.2 

160.7 

1 777.0 
509.0 
235.7 
477.5 
336.0 
81.5 
137.4 



605.7 
258.5 
347.2 



356.1 
239.1 
116.9 



418.7 

111.4 

55.8 

34.6 

153.5 

63.4 

478.0 
274.2 
722.6 
155.5 
100.1 
225.6 

148.2 

546.5 
420.7 
308.1 
205.5 
149.4 
247.3 
158.7 
56.8 



19 978.2 

10 170.1 
8 910.1 
193.2 
269. 1 
269.1 
412. 1 

<L 631.0 

1 543.1 

296.5 

791.4 



1 381.5 
262.6 
"8.3 
119.5 
811.8 
139.3 

271.2 

3 324. o 
704.4 
938.7 
351.7 

1 330.1 

1 067.5 
516.6 
226.8 
324.1 



131.9 
607.4 
154.4 
370.2 



1 141.5 

2 318.3 
276.3 
500.4 

97. 1 
1 435.5 

871.9 
140.6 
i83.3 
547. o 

4 034.3 
1 319.3 
651.1 
1 393.4 
889.3 
232.6 
448.6 

1 620.9 
641.5 
979.4 



S64.3 
574.8 
289.6 



2 605.4 

170.0 

67.2 

47.1 

225.0 

96.1 

-'4 999.6 
550.1 

1 201 1 

2 684.2 
176.5 
387.7 

2 236 . 4 



795, 
725, 
575, 
352, 
280, 
454, 
307, 
99, 



2 46 730.9 

23 121.0 

19 620.6 

467.9 

845.2 

1 038.'' 

148.6 



1 



289.3 
637.8 
438.3 
213.2 



3 714.0 

1 184.1 

304.0 

332.8 

1 608.7 

284.4 

1 586.0 

; 9 925.4 

2 391.1 

2 958.9 
984.0 

3 591.4 



2 1 


922. 







920 


5 




445 


2 




556. 


3 


2 2 


173 


2 


1 


261 


6 




333 


1 




578 


5 


34 


577 


8 


2 


890 


6 


2 3 


714 


6 




378 


5 




813 


5 




154 


3 


2 


368 


3 


z l 


724 







251 


2 




404 


7 


2 1 


069 





10 


449 


2 


2 


967 


8 


1 


413 


6 




688 


5 


1 


812 


4 




484 


9 


1 


082 





2 2 


665 


.4 


1 


021 


5 


1 


643 


.9 


5 


393 


,7 


2 1 


262 


,4 




791 


.1 




471 


.3 


1 


220 


4 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



37 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963 -Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967-Continued 



Capital expenditures, new' 



Total 



(million 
dollars) 



Structures 
and 

additions 
to plant 
(million 
dollars) 



Machinery 

and 
equipment 

(million 
dollars) 



Inventories end of- 



1967 



(million 
dollars) 



1966 



(million 
dollars) 



Special- 
ization 
ratio 



(per- 
cent) 



Cover- 
age 
ratio 



(per- 
cent) 



1963 



All employees 



Number 



(1.000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 

(million 
dollars) 



Value ot 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 

new 

(million 
dollars) 



326 

3261 

3262 

3263 

3264 

3269 

327 

3271 

3272 

3273 

3274 

3275 

3281 

329 

3291 

3292 

3293 

3295 

3296 

3297 

3299 



33 

331 

3312 

3313 

3315 

3316 

3317 

332 
3321 
3322 
3323 

333 

3331 

3332 

3333 

3334 

3339 

3341 



STONE, CLAY, AND GLASS 
PRODUCTS — CON. 

POTTERY AND RELATED PRODUCTS . . . 

VITREOUS PLUMBING FIXTURES 

VITREOUS CHINA FOOD UTENSILS . . . . 
FINE EARTHENWARE FOOD UTENSILS . . . 
PORCELAIN ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES. . . . 
POTTERY PRODUCTS. NEC 

CONCRETE. GYPSUM. PLASTER PRODUCTS 

CONCRETE BLOCK AND BRICK 

CONCRETE PRODUCTS. NEC 

READY-MIXED CONCRETE 

LIME 

GYPSUM PRODUCTS 

CUT STONE AND STONE PRODUCTS . . . . 

MISC. NONMETALLIC MINERAL PRODUCTS 

ABRASIVE PRODUCTS 

ASBESTOS PRODUCTS 

GASKETS AND INSULATIONS 

MINEkALS" GROUND OR TREATED 

MINERAL WOOL 

NONCLAY REFRACTORIES 

NONMETALLIC MINERAL PRODUCTS. NEC. . 



PRIMARY METAL INDUSTRIES ., . . 

BLAST FURNACE. BASIC STEEL PROD. 
BLAST FURNACES AND STEEL MILLS . . 
ELECTROMETALLURGICAL PRODUCTS. . . 
STEEL WIRE AND RELATED PRODUCTS. . 
COLD FINISHING OF STEEL SHAPES . . 
STEEL PIPE AND TUBES 



IRON AND STEEL FOUNDRIES 
GRAY IRON FOUNDRIES. . . . 
MALLEABLE IRON FOUNDRIES . 
STEEL FOUNDRIES 



PRIMARY NONFERROUS METALS. . 

PRIMARY COPPER . 

PRIMARY LEAD 

PRIMARY ZINC 

PRIMARY ALUMINUM 

PRIMARY NONFERROUS METALS. NEC 



SECONDARY NONFERROUS METALS. 



335 NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING 

3351 COPPER ROLLING AND DRAWING 

3352 ALUMINUM ROLLING AND DRAWING . . . , 

3356 NONFERROUS ROLLING AND DRAWING. NEC. 

3357 NONFERROUS WIREDRAWING. INSULATING . 



336 
3361 
3362 
3369 

339 
3391 
3392 
3399 



34 

3411 

342 

3421 

3423 

3425 

3429 

343 
3431 
3432 
3433 

344 

3441 

3442 

3443 

3444 

3446 

3449 

345 

3451 

3452 



347 

3471 

3479 



NONFERROUS FOUNDRIES 

ALUMINUM CASTINGS 

BRASS. BRONZE. AND COPPER CASTINGS 
NONFERROUS CASTINGS. NEC 



MISC. PRIMARY METAL PRODUCTS 
IRON AND STEEL FORGINGS. . . . 

NONFERROUS FORGINGS 

PRIMARY METAL PRODUCTS. NEC. . 



FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS. 
METAL CANS 



CUTLERY. HANDTOOLS. AND HARDWARE 

CUTLERY 

HAND AND EDGE TOOLS. NEC 

HANDSAWS AND SAW BLADES 

HAROWARE. NEC 



PLUMBING AND HEATING EXC . ELECTRK 

METAL SANITARY WARE , 

PLUMBING FITTINGS AND BRASS GOODS. . 
HEATING EQUIPMENT. EXCEPT ELECTRIC . 

FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PROD.. 
FABRICATED STRUCTURAL STEEL. . . . 

METAL DOORS. SASH. AND TRIM 

FABRICATED PLATEWORK (BOILER SHOPS). 

SHEET METALWORK 

ARCHITECTURAL METALWORK 

MISCELLANEOUS METALWORK 



SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS. BOLTS. ETC 

SCREft' MACHINE PRODUCTS 

BOLTS. NUTS. RIVETS. AND WASHERS . . 



METAL STAMPINGS. 



METAL SERVICES. NEC 

PLATING AND POLISHING 

METAL COATING AND ALLIED SERVICES. 



2.6 
1.9 
1.0 

21.4 
3.0 

271.8 
30.5 
73.8 

136.9 
17.7 
12.9 

6.1 

128.7 
30.4 
18.9 

9.2 
23.5 
27.2 
17.3 

2.2 



3 134.1 

1 911.0 

2°.3 

56.9 

126.0 

37.8 

275.0 

196.3 

21.9 

56.8 

272.8 
51.7 
18.5 
25.8 

151.7 
25.1 

23.6 

470.0 
68.0 

155.6 
58.1 

188.3 

69.4 
38.7 
12.4 
18.2 

112.4 
45.0 
32.4 
35.0 



99.2 

120.0 

11.5 

23.3 

3.9 

81.3 

47.1 
7.6 
8.2 

31.3 

257.6 
76.6 
24.3 
81.9 
44.4 
7.4 
23.0 

120.4 
49.7 
70.7 



55.1 
33.1 
22.0 



10.7 

1.1 
.6 

.1 



60.4 

8.1 

11.7 

35.6 

2.0 

3.0 

1.5 

31.4 
8.5 
3.0 
2.3 

5.1 

6.0 

5.8 

.6 



689.9 

389.8 

324.1 

5.1 

24.2 

27. 3 

9.1 

63.6 

44.6 

4.0 

15.0 

88.9 
9.8 
4.9 
2.0 

67.4 
4.8 

7.5 



31.1 
12.7 
46.5 

16.9 
8.9 
3.4 
4.6 

25.8 
10.4 



284.2 
11.8 



1 .5 

6.8 

.9 

17.6 

14.0 
1.5 

2.1 
10.4 

92.4 

28.8 

7.6 

28.6 

14.8 
2.7 
10.0 

27.2 
9.5 

17.7 



13.3 
8.3 
5.0 



19.2 
1.5 
1.3 

.9 

13.2 
2. 3 

211.4 
22.4 
62.1 

101.3 

15.6 

9.9 

4.5 

97.3 
21.9 
15.9 

6.9 
18.4 
21.1 
11.5 

1.5 



521.1 
337.0 

24.1 
32.7 
98.7 
28.6 

211.4 

151.7 

17.9 

41.8 

184.0 
41.9 
13.7 
23.7 
84.3 
20.3 

16.1 

372.7 
61.0 

124.5 
45.5 

141.8 

52.5 
29.8 

9.1 
13.6 

86.6 
34.6 
23.7 
28.3 



16.5 

3.0 

63.7 

33.1 
6.2 
6.1 

20.8 

165.2 
47.8 
16.7 
53.3 
29.7 



93.2 
40.2 
53.0 



41.8 
24.8 
17.0 



98.1 
26.6 

15.2 
10.1 
35.6 
10.7 

362.0 
60.8 

159.1 
87.1 
15.8 
39.2 

31.1 

454.6 
128.2 
111.0 
54.2 
27.3 
35. 3 
87.0 
11.6 



606. 
936, 

114. 

162. 

188, 



2 
4 
205.6 



414.2 

240.8 

29.5 

143.9 

591.9 

188.8 

93.5 

59.5 

176.8 

73.2 

174.6 

1 724.2 
276.3 
668.1 
261.1 
518.7 

171.4 
67.2 
52.5 

51.7 

318.6 

200.1 

72.2 

46.3 



5 654.4 
449.6 

664.8 
62.8 

177.5 
35.0 

389.5 

369.7 
43.0 
90.5 

236.2 

1 815.4 
599.8 
208.9 
510.6 
254.2 
60.0 
181.9 

414.4 

93.6 

320.8 



90.9 
26.7 

13.9 
10.1 
30.1 
10.1 

340.8 

60.4 

149.6 

70.8 
15.5 
44.5 

30.1 

458.1 
125.8 
115.8 

50.7 
25.8 
38.9 
88.6 
12.5 



4 242.4 
3 612.5 
103.9 
157.5 
179.0 
189.5 

446.9 

266.0 

29.5 

151.0 

468.7 

170.1 

77.2 

49.8 

112.5 

59.0 

165.0 

1 655.8 
311.4 
618.1 
256.8 
469.3 

169.6 
64.8 
53.7 
51.1 

322.1 

211.3 

69.4 

41.4 



390.6 

631.0 
60.2 

166.3 
33.9 

370.6 

364.0 
44.4 
96.4 

223.2 

1 816.8 
639.8 
205.9 
488.8 
246.6 
56.7 
179.0 

384.7 

90.7 

294.1 



73. 
36. 
36. 



64.3 
30.6 
33.7 



(NA) 
95 
9 90 
86 
85 
97 

(NA) 
92 
96 
93 
87 
96 

95 

(NA) 
91 
93 
82 
95 
92 
90 
83 



(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

85-90 

90 

89 

89 

(NA) 
93 
85 
90 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

88 

97 

87 

(NA) 

(NA) 
90 
89 
89 
93 

(NA) 
83 
83 
83 

(MA) 
90 



(NA) 



(NA) 
79 
93 
90 
91 

(NA) 
83 
93 

77 

(NA) 
89 
91 
91 
88 
83 
89 

(NA) 



(NA) 



MISC. FABRICATED WIRE PRODUCTS 



(NA) 
96 



(NA) 
86 
94 
98 
93 
98 



(NA) 
85 
90 
81 
89 
96 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
82 
37 
24 
38 

(NA) 



89 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

81 

78 

40 

(NA) 

(NA) 

93 
89 
89 



(NA) 
85 
82 
82 

(NA) 
72 
54 
85 



(NA) 

98 

(NA) 
95 
85 
82 
95 

(NA) 
89 
86 
80 

(NA) 
91 
94 
85 
83 



(NA) 
90 
90 



(NA) 
( ,s ) 



42.2 
9.3 
6.3 
7.3 

10.2 
9.1 

165.9 
23.8 
52.3 

71.5 

6.8 

11.5 

18.3 

100.6 
28.2 

19.5 

16.8 

7.3 

14.7 

8.6 

5.5 



56B.8 
500.5 
10.4 
21.3 
13.7 
22.9 

199.6 

120.5 

22.3 

56.8 

48.8 

14.9 

2.6 

8.1 

18.1 

,1 



5 

15.4 

167.0 
38.9 

54.3 
17.4 
56.4 

69.2 
36.2 
15.3 
17.7 

57.6 

36.3 

6.3 

15.0 



53.2 

136.5 
11.8 

31.5 

5.1 

88.1 

68.1 

11.0 
15.1 
42.0 

325.5 
85.4 
62.8 
75.0 
61.7 
15.6 
25.0 



212.9 
56.6 
29.6 

31.6 
57.4 
37.5 

9 06.0 
119.5 
266.7 
410.5 
38.9 
70.3 

85.7 

613.8 
187.0 
118.0 
94.4 
41.6 
92.3 
53.4 
27.1 



4 167.9 

3 711.6 
68.9 

134.6 
99.6 

153.1 

1 233.6 
730.3 
142.0 
361.4 

327.8 
96.1 
15.0 
47.8 

134.1 
34.8 

96.3 

1 094.4 
260.3 
376.6 
117.5 
339.9 

412.1 
222.8 

86. 3 
102.9 

402.1 
259.8 



6 834.4 
377.0 

799.5 
64.3 

176.8 
29.1 

529.2 

391.4 
68.2 
79.3 

213.9 

1 922.7 
527.2 
324.8 
465.4 
373.3 
87.0 
145.0 

584.2 
213.2 
371.0 



330.8 
223.5 
107.1 



337.1 

101.5 
42.5 
41.0 
90.0 
62.1 

2 122.2 
245.5 
540.0 
982.0 
95.1 
259.7 

131.5 

1 337.5 
416.4 
269.1 
160.7 
102.1 
206.8 
129.1 
53.3 



15 068.0 

8 424.1 
7 506.4 
145.5 
253.0 
224.0 
295.2 

1 960.0 

1 168.5 

204.6 

586.9 



1 



012.6 
285.5 
24.9 
98.8 
499.6 
103.8 

228.2 

2 127.7 
478.4 
721.2 
250.6 
677.5 

656.5 
343.9 
144. 1 
168.5 

658.9 

395.3 

71.4 

192.2 



830.5 

1 707.6 

214.0 

364. 3 

65.6 

1 063.7 

790.4 
139.9 
154.8 
495.7 

3 219.9 
814.8 
570.4 
770.1 
632.4 
148.8 
283.4 

1 054.3 
359.0 
695. 3 



554.7 
370.2 
184.5 



493.0 

155.7 

51.0 

59.0 

131.8 

95.5 

4 312.8 
505.2 
925.7 

2 292.5 

164.4 
425.1 

217.2 

2 435.3 
704.2 
509.2 
279.2 
204.4 
391.9 
250.2 
96.2 



35 428.4 

18 953.0 
16 418.0 
382.1 
592.3 
751.6 
809.0 

3 173.5 

1 984.9 

317.5 

871.0 

3 094.2 

1 245.5 

265.1 

281.5 

1 090.0 

212.2 

1 045.5 

6 612.9 

1 657.5 

2 196.4 
641.0 

2 117.9 

1 230.5 
640.2 
287.5 
302.7 



1 



318.8 
868.9 
165.1 
284.7 



2 075.0 

2 736.9 
283.4 
565.6 
102.8 

1 785.1 

1 588.5 
234.9 
333.8 

1 019.8 

7 069.9 
1 916.0 
1 253.8 
1 623.0 
1 303.7 
269.3 
7 04.2 



1 807, 
589. 

1 218, 



839. 
517. 
322, 



See footnotes at end of table . 



38 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967 



Companies 



(number) 



Establishments 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 

(number) 



All employees 



Numbei 



(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1.000) 



Man-hours 



(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 

(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



349 

3491 

3492 

3493 

3494 

3496 

3497 

3498 

3499 



FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS — CON. 

MISC. FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS. 
METAL BARRELS- DRUMS" AND PAILS. . 

SAFES AND VAULTS 

STEEL SPRINGS 

VALVES AND PIPE FITTINGS 

COLLAPSIBLE TUBES 

METAL FOIL AND LEAF 

FABRICATED PIPE AND FITTINGS . . . 
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTSi NEC . . 



MACHINERY. EXCEPT ELECTRICAL 



351 

3511 

3519 

3522 

353 

3531 

3532 

3533 

3534 

3535 

3536 

3537 

354 

3541 

3542 

3544 

3545 

3548 

355 

3551 

3552 

3553 

3554 

3555 

3559 

356 

3561 

3562 

3564 

3565 

3566 

3567 

3569 

357 

3572 

3573 

3574 

3576 

3579 

358 

3581 

3582 

3585 

3586 

3589 

3599 

36 

361 
3611 
3612 
3613 

362 

3621 

3622 

3623 

3624 

3629 

363 

3631 

3632 

3633 

3634 

3635 

3636 

3639 

364 

3641 

3642 

3643 

3644 

365 

3651 

3652 



ENGINES AND TURBINES . . • 
STEAM ENGINES AND TURBINES . 
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES. 



FARM MACHINERY 



METALWORKING MACHINERY 

MACHINE TOOLS. METAL-CUTTING TYPES . 
MACHINE TOOLS. METAL-FORMING TYPES . 
SPECIAL DIES! TOOLS. JIGS. FIXTURES. 

MACHINE TOOL ACCESSORIES 

METALWORKING MACHINERY. NEC 



CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY 

CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY 

MINING MACHINERY 

OILFIELD MACHINERY 

ELEVATORS AND MOVING STAIRWAYS'". . . 
CONVEYORS AND CONVEYING EQUIPMENT. . 
HOISTS' CRANES. AND MONORAILS. . . . 
INDUSTRIAL TRUCKS AND TRACTORS . . . 



SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY . . 

FOOD PRODUCTS MACHINERY 

TEXTILE MACHINERY 

WOODWORKING MACHINERY 

PAPER INDUSTRIES MACHINERY . . . 
PRINTING TRADES MACHINERY. . . . 
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY" NEC. 



GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY . . 

PUMPS AND COMPRESSORS 

BALL AND ROLLER BEARINGS 

BLOWERS AND FANS 

INDUSTRIAL PATTERNS 

POWER TRANSMISSION EQUIPMENT . . . 
INDUSTRIAL FURNACES AND OVENS. . . 
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY" NEC. 



OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES. . < 
TYPEWRITERS 

ELECTRONIC COMPUTING EQUIPMENT . . . 
CALCULATING AND ACCOUNTING MACHINES. 

SCALES AND BALANCES 

OFFICE MACHINES. NEC 



SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES. . . . 
AUTOMATIC MERCHANDISING MACHINES . 
COMMERCIAL LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT . . . 

REFRIGERATION MACHINERY 

MEASURING AND DISPENSING PUMPS . . 
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES. NEC . . 

MISC. MACHINERY. EXCEPT ELECTRICAL 6 . 

ELECTRICAL EQUIP. AND SUPPLIES . 

ELECTRIC TEST" DISTRIBUTING EQUIP. 
ELECTRIC MEASURING INSTRUMENTS . . . 
TRANSFORMERS 

SWITCHGEAR AND SWITCHBOARD APPARATUS 



ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS. . 

MOTORS AND GENERATORS 

INDUSTRIAL CONTROLS • 

WELDING APPARATUS • 

CARBON AND GRAPHITE PRODUCTS . . . . 
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS. NEC 



HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES 

HOUSEHOLD COOKING EQUIPMENT 

HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATORS AND FREEZERS 

HOUSEHOLD LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT 

ELECTRIC HOUSEWARES AND FANS . . . . 

HOUSEHOLD VACUUM CLEANERS 

SEWING MACHINES 

HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES" NEC 



ELECT. LIGHTING. AND WIRING EQUIP. 

ELECTRIC LAMPS 

LIGHTING FIXTURES 

CURRENT-CARRYING WIRING DEVICES. . . 
NONCURRENT-CARRYING WIRING DEVICES . 



RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT 
RADIO AND TV RECEIVING SETS. . . . 
PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 



2 434 

91 

28 

105 

575 

15 

59 

356 

1 233 



144 

20 

129 



2 051 
578 
197 
309 
130 
416 
139 
337 

9 159 

865 

344 

6 532 

1 073 

409 

3 106 
611 
524 
232 
206 
485 

1 085 

3 502 

590 

85 

271 

1 156 
476 
246 
725 

505 
20 

134 

132 
69 

170 

1 453 
143 
109 
624 
46 
554 

15 055 

8 799 

1 027 
502 
150 
398 

1 138 
320 
456 
133 
49 
212 

536 
66 

31 
25 
248 
34 
83 
71 

1 707 
72 

1 148 
351 
158 

604 
303 
306 



2 711 

149 

32 

114 

666 

19 

72 

393 

1 266 



182 

27 

155 



2 305 
651 
212 
360 
144 
446 
141 
351 

9 439 
903 
350 

6 615 

1 141 
4 30 

3 312 
642 
560 
239 
220 
522 

1 129 



3 760 

660 
124 
287 
1 163 
513 
255 
758 

594 
25 

178 

138 
76 

177 

1 573 
150 
117 
682 
49 
575 



1 218 

546 
190 
482 

1 316 
409 
476 
147 
65 
219 

637 
73 
36 
35 

290 
34 
86 



1 868 
106 

1 213 
375 
174 

661 
340 
321 



312 
96 

18 

61 

412 

18 

46 

197 

464 



119 
23 
96 

661 

1 147 
358 
110 
174 

78 
216 

71 
140 

2 652 
338 
168 

1 531 
429 
186 

1 368 
280 
239 
88 
110 
165 
486 

1 432 
299 
97 
129 
141 
303 
117 
346 

319 
17 

140 
51 
34 



680 
56 
54 

360 
23 

187 



679 
274 
122 
283 

705 
279 
169 
92 
42 
123 

337 
49 
25 
28 

143 
17 
21 
54 

879 
65 
524 
185 
105 

260 

187 

7 3 



16 



11.6 
3.8 
7.7 

95.3 
4.3 
6.6 

13.2 

41.3 



36.2 
63.7 

136.3 

272.6 
133.1 
21.7 
32.7 
13.9 
27.4 
16.8 
27.0 

337.0 
87.2 
29.2 

113.6 
60.3 
46.7 

206.7 
32.6 
39.7 
12.7 
21.3 



279.2 

78.3 
58.8 
21.0 
10.9 
54.8 
16. 1 
39.4 

190.4 
26.0 
98.9 
38.4 
6.5 
20.7 

139.6 
10.0 

7.5 
94.8 

6.4 
20.9 

202.5 



175.7 
61.5 
45.6 
68.5 

206.7 
112.8 

50.4 
13.7 
11.9 
17.9 

169.2 
20.4 
53.0 
22.2 
44.6 
9.2 
6.4 
13.4 

157. 1 
29.5 
64.6 



130. 
116. 



309.0 
83.5 
26.6 
53.9 

683.5 
23.6 
48.7 

129.1 

260. 1 



819.6 
318.8 

500.8 



041, 
989. 
156. 
240. 

107, 
213. 
134. 
199. 



2 859.5 

759.9 
249.6 
1 032.8 
479. 3 
338.0 

1 569.9 
249.4 
253.3 

83.9 
172.5 
239.6 
571.2 

2 137.0 
591.7 
456.0 
149.2 
106.0 
409.4 
129.3 

295.4 



462.2 
172.1 
803.5 
294.4 
45.6 
146.6 

946.8 
59.2 

50.9 
640.4 

45.6 
150.7 



1 229.5 
423.9 
317.6 
488.0 

1 420.4 
764.6 
350.9 
118.4 
82.8 
103.7 



100.5 

128.4 

377.8 

154.2 

241.1 

58.8 

49.3 

90.9 

950.4 
169.9 
388.0 
234.4 
158.1 

720. 1 

643.6 

76.6 



140.6 

9. 1 

2.6 

6.2 

67.8 

3.9 

4.3 

13.4 

32.8 



72.1 
24.6 
47.5 

104.0 

190.2 

98.6 
14.9 
21.7 
8.8 
16.8 
11.6 
17.7 



256 

60 
20 
95 
45 
34 



141.0 
22.0 
29.4 
8.8 
14.6 
20. 1 
46. 1 

196.6 
49.8 
47.5 
14.9 

9.5 
40.6 

8.9 
25.4 

119.6 
19.9 
50.7 
31.3 
4.3 
13.5 

100.7 

7.8 

5.4 

69.6 

4.3 

13.5 

168.8 



124. 1 
40.4 
34.0 
49.7 

152.7 

85.3 

34.8 

9.4 

9.1 

14. 

135.2 
16.0 
43.9 
17.8 
35.5 
7. 1 
4.9 
10.0 

123.1 
25.8 
50.0 
30.5 
16.8 



107, 
96, 
11, 



287. 3 

19.4 

4.9 

12.6 

139.0 

7.6 

10.3 

27.4 

66.0 



147. 1 
49.9 
97.2 

203.2 

333.4 
193.9 
29.7 
46. 1 
18.1 
35.0 
24. 1 
36.5 



557.9 

131.8 

46.2 

214.2 

96.4 

69.4 



296.4 
45.2 
62.5 
17.6 
31.1 
42.2 
97.8 

410.5 
104.6 
100.9 
31.5 
19.4 
83.4 
18.3 
52.3 



237.1 
39.3 

104.2 

58.6 

8.5 

26.6 

203.1 
14.8 
11.2 

141.0 

8.9 

27.2 

346.2 



247.7 

78.7 

68.5 

100.5 

307.5 
172.3 
69.6 
19.8 
18.5 
27.4 

262.1 
31.3 
84.5 
33.7 
69.1 
13.2 
9.7 
20.6 

242.3 

49.9 
98.8 
60.1 
33.5 

205.6 

183.4 

22.2 



858.3 
59.9 
16.4 
39.8 

429.8 
13.7 
31. 1 
86.6 

176. 1 



540.2 
195.6 

344.6 

662.3 

1 291.6 
673.4 

95.8 
143.4 

63.4 
112.0 

88.0 
115.6 

1 984.5 
476.5 
165.0 
300.0 
324.2 
218.8 

950.5 
147.2 
169.1 
50.4 
111.6 
149.2 
323.0 

1 353.7 

335.3 

343.5 

93.2 

86.7 

273.6 

58.2 

163.2 

757.0 
116.6 
314.5 
219.8 
24.0 
82.1 

603.4 
39.6 
32.5 

423.9 
25.1 
32.4 



737.4 
222.3 
210.1 
304.9 

925.0 

514.4 

210.7 

72.9 

57.8 

69.2 

788.2 

88.7 

290.2 

113.8 

161.0 

39.6 

34.7 

60. 1 

641.9 
136.0 
252.6 
151.3 
102.0 

516.6 

462.6 

54.0 



2 591. 1 

150.6 

67.1 

92.0 

1 377.3 

38.5 

104.9 

238.5 

522.2 



1 598.1 
582.3 

1 015.8 

2 041.5 



4 129.9 
2 056.5 

308.3 
502.9 
196. 1 
415.8 
241.6 
403.6 

5 091.4 
1 391.3 

437.2 

1 646.7 
922.8 
693.4 

2 330.3 
502.9 
404. 1 
192.3 
283.4 
458.7 

1 033.4 

4 107.2 
1 210.2 
833.3 
302.2 
165.5 
800.7 
259.4 
535.9 

3 331.8 
454.7 

1 926.4 

518.2 

90.0 

342.5 



125. 1 
140.8 
96.4 



1 


479.8 




94.8 




313.3 


2 


531.2 


24 


487.3 


2 


508.9 




799.7 




678.9 


1 


030.3 


2 


791.7 


1 


430.8 




720.9 




265.3 




186.3 




188.3 


2 


540.3 




254.2 




794.0 




408.4 




590.4 




131.4 




94.1 




217.7 


2 


214. 1 




533.4 




828.6 




507.4 




344.7 


1 


586.7 


1 


404.5 




182.3 



2 4 756, 

370, 



93.7 
192.4 

274.5 
65.0 
265.5 
508. 1 
981.7 



3 


136. 


4 


1 


043. 


2 


2 


093. 


2 


4 


299. 


9 


7 


865. 





4 


138. 







622. 


2 




799 


8 




319 


7 




763. 







444 


4 




778 





2 7 


511 


5 


2 


127 


2 




714 





2 


202 


3 


1 


309 


9 


1 


158 


1 


2 4 


993 







830 


2 




711 


7 




314 


4 




551 


4 




752 


3 


1 


833 





6 


923 


3 


2 


207 


5 


1 


328 


5 




525 


2 




201 


8 


1 


263 


4 




495 


7 




901 


2 


*5 


731 







595 


5 


3 


770 


9 




707 


8 




140 


2 




516 


6 


2 4 


305 







248 







183 




3 


101 


1 




174 


7 




598 


1 


3 


712 






4 


062 


4 


1 


184 





1 


188 


4 


1 


690 





! 4 


623 


7 


2 


402 


3 


1 


102 


8 




493 


3 




296 


4 




328 


8 


5 


328 


4 




551 


9 


1 


785 


4 




982 


5 


1 


112 







293 


2 




123 


6 




479 


9 


! 3 


850 


3 




781 


8 


1 


593 


6 




837 







637 


9 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



39 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963 -Continued 



Industry group and industry 



1967-Contrnued 



Capital expenditures, new 1 



Total 



(million 
dollars) 



Structures 
and 

additions 
to plant 
(million 
dollars) 



Machinery 

and 
equipment 

(million 

lloll.ll i 



Inventories end of-- 



1967 



(million 
dollars) 



1966 



(million 
dollars) 



Special- 
ization 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 



Cover- 
age 
ratio 



(per- 
cent) 



1963 



All employees 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 

(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 



FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS — CON. 

MISC. FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS. 
METAL BARRELSi DRUMSt AND PAILS. . 

SAFES AND VAULTS 

STEEL SPRINGS 

VALVES AND PIPE FITTINGS 

COLLAPSIBLE TUBES 

METAL FOIL AND LEAF. 

FABRICATED PIPE AND FITTINGS . . . 
FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTSi NEC . . 



MACHINERY! EXCEPT ELECTRICAL . . 

ENGINES AND TURBINES 

STEAM ENGINES AND TURBINES 

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINESi NEC . . 

FARM MACHINERY 

CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED MACHINERY 

CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY 

MINING MACHINERY 

OILFIELD MACHINERY 

ELEVATORS AND MOVING STAIRWAYS . . . 
CONVEYORS AND CONVEYING EQUIPMENT. . 
HOISTS. CRANESi AND MONORAILS. . . . 
INDUSTRIAL TRUCKS AND TRACTORS . . . 

METALWORKING MACHINERY 

MACHINE TOOLSt METAL-CUTTING TYPES . 
MACHINE TOOLSt METAL-FORMING TYPES . 
SPECIAL DIESi TOOLS. JIGSi FIXTURES. 

MACHINE TOOL ACCESSORIES 

METALWORKING MACHINERY! NEC 

SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY . . . . 

FOOD PRODUCTS MACHINERY 

TEXTILE MACHINERY 

WOODWORKING MACHINERY 

PAPER INDUSTRIES MACHINERY 

PRINTING TRADES MACHINERY 

SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY! NEC. . . 

GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY . . . 

PUMPS AND COMPRESSORS 

BALL AND ROLLER BEARINGS 

BLOWERS AND FANS 

INDUSTRIAL PATTERNS 

POWER TRANSMISSION EQUIPMENT . . . . 
INDUSTRIAL FURNACES AND OVENS. . . . 
GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY! NEC. . 

OFFICE AND COMPUTING MACHINES. . . 
TYPEWRITERS 

ELECTRONIC COMPUTING EQUIPMENT . . . 
CALCULATING AND ACCOUNTING MACHINES. 

SCALES AND BALANCES 

OFFICE MACHINES! NEC 

SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES 

AUTOMATIC MERCHANDISING MACHINES . . 
COMMERCIAL LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT .... 

REFRIGERATION MACHINERY 

MEASURING AND DISPENSING PUMPS . . . 
SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES! NEC . . . 

MISC. MACHINERY! EXCEPT ELECTRICAL . 

ELECTRICAL EQUIP. AND SUPPLIES . 

ELECTRIC TESTi DISTRIBUTING EQUIP. 
ELECTRIC MEASURING INSTRUMENTS . . . 
TRANSFORMERS 

SWITCHGEAR AND SWITCHBOARD APPARATUS 

ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS. . 

MOTORS AND GENERATORS . 

INDUSTRIAL CONTROLS 

WELDING APPARATUS 

CARBON AND GRAPHITE PRODUCTS . . . . 
ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS. NEC 

HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES 

HOUSEHOLD COOKING EQUIPMENT. . . . . 
HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATORS AND FREEZERS 

HOUSEHOLD LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT 

ELECTRIC HOUSEWARES AND FANS . . . . 

HOUSEHOLD VACUUM CLEANERS 

SEWING MACHINES 

HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES! NEC 

ELECT. LIGHTING! AND WIRING EQUIP. 

ELECTRIC LAMPS 

LIGHTING FIXTURES 

CURRENT-CARRYING WIRING DEVICES. . . 
NONCURRENT-CARRYING WIRING DEVICES . 

RADIO AND TV RECEIVING EQUIPMENT . 

RADIO AND TV RECEIVING SETS 

PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 



185.4 

15.0 

3.1 

6.3 

100.0 

4.1 

10.6 

14.4 

31.9 



163.9 
66.3 
97.6 

128.5 

279.6 
184.9 
18.4 
23.7 
3.9 
13.6 
11.3 
23.9 

319.4 

78.7 
26.2 
114.7 
55.0 
44.8 

179.3 
22.0 
22.2 
8.2 
18.6 
32.9 
75.4 

291.4 
62.3 

107.1 
14.5 
8.1 
57. 3 
11.6 
30.5 

192.7 
20.1 

117.1 

32.6 

5. 1 

17.8 

134.1 
5.5 
4.9 

109.3 

3.8 

10.6 



145.6 
53.7 
52.8 
39.1 

208.6 
102.5 
34.3 
18.1 
41.3 
12.3 

125. 1 

8.6 

37.3 

31.8 

24.6 

6.5 

5.6 

10.7 

130.9 
48.2 
32.7 
29.8 
20.2 

93.2 
86.1 

7.1 



50.8 
2.6 
1.5 
1.3 

26.1 
2.1 
1.9 
5.3 

10.0 



47.2 
17.6 
29.6 

35.1 

71.5 
44.1 
3.3 
5.1 
.7 
5.1 
3.0 
9.6 

68.9 
19.3 

5.7 
21.3 
12.9 

9.7 



89.9 

15.6 

38.7 

4.4 

3.3 

12.4 

4.8 

10.7 

44.0 
2.6 

29.8 
6.1 
1.6 
3.9 

48.8 
1.0 
2.7 

40.4 

.7 

4.0 



58.6 
27.7 
17.8 

13.1 

64.6 
28.7 
14.1 

5.8 
12.4 

3.6 

35.4 
1.7 

15.1 
7.5 
4.5 
2.0 
1.5 
3.2 

34.2 
11.1 
8.6 



31.9 
30.8 



134.6 

12.3 

1.6 

5.0 

73.9 

2.1 

8.7 

9.2 

21.9 



116.7 
48.7 
68.0 

93.3 

208.1 

140.8 

14.6 

18.5 

3.2 

8.4 

8.4 

14.2 

250.5 
59. 3 
20.5 
93.4 
42. 1 
35. 1 

116.4 
16.2 
14.7 
6.0 
13.3 
21.9 
44.2 

201.5 
46.7 
68.4 

10.0 
4.8 

44.9 
6.8 

19.9 

148.7 
17.5 
87.3 
26.5 
3.5 
13.9 

85.4 
4.5 
2.2 

69.0 
3.1 
6.6 

140.9 



144.0 
73.8 
20.2 
12.3 
28.9 



4.0 
7.5 

96.7 
37.1 
24.1 
22.2 
13.4 

61.2 

55.3 

6.0 



989.5 
57.1 
21.4 
30.0 

599.9 

7.1 

37.4 

100.7 

136.0 



728. 3 
314.2 
414.1 

994.6 

978.4 
034.2 
171.2 
257.6 

96.6 
129.2 

96.2 
193.4 



1 563.7 
535.3 
207.8 
214.2 
273.7 
332.6 

1 257.9 
198.0 
185. 1 
72. 1 
138. 1 
217.2 
447.4 



1 



553.5 

587.5 

318.0 

84.7 

12.7 

289.3 

66.5 

194.8 

480.5 
113.8 
985.6 
206.8 
36.1 
138.1 

991.7 
77.8 
41.6 

713.9 
43.7 

114.7 

368.6 



862.4 
283.9 
240.3 
338.2 

f 20.8 

457.4 

224.2 

98.5 

69.4 

71.3 

001.9 

107.9 

336.0 

138. -6 

236.2 

56.5 

51.2 

75.5 

627.3 
83.7 
246.5 
162.5 
134.6 

764.8 

726.0 

38.7 



926.0 
53.4 
19.6 
29.8 

550.0 

6.2 

39.1 

91.2 

136.7 



687.8 
293.1 

394.7 

904. 1 

1 939.1 

1 030.1 

171.0 

245.0 

95.8 

124.8 

95.7 

176.7 

1 424.8 
501.6 
187.8 
187.0 
235.2 
313. 1 



1 166.4 
184.4 
185.2 
70.2 
135.8 
178.3 
412.6 

1 445.4 

541.0 

303.2 

84.5 

11.5 

266.5 

64.4 

174.3 



335.2 
100.0 
883.7 
199.2 
34.5 
117.7 

891.1 
63.9 
42.3 

638.6 
42.7 

103.6 

345.3 



816.3 
275.8 
209.8 
330.7 

876.5 

436.3 

217.7 

S9.0 

61.6 

71.9 

987.0 

112.3 

311.0 

153.7 

241.9 

51.9 

48.6 

67.5 

610.3 
79.2 
240.8 
160.5 
129.8 

772.1 

733.5 

38.6 



(NA) 
92 
87 
88 
87 
80 
85 
95 
90 



(NA) 

(NA) 
83 
89 

92 

(NA) 



(NA) 
86 
85 
94 
85 
86 

(NA) 
88 
94 
83 
92 
98 
82 

(NA) 
87 
97 
85 
96 
90 
87 
85 

(NA) 

86 

(") 
85 

93 

89 

(NA) 
97 
92 

( ls ) 
71 
89 



93 

(NA) 

(NA) 
84 
95 
89 

(NA) 
83 
83 
91 
96 
84 

(NA) 
92 
59 
87 
90 
75 
95-99 
87 

(NA) 
94 
93 



(NA) 
94 
99 



(NA) 
88 
85-90 
63 
88 
100 
56 
90 
71 



(NA) 

(NA) 
78 
83 

94 

(NA) 
92 
82 
92 
95 
83 
83 
86 

(NA) 
90 
84 



88 

(NA) 
86 
95 

87 
86 
94 
81 

(NA) 
88 
97 
82 
80 
83 
88 
79 

(NA) 
99 

( 1S ) 
84 
96 
77 

(NA) 



(IS) 

80 
88 

94 

(NA) 

(NA) 
79 
98 
90 

(NA) 
83 
81 
94 
96 
67 

(NA) 
76 
99 
90 
86 
84 
96 
79 

(NA) 
95 
94 
78 
82 

(NA) 
99 
96 



149.9 

10.5 

3.3 

6.3 

80.4 

4.0 

4.1 

13.0 

28.3 



86.6 
30.9 
55. 7 

112.6 

211.0 
104.5 
16.9 
29.2 
12.4 
20.8 
9.6 
17.6 

259.1 

61.1 
22.1 
90.9 

47.0 
38.0 

171.6 
31.7 
36.0 
12. 1 
18.6 
23.0 
50.2 



233.1 
61.3 
52.3 

15.2 
9.9 
46.7 
12.1 
35.6 

137.2 
18.0 



17.0 

112.6 

11.7 
6.5 

72.3 
6.8 

15.3 

135.8 



132.1 

44.7 
33.4 
54.0 

160.8 

94.2 

33.0 

9.6 

10.0 
14.0 

145.8 
19.2 
43.1 
18.3 
38.8 
5.7 
7.6 
13.1 

133.0 
23.4 
53.9 
35.4 
20.3 

90.9 

81.3 

9.6 



906.6 
66.2 
21.8 
41.3 

500.0 
18.8 
27.1 
79.1 

151.9 



609.3 
237.5 
37 1.8 

689. 1 

1 381.3 
683.7 
109.5 
184. 3 
88.4 
140.6 
64.3 
110.4 

1 841.7 
438.2 
161.7 
682.7 

312.8 
246.2 

1 094.8 
205.4 
196.4 
72.9 
130.6 
159.4 
330. 1 

1 542.0 

395.8 

348.7 

94.1 

75.6 

303.3 

83.7 

240.8 

945.2 
102.9 



35.1 
104.1 

673.9 
64.8 
37.9 

432.6 

41.7 
96.8 

793.6 



822.0 
273.6 
209.5 
338.9 

1 004.9 

583.2 

214.6 

72. 1 

62.0 

73.0 

864.0 

111.3 

280.0 

115.4 

188.3 

35.5 

52.0 

81.6 

709.6 
122.7 
288.1 
175.2 
123.6 



1 713.9 

119.6 

56.2 

69. 3 

942.7 

30.6 

51.6 

144.6 

299.3 



113.5 
379.9 
7 32.6 



458. 

411, 

47, 



7 32.3 
301.3 
215.4 
398.2 
201.5 
270.5 
112.3 
233.1 



3 037.6 
699.3 
281.3 

1 029.3 
559.3 
468.4 

1 917.2 
380.4 
314.2 
147.0 
217.5 
285.9 
572.2 

2 812.7 
768.8 
627.7 
180.8 
112.6 
555.7 
143.0 
424.1 

1 818.4 
243.2 



64.4 
224.7 

1 369.0 
121.4 

70.8 
892.7 

91.7 
192.4 

1 366.3 

17 010.5 

1 534.6 
505.3 
381.5 
647.8 

1 889.1 
993.2 

450.5 
162.4 
141.4 
141.6 

2 097.9 
230.3 
631.3 
353.9 
463.8 
116.1 

98.3 
204.2 

1 559.5 
362.2 
587.8 
355.6 
253.9 

1 037.4 
912.0 
125.4 



3 209.0 

303.4 

78.0 

157.7 

1 588.5 

51.0 

151.6 

305.6 

573.2 



2 090.0 

616.4 

1 473.6 



260.4 
696.0 
417.6 
666.5 
318.6 
494.6 
220.0 
447.0 



4 474.7 

1 060.8 

441.4 

1 388.8 

787.3 
796.3 

3 303.3 
640.5 
542.7 
252.8 
403.9 
448.4 

1 015.0 



4 732.8 
1 419.1 
998.8 
315.3 
140.7 
888.6 
279.0 
691.3 

3 502.6 
315.4 



98.5 
349.2 

840.5 
238.0 
136.8 
928.0 
159.5 
378.3 



2 565.9 
749.2 
722.9 

1 093.7 

3 153.9 
1 7 09.8 

648.7 
330.2 
226.9 
238.3 

4 118.4 
473.5 

1 306.5 
760.2 
850.3 
175.4 
117.2 
435.5 

2 829.0 
574.5 

1 159.5 
616.0 
479.0 



435.1 
254.9 
180.2 



See footnotes at end of table. 



40 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 3. General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967 



Companies 



(number) 



Establishments 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 

(number) 



All employees 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1.000) 



Man-hours 



(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 



366 

3661 

3662 

367 

3671 

3672 

3673 

3674 

3679 

369 

3691 

3692 

3693 

3694 

3699 



37 

371 

3711 

3714 

3713 

3715 

372 
3721 
3722 
3729 

373 

3731 

3732 

374 

3741 

3742 



379 

3791 

3799 



382 

3821 

3822 

3831 

384 
3841 
3842 
3843 

3851 
3861 

387 

3871 

3872 



39 

391 

3911 

3912 

3913 

3914 

3931 

394 

3941 

3942 

3943 

3949 

395 

3951 
3952 
3953 
3955 

396 

3961 

3962 

3963 

3964 



ELECTRICAL EQUIP. 
CONTINUED 



AND SUPPLIES- 



COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT 

TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH APPARATUS. • 
RADIO AND TV COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT 

ELECTRONIC COMPONENTSi ACCESSORIES 
ELECTRON TUBESi RECEIVING TYPE . . . 

CATHODE RAY PICTURE TUBES 

ELECTRON TUBESi TRANSMITTING . . . . 

SEMICONDUCTORS 

ELECTRONIC COMPONENTSi NEC 

MISC. ELECTRICAL EQUIP. i SUPPLIES. 

STORAGE BATTERIES 

PRIMARY BATTERIESi DRY AND WET . . . 

X-RAY APPARATUS AND TUBES 

ENGINE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT! NEC 



TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT . . . . 

MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT . . . 

MOTOR VEHICLES". 

MOTOR VEHICLE PARTS AND ACCESSORIES 1 

TRUCK AND BUS BODIES 

TRUCK TRAILERS 



AIRCRAFT AND PARTS 

AIRCRAFT 

AIRCRAFT ENGINES AND ENGINE PARTS. 
AIRCRAFT EQUIPMENTi NEC. 1 ' 



SHIP AND BOAT BUILDINGi REPAIRING. 
SHIP BUILDING AND REPAIRING 18 . . . . 
BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING 



RAILROAD EQUIPMENT . . 
LOCOMOTIVES AND PARTS. . 
RAILROAD AND STREET CARS 



MOTORCYCLESi BICYCLESi AND PARTS 



MISC. TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT 

TRAILER COACHES 

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENTi NEC. . 



INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS 

ENGINEERINGi SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS. 

MECHAN. MEASURINGi CONTROL DEVICES 
MECHANICAL MEASURING DEVICES . . . . 
AUTOMATIC TEMPERATURE CONTROLS . . . 

OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS AND LENSES . . . 

MEDICAL INSTRUMENTS AND SUPPLIES . 
SURGICAL AND MEDICAL INSTRUMENTS . . 
SURGICAL APPLIANCES AND SUPPLIES . . 
DENTAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES. . . . 

OPHTHALMIC GOODS 

PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES. 

WATCHESi CLOCKSi AND WATCHCASES. . 

WATCHES AND CLOCKS 

WATCHCASES 

MISC. MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES . 



JEWELRYi SILVERWAREi PLATED WARE 

JEWELNYi PRECIOUS METAL 

JEWELERS' FINDINGS AND MATERIALS . 

LAPIDARY WORK 

SILVERWARE AND PLATED WARE .... 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS AND PARTS. . . . 

TOYS AND SPORTING GOODS 

GAMES AND TOYS 

DOLLS 

CHILDREN'S VEHICLESi EXCEPT BICYCLES 
SPORTING AND ATHLETiC GOODSi NEC . . 

PENSi PENCILSi OFFICEi ART GOODS . 

PENS AND MECHANICAL PENCILS 

LEAD PENCILS AND ART GOODS 

MARKING DEVICES 

CARBON PAPER AND INKED RIBBONS . . . 



COSTUME JEWELRY AND NOTIONS. 

COSTUME JEWELRY 

ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS 

BUTTONS 

NEEDLESi PINSi AND FASTENERS . 



1 


183 


1 


402 




82 




106 


1 


111 


1 


296 


2 


026 


2 


439 




28 




39 




95 




99 




43 




56 




141 




177 


1 


775 


2 


068 


1 


016 


1 


165 




154 




232 




32 




49 




78 




82 




239 




264 




528 




533 



6 563 

2 264 

107 

1 424 

620 

147 

1 081 

91 

205 

825 

1 953 

389 

1 56 5 

105 
26 
79 



1 146 
708 
442 



4 020 
642 



685 
605 



287 

1 349 
298 

755 

314 

432 
505 

196 

153 

45 



13 614 



7 483 

2 675 

181 

1 Ji74 

641 

179 

1 273 
125 
255 

893 

2 Oil 
415 

1 596 

123 
27 
96 



1 310 
856 
454 



4 453 

677 

766 
661 
105 

303 

1 466 
321 
811 
334 

461 
557 

223 
176 

47 



2 


185 


2 212 


1 


477 


1 489 




232 


232 




296 


296 




186 


195 




304 


343 


2 


320 


2 435 




653 


684 




331 


340 




41 


45 


1 


304 


1 366 




877 


959 




113 


119 




123 


131 




561 


602 




87 


107 


1 


569 


1 608 




763 


764 




319 


321 




227 


234 




262 


289 



845 

63 

782 

410 
19 
23 
38 

117 
213 

457 
120 
36 
41 
132 
128 



3 354 

1 281 
130 
785 
258 

108 

832 

83 

202 

547 

540 
253 

287 



583 
442 
141 



1 614 

282 

339 

285 

54 

109 

425 

138 

211 

76 

142 
214 

103 

84 
19 



472 

306 

62 

22 

82 

121 

874 
330 
138 
23 
383 

292 
61 
59 

109 
63 

485 

206 

79 

62 

138 



52 5.3 
115.4 
409.9 

403.4 
21.0 
27.6 
18.2 
85.4 

251.3 

107.2 
19.3 
11.0 
7.9 
55.4 
13.6 



739.4 

321.2 

364.9 

30.4 

22.9 

802.0 
386.8 
195.4 
219.8 

169.3 

138.8 
30.5 



54.8 
43.6 
11.2 



394.3 
46.1 

104.3 

72.9 
31.4 

20.8 

67.4 
22.0 
35.2 
10.2 

25.6 
94.9 

35.2 

31.5 

3.7 



24.9 

115.9 

55.1 

11.9 

3.7 

45.2 

34.7 

11.8 

7.9 

8.5 

6.5 

51.6 

22.4 

5.2 

4.8 

19.2 



4 396.7 

827.9 

3 568.8 

2 435.3 
118.3 
172.5 
145.8 
545.1 

1 453.6 

715.0 

133.3 

61.0 

63.3 

387.4 

70.0 



929.9 
699.9 
890.7 
192.2 
147.1 



7 209.4 
3 569.0 
1 778.5 
1 861.9 

1 239.0 

1 076.0 

163.0 

426.7 
132.5 
294.2 



298.4 

237.9 

60.5 



2 821.6 

327.1 

731.6 
520.8 
210.8 

163.0 

427.3 

139.6 

220.3 

67.4 

143.4 
820.2 

209.0 
187.9 
21.1 



319 


8 


182. 


6 


29 


7 


11 


8 


95 


8 


143 


7 


559 





264 


9 


46 


n 


19 


4 


228 


3 


200 


1 


62 


8 


42 


2 


53 


,3 


41 


.8 


251 


.9 


106 


,9 


20 


.2 


23 


.7 


101 


.1 



304 


5 


83 


2 


221 


3 


293 


4 


18 





19 


9 


12 


6 


57 


9 


185 





83 


8 


15 


2 


8 


9 


4 


3 


44 


2 


11 


.1 



605.5 

262.3 

300.0 

24.6 

18.3 

489.3 
230.6 
112.6 
146.1 



140, 

114, 

26. 



44.4 
11.7 
32.7 



46.8 

37.4 

9.4 



68.6 
45.9 
22.6 



27.7 
24.5 

3.1 



606.4 
158.8 
447.6 

576.2 

3^.4 

40.0 

26.1 

118.1 

359.6 

163.4 
30.6 
17.6 
8.7 
86.3 
20.2 



2 745.6 

1 218.3 
524.4 
609.0 

49.4 
35.5 

1 047.6 
489.9 
245.8 
311.9 

282.3 

231.0 

51.8 

86.3 
23.5 
62.8 



91.5 

73.1 
18.4 



530.2 

64.0 

135.1 
89.9 
45.2 

27.6 

95.1 
32.8 
48.0 

14.3 



41. 
112. 

55, 

49. 
5. 



41.6 


82.1 


22.8 


44. 1 


4.6 


8.6 


1.7 


3.0 


12.6 


26.6 


20.8 


39.9 


97.1 


183.5 


46.1 


86.6 


10.7 


18.4 


3.1 


6.4 


37.2 


72.0 


25.5 


50.1 


9.2 


18.1 


6.0 


12.0 


5.8 


11.1 


4.4 


9.0 


43.9 


84.3 


19.4 


36.7 


4.6 


7.9 


4.1 


8.0 


15.9 


31.8 



2 050.0 
534.4 

1 515.6 

1 448.9 

85.9 

107.4 

84.0 

307.3 

864.3 

499.2 
97.7 
43.2 
26.3 

286.8 
45.^ 



586.4 
098.4 
244.4 
138.5 
105.1 



3 792.9 

1 806.7 

875.2 

1 111.0 

947.5 
819.4 

128.1 

313.8 

90.8 

223.1 



224.2 

180.3 

43.8 



1 569.0 

191.2 

400.1 
268.9 

131.1 

86.1 

247.5 
83.5 

125.7 
38.3 

103.4 
401.3 

139.6 

122.9 

16.6 



216 


9 


113 


6 


18 


9 


7 


9 


76 


5 


106 





386 


3 


178 


1 


34 


3 


13 


9 


160 





116 


3 


38 


6 


24 


7 


29 


2 


23 


8 


175 


9 


73 


8 


14 


8 


16 


.8 


70 


.5 



6 992.5 

1 536.7 
5 455.8 

4 359.2 
224.7 
462.5 
239.6 
820.0 

2 612.2 



493.9 
259.2 
188.7 
135.7 
766.0 
144.4 



28 173.9 

13 666.1 

7 353.6 

5 712.0 

331.7 

268.8 



327.0 
447.6 
922.1 
957.3 

705.1 
430.4 
274.8 

787.9 
345.2 
442.7 



551.4 
434.6 
116.9 



1 391.7 
972.0 
419.7 

283.7 

965.6 
297.4 
527.2 

141.0 

286.4 

2 480.7 

392.9 

361.6 

31.3 



640.9 

352.7 

57.8 

32.4 

198.0 

237.8 

205.3 

614.3 

82.8 

38.7 

4 695 

412.1 

140.5 

79.8 

98.1 

93.3 

528.0 

220.5 

43.3 

46.1 

218.1 



11 147.0 

2 591.2 

3 555.3 

2 7 452.7 
300.6 
832.3 
369.4 

1 141.0 

4 809.4 



'2 773.7 
577.5 
307.6 
233.2 
1 364.7 
290.8 



68 512.3 

2 40 339.3 

27 296.0 

11 623.8 

706.1 

713.9 

2 21 063.9 

11 079.8 

5 289.7 

4 694.4 

2 3 089.6 
2 518.2 

571.4 

2 2 110.6 

689.6 

1 420.9 



1 608.9 

1 324.5 

284 . 4 



9 907.2 

1 000.8 

! 2 073.0 

1 455.1 

618.0 

406.9 

2 1 533.8 
475.4 
837.9 
220.5 

426.0 

3 664.5 

2 802.1 

746.5 

55.6 



8 310.7 

2 1 29°. 

741.8 

128.6 

89.5 

339.1 

434.3 

! 2 208.3 

1 113.5 

162.8 

78.7 

853.3 

5 723.7 
211.8 
158.9 
146.3 
206.8 

2 927.3 

376.5 

84.7 

80.8 

385.3 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



41 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967-Continued 



Capital expenditures, new 1 



Total 



(million 
dollars) 



Structures 
and 

additions 
to plant 
(million 
dollars) 



Machinery 

and 
equipment 

(million 
dollars) 



Inventories end of-- 



1967 



(million 
dollars) 



1966 



(million 
dollars) 



Special- 
ization 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 



Cover- 
age 
ratio 



(per- 
cent) 



1963 



All employees 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 

(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 



ELECTRICAL EQUIP. 
CONT I NUED 



AND SUPPLI ES-- 



366 

3661 

3662 

367 

3671 

3672 

3673 

3674 

3679 

369 

3691 

3692 

3693 

369U 

3699 



37 

371 
37 11 
3714 
3713 
3715 

372 
3721 
3722 
3729 

373 

3731 

3732 

374 

3741 

3742 



379 

3791 

3799 



382 

3821 

3822 

3831 

384 
3841 
3842 
3843 

3851 
3861 

387 

3871 

3872 



39 

391 

3911 

3912 

3913 

3914 

3931 

394 

3941 

3942 

3943 

3949 

395 

3951 

3952 

3953 

3955 

396 

3961 

3962 

3963 

3964 



COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT 

TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH APPARATUS. 
RADIO AND TV COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT 

ELECTRONIC COMPONENTSi ACCESSORIES 
ELECTRON TUBES' RECEIVING TYPE . . 

CATHODE RAY PICTURE TUBES 

ELECTRON TUBESt TRANSMITTING . . . 

SEMICONDUCTORS 

ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS" NEC .... 

MISC. ELECTRICAL EQUIP.. SUPPLIES 

STORAGE BATTERIES 

PRIMARY BATTERIES. DRY AND WET . . 
X-RAY APPARATUS AND TUBES. .... 
ENGINE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. . . . 
ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. NEC 



TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT . . . . 

MOTOR VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT . . . 

MOTOR VEHICLES 

MOTOR VEHICLE PARTS AND ACCESSORIES, 

TRUCK AND BUS BODIES 

TRUCK TRAILERS 

AIRCRAFT AND PARTS 

AIRCRAFT i 

AIRCRAFT ENGINES AND ENGINE PARTS, i 
AIRCRAFT EQUIPMENT. NEC i 

SHIP AND BOAT BUILDING. REPAIRING 
SHIP BUILDING AND REPAIRING. . . . 
BOAT BUILDING AND REPAIRING. . . . 



RAILROAD EQUIPMENT 

LOCOMOTIVES AND PARTS 

RAILROAD AND STREET CARS .... 

MOTORCYCLES. BICYCLES. AND PARTS 

MISC. TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT 

TRAILER COACHES 

TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT. NEC. . 



INSTRUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS 

ENGINEERING. SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 

MECHAN. MEASURING. CONTROL DEVICES 
MECHANICAL MEASURING DEVICES . . . 
AUTOMATIC TEMPERATURE CONTROLS . . 

OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS AND LENSES . . 

MEDICAL INSTRUMENTS AND SUPPLIES 
SURGICAL AND MEDICAL INSTRUMENTS . 
SURGICAL APPLIANCES AND SUPPLIES . 
DENTAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES. . . 

OPHTHALMIC GOODS . 

PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

WATCHES. CLOCKS. AND WATCHCASES. 

WATCHES AND CLOCKS 

WATCHCASES 



MISC. MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 

JEWELRY. SILVERWARE. PLATED WARE 

JEWELRY. PRECIOUS METAL 

JEWELERS' FINDINGS AND MATERIALS . 

LAPIDARY WORK 

SILVERWARE AND PLATED WARE .... 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS AND PARTS. 

TOYS AND SPORTING GOODS. . . 

GAMES AND TOTS 

DOLLS 

CHILDREN'S VEHICLES. EXCEPT BICYCLES 
SPORTING AND ATHLETIC GOODS" NEC . 

PENS. PENCILS. OFFICE. ART GOODS 
PENS AND MFPHANICAL PENCILS. . 
LEAD PENCILS AND ART GOODS . . 

MARKING DEVICES 

CARBON PAPER AND INKED RIBBONS 



COSTUME JEWELRY AND NOTIONS. 

COSTUME JEWELRY 

ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS 

BUTTONS , 

NEEDLES. PINS. AND FASTENERS . 



356 


9 


no 


9 


246 


O 


373 


3 


7 


O 


46 


O 


13 


1 


131 


1 


176 


1 


103 


6 


14 


8 


20 


2 


11 


2 


4b 


9 


1 1 


5 



870 

263. 

572, 

13 

22, 



798.9 
408.2 
224.4 
166.3 

86. 1 
70.3 
15.8 

40.5 
10.8 
29.6 



21.0 

14.6 
6. 4 



392.2 

21.8 

58.3 
4b. ' 
13.2 

15.8 

53.5 

18. 5 

30.5 

4,b 

14.5 
217.9 

10. 4 

9.5 

.9 



14. 1 

5.9 

1 .9 

.6 

5.7 

10.6 



2.4 

3.5 

22.5 

23.0 
6.8 
4.6 
6.4 
5.3 

21.7 

4.4 

.7 

1.2 

15.3 



93. 4 
23.0 
70. 4 

99. 1 

1 . 4 

7,4 

3.5 

42.0 

44.8 

32.0 
3. 1 
9.2 
7.6 
9.2 
2.9 



227.5 
74. 1 

136.2 

5.3 

11.9 

252.3 

163.0 
50.0 
39. 4 

41.9 

33.9 

8. 1 

11.4 
3.2 



145.2 

6.8 

19.0 

17.2 

1.7 



20.0 
8.2 

10.6 
1.2 

2.8 
89.8 

1.8 

1.7 

. 1 



73.4 
3.2 



20.7 
12.3 

1 .7 

6.5 

7.3 

.9 

2. 1 

3.5 



4.3 

1 .2 

.3 

.2 

2.7 



263.5 
87.9 
175.6 



274 

5 

38 

9 

89 

131 



71.6 
11.7 
11.0 

3.6 
36.8 

8.6 



643.0 
189. 1 
435.8 



546 
245 
174 
127 



44.2 
36.5 



247.0 

14.9 

39.3 
27.9 
11.4 

10.8 

33.5 

10. 3 
19.9 
3. 3 

11.7 
128. 1 



10.8 

4.2 



5.2 

41.4 

21.4 

2. 1 

1.9 

16.0 

15.8 
b.9 
2.5 
2.9 

4.5 

17.4 

3.2 

. 5 



2 651.3 

536. 4 

2 114.9 

1 285.8 

27.9 

85. 3 

84.7 

214.1 

873.8 



12 323.4 

3 527.4 

1 802.3 

1 468.5 

126.9 

129.7 

7 276.7 

5 253.3 

1 056.7 

966.7 

915.9 
800.3 
115.5 

389.2 
119. 7 
269.5 



153 
112. 



1 978. 1 

218.6 

514.6 
390.0 
124.6 

91.9 

301.5 
101.6 
154.0 
45.9 

97.8 
568.6 

185. 1 
176.8 



270. 4 

148. 1 

19.9 

19. 4 

83.0 

123.6 

407.8 

159.4 

16. 4 

13.9 

218. 1 

122.7 
37.7 
36. 4 
17.8 
30.9 

133.3 
48.5 
1 1.2 
12.2 
61.4 



2 210.6 

491 . 1 
I 719.5 

1 247.7 
32.7 
95. 5 
84.4 
199.5 
835.6 

395.8 
94.4 
41.4 
48.2 

170.0 
41.8 



9 996.4 

3 479.8 

1 773.0 

1 461 .0 

122.0 

123.8 

5 133.6 

3 163.5 

1 058.3 

911.8 

743.8 
633.3 
110.5 

447. 4 
119.2 
328.2 



14C .4 

103.2 

37.2 



1 833.1 
189.7 

505.0 
371.9 

133. 1 

85.0 

262. 4 
83.2 

138.7 
40.5 

94. 4 
524. b 

172. 1 
163.3 



244.8 

135.4 

18.4 

16.3 

74.8 

118.6 

390.7 

169.4 

17.3 

12.5 

191.5 

113. 1 
32.7 

33.7 
16.5 
30.2 

123.4 
42.7 
10.7 
10.5 
59.5 



(NA) 
88 
89 

(NA) 
85 
92 
79 
92 
83 

(NA) 
99 
97 
93 
81 
93 



(NA) 

(NA) 
96 
90 
85 
94 

(NA) 
83 
88 

78 

(NA) 
95 
96 

(MA) 

80-85 

95 



(NA) 
99 
94 



(NA) 

88 

(NA) 
86 
81 



(NA) 
91 
80 
94 

88 



(NA) 
85 

78 



(NA) 

(NA) 
9 1 
90 
95 

95 

97 

(NA) 
88 
99- 
81 
95 

(NA) 
93 
85 
90 

94 

(NA) 

95 
97 
97 
93 



(NA) 
96 
90 

(NA) 
94 
98 
72 
87 
85 

(NA) 
97 
86 
86 
85 
50 



(NA) 

(NA) 

99 
88 
92 
91 

(NA) 

97 
92 
64 

(NA) 
98 
91 

(NA) 
92 
95 



(NA) 
99 
75 



(NA) 

73 

(NA) 
82 

91 

74 

(NA) 
69 
86 
94 

95 
97 

(NA) 
90 
96 



(NA) 

(NA) 
96 
94 
78 
99 

98 

(NA) 
96 
70 
61 
91 

(NA) 
92 

93 
91 
79 

(NA) 
92 
85 
90 
89 



476.9 

89.5 

387.4 

288. 4 
25.8 
10.9 
18.7 
56.3 

176.7 

83.7 
17.5 
8.5 
6.2 
40.6 
10.9 



1 548.4 

643.8 

599.9 

24.5 
19. 4 

676.7 
302.2 
188. 1 

186. 4 

139.5 
114.6 
24.9 

45.0 
14.3 
30.7 



33. 

25. 



305.4 

33. 1 

94. 1 
62.4 
31.7 

11.9 

51.4 
15. 1 
28.3 

8.0 



20. 
64. 

29. 

27. 

2. 



390.7 

43. 1 

23.6 

4.8 

1.5 
13.2 

20. 1 

113.0 

51.8 

16.2 

4.5 

40. b 

31.6 

11.6 

6.9 

7.6 

5.5 

52.6 

21.7 

5.0 

b.6 

20.3 



3 394.6 

554.4 

2 840.2 

1 535.7 
136.8 
66.9 
129. 3 
320.9 
881.9 

494.5 

108.7 

40.6 

43.8 

250.2 

51.2 



741 
495, 



133.3 

112.9 

5 228.3 
2 369.4 
1 460.7 
1 398.2 

898.4 
782.3 
116. 1 

301.7 

99.7 

202.0 



162 
125 

37 



1 912. 5 

208.2 

581.2 
388.9 

192. 3 

79. 1 

29 1.2 
83.3 

161.8 
46. 1 

96.4 
498.8 

157.6 

144.2 

13.4 



225.6 
125.6 

20.8 
8.3 

70.9 

103.0 

460.9 

206.7 

59.0 

19.4 

175.8 

159.8 
55.0 
31.9 
41.4 
31.5 

214. 1 
85.3 
16.3 
23.0 
89.4 



5 341.5 

1 013.8 
4 327.7 

2 508. 1 

250.7 
128.4 
204.6 
467.0 
1 457.4 

1 042.4 
244.2 
113.8 
86.5 
496.7 
101.2 



11 868.9 

11 433.9 

229.5 
205.5 

7 831.2 

3 542.7 

2 208.2 

2 080.3 

1 192.8 
1 009.7 

183. 1 

541.4 
186.2 
355.2 



301.3 

232.5 

68.8 



3 992.2 

358.6 

1 111.6 
732.5 

379. 1 

131.9 

634.8 

168.6 

370.3 

95.9 

177.9 
1 270. 1 

307.3 

288. 1 

19.2 



415. 

234, 
34, 
16. 

130. 



179.0 

978.5 
444. 1 
138. 1 
35.3 
361.0 



337. 

119, 
64 
85. 
68. 



8 882.0 

1 736.4 
7 145.6 

3 909. 8 

321. 1 
269. 1 
299.5 
687.8 

2 332.2 

1 946.2 
516.5 
195.3 
143.7 
900.7 
190.0 



53 505.5 

35 326.2 

34 333.8 

476.7 
515.7 

13 700.8 
6 316.5 
4 024.9 
3 359.4 

2 040.0 

1 679.8 

360.2 

1 365.1 
437.9 
927.2 



880. 
713. 
167. 



414.9 

151.0 

29.2 

43.8 

190.9 



6 117.9 

553.9 

1 670.8 

1 143.4 

527.4 

196.0 

1 028.5 
284.0 
596.7 

147.8 

272.7 
1 851.2 

544.8 

511.2 

33.6 



858.7 

481.9 

72.8 

65.1 

238.9 

314.4 

1 826.8 
796.6 
247.9 

77.5 
704.7 

589.5 
185.5 
121.6 
126.8 
155.5 

760.0 

280.5 

60.4 

81.8 

337.3 



193.9 
55. 1 

138.7 



175. 
5 
16 
13 
52 
88 



37.0 

12.0 

4. 1 

2. 1 

15.5 

3.3 



981. 1 

614.5 

602.7 

6.6 
5.3 

294.2 
114.7 
111.5 
67.9 

37.9 
24.5 

13.5 

18. 1 

7.2 

10.9 



13.3 

9.6 
3.7 



191.9 

16.2 

41.1 
30.9 
10.5 

6.2 

31. 1 
10.5 
17.8 
2.7 

9. 1 
78.6 

9.2 

8.7 

.5 



8. 1 
3.7 
1.3 
.4 
2.7 

5.8 

51.1 

27.7 

6.3 

1.9 

15.3 



10 



1 

4. 1 
1.6 
2.2 
2.3 

13.0 

3.8 

.7 

1.0 

7.4 



See footnotes at end of table. 



42 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967 



Companies 



(number) 



Establishments 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 

(number) 



All employees 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man-hours 



(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



399 

3991 

3993 

3994 

3996 

3999 



192 

1925 

1929 



MISC. MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
CONT 1NUED 

MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURES 1 .' 

BROOMS AND BRUSHES." 

S INGS AND ADVERTISING DISPLAYS 1 

MORTICIANS, GOODS 19 . 

HARD SURFACE FLOOR COVERINGS 1 . 9 
MANUFACTURES, NEC 19 . 



ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES. . . . 

AMMUNITION EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS 

COMPLETE GUIDEO MISSLES 

AMMUNITION EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS, 
NEC 



1931 | TANKS ANO TANKS CONPONENTS. 



1941 
1951 

1961 
1911 
1999 



SIGHTING ANO FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 

SMALL ARMS 

SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION 

GUNS HOWITZERS AND MORI ARS AND 
ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES, NEC 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUXILIARY 



382 

516 

159 

52 7 

18 



105 
25 



6 515 
533 

3 188 

563 

20 

2 211 



16a 
65 



1 601 
169 
623 
211 
12 
586 



115 
59 



5 460 



3 119 



143.8 
17.3 
47.8 
16.1 
6.0 
56.6 



303.1 
201.4 

101.7 

13.2 

4.6 

17.4 

25.2 

36.9 



830.9 





816 


4 




88 


3 




309 


3 




90 


9 




43 


5 




284 


4 


3 


528 


4 


2 


804 


5 


2 


098 


7 



705.8 

101.4 
40.5 
124. 3 
173.3 
284.4 



727.9 



115.4 
14. 1 
36.8 
13.0 
4.9 
46.6 



147.0 
70.2 

76.8 

10.0 

2.4 

13.1 

19.7 

22.6 



221.9 

26.8 
70.6 
26.4 
10.1 



300.6 
142.9 

157.7 

20.7 

5.2 

27.4 

39. 

46. 5 



551.2 
61.3 

198.8 
60.6 
33.2 

197.2 



1 061.1 
587.0 

474.1 

68. 1 

18. 1 

83.3 

123.7 

147.9 



575.2 
192.9 
546.6 
161.7 
133.4 
540.6 



4 457.4 
°3 338.8 



144.7 

63.7 

226.6 

286.3 

409.1 



2 


718 







371 


8 




875 


1 




306 


1 




221 


7 




943 


3 


9 


267 


7 


7 


104 


7 


4 


640. 


5 



394. 1 
101.5 
384.0 
595.9 

687.5 



individual companies . 

arising from shipme 



between establishments 



Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D ) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures 

l Includes expenditures for plants in operation and for plants under construction but not yet in operation. 

2 The total value of shipments for industry groups (2-and 3-digit) and a few individual industries (4-digit) includes extensive duplica 
in the same industry classification. 

3 Includes data only for privately-owned and /or operated establishments. Government-owned and operated establishments are excluded. 

4 In 1967 and 1963, in addition to the employment and payroll reported for operating manufacturing establishments, manufacturing concerns reported separately for central administrative 
offices or auxiliary units which serve the manufacturing establishments of a company (e.g., storage warehouses, power plants, research laboratories, garages, repair shops, etc.), rather 
than the general public. Separate reports were obtained if these units were at different general locations from the establishments served or if they serviced more than one manufacturing 
establishment. The figures shown for these units do not represent a separate industry but rather a balancing total for all manufacturing industries. 

5 Some of the small establishments in these industries may have been misclassif ied as to industry. This does not significantly affect the statistics other than the number of establish- 
ments. (See section of text on scope and coverage for further explanation). 

Establishments in this industry were requested to report value of production instead of value of shipments. Consequently, the formula for computing value added by manufacture was 
modified to exclude any change in finished products inventories between the beginning and end of the year. 

7 The data for 1967 for industry 2045 exclude establishments producing self-rising, phosphated, and bromated flour which is now classified in industry 2041. However for 1963, data 
were included. 

8 Data for 1967 for industry 2396 are not strictly comparable with prior years because of misclassif icati. on of several plants. These establishments accounted for approximately 5 to 
10 percent of total employment and value of shipments in 1967. 

9 This is a minimum percentage. The exact percentage can not be shown without disclosing figures for individual companies. 
10 The 1963 data for industry 2651 are not directly comparable with other years due to an undetermined number of establishments reporting sanitary containers as folding boxes. This 
caused such establishments to be classified incorrectly to the Folding Box Industry. 

ll Value added data include government-owned, contractor-operated plants which were estimated based upon averages reported for commercial establishments in prior years. Cost of 
materials data excluded government-owned materials furnished to government-owned, contractor-operated plants and include fuel and electricity purchased by or for the establishments. 
Value of shipments data include a calculated value of shipments for government-owned, contractor-operated plants comprised of adjusted value added plus the cost of fuels and electric 

not in operation. Capital expenditures of government- 



ergy. Capital expenditures, 
eluded 



include expenditures for plants under construction 



wned , contractor-operated plants are 



the totals for the industry. 

lz Included in the coverage ratio for industry 2992 are lubricating oils and greases which are also primary to industry 2911, Petroleum Refining. A 1967 coverage ratio computed on 
the basis of including both industries to which lubricating oils and greases are primary would total 99 percent; 67 percent by industry 2911, and 32 percent by industry 2992. The 
remaining 1 percent was shipped by establishments in other industries. Computed on the basis of excluding industry 2911, the 1967 coverage ratio is 96 percent for industry 2992. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



43 



table 3 General Statistics for Establishments by Industry Groups and Industries: 

1967 and 1963 -Continued 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



1967--Continued 



Capital expenditures, new 1 



Total 



(million 
dollars) 



Structures 
and 

additions 
to plant 
(million 
dollars) 



Machinery 

and 
equipment 

(million 
dollars) 



Inventories end of-- 



1967 



(million 
dollars) 



1966 



(million 
dollars) 



Special- 
ization 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 



Cover- 
age 
ratio 



(per- 
cent) 



1963 



All employees 



Number 



(1.000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 

added by 

manufacture 

(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 

'r Hum 
dollars) 



MISC. MANUFACTURING 
CONTINUED 



NDUSTRI ES-- 



399 

3991 

3993 

3994 

3996 

3999 



192 

1925 

1929 

19 

1931 

1911 

1951 

1961 

19 1 1\ 

1999J 



MISCELLANEOUS MANUFACTURES . 

BROOMS AND BRUSHES 

SIGNS AND ADVERTISING DISPLAYS 

MORTICIANS' GOODS 

HARD SURFACE FLOOR COVERINGS . 
MANUFACTURES' NEC 



ORDNANCE AND ACCESSORIES . . . 

AMMUNITIONi EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS 

COMPLETE GUIDED MISSLES 

AMMUNITION. EXCEPT FOR SMALL ARMS. 
NEC 

TANKS AND TANK COMPONENTS 

SIGHTING AND FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 

SMALL ARMS 

SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION 

GUNS. HOWITZERS. AND MORTORS.AND 
ORDNANCE INCL. ACCESSORIES. NEC . 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUXILIARY . 



153.9 
111.1 

U2.5 

3.3 

1.3 

11.2 

12.6 

17.7 



32.5 
3.0 
9.8 
1.7 
8.0 

10.0 



49.2 
38.0 



.3 
2.0 
6.2 



49.4 
7.7 

13. 1 
2.5 

12.6 

13.5 



101.6 

73. y 

31.2 

2.5 
1.0 
9.2 

6. a 
13.3 



389.2 
69.5 
87.3 
51.4 
11.8 

139.3 



881.5 
485.4 

399. 1 

87.9 

11.3 

81.1 

153.8 

91.6 



369. 1 
68.8 
83.6 
51.0 
39.0 

126.8 



707.4 
130.2 

277.2 

74.3 

10.2 

77.5 

118.8 

90.2 



(NA) 
90 
97 
95 
86 
91 



(NA) 

(NA) 
89 

92 

85 

50-60 

92 

97 



(NA) 
92 
95 
98 
97 
90 



(NA) 



(NA) 
86 



76 

40-50 

94 

99 

61 



130.3 
16.6 
43.5 
17.3 
6.2 
46.7 



184.2 
151.6 

32.6 

11.3 
9.2 

10.0 
8.9 

25.0 



648.6 
73.6 

212.6 
86.2 
39.0 

207.3 



1 553.1 
1 351.2 



76.6 
66.9 
57.3 

51.9 



176.2 



1 236.6 
167.9 
107.5 
158.1 
118.8 
381.0 



20 2 216.7 
1.960.9 

285.8 

118.1 
96.3 
88.3 

103.8 

235.2 



116. 3 
321.1 
616.8 
290.0 
201. 1 
684.2 



3 632.5 
3 129.5 

503.0 

391. 1 
156.6 
133.0 
192.5 

351.0 



12 


8 


4 


1 


15 





5 


5 


1 


1 


13 


5 



56-5 
U8.8 

7.6 

5.2 
3.6 
5.1 
5.5 

12.3 



13 Data for 1963 for industry 3461 have been revised by the inculsion of automotive stampings plants operated by automobile producing companies. The data for 1963 for industries 3711 
and 3714 (previously identified as Census code 3717) have been revised by the exclusion of automotive stampings plants operated by automobile producing companies. 

14 The figures for 1967 for industry 3534 are not comparable with those for earlier years because some companies previously included construction receipts with value of shipments. 
Value added and value of shipments would have been $50 million to $75 million higher had they been on a basis comparable with earlier years. 

J5 The value of shipments and cost of materials for this industry includes extensive duplication arising from shipments between establishments in the same industry classification. 
Accordingly , the specialization ratios and coverage ratios are not shown. 

16 In 1967 a number of establishments performing "machine shop jobwork" have been classified in this industry, which had previously been classified in other industries. This change in 
classification results mainly from the fact that a separate product code for such work (35993 11) was introduced in the 1967 Census of Manufactures. It appears that between $400 million 
and $600 million in value of shipments is accounted for by establishments which have been classified in other industries in prior years. 

l7 The 1963 data for industry 3729 exclude establishments which were classified in industry 3723. 

1 Establishments in this industry reported value of work done rather than value of shipments. Consequently, the formula for computing value added by manufacture was not adjusted for 
inventory change between the beginning and the end of the year. It does include value added by resale. 

19 Industry group 399, "Miscellaneous manufactures," was previously identified as industry groups 398 and 399. The comparability of 1967 industry codes with those used in prior years 
is as follows: 



1967 SIC 


Prior year 
SIC 


1967 SIC 


Prior year 
SIC 


3991 
3993 
3994 

3996 


3981 
3993 
3988 

3982 


3999 


3983 
3984 
3987 
3992 
3995 
3999 



Establishments in the industry were requested to report value of work done instead of value of shipments. Consequently, the formula for computing value added by manufacture was not 
adjusted for any inventory change between the beginning and end of the year. 

Government-owned, privately operated establishments did not enter into the calculation of "Primary product specialization ratio" or "Coverage ratio" as all dollar receipts for 
these establishments were included in "Miscellaneous receipts." 



44 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 4 Selected Statistics on Central Administrative Offices and Auxiliaries, by Major Industry Groups 

of Establishments Serviced: 1967 



Code 



Major industry group and central 
administrative offices and auxiliaries 



Estab- 
lishments 

(number) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Total 

payroll 

(million 

dollars) 



Major industry group and central 
administrative offices and auxiliaries 



Estab- 
lishments 

(number) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Total 

payroll 

(million 

dollars) 



TOTAL 

Central administrative offices 

Research, development, or 
testing 

Storage (warehouse) 

Other auxiliaries 

Food and kindred products 

Central administrative offices.... 
Research, development, or testing. 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Tobacco manufactures 

Central administrative offices.... 
Research, development, or testing. 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Textile mill products 

Central administrative offices.... 
Research, development, or testing. 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Apparel and other textile products.. 
Central administrative offices.... 
Research, development, or testing. 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Lumber and wood products 

Central administrative offices.... 
Research, development, or testing. 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Furniture and fixtures 

Central administrative offices.... 
Research, development, or testing. 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Paper and allied products 

Central administrative offices.... 
Research, development, or testing. 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Printing and publishing 

Central administrative offices.... 
Research, development, or testing. 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Chemicals and allied products 

Central administrative offices.... 
Research, development, or testing. 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Petroleum and coal products 

Central administrative offices.... 
Research, development, or testing. 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 



546.0 
358.4 

608 
504 
764 
960 
585 
52 
117 
206 

61 
23 
4 
12 
22 

234 

180 

10 

19 

25 

239 

166 

6 

45 

22 

161 

128 

7 

6 

20 

69 
57 

1 
3 



184 
136 

27 
6 

15 

293 

136 

2 

19 

136 

722 

445 
171 

47 
59 

204 

146 

34 



830.9 
580.6 

195.6 

15.3 

39.4 

76.3 

68.0 

4.0 

1.9 

2.3 

8.0 

6.7 

.8 

.2 

.2 

25.0 

21.5 

21.5 

.6 

2.3 

16.2 
12.8 

.2 
2.6 

.6 

7.7 

7.0 

.4 

.1 

.3 

4.7 
4.4 

(c) 
(b) 
1.0 

31.8 

26.7 

4.4 

1.0 

.7 

21.1 
17.2 

(b) 
(f) 
2.1 

141.3 

85.2 

49.9 

.8 

5.4 

69.1 

54.4 

13.9 

.1 

.1 



8,727.9 
6,176.4 



2,106.6 
91.3 



353, 

764 

696 

39 

12 

16 



74.4 

63.2 

7.2 

1.0 

2.9 

219.7 

195.4 

5.1 

2.9 

16.3 

140.0 

118.8 

1.6 

12.8 

6.8 

73.7 
68.8 

3.1 
.4 

1.4 

46.8 

45.1 

(D) 

(D) 

.5 

352.3 

306.0 

40.6 

.4 

5.3 

172.0 
143.1 

(D) 

(D) 

20.1 

1,489.1 
903.4 
528.2 

5.3 
52.2 

744.4 
581.9 
153.1 

(D) 
(D) 



Rubber and plastics products, n.e.c... 

Central administrative offices 

Research, development, or testing... 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Leather and leather products 

Central administrative offices 

Research, development, or testing... 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Stone, clay, and glass products 

Central administrative offices 

Research, development, or testing... 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Primary metal industries 

Central administrative offices 

Research, development, or testing... 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Fabricated metal products 

Central administrative offices 

Research, development, or testing... 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Machinery, except electrical 

Central administrative offices 

Research, development, or testing... 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Electrical equipment and supplies 

Central administrative offices 

Research, development, or testing... 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Transportation equipment 

Central administrative offices 

Research, development, or testing... 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Instruments and related products 

Central administrative offices 

Research, development, or testing... 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 1 

Central administrative offices 

Research, development, or testing... 

Storage (warehouse) 

All other functions , 



386 

272 

21 

39 

54 



270 

176 

37 

25 

32 



319 

234 

20 

21 

44 



386 

251 

59 

48 

28 



386 

242 

74 

31 

39 

251 
169 

54 
11 
17 



14.3 

13.3 

.8 

.1 

.1 

7.9 
6.5 

(a) 
1.2 

(c) 



30.7 
22.9 

5.2 
.8 

1.9 



48.1 

43.3 

4.1 

.1 

.6 



33.3 
25.1 

4.7 
.4 

3.1 



64.9 

46.8 

15.8 

1.1 

1.2 



105.7 

45.2 

44.1 

1.6 

14.8 

101.4 

54.3 

43.6 

.7 

2.8 



15.3 

12.7 

2.0 

(e) 
(b) 

8.1 

6.5 

1.0 

.5 

.1 



135.3 
126.4 

(D) 
(P) 

(D) 

59.4 
50.4 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



308.3 
238.4 

50.5 
4.3 

15.0 



544.8 

499.4 

39.2 

.8 

5.4 



350.5 
267.9 

50.9 
2.7 

28.9 



703.9 

510.3 

172.7 

8.9 

12.0 



1,138.5 

507.7 

489.2 

9.4 

132.1 

1,168.7 

650.3 

485.3 

5.5 

27.6 



159.2 

135.1 

20.5 

(D) 
(D) 

84.1 

69.9 

(D) 

3.2 

(D) 



Standard Notes : 
applicable. 



- Represents zero. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 



Not available. 



(X) Not 



500 to 999 employees. 
1,000 to 2,499 employees. 



a. Less than 20 employees. c. 100 to 249 employees. 

b. 20 to 99 employees. d. 250 to 499 employees. 

1 Includes privately owned and/or operated establishments classified in Census major industry group 19, "Ordnance and Accessories." Establishments 
which are Government owned and operated are not included. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



45 



Table 5 Detailed Statistics by Industry Groups: 1967 



Item 



United 
States, 
total 



Food and 
kindred 
products 
(SIC 20) 



Tobacco 
manufac- 
tures 

(SIC 21) 



Textile 

mill 
products 
(SIC 22) 



Apparel and 

other textile 

products 

(SIC 23) 



Lumber 
and wood 
products 
(SIC 24) 



Furniture 

and 
fixtures 
(SIC 25) 



Paper and 

allied 

products 

(SIC 26) 



Printing 

and 
publishing 
(SIC 27) 



ESTABLISHMENTS, TOTAL NUMBER 

WITH 1 TO 19 EMPLOYEES 00 . 

WITH 20 TO 99 EMPLOYEES 00 . 

WITH 100 EMPLOYEES OR MORE DO . 

ALL EMPLOYEES, AVERAGE FOR YEAR 1,000 

PAYROLL FOR YEAR, ALL EMPLOYEES . . . MILLION DOLLARS 

PRODUCTION WORKERS: 

AVERAGE FOR YEAR 1,000 

MARCH DO . 

MAY 00 . 

AUGUST DO . 

NOVEMBER DO . 

MAN-HOURS MILLIONS 

JANUARY-MARCH DO . 

APRIL-JUNE DO . 

JULY-SEPTEMBER 00 . 

OCTOBER-DECEMBER DO . 

WAGES MILLION DOLLARS 

COST OF MATERIALS, ETC., TOTAL DO . 

MATERIALS, PARTS, CONTAINERS, ETC. CONSUMED . .DO . 

COST OF RESALES DO . 

FUELS CONSUMED DO . 

PURCHASED ELECTRIC ENERGY DO . 

CONTRACT WORK DO . 

VALUE OF SHIPMENTS, INCLUDING RESALES 00 . 

VALUE OF RESALES DO . 

VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURE DO . 

MANUFACTURERS' INVENTORIES; 

BEGINNING OF YEAR, TOTAL DO . 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO . 

WORK IN PROCESS DO . 

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES, FUEL, ETC DO . 

END OF YEAR, TOTAL DO . 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO . 

WORK IN PROCESS DO . 

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES, FUEL, ETC DO . 

EXPENDITURES FOR PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, TOTAL . . .DO . 

NEW PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, TOTAL DO . 

NEW STRUCTURES AND ADDITIONS TO PLANT . . . .DO . 

NEW MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT 00 . 

USED PLANT AND EQUIPMENT DO . 



305 680 

198 542 

73 882 

33 256 

16 492.0 
123 H80.6 



13 955.3 
13 803.3 

13 809.3 

14 076.8 

14 135.5 

27 837.6 
6 938.9 
6 962.8 

6 848.4 

7 088.0 

81 393.6 

298 513.7 
265 889.3 

15 449.6 
3 974.9 
3 716.8 
9 483.2 

557 398.2 
19 527.9 



77 726.9 

24 882.5 

25 844.0 

27 000.1 

84 405.5 

26 771.9 
29 107.5 

28 526.2 

22 469.9 

21 503.0 

5 714.0 

15 789.0 

966.9 



32 518 

19 004 

9 409 

4 105 

1 649.6 
10 076.8 



1 121.7 

1 048.6 

1 063.1 

1 223.3 

1 151.7 

2 259.4 

521.7 
540.7 
612.8 
584.6 

6 062.6 

57 540.6 
52 548.8 

4 157.4 
345.4 
316.2 
172.8 

83 975.2 

5 020.2 



7 240.2 

4 176.9 

479.9 

2 583.3 



748.8 
488.7 
514.9 
745.1 



820 
730, 
466 
264 
91, 



329 

134 
81 

114 

75.1 
376.8 



66.2 
61.4 
57.6 
69.5 
75.9 



125. 
29. 
28, 
32, 

34, 



871.7 

663.8 

182.3 

7.1 

7.9 

10.5 

903.6 
191.0 



2 303.7 

94.7 

33.9 

2 175.1 

2 377.9 

100.1 

33.8 

2 244.1 

54.2 
52.9 
11.1 
41.9 
1.3 



7 080 
2 627 
2 345 
2 108 

929.0 
390.9 



828.2 
816.2 
822.7 
836.7 
837.3 

689.7 
415.2 
425.0 
414.3 
434.8 



741.4 
564.2 
336.2 
105.9 
178.6 
556.3 



19 815.2 
389.9 



2 967.3 

1 167.2 

859.4 

940.5 



093.2 
208.8 
897.1 
987.2 

785.8 
733.1 
166.2 
566.9 
52.7 



26 393 

13 688 

9 357 

3 348 

1 356.7 
i 582.2 



1 200.4 

1 194.8 

1 193.8 

1 208.2 

1 204.3 

2 178.6 
544.1 
546.1 
538.8 
549.6 

4 340.7 

11 322.1 

8 550.9 

354.2 

27.2 

67.0 

2 322.8 

21 326.9 
470.3 



2 672.5 

1 231.7 

524.6 

916.1 



753.0 
270.3 
546.0 
936.9 

226.2 

208.3 

57.9 

150.5 

17.9 



36 795 

30 992 

4 711 

1 092 

554.0 
2 798.9 



495.7 
475.5 
495.6 
512.7 
498.9 

977.0 
236.4 
241.7 
252.0 
246.9 

290.6 



231.6 
236.0 
381.6 
115.1 
89.2 
409.7 



11 205.7 
455.8 



1 466.4 
638.6 
308.3 

519.1 

1 465.7 
646.2 
299.8 
519.7 



465. 
426, 

88, 
338, 

39, 



10 008 

6 559 

2 489 

960 

425.3 
I 258.3 



357.5 
356.8 
351.8 
358.0 
363.2 

715.7 
178.8 
176.5 
176.1 
184.3 



3 619.6 

3 286.4 

234.6 

21.0 

37.2 

40.4 

7 749.8 
284.9 



1 080.4 
306.8 
270.6 
503.2 

1 129.8 
329.4 
287.2 
513.4 

210.4 
198.0 

85.2 
112.9 

12.4 



5 890 
2 077 
2 131 
1 682 

638.9 
4 436.2 



507.7 
501.7 
503.5 
514.4 
511.5 

071.2 
267.0 
268.2 
265.3 
270.8 



10 376.8 

288.8 

367.2 

209.6 

49.8 

20 969.9 
392.2 



2 176.0 
755.4 
255.6 

1 165.1 

2 262.8 
825.2 
264.1 

1 173.6 

1 648.2 

1 585.3 

301 .6 

1 283.8 

62.9 



37 989 

29 954 

6 250 

1 785 

1 031.0 
7 151.5 



631.6 
633.3 
631.0 
630.3 
633.8 

1 196.1 
298.9 
298.6 
296.7 
302.2 

4 011.3 

7 518.5 

5 398.4 
321.4 

32.1 

88.1 

1 678.5 

21 738.4 
483.8 



1 667.2 

616.4 
433.1 
617.5 

1 859.8 
728.7 
456.7 
674.3 

839.5 
788.1 
209.8 

578.3 
51.4 



See footnotes at end of table. 



46 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



Table 5 Detailed Statistics by Industry Groups: 1967 -Continued 



Item 



Chemicals 
and allied 
products 
(SIC 28) 



Petroleum 
and coal 
products 
(SIC 29) 



Rubbei and 

plastics 

products, n.e.c. 

(SIC 30) 



Leather and 
leather 
products 
(SIC 31) 



Stone, clay, 
and glass 
products 
(SIC 32) 



Primary 

metal 

industries 

(SIC 33) 



Fabricated 

metal 

products 

(SIC 34) 



Machinery, 
except 
electrical 
(SIC 35) 



Electrical 

equipment and 
supplies 
(SIC 36) 



ESTABLISHMENTS, TOTAL NUMBER 

WITH 1 TO 19 EMPLOYEES DO . 

WITH 20 TO 99 EMPLOYEES DO . 

WITH 100 EMPLOYEES OR MORE DO . 

ALL EMPLOYEES, AVERAGE FOR YEAR 1,000 

PAYROLL FOR YEAR, ALL EMPLOYEES DO . 

PRODUCTION WORKERS: 

AVERAGE FOR YEAR 1,000 

MARCH DO . 

MAY DO . 

AUGUST DO . 

NOVEMBER DO . 

MAN-HOURS MILLIONS 

JANUARY-MARCH DO . 

APRIL-JUNE DO . 

JULY-SEPTEMBER DO . 

OCTOBER-DECEMBER DO . 

WAGES MILLION DOLLARS 

COST OF MATERIALS, ETC., TOTAL DO . 

MATERIALS, PARTS, CONTAINERS, ETC. CONSUMED . .DO . 

COST OF RESALES DO . 

FUELS CONSUMED DO . 

PURCHASED ELECTRIC ENERGY DO . 

CONTRACT WORK DO . 

VALUE OF SHIPMENTS, INCLUDING RESALES DO . 

VALUE OF RESALES DO . 

VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURE 00 . 

MANUFACTURERS' INVENTORIES: 

BEGINNING OF YEAR, TOTAL DO . 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO . 

WORK IN PROCESS DO . 

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES, FUEL, ETC DO . 

END OF YEAR, TOTAL DO . 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO . 

WORK IN PROCESS DO . 

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES, FUEL, ETC DO . 

EXPENDITURES FOR PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, TOTAL . . .DO . 

NEW PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, TOTAL DO . 

NEW STRUCTURES AND ADDITIONS TO PLANT . . . .DO . 

NEW MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT DO . 

USED PLANT AND EQUIPMENT DO . 



11 799 

7 451 
2 935 
1 413 

841.4 
> 443.0 



541.4 
540.6 
541.2 
543.3 
541 .1 

1 086.1 
272.2 
274.2 
265.4 
274.3 

3 555.2 



18 821 .2 

16 129.9 

1 317.7 

605.5 

582.8 

185.3 

42 148.3 
1 785.8 



4 997.2 

2 435.5 

737.0 

1 824.7 



348.7 
614.3 



985.8 
936.1 
659.0 

277.1 
49.7 



1 880 

1 176 

442 

262 

141.7 
1 216.5 



99.2 
95.7 
99.6 

103.2 
98.7 

202.1 
47.5 
51 .7 
52.5 
50.5 

786 .3 

16 748.4 

15 464.8 

742.1 

322.4 

134.5 

84.6 

22 043.4 
802.8 



1 860.9 

1 082.8 

384.2 

393.8 



029.6 
184.5 

413.4 
431.7 

014.2 
999.3 
560.3 
4 38.9 

14.9 



6 456 
3 334 
2 089 
1 033 

516.7 
286. 5 



410 . 1 
404.0 
389.7 
421.9 
425.1 

815.5 
206.3 
190.1 
200.1 
219.0 



974.4 
146.7 
554.2 

57.8 
117.3 

98.5 



12 758.6 

<D) 



1 600.9 
806.6 
268.2 
526.1 

1 670.0 
806.7 
283.5 
579.6 



707 
677 
139 

537 
30 



3 685 

1 718 

1 054 

913 

328.7 
458.8 



293.3 
291.4 
287.6 
296.9 
297.5 

549.2 
138.1 
133.7 
135.3 
142.2 



540.9 
247.5 
137.1 
13.5 
20.6 
122.2 

169.0 
171.6 



667.4 
258.1 
156.7 
252.5 



653 
258 
155 
240 

71 
62 
19 
42 



15 580 

10 669 

3 716 

1 195 

589.9 
3 825.5 



469.3 
454.0 
469.2 
482.2 
471 .6 

948.4 
226.6 
239.0 
242.6 

240.2 



6 146.0 

4 932.9 

498.9 

437.5 

200.3 

76.4 

14 449.4 
624.3 



1 803.5 
946.9 
249.8 
606.6 

1 851.2 
963.0 
264.6 
623.4 

866.9 
820.9 
193.0 
627.8 
46.0 



6 837 
2 755 
2 266 
1 816 

281.0 

850 .9 



1 041 .5 

1 065.7 

1 48.5 

1 031.2 

1 020.7 

2 088.7 
546.6 
532.4 
494.8 
514.8 

7 457.3 

27 219.9 
24 444.2 
718.5 
942.2 
693.5 
421 .7 

46 730.9 
783.3 



7 470.5 
2 009.4 

2 436.4 

3 024.6 



001 .4 
208.2 
704.4 
089.0 

211 .6 
134.1 
689.6 

144.4 
77 .5 



27 418 
16 677 

7 911 
2 830 

1 341.8 
9 319.5 



1 056.9 

1 044.1 

1 052.8 

1 064.1 

1 066.4 

2 160.9 
535.2 
543.8 
532.2 
550 . 1 

6 541 .6 

16 704.9 
14 749.8 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

34 577.8 
(0) 



5 429.9 

1 407.5 

1 902.2 

2 120.2 

5 654.4 
1 508.5 

1 969.2 

2 176.7 

1 201.5 

1 118.4 

284.2 

834.2 

83. 1 



37 892 

27 265 

7 765 

2 862 

1 864.5 
14 226.3 



1 349, 

1 365, 

1 361 , 

1 337, 

1 332, 



2 785.0 
724. 1 
714.8 
661.2 
684.9 

9 236.1 

21 231.6 

18 516.1 

1 500.5 

138.8 

217.2 

859.0 

48 477.2 
1 996.2 



10 139.1 

2 749.4 

4 780.5 

2 609.4 

10 917.0 

3 073.1 

5 046.7 
2 797.0 

1 977.6 

1 868.1 

506.5 

1 361.5 

109.5 



10 706 
5 134 
2 971 
2 601 

1 874.9 
12 968.0 



1 323.8 

1 337.4 

1 300.0 

1 319.8 

1 338.1 

2 611.3 
670.8 
649.0 
619.6 

671.8 

7 607.0 

19 437.3 

17 797.9 

997.3 

89.5 

(D) 

(D) 

43 361.0 
1 364.1 



7 916.3 

1 872.9 

3 729.7 

2 313.8 

8 526.6 
2 041.9 

4 118.7 
2 366.2 

1 597.0 

1 537.2 

449.3 

1 087.9 

59.3 



footnotes 



end 



>f table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



Table 5. Detailed Statistics by Industry Groups: 1967-Contmued 



47 



Item 



Transportation 
equipment 
(SIC 37) 



Instruments 

and related 

products 

(SIC 38) 



Miscellaneous 

manufacturing 

industries 

(SIC 39) 



Ordnance 

and 
accessories 
(SIC 19) 



ESTABLISHMENTS, TOTAL NUMBER 

WITH 1 TO 19 EMPLOYEES 00 . 

WITH 20 TO 99 EMPLOYEES DO . 

WITH 100 EMPLOYEES OR MORE DO . 

ALL EMPLOYEES, AVERAGE FOR YEAR 1,000 

PAYROLL FOR YEAR, ALL EMPLOYEES . . . MILLION DOLLARS 

PRODUCTION WORKERS: 

AVERAGE FOR YEAR 1,000 

MARCH DO . 

MAY DO . 

AUGUST DO . 

NOVEMBER DO . 

MAN-HOURS MILLIONS 

JANUARY-MARCH DO . 

APRIL-JUNE 00 . 

JULY-SEPTEMBER DO . 

OCTOBER-DECEMBER DO . 

WAGES MILLION DOLLARS 

COST OF MATERIALS, ETC., TOTAL 00 . 

MATERIALS, PARTS, ' CONTA 1NERS , ETC. CONSUMED . .00 . 

COST OF RESALES DO . 

FUELS CONSUMED DO . 

PURCHASED ELECTRIC ENERGY 00 . 

CONTRACT WORK DO . 

VALUE OF SHIPMENTS, INCLUDING RESALES DO . 

VALUE OF RESALES DO . 

VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURE DO . 

MANUFACTURERS' INVENTORIES: 

BEGINNING OF YEAR, TOTAL DO . 

FINISHED PRODUCT DO . 

WORK ,IN PROCESS DO . 

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES, FUEL, ETC DO . 

END OF YEAR, TOTAL DO . 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO . 

WORK IN PROCESS DO . 

MATERIALS, SUPPLIES, FUEL, CTC DO . 

EXPENDITURES FOR PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, TOTAL . . .00 . 

NEW PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, TOTAL DO . 

NEW STRUCTURES AND ADDITIONS TO PLANT . . . .DO . 

NEW MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT DO . 

USED PLANT AND EQUIPMENT DO . 



7 183 

a 130 

1 891 

1 162 

1 834.1 
15 173.1 



1 336.5 

1 321.1 

1 328.6 

1 280.2 

1 116.1 

2 715.6 
682.7 
701.1 
653.7 
708.1 

9 9i8.2 

10 120.0 

38 279.1 

(D) 

(01 
(D) 
(D) 

68 512.3 
(D) 



9 996.1 

1 120.8 
6 211.1 

2 661.1 

12 323.1 

1 185.2 

8 065.6 

3 072.1 

1 952.8 

1 322.1 

545.1 

1 277.1 

130.1 



1 453 

2 839 
991 
623 

391.3 
2 821.6 



265.9 
263.5 
261.6 
268.0 
268.1 

530.2 
133.6 
133.8 
127.6 
135.4 



090. 
360. 

21. 
34. 
85, 

907, 
580. 



1 833.1 
527.2 
801.9 
501.3 



978.1 
583.4 
851.9 
542.6 

390.0 
392.2 
115.2 
247.0 
6.8 



11 072 

iC 227 

2 997 

818 

423.1 
2 291.0 



344.4 
325.1 
338.8 
353.5 
359.9 

662.0 
158.2 
161.2 
165.2 
171.1 



3 773.1 

3 263.8 

333.7 

20.6 

37.9 

117.1 

3 310.7 
487.7 



1 359.7 
550.2 
348.1 
161.2 

1 117.2 
581.6 
379.1 
186.1 

226.5 

213.5 

73.1 

110.0 

9.1 



417 

132 

81 

201 

100.1 
528.1 



211.8 
206.8 
208.5 
222.1 
222.1 

439.4 
105.4 
109.6 
110.2 
114.3 



3 766.5 
3 201.2 
(D) 
(0) 
(0) 
(D) 

9 267.8 
(D) 



078.4 
127.3 
669.1 
281 .7 

313.5 
165.9 

771.7 
373.0 

2i0.7 

200.0 

63.0 

137.0 

10.7 



Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable, 
closing figures for individual companies. 



(NA) Not 



(D) Withheld to 



48 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958 



Geographic area 



Year 



All establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



United States. 



DIVISION AND STATE 
New England Division 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic Division 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central Division 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Division 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1967 
1963 
1958 



1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958. 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 



1,561.8 
1,425.0 
1,399.6 

110.8 
99.9 
98.3 

94.9 
84.1 
79.5 

42.5 
33.7 
32.5 

713.6 
674.0 
680.6 

122.3 
113.9 
114.5 

477.7 
419.4 
394.2 

4,360.0 
4,075.1 

4,112.5 

1,929.2 
1,853.0 
1,915.5 

881.3 
829.2 
795.0 

1,549.5 
1,392.9 
1,402.0 

5,150.8 
4,483.7 
4,261.3 

1,397.0 
1,23a. 5 
T:,201.0 

710.2 
609.8 
551.0 

1,397.3 
1,211.2 
1,189.9 

1,134.1 
961.1 
880.0 

512.2 
461.8 
439.4 

1,205.9 

1,014.4 

964.0 

299.8 
245.9 

220.8 

210.1 
178.2 
166.1 

452.2 
391.4 
380.5 



132,208.5 
99,898.8 
78,348.9 



10, 


189. 


9 


7, 


815. 





e, 


297. 


8 




577. 


2 




438. 


6 




377. 


2 




512. 


6 




378. 


9 




297. 


1 




259. 


1 




167. 


9 




132. 


5 


4 


646. 


3 


3 


712. 


4 


3, 


070. 


8 




700 


4 




533 


4 




453 


1 


3 


494 


3 


2 


583 


8 


1, 


967 


1 


30 


526 


6 


24 


419 


6 


20, 


470 


3 


13 


851 


5 


11 


284 


7 


9 j 


627 


7 


6 


325 


4 


5 


121 


3 


4j 


066 


5 


10 


349 


7 


8 


008 


6 


6. 


776 


1 


38 


495 


2 


29 


212 


1 


22 


992 


1 


10 


523 


1 


8 


125 


4 


6 


522 


5 


5 


023 


2 


3 


794 


3 


2 


874 


7 


10 


013 


9 


7 


560 


6 


6 


224 


8 


9 


357 


2 


6 


950 


7 


5 


161 


2 


3 


577 


8 


2 


781 


1 


2 


208 


9 


8 


164 


8 


5 


894 


4 


4 


615 


5 


2 


106 


5 


1 


478 


6 


1 


094 


8 


1 


434 


6 


1 


046 


7 




812 


5 


3 


048 


9 


2 


235 


2 


1 


,771 


,1 



18,492.3 
16,231.9 
15,423.1 



1,515.1 
1,379.5 
1,360.3 

110.2 
99.2 
97.7 

94.6 
83.4 
78.3 

42.2 
33.5 
32.3 

685.4 
646.9 

657.9 

121.0 
112.6 
113.4 

461.7 
403.9 
380.7 

4,058.0 
3,811.4 
3,881.8 

1,771.2 
1,708.7 
1,782.4 

817.9 
778.0 
761.9 

1,468.9 
1,324.7 
1,337.5 

4,902.3 
4,264.5 
4,084.3 

1,334.9 
1,186.1 
1,162.3 

701.3 
599.8 
544.3 

1,331.5 
1,151.2 
1,139.4 

1,039.7 
879.0 
809.6 

494.9 
448.2 
428.7 

1,156.4 
974.8 
932.6 

275.9 
230.6 
209.2 

208.8 

(D) 

164.5 

430.8 
371.7 
364.0 



123,480.6 
93,283.3 
73,875.2 



9,726.5 
7,429.8 
6.047.8 

572.1 
433.8 
373.2 

509.9 
373.8 
292.6 

256.9 
166.1 
131.7 

4,372.8 
3,476.5 
2,925.5 

687.4 
523.2 
445.6 

3,327.4 

2,456.4 
1,879.2 

27,234.7 
21,916.7 
18,679.0 

12,055.4 
9,878.2 
8,573.2 

5,673.1 
4,665.8 
3,822.9 

9,506.0 
7,372.7 
6,282.9 

35,855.3 
27,200.6 
21,678.6 

9,898.5 
7,656.6 
6,229.2 

4,933.2 
3,708.5 
2,826.6 

9,319.6 
7,023.2 
5,864.6 

8,290.9 
6,147.5 
4,618.7 

3,413.1 

2,664.8 
2,139.5 

7,681.6 
5,583.8 
4,407.6 

1,881.3 
1,356.0 
1,020.2 

1,320.3 

(D) 

801.7 

2,831.4 

2,080.8 
1,659.1 



830.9 
726.5 
602.1 



46.7 
45.8 
39.3 



0.3 
0.3 
0.2 

28.2 
27.2 
22.7 

1.3 
1.3 
1.1 

16.0 
15.6 
13.5 

302.0 
263.7 
231.0 

158.0 
144.3 
133.5 

63.4 
51.2 
33.1 

80.6 
68.2 
64.4 

248.5 
219.2 

177.1 

62.1 
53.7 
38.8 

8.9 

10.0 

6.7 

65.8 
59,8 
50.5 

94.4 
82.1 
70.4 

17.3 
13.6 
10.7 

49.5 
39.5 
31.5 

23.9 
15.3 
11.6 

1.3 
(D) 
1.6 

21.4 
19.5 
16.5 



8,727.9 
6,615.5 
4,473.7 



463.4 
385.1 
250.0 

5.1 
4.8 
4.0 

2.7 
5.1 
4.5 

2.2 
1.8 
0.8 

273.5 
235.9 
145.3 

13.0 

10.2 

7.5 

166.9 

127.3 

87.9 

3,291.9 
2,503.0 
1,791.4 

1,795.9 
1,411.5 
1,054.5 

652.3 
455.5 
243.6 

843.7 
636.0 
493.3 

2,639.9 
2,011.0 
1,313.5 

624.6 
468.8 
293.3 

90.0 
85.8 

48.1 

694.3 
537.4 
360.2 

1,066.3 
803.2 
542.5 

164.7 

116.3 

69.4 

483.2 

310.8 
207.9 

225.2 
122.6 

74.6 

14.3 

(D) 
10.8 

217.5 
154.4 
112.0 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



49 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 



Year 



All establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



DIVISION AND STATE — Continued 
West North Central Division — Continued 
North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas , 

South Atlantic Division 

Del aware 

Maryland , 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central Division 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama. 

Mississippi 

West South Central Division 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 



1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 



7.5 
6.5 
6.3 

15.5 
13.2 
12.9 

77.0 
64.9 
58.6 

143.8 
114.3 
118.8 

2,501.5 
2,124.8 
1 , 884 . 9 

70.7 
58.3 
57.8 

287.6 
263.7 

259.1 

23.1 
22.1 
21.3 

339.8 
302.1 
258.1 

124.0 
117.0 
116.2 

643.8 
530.6 
461.5 

304.3 
261.6 
225.5 

423.1 
354.0 
314.1 

285.1 
215.4 
171.3 

1,091.8 
r 887.7 
r 779.8 

224.6 
180.5 
162.2 

418.0 
r 334.9 
r 279.3 

288.8 
243.8 
229.8 

160.4 
128.5 
108.5 

1,083.3 
864.6 

794.8 

143.6 

113.6 

88.7 

164.5 
139.5 
136.9 



41.6 
31.5 
26.3 

92.5 
70.0 
54.8 

475.9 
348.0 
265.2 

964.8 
684.4 
590.8 

14,014.0 

10,008.4 

7,253.6 

588.4 
429.6 
347.6 

1,956.0 
1,549.8 
1,257.4 

178.7 
147.6 
114.0 

1 , 905 . 1 

1,432.0 

986.5 

831.6 
700.1 
573.8 

3,066.1 
2,092.1 
1,486.7 

1,502.2 

1,049.3 

732.1 

2,231.2 
1,505.6 
1 , 075 . 

1,754.7 

1,102.3 

680.5 

5,908.7 
r 4,112.8 
r 3,072.8 

1,351.9 
959.0 
721.4 

2,190.0 
r i,505.2 
r i, 077.0 

1,602.8 

1,162.4 

920.0 

764.0 
486.2 
354.4 

6,854.6 
4,651.2 
3,645.4 

665.6 
439.6 
292.7 

1,084,4 
769.4 
621.4 



(D) 
(D) 
6.3 

(D) 
13.1 
12.9 

75.9 
63.8 
57.7 

142.0 
112.8 
118.0 

2,429.8 
2,068.5 
1,844.1 

50.6 
41.2 
40.5 

281.2 
258.6 
256.9 

22.4 
21.3 

20.8 

331.6 
295.3 
251.9 

120.8 
112.8 
114.4 

628.9 
519.1 
454.9 

298.2 
258.5 

224.5 

415.0 
349.7 
312.4 

281.1 
212.0 
167.8 

1,076.1 
874.5 
767.2 

217.6 
175.7 
157.8 

412.8 
330.8 
275.8 

268.4 
240.2 
225.4 

159.3 
127.8 
108.2 

1,046.7 
838.3 

771.5 

14 2.2 

112.8 

87.9 

162.7 
138.8 
136.4 



(D) 

(D) 

26.2 

(D) 
69.4 

54.8 

465.6 
339.7 
259.0 

949.3 
674.0 
586.6 

13,284.8 
9,501.0 
6,941.7 

338.7 
244.5 

191.8 

1,891.3 

1,501.1 
1,241.8 

168.3 
138.8 
109.7 

1,828.1 

1,377.1 

949.0 

801.0 
659.4 
560.1 

2,924.7 
2,002.9 
1,443.6 

1,452.4 

1,030.8 

726.6 

2,159.8 
1,473.2 
1,062.5 

1,720.5 

1,073.2 

6.56.6 

5,768.6 
4,008.4 
2,991.8 

1,285.4 
920.0 
693.2 

2,145.8 
1,479.2 
1,058.4 

1,581.4 

1,128.3 

887.2 

756.0 
480.9 
353.0 

6,501.2 
4,427.6 
3,482.3 

653.6 
433.4 
288.1 

1,068.8 
763.7 
618.1 



(D) 

(D) 

(Z) 

(D) 
.1 



71.7 
56.7 
40.6 

20.1 
17.1 
17.3 

6.4 
5.1 
2.2 

.7 
.9 
.5 

8.2 
6.8 
6.2 

3.2 

4.3 
1.8 

14.9 

11.6 

6.5 

6.1 
3.2 
1.0 

8.1 
4.3 
1.7 

4.0 
3.4 
3.4 

15.7 
r 
13.2 

r l2.8 

7.0 
4.8 
4.5 

5.2 
r 4.1 
r 3.5 

2.4 
3.6 
4.5 

1.1 
.7 
.3 

36.6 
26.5 
23.4 

1.4 
.9 
.8 

1.8 
.8 
.6 



(D) 

(D) 

(Z) 
(D) 



10.3 
8.3 
6.2 

15.5 
10.5 
4.3 

729.2 
507.2 
312.1 

249.7 
185.1 
155.8 

64.7 
48.7 
15.6 

10.4 
8.9 
4.4 

77.0 
54.9 
37.6 

30.6 
40.6 
13.7 

141.4 
89.1 
43.1 

49.8 

18.5 

5.5 

71.4 
32.4 
12.5 

34.2 
29.0 
23.9 

140.1 

r i04.4 

r 81.1 

66.5 
39.0 
28.2 

44.2 
r 26.0 
r i8.7 

21.4 
34.1 
32.8 

8.0 
5.3 

1.4 

353.4 
223.6 
163.0 

12.0 

6.1 
4.6 

15.6 
5.8 
3.3 



See footnotes at end of table. 



50 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 


Year 


All establishments 


Operating manufacturing 
establishments 


Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 


Employees 
(1,000) 


Payroll 
(million dollars) 


Employees 
(1,000) 


Payroll 
(million dollars) 


Employees 
(1,000) 


Payroll 
(million dollars) 


DIVISION AND STATE — Continued 
















West South Central Division — Continued 


















1967 
1963 
1958 


117.7 
97.7 
91.6 


764.2 
551.7 
446.4 


105.0 
87.3 
80.8 


648.0 
465.1 
367.9 


12.7 
10.4 
10.8 


116.2 




86.6 
78.4 




1967 
1963 
1958 


657.5 
513.8 
477.6 


4,340.4 
2,890.8 
2,284.9 


636.8 
499.4 
466.4 


4,130.8 
2,765.4 
2,208.2 


20.7 
14.4 
11.2 


209.6 




125.1 
76.7 




1967 
1963 
1958 


315.1 
283.7 
228.7 


2 .123 .3 
1,706.4 
1,145.2 


308.6 

278.7 

(D) 


2,063.2 
1,662 .7 

(D) 


6.5 

5.0 
(D) 


60.1 




43.7 




1967 
1963 
1958 


20.4 
20.2 
20.3 


129.5 

109.3 

94.8 


(D) 

(D) 

20.2 


(D) 

(D) 
94.1 


(D) 
(D) 

.1 


(D) 




(D) 

.7 




1967 
1963 
1958 


37.1 
30.5 
27.6 


219.9 
162.6 
128.1 


36.0 
30.1 
27.4 


208.8 

159.2 
126.4 


1.1 
.4 
.2 


11.1 




3.4 
1.8 




1967 
1963 
1958 


5.9 
6.8 
6.4 


37.1 
38.0 
31.6 


(D) 

(D) 
(D) 


(D) 
(D) 

(D) 


(D) 
(D) 
(D) 


(to) 




(D) 
(D) 




1967 
1963 
1958 


104.0 
93.7 
77.5 


730.5 
596.0 
405.0 


101.0 
91.2 
75.5 


702.8 
573.8 
390.9 


3.0 
2.6 
2.0 


27.7 




22.2 
14.0 




1967 
1963 
1958 


16.9 
15.3 
13.7 


98.6 
82.1 
59.4 


16.6 
15.2 
13.6 


95.2 
79.7 
58.7 


.3 
.2 

.1 


3.4 




2.3 
.7 




1967 
1963 
1958 


76.8 
56.9 
40.6 


543.2 
347.5 
213.3 


75.7 
56.4 
40.3 


533.1 
342.7 
211.4 


1.1 
.6 
.3 


10.1 




4.8 
1.9 


Utah 


1967 
1963 
1958 


47.0 
53.5 
37.6 


314.9 
328.2 

185.9 


46.4 
52.6 
36.7 


310.2 
320.2 
181.0 


.6 
.9 
.9 


4.7 
8.1 
4.9 




1967 
1963 
1958 


7.0 
6.8 
5.0 


49.6 
42.2 
27.1 


7.0 

(D) 

5.0 


49.1 

(D) 

26.8 


(z) 

(D) 

(z) 


.5 




(D) 
.3 




1967 
1963 
1958 


2,050.3 
1,798.1 
1,595.0 


15,911.2 

12,059.6 

8,806.1 


1,996.6 
1,745.3 
1,554.2 


15,344.6 

11,571.7 

8,502.4 


53.7 
52.8 
40.9 


566.7 




488.0 
303.6 




1967 
1963 
1958 


270.7 
224.4 
215.0 


2,119.0 
1,479.1 
1,173.3 


266.6 

221.3 
212.0 


2,075.8 
1,454.0 
1,157.1 


4.1 
3.1 
3.0 


43.2 




25 .1 
16.1 




1967 
1963 
1958 


163.1 
145.2 
134.0 


1,082.5 
819.6 
648.6 


160.4 
143.1 
132.6 


1,059.3 
803.0 
639.7 


2.7 
2.0 
1.4 


23.2 




16.6 
8.9 




1967 
1963 
1958 


1,583.5 
1,397.6 
1,217.3 


12,514.5 
9,612.2 
6,876.3 


1,537.6 
1,350.7 
1,181.8 


12,024.4 
9,173.2 
6,601.1 


45.9 
46.9 
35.6 


490.2 




439.0 
275.2 




1967 
1963 
1958 


7.6 
5.8 
4.8 


55.6 
39.7 
25.7 


7.6 
5.8 
4.8 


55.2 
39.6 
25.7 


(z) 
(z) 


.4 




.2 




1967 
1963 
1958 


25.4 
25.1 
23.9 


139.6 

109.0 

82.2 


24.4 
24.3 
23.0 


129.9 

101.9 

78.8 


1.0 
.9 
.9 


9.7 




7.1 
3.4 


STANDARD CONSOLIDATED AREAS 


















1967 
1963 
1958 


1,088.1 
958.5 
957.2 


8,020.4 
6,195.4 
5,213.4 


1,030.1 
905.0 
911.8 


7,410.3 
5,710.0 
4,881.6 


58.0 
53.6 
45.4 


610.1 




485.4 
331.8 




1967 
1963 
1958 


1,818.5 
1,779.3 
1,797.0 


12,968.2 

10,767.5 

9,045.3 


1,643.5 
1,625.5 
1,660.4 


10,998.6 
9,279.1 
7,947.7 


175.0 
153.5 
136.5 


1,969.6 
1,488.0 
1,097.5 


STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 1 


















1967 
1963 
1958 


4.0 
3.4 
3.6 


21.0 

14.2 
11.6 


(D) 
(D) 
(D) 


(D) 

(D) 
(D) 


(D) 
(D) 

(D) 


(D) 




(D) 
(D) 




1967 
1963 
1958 


101.1 
90.7 
88.6 


807.0 
638.9 
501.5 


92.2 
83.3 
85.0 


724.6 
578.1 
476.0 


8.8 
7.3 
3.6 


82.4 




60.8 
25.5 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



51 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 



Year 



All establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS ' — Con, 
Albany, Ga 

Albany -Schenectady -Troy , N. Y 

Albuquerque, N. Mex 

Allen towa-Bethleh em-East on, Pa. -N.J 

Altoona, Pa 

Amarillo, Tex 

Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove, Calif 

Anderson, Ind 

Ann Arbor, Mich 

Asheville, N.C 

Atlanta, Ga 

Atlantic City, N.J 

Augus ta , Ga . -S . C 

Austin, Tex 

Bakersfleld, Calif 

Baltimore, Md 2 

Baton Rouge, La 

Bay City, Mich 

Beaumont-Port Arthur-Orange, Tex 

Billings, Mont 

Biloxi-Gulf port, Miss 2 

Binghamton , N . Y . -Pa 

Birmingham, Ala 2 

Bloomington-Normal , 111 . 2 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 



5.7 
4.7 
3.3 

65.3 
61.8 
71.5 

7.8 
8.1 
6.7 

102.6 
93.7 
93.9 

14.6 
11.7 
10.4 

4.5 
4.0 
3.7 

125.8 
96.9 
31.8 

28.4 
26.2 

23.5 

35.0 
25.8 
18.8 

19.7 
16.5 
12.2 

117.2 
95.7 
83.5 

2 
7 

1 



10, 



7.0 
5.9 
5.0 

6.0 
5.H 

5.5 

209.7 
190.5 
197.8 

16.1 
15.3 
19.0 

12.3 
9.6 
9.3 

33.2 
32.8 
32.5 

2.7 

2.5 
2.7 

3.2 

46.1 
41.6 
46.5 

68.0 
59.2 
63.5 

6.4 



28.8 
17.9 
11.2 

493.2 
395.1 
385.0 

48.7 
47.3 
32.3 

663.6 

517.9 
430.1 

78.0 
53.6 
39.6 

26.9 
22.0 
16.6 

1,106.8 
687.3 
175.9 

224.1 
183.3 
123.8 

288.0 
188.7 
108.1 

95.9 
70.1 
43.8 

809.6 
538.6 

379.7 

52.5 
35.4 
23.3 

181.1 
135.6 
105.8 

34.9 
25.8 
18.8 

43.0 
38.4 
30.4 

1,486.1 
1,184.3 

1,011.4 

140.6 
114.9 
119.5 

83.0 
61.7 
50.9 

273.4 
233.9 

195.0 

19.3 
15.5 
14.1 

15.8 

347.5 
259.0 

227.8 

450.1 
362.2 
335.7 

41.5 



5.7 
4.7 
3.3 

59.1 

(D) 

63.3 

(D) 
8.2 
6.6 

95.6 
88.4 
88.3 

(D) 

(D) 

10.4 

4.1 

(D) 
3.6 

124.2 
93.7 
31.2 

28.4 

(O) 
23.5 

32.2 
25.7 
18.1 

18.8 

(D) 
12.2 

111.7 
92.7 
82.5 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

28.7 

24.6 

23.2 

(D) 
(D) 
4.9 

6.0 
5.8 
5.3 

204.9 
187.5 
195.9 

15.9 

(D) 

19.0 

(D) 
9.6 
9.3 

32.4 
32.3 
32.1 

(D) 
(D) 

2.6 

3.2 
45.1 
(D) 
(D) 
66.9 
57.4 
60.5 

(D) 



28.8 

17.9 
11.2 

427.4 

(D) 
324.4 

(D) 
47.3 
31.9 

584.0 
463.4 
379.4 

(D) 

(D) 

39.6 

23.6 

(D) 

16.1 

1,090.1 
662.8 
171.2 

224.1 

(D) 

123.8 

255.6 
187.8 
103.1 

88.5 

(D) 
43.8 

761.3 
515.9 
371.1 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

176.9 
132.0 
104.4 

(D) 

(D) 

18.1 

42.7 
38.1 
27.6 

1,439.8 
1,158.3 
1,000.3 

137.7 

(D) 
119.3 

(D) 
61.7 
50.9 

265.0 
229.1 

191.5 

(D) 

(D) 

13.9 

15.8 

340.8 

(B) 

(D) 

439.6 
344.4 
312.8 



(D) 



6.2 

(D) 
8.3 

(D) 

.1 

7.0 
5.3 
5.6 

(D) 
(D) 
(Z) 

.4 
(D) 

.1 

1.6 

3.2 

.6 



(D) 

2.8 
.1 
.7 

.9 

(D) 
(Z) 
5.5 
2.9 
1.1 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

.6 

.6 

.3 

(D) 

(D) 
.1 

(Z) 

(Z) 

.2 

4.8 
3 
1.9 

.2 
(D) 

(Z) 

(D) 



.5 

.4 

(D) 
(D) 
(Z) 



1.0 
(D) 
(D) 
1.1 
1.9 
3.0 

(D) 



65.8 

(D) 
60.6 

(n) 

.3 

79.6 
54.6 

50.7 

(D) 
(D) 

(Z) 

3.3 

(D) 
.4 

16.7 
24.5 

4.8 



(D) 

32.4 

.9 

5.0 

7.4 

(D) 
(Z) 

48.3 

22.7 

8.6 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
4.2 
3.6 
1.4 

(») 
(D) 

.7 

.3 

.3 

2.8 

46.3 
26.0 

11.1 
2.9 

(D) 
.1 

(B) 



8.4 
4.8 
3.5 

(B) 

(B) 

.3 



6.7 

(B) 

(B) 

10.5 

17.8 

22.9 

(B) 



52 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 



Year 



All establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 



Employees 
(1,000) 



(million dollars) 



STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 1 — Con, 
Boise City, Idaho 

Boston, Mass 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Brockton, Mass 

Brownsville-Harlingen-San Benito, Tex 

Buffalo, N.Y 

Canton, Ohio 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Champaign-Urbana, 111 

Charleston, S.C 

Charleston, W. Va 

Charlotte, N.C 

Chattanooga, Tenn. -Ga 

Chicago, 111 

Cincinnati, Ohio-Ky. -Ind 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Colorado Springs, Colo 

Columbia, S.C 

Columbus, Ga. -Ala 

Columbus, Ohio 

Corpus Christi, Tex. 2 

Dallas, Tex. 2 

Davenport-Rock Island-Moline, Iowa-Ill 



1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1968 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 



3. 


8 


2. 


8 


2. 


7 


316. 


2 


293. 


2 


301. 





79. 


5 


67. 


4 


64. 


7 


16. 


5 


15. 


9 


15. 


8 


5. 


4 


4. 


8 


4. 


1 


176. 


2 


162 


9 


173 


9 


62 


5 


53 





51 


2 


28 


3 


23 


8 


19 





5 


6 


3 


3 


2 


7 


12 


3 


11 





10 


6 


20 


9 


21 


2 


21 


1 


39 


3 


32 


8 


27 


7 


51 


6 


38 


9 


40 


9 


983 


1 


860 


6 


857 


2 


166 


8 


153 


9 


156 


5 


306 


8 


280 


3 


273 


7 


5 


8 


3 


.7 


3 


3 


18 


.1 


14 


.5 


11 


.2 


18 


.1 


14 


.3 


17 


.1 


83 


.0 


80 


.2 


73 


.0 


10 


.0 


7 


.8 


7 


.7 


148 


.9 


106 


.4 


95 


.2 


49 


.3 


41 


.1 


39 


.1 



24.7 
14.4 
11.8 

2,222.3 
1,768.8 

1,514.8 

585.2 
419.9 
331.8 

89.9 
72.3 
58.8 

19.3 
14.9 
10.9 

1,354.8 

1,104.3 

980.7 

452.9 
343.6 
269.7 

204.4 

14 9.1 

98.6 

35.6 
20.3 
12.3 

65.9 
48.3 
38.0 

166.7 
159.6 
127.5 

220.6 
152.4 
106.7 

308.3 
193.8 
166.1 

7,168.1 
5,473.0 
4,599.9 

1,258.7 
989.0 
833.3 

2,411.4 
1,908.3 
1,558.2 

34.3 
19.7 
15.1 

87.9 
56.7 
34.3 

88.3 
54.2 
51.2 

616.7 
510.7 
381.3 

73.2 
46.6 
39.8 

992.1 
593.4 
461.6 

387.1 
272.5 
213.7 



3.3 

(D) 
(D) 

295.4 
271.8 
283.1 

77.9 
65.8 
62.9 

16.0 

(D) 

15.5 

(D) 

4.8 
4.1 

173.1 
158.6 
169.9 

59.4 
50.5 
50. .5 

(D) 

(D) 

18.9 

5.5 

(D) 

2.4 

12.1 

(D) 
10.5 

19.6 

(D) 
20.9 

37.2 
31.0 
26.7 

50.7 
38.6 
40.7 

926.0 
808.5 
813.6 

155.6 
144.4 
149.8 

288.2 
262.6 
259.1 

5.6 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

11.2 

18.1 
14.3 
17.1 

80.5 
78.2 
72.1 

9.7 
(D) 
7.5 

143.7 

102.6 

90.9 

47.6 

(D) 

38.3 



19.3 

(D) 

(D) 

2,011.7 

1,578.8 

1,400.3 

568.8 
406.4 
319.7 

87.1 

(D) 
57.6 

(D) 
14.9 
10.9 

1,326.1 

1,071.0 
954.5 

423.8 
322.0 
265.1 

(D) 
(P) 

97.7 

35.2 

CD) 

11.2 

64.6 

(D) 

37.8 

152.5 

(D) 
125.9 

201.3 
141.7 
100.3 

302.6 
191.6 
164.9 

6.564.1 
5,001.0 
4,281 .0 

1,150.5 
910.4 
784.8 

2,216.7 
1,750.8 

1,447.1 

32.4 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

34.2 



54. 
51, 

594, 
494, 
375, 



69.8 

(D) 

38.2 

943.1 
562.1 
432.1 

367.0 

(D) 
205.2 



.5 

(D) 

(D) 

20.8 

21.5 

17.9 

1.6 
1.6 
1.8 

.5 

(D) 
.3 

(D) 



3.1 
4.3 

4.0 

3.1 

2.5 

.7 

(D) 

(D) 

.2 

.1 

(D) 

.3 

.2 
(D) 

(Z) 

1.3 

(D) 
.2 

2.1 
1.8 
1.0 

.9 
.3 
.2 

57.1 
52.1 
43.7 

11.2 
9.5 
6.7 

18.6 
17.6 
14.6 

.2 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 
(Z) 



2.5 

2.0 
.9 

.3 

(D) 
.2 

5.2 
3.8 
4.3 

1.7 

(D) 

.9 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



53 



table 6 . Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 



Year 



All establishments 



Employees Payroll 

(1,000) (million dollars) 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS l — Con, 
Dayton, Ohio 

Decatur, 111 

Denver, Colo 

Des Moines, Iowa 

Detroit, Mich 

Dubuque, Iowa 

Duluth -Superior, Minn. -Wis 

Durham, N.C. 2 

El Paso, Tex 

Erie, Pa 

Eugene , Oreg 

Evansville, Ind. -Ky 

Fall River, Mass. -R.I 

Fargo-Moorhead, N. Dak. -Minn 

Fayetteville, N.C. 2 

Fitchburg -Leominster, Mass 

Flint, Mich 

Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood, Fla 

Fort Smith, Ark.-Okla 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

Fort Worth, Tex 

Fresno, Calif 

Gadsden , Ala 



1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 



126.2 

104.2 

97.2 

18.5 
14.0 
14.1 

74.1 
69.5 

53.7 

25.4 
21.6 
23.2 

584.5 
493.9 
467.4 

12.3 
10.9 
10.6 

12.0 
11.5 
11 



42.3 
36.4 
34.9 

18.2 
18.3 
14.1 

34.0 
26.2 
27.1 

21.3 
23.4 
23.7 

2.5 
2.3 
2.7 

6.5 

18.3 
17.5 
17.0 

(D) 
68.9 
58.8 

15.8 
9.8 
6.4 

14.1 

12.3 

9.7 

42.9 
36.1 
33.3 

78.4 
50.5 
55.9 

15.5 
14.3 
12.5 

12.4 

9.6 

11.7 



1,022.6 
719.0 
552.5 

139.9 
92.2 
71.7 

554.5 
461.8 
286.0 

184.4 
135.0 
119.1 

5,218.8 
3 , 847 . 2 
2,972.1 

91.0 
70.4 
55.9 

74.2 
60.6 
56.4 

72.8 

85.1 
62.0 
43.1 

298.4 
220.8 
178.8 

120.4 

100.9 

68.3 

215.5 
146.2 
128.2 

93.3 
88.0 
74.5 

16.4 
11.7 
11.4 

28.3 

115.6 
92.1 
74.0 

(D) 
563.5 
348.1 

94.8 
43.6 
26.3 

64.6 
47.6 
32.4 

339.0 

247.0 
183.5 

587.4 
322.2 
289.6 

91.7 
75.0 
55.3 

88.0 
62.8 
58.7 



123.6 

102.0 

95.2 

18.4 

(D) 

14.0 

71.6 
67.5 
52.1 

(D) 
21.4 
23.0 

503.8 
422.3 
405.0 

12.3 
10.9 
10.4 

11.9 
11.5 
11.3 

12.6 

18.9 

(D) 
11.2 

42.1 
35.7 
34.9 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

27.1 

(D) 
CD) 
(D) 
2.5 
2.3 
2.7 



(D) 

(D) 

16.9 

(D) 

(D) 
58.7 

CD) 

(D) 
6.2 

(D) 

(D) 
9.7 

40.5 
34.1 
31.3 

77.5 
49.3 
55.3 

15.4 
14.3 
12.4 

12.4 

9.6 

11.7 



997.6 
699.2 
539.9 

138.7 

(D) 

71.2 

530.8 
443.5 
274.3 

(D) 
134.1 
117.5 

4,296.6 
3,140.6 
2,480.3 

91.0 
70.4 
55.4 

73.4 
60.3 
55.9 

64.5 

84.9 

(D) 

41.2 

296.8 
215.8 
178.8 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

128.0 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

16.4 

11.7 

11.4 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

72.8 

(D) 

(D) 

347.4 

(D) 

(D) 

25.3 

(D) 

(D) 

32.4 

315.6 
228.3 

168.8 

579.9 
313.2 
288.2 

91.0 
74.6 
54.8 

88.0 
62.8 
58.7 



2.6 

2.2 
2.0 

.1 

(D) 

.1 

2.5 
2.1 
1.6 

(D) 
.2 
.2 

80.7 
71.6 
62.4 



.1 

(Z) 

.1 



(z) 

(D) 
.3 

.2 

.7 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 
(Z) 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 

(D) 

(D) 
.1 

(D) 

(D) 

.1 

(D) 

(D) 

.2 

(D) 

(D) 



25.0 
19.8 
12.6 

1.2 

(D) 

.5 

23.7 
18.3 

11.7 

(D) 

.9 

1.7 

922.2 
706.6 
491.8 



.8 
.3 

.5 

8.3 

.2 

(P) 

1.9 

1.6 
5.1 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

CD) 
(D) 

.1 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
1.2 

(D) 

(D) 

.7 

CD) 
(D) 
1.1 

(D) 
(D) 

23.4 
18.7 
14.8 

7.5 
9.0 
1.3 

.7 
.3 
.5 



See footnotes at end of table. 



54 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 



Year 



All establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS ' — Con, 
Galveston -Texas City, Tex 

Gary-Hammond-East Chicago, Ind 

Grand Rapids, Mich 

Great Falls, -Mont 

Green Bay, Wis 

Greensboro-Winston-Salem-Highpoint, N.C . 2 . . . 
Greenville, S.C 

Hamilton-Middletown, Ohio 

Harrisburg, Pa 

Hartford, Conn 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Houston, Tex 

Huntington-Ashland, W. Va.-Ky.-Ohio 

Huntsville, Ala 

Indianapolis , Ind. 2 

Jackson, Mich 

Jackson , Miss 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Jersey C i ty , N.J 

Johnstown, Pa 

Kalamazoo, Mich 

Kansas City, Mo. -Kans 

Kenosha, Wis 



1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 



10. 


1 


9. 


5 


10. 


9 


105. 





98. 





100. 





75. 


7 


64. 


6 


56 


5 


2 


5 


2 


9 


2 


4 


16 


2 


13 


5 


12 


2 


110 


9 


52 


8 


45 


3 


36 


8 


29 


5 


26 


2 


30 


9 


37 


9 


33 


5 


33 


4 


110 


6 


90 


2 


88 


5 


19 


5 


18 





16 





138 


1 


108 


6 


104 


5 


27 


4 


23 


6 


22 


8 


17 


7 


13 


3 


6 


8 


134 


7 


115 


8 


105 


6 


19 


4 


16 


5 


14 


9 


13 


8 


11 


6 


11 


2 


23 


1 


20 


6 


19 


2 


107 


2 


109 


5 


124 


3 


25 


1 


23 





23 


6 


30 


.2 


25 


9 


25 


.1 


129 


4 


111 


.1 


103 


.1 


16 


.3 


22 


.5 


15 


.5 



88.4 
71.6 
66.4 

852.3 
722.4 
613.5 

540.9 
393.2 
291.7 

16.1 
15.9 
13.2 

114.8 
81.7 
60.0 

596.6 

257.1 
177.0 
118.6 

251.7 
195.1 
192.0 

233.1 
165.1 
137.0 

901.7 
589.5 
458.6 

107.5 
80.6 
55.7 

1,061.8 
720.3 
579.4 

194.9 
145.7 
117.9 

133.4 
86.8 
30.9 

1,009.7 
751.2 
574.3 

146.3 

107.5 

81.0 

72.1 
50.6 
41.5 

141.8 

101.8 

77.7 

737.8 
633.4 
619.2 

161.4 
128.1 
110.2 

235.6 

171.1 
136.5 

906.6 
684.5 
523.8 

117.4 

150.5 

84.7 



9.7 

(D) 
10.6 

104.2 
96.5 
98.3 

75.3 
64.3 
56.3 

(D) 
(D) 

2.8 

(D) 

(D) 
12.2 

103.4 

51.7 
45.0 
36.6 

26.8 

(D) 
29.2. 

35.3 
31.4 
32.5 

104.6 

(D) 
84.3 

18.5 

(») 

15.1 

126.9 
102.5 
100.5 

26.3 

(P) 

22.1 

(D) 
(D) 
6.5 

131.2 

112.5 
104.1 

19.1 
15.9 
14.9 

13.4 
11.-5 
11.1 

22.7 
20.2 
19.1 

104.4 
106.6 
120.7 

(D) 

(D) 

23.5 

28.3 
24.2 
24.3 

125.3 

107.1 
100.3 

16.3 

(D) 
15.4 



84.1 

(D) 
63.8 

846.2 
709.1 
600.6 

535.8 
390.7 
290.6 

(D) 

(D) 

13.2 

(D) 

(D) 
59.7 

521.1 

249.3 

174.7 
117.2 

214.3 

(D) 

172.5 

207.5 
148.3 
130.5 

832.1 

(D) 
428.4 

98.2 

(D) 

52.3 

941.9 
661.9 
549.4 

184.2 

(D) 

113.7 

(D) 
(D) 

29.4 

973.9 
723.8 
564.3 

143.0 

103.0 

80.9 

70.0 
49.5 
41.1 

139.2 
99.1 
76.9 

708.8 
611.6 
591.6 

(D) 

(D) 
108.9 

213.7 
154.9 
132.0 

869.8 
654.6 
506.5 

117.4 

(D) 

84.1 



1.4 
1.7 

.4 
.3 
.2 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
(Z) 

7.5 

1.1 

.3 
.2 

2.7 

(D) 

1.7 

2.6 

2.0 

.9 

6.0 

(D) 

4.2 

1.0 

(D) 

.9 

11.2 

6.1 
4.0 

1.1 

(D) 

.7 

(D) 

(D) 

.2 

3.5 
3.3 
1.5 

.3 
.6 



.4 

.1 
.1 

.4 
.3 
.1 

2.8 
3.0 
3.7 

(D) 

(D) 

.2 

1.9 

1.7 
.7 

4.1 
4.0 



CD) 



4.3 
(D) 
2.6 

6.1 
13.3 
12.9 

5.1 
2.5 
1.1 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

.3 

75.5 

7.8 
2.3 
1.4 

37.4 

(D) 

19.5 

25.6 

16.8 

6.4 

69.6 

(D) 

30.2 

9.3 
(D) 

3.4 

119.9 
58.4 
30.0 

10.7 
(D) 
4.2 

(D) 
(D) 
1.5 

35.8 
27.4 
10.0 

3.3 

4.4 
(Z) 

2.1 

1.1 

.4 

2.6 

2.7 

.9 

29.0 
21.9 
27.6 

(D) 
(D) 
1.3 

21.9 
16.2 

4.5 

36.8 
29.9 
17.3 



(D) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



55 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 



STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 1 — Con. 
Knoxville, Tenn 



Lafayette, La. 



Lafayette-West Lafayette, Ind. 
Lake Charles, La 



Lancaster. Pa. 



Lansing, Mich. 



Laredo, Tex. 



Las Vegas, Nev. 



Lawrence-Haverhill, Mass. -N.H. 



Law ton, Okla. 



Lewiston-Auburn, Maine. 



Lexington, Ky. 



Lima, Ohio - . 



Lincoln, Nebr. 



Little Rock-North Little Rock, Ark.' 



Lorain-Elyria, Ohio. 



Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif. 



Louisville, Ky.-Ind. 



Lowell, Mass. 



Lubbock, Tex. 



Lynchburg, Va. 



Macon. Ga. 



Madison, Wis. 



Year 



All establishments 



Manchester, N.H. 



1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
7.958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 

1958 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



38.9 
34.9 
31.1 

2.0 
1.7 

1.7 

10.9 

8.2 
7.9 
7.9 

54.1 
47.9 
43.9 

36.4 
28.4 
25.8 

.7 
.9 
.9 

3.9 
3.9 

2.4 

39.9 
42.0 
36.4 

1.2 

1.0 

.8 

13.5 
12.5 
13.0 

16.0 

10.9 

7.8 

22.6 
14.9 
13.5 

9.5 
9.1 
8.6 

24.2 
16.5 
13.4 

33.8 
29.8 
24.7 

855.4 
745.0 
697.2 

110.0 
87.7 
86.7 

22.6 
21.1 
19.1 

6.0 
5.4 
4.2 

20.1 
18.0 
15.8 

14.5 
11.1 
10.9 

16.3 
13.5 
12.4 

18.0 
16.9 
18.4 



222.2 
175.9 
135.9 

10.6 
7.6 
6.1 

79.1 

66.3 

53.5 
45.3 

333.1 

255.1 
190.2 

307.4 
220.0 
150.9 

2.7 
2.7 
2.2 

28.4 
24.9 
13.7 

245.3 

214.3 
149.3 

5.8 

4.5 
2.9 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



60 


1 


48 


2 


42 


5 


111 


6 


65 


7 


36 


6 


160 


7 


93 


3 


71 


4 


57 


9 


45 


6 


38 


9 


123 


.5 


67 


.5 


47 


.5 


263 


.1 


214 


.1 


143 


.5 



6 


692.5 


5 


118.5 


3 


,971.5 




750.5 




542.5 




434.6 




134.8 




102.6 




70.5 




32.3 




25.4 




17.4 




115.3 




86.9 




56.7 




79.2 




48.8 




38.5 




118.4 




83.1 




63.3 




90.8 




71.9 




64.9 



Employees 
(1,000) 



38.9 
34.6 
31.0 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

8.1 

(D) 

(D) 
52.0 

(D) 
42.3 

36.3 
28.1 
24.7 

.7 
.9 
.9 

3.9 
3.9 

2.4 

39.5 

(D) 
36.1 

1.2 
1.0 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 
13.0 

15.7 
(D) 
7.7 

(D) 

(D) 
13.5 

9.3 
8.9 
8.5 

23.9 

(D) 

13.4 

33.1 

(D) 
23.7 

836.8 
727.0 
681.6 

104.7 
84.0 
83.2 

20.8 

(D) 

19.0 

(D) 
(D) 

4.2 

18.7 

(D) 

15.2 

(D) 

(D) 
10.7 

15.1 

12.4 
11.7 

(D) 

(D) 

18.1 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 



221.9 
175.1 
135.5 

(D) 
(D) 

D; 

(D) 
66.0 

(D) 

(D) 
311.2 

(D) 
177.3 

306.8 
217.4 
144.9 

2.7 
2.7 
2.1 

28.4 
24.9 

13.7 

240.1 
(D) 

147.1 

5.8 
4.5 

(D) 

(D) 

D 

41.9 

109.5 

(D) 

35.8 

(D) 

(D) 

71.3 

56.0 
44.8 
38.1 

120.9 
D 
47.4 

256.5 

(D) 

137.6 

6,484.1 
4,939.2 
3,849.4 

699.5 
510.5 
412.3 

116.3 

(D) 
69.1 

(DO 
(D) 

17.4 

101.7 

(D) 

53.9 

(D) 

(D) 

37.1 

105.2 
75.6 
58.0 

(D) 

(D) 

63.6 



Employees 
(1,000) 



.2 
.1 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

.1 

(D) 

(D) 

2.1 

(D) 
1.6 

.1 
.3 

1.1 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



.4 

(D) 
.3 



(D) 

(D) 

(D) 
.1 

.3 

(D) 

.1 

(D) 
(D) 

(Z) 
.2 
.2 
.1 

.3 

(D) 

(Z) 

.7 

(D) 
1.0 

18.6 
18.0 
15.7 

5.3 
3.7 
3.5 

1.8 

(D) 
.2 

(D) 
(D) 



1.4 

(D) 

.5 

(D) 

(D) 

.2 

1.2 

1.0 

.6 

(D) 

(D) 
.3 



.3 

.7 

.4 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

.3 

(D) 

(D) 

21.9 

(D) 

12.9 

.6 
2.6 

6.0 



5.2 
(D) 
2.2 



(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

.5 

2.1 

(D) 

.9 

(D) 

(D) 

.1 



2.6 

(D) 
.1 

6.6 

(D) 

6.0 

208.4 
179.3 
122.0 

51.0 
32.0 
22.2 

18.5 
(D) 
1.4 

(D) 
(D) 

13.9 

(D) 
2.8 

(D) 
(D) 
1.4 

13.2 
7.5 
5.3 

(D) 

(D) 
1.3 



See footnotes at end of table. 



56 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 



Year 



All establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 1 — Con 
Mansfield, Ohio 2 

McAllen-Pharr-Edinburg, Tex. 2 

Memphis, Tenn. -Ark 

Meriden, Conn 

Miami, Fla 

Midland, Tex 

Milwaukee, Wis. 2 

Minneapolis-St . Paul, Minn 

Mobile, Ala 

Monroe , La 

Montgomery, Ala 

Muncie, Ind 

Muskegon-Muskegon Heights, Mich 

Nashville, Tenn 

New Bedford, Mass 

New Britain, Conn 

New Haven, Conn 

New London-Groton-Norwich, Conn 

New Orl eans , La , 

New York, N.Y , 

Newark, N.J 

Newport News-Hampton, Va 

Norfolk-Portsmouth, Va 

Norwalk, Conn 



1967 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 



57 


4 


47 


1 


41 


9 


8 


4 


7 


4 


8 


7 


58 


3 


43 


2 


36 


9 




7 




5 




5 


216 


5 


193 


8 


189 


5 


203 


7 


163 


8 


146 





20 


3 


18 


5 


19 





6 


2 


5 


7 


6 





9 





7 


6 


7 


3 


18 


6 


16 


7 


15 





28 


5 


25 


1 


23 


5 


54 


1 


46 


5 


40 





25 


1 


25 


4 


26 


5 


33 


5 


29 


8 


31 


4 


4C 


1 


43 





42 


5 


29 


9 


30 


1 


23 


6 


55 


5 


49 


.1 


47 


5 


1,147 


.4 


1,147 


1 


1,183 


.4 


263 


.7 


250 


.2 


245 


.6 


27 


.0 


24 


.7 


17 


.2 


19 


.0 


16 


.1 


15 


.2 


20 


.8 


17 


.6 


14 


.2 



9.3 

332.8 
241.4 
178.1 

63.6 
45.0 
43.9 

302.9 
192.6 

143.1 

4.4 
3.7 
2.7 

1,628.8 
1,271.9 
1 , 04 1 . 7 

1,524.9 

1,056.0 

766.2 

130.8 

101.1 

87.8 

40.6 
30.5 
26.6 

43.6 
30.6 
23.1 

143.0 

110.1 

83.0 

213.3 
163.9 
124.5 

317.4 
226.2 
166.1 

126.4 

105.2 

90.8 

241.6 
172.2 
149.9 

321.3 
253.1 
205.8 

222.0 
209.0 
129.1 

380.0 
282.9 
212.4 

8,112.7 
6,849.4 
5,876.9 

1,958.4 
1,613.8 
1,289.8 

192.7 

157.0 

88.5 

109.3 
82.1 
63.4 

157.2 

109.3 

66.7 



(D) 

(D) 

56. 1 
46.2 
41.3 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

57.6 

42.7 

36.5 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

207.6 

187.8 
185.0 

181.0 
149.6 
135.1 

20.2 

(D) 

18.9 

(D) 

(D) 

6.0 

(D) 
(D) 
7.3 

(D) 

(») 

15.0 

28.2 
24.9 
23.3 

52.0 
45.2 
37.9 

24.7 

(D) 

26.5 

(B) 

(B) 

31.4 

45.1 

(D) 

42.2 

(B) 

(B) 

(B) 

54.4 

48.8 

47.3 

1,023.5 
1,034.0 
1 , 074 . 5 

238.2 
224.6 
226.7 

(B) 

(B) 

17.1 

18.6 
15.8 
14.9 



(B) 



(D) 
(B) 
(B) 



321.4 

233.9 
175.2 

(D) 
(B) 
(B) 

295.2 
186.8 
140.1 

(B) 

(B) 

(B) 

1,544.7 

1,219.9 

1,012.1 

1,313.4 
940.8 
696.6 

130.1 

(B) 

87.3 

(B) 

(B) 

26.6 

(B) 

(B) 

23.1 

(B) 

(D) 

82.9 

210.7 
162.0 
123.2 

299.2 
218.7 
155.3 

124.3 

(B) 

90.6 

(D) 

(B) 

149.9 

311.0 

(D) 

202.2 

(B) 

(B) 

(B) 

371.8 

280.8 

210.7 

6,654.7 
5,713.4 
4,984.7 

1,698.5 
1,379.4 
1,155.8 

CD) 

(D) 
88.0 

106.1 
79.8 
61.4 

(D) 
(B) 
(D) 



(D) 

(B) 

1.3 

1.0 

.6 

(D) 

(B) 

(B) 

.7 

.5 

.4 

(D) 
(B) 
(B) 
8.9 

6.0 
4.6 

22.7 
14.2 
10.9 

.1 
(B) 

. 1 

(D) 

(D) 



(B) 
CD) 

(B) 

(D) 

(Z) 

.3 

.3 

.2 

2.1 
1.3 
2.1 

.4 
(D) 
(Z) 

(D) 
(D) 

1.0 

(B) 

.3 

(D) 
(D) 
(B) 

1.1 
.3 
.3 

123.9 

113.2 
109.4 

25.5 
25.7 
19.0 



(D) 

(D) 



.4 
.3 
.3 

(D) 

(D) 
(D) 



(B) 

(D) 

11.4 

7.5 

2.9 

(D) 
(D) 
(B) 
7.7 
5.7 
3.0 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

84.1 
52.1 
29.6 

211.5 

115.1 
69.6 

.7 

(B) 
.5 

(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

(B) 

(B) 

.1 

2.6 
1.9 
1.3 

18.2 

7.5 

10.9 

2.1 

(D) 

.2 

(D) 
(B) 

10.3 
(D) 
3.6 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

8.2 
2.2 
1.7 

1.458.0 

1,136.1 

892.2 

259.9 

234.4 
134.1 

(D) 

(D) 
.4 

3.2 
2.3 

2.0 



(D) 

(D) 
(B) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



57 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 



Year 



All establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS ' — Con, 
Odessa, Tex 

Ogden, Utah 

Oklahoma City, Okla 

Omaha, Nebr.-iowa 

Orlando, Fla 

Oxnard- Ventura, Calif . 2 

Paterson-Clif ton-Passaic, N.J 

Pensacola, Fla 

Peoria, 111 

Philadelphia, Pa. -N.J 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Pine Bluff, Ark 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Pittsf ield, Mass 

Portland, Maine 

Portland, Oreg. -Wash 

Providence-Pawtucket-Wax-wick, R. I . -Mass 

Provo-Orem, Utah 

Pueblo, Colo 

Racine, Wis 

Raleigh, N.C 

Reading, Pa 

Reno , Nev 



1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963' 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 



3.4 
2.2 
1.9 

4.9 
4.6 
4.6 

29.3 
27.2 
19.1 

36.6 
35.1 
33.0 

21.7 
19.4 
10.8 

10.8 

190.0 
176.5 
158.5 

13.2 
13.1 
12.5 

45.6 
40.1 
37.2 

573.8 
535.8 
436.9 

59.3 
40.9 
25.8 

5.7 
5.1 
3.9 

299.6 
272.2 
305.7 

16.9 
16.1 
14.2 

14.7 
12.4 
12.9 

79.8 
65.3 
58.3 

138.0 
125.9 
127.2 

7.9 
6.9 
7.3 

9.4 
8.8 
9.7 

26.2 
22.2 
21.2 

15.2 
8.9 
7.2 

56.4 
50.7 
48.4 

2.1 
2.1 
1.9 



25.7 

13.5 
10.3 

31.3 
28.0 
22.8 

185.1 

153.1 

87.0 

249.4 
206.8 
160.9 

157.9 

124.9 

55.4 

83.2 

1,320.8 

1,053.1 

806.5 

88.7 
75.9 
58.6 

371.3 
277.6 
195.6 

4,125.2 
3,310.6 
2,738.9 

433.4 
253.1 
139.7 

31.6 
24.5 
15.7 

2,383.0 
1,925.6 
1,798.2 

140.0 

113.6 

84.0 

85.7 
63.5 
55.7 

561.0 
392.8 
296.2 

789.8 
596.4 
509.9 

59.2 
48.9 
47.1 

65.6 
57.8 
60.4 

199.3 
147.2 
112.7 

88 ;0 
38.3 
25.0 

334.3 
255.1 
194.4 

14.7 

12.8 

9.8 



(D) 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
4.5 

27.9 
26.1 
17.9 

35.9 
34.3 
32.4 

20.9 

(D) 
10.3 

(D) 
180.6 
170.8 
156.3 

(D) 

13.1 

11.9 

42.4 

(D) 

(D) 

549.4 

512.8 

515.2 

58.6 
40.4 
25.6 

(D) 
5.1 
3.9 

258.2 
237.2 
269.9 

(D) 

(D) 

14.0 

(D) 

(D) 

12.8 

77.4 
63.3 
57.0 

136.7 
124.6 
126.1 

7.9 
6.9 
7.3 

(D) 

(D) 
9.5 

23.9 

(D) 
20.4 

15.0 

(D) 
7.1 

56.0 
50.1 
48.1 

(D) 
(D) 
1.9 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

22.1 

174.5 

145.0 

79.3 

242.7 
200.2 
156.2 

151.2 

(D) 
52.8 

(D) 

1,236.7 

1 , 007 . 6 

782.2 

(D) 
75.9 
52.6 

326.2 

(D) 

(D) 

3,875.5 

3,108.7 

2,573.5 

426.1 
249.3 
138.1 

(D) 
24.5 
15.7 

1,924.4 
1,577.8 
1,523.8 

(D) 

(D) 
82.7 

(D) 

(D) 
54.7 

540.2 
377.0 
288.4 

776.8 
586.2 
502.4 

59.2 
48.9 
47.1 

(D) 

(D) 

59.2 

179.1 

(D) 
107.7 

86.5 

(D) 

24.1 

329.9 
250.1 

192.1 

(D) 
(D) 
9.5 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 
.1 

1.4 
1.1 
1.1 

.7 
.7 
.6 

.8 

(D) 

.5 

(D) 
9.4 
5.7 
2.2 

(D) 



4.2 

(D) 

(D) 

24.4 

23.0 

21.7 

.7 
.4 
.2 

(D) 

(Z) 
41.4 
35.0 
35.9 

(D) 

(D) 

.2 

(D) 

(D) 
.1 

2.4 
1.9 
1.3 

1.3 
1.3 
1.1 



(D) 

(D) 

.2 

2.3 

(D) 

.8 



(D) 
.2 

.4 
.6 
.3 

(D) 

(D) 

(Z) 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

.7 

L0.6 
8.2 
7.6 



6.7 

(D) 
2.6 

(») 
84.1 
45.5 
24.3 

(D) 

6.0 

45.1 

(D) 

(D) 

249.7 

201.9 

165.4 

7.3 
3.8 
1.6 

(D) 

(Z) 

458.6 
347.8 
274.4 

(D) 

(D) 
1.2 

(D) 

(D) 

1.0 

20.8 

15.8 

7.8 

13.0 

10.1 

7.5 



(D) 

(D) 
1.2 

20.2 

(D) 
5.0 

1.5 

(D) 
.9 

4.4 
5.0 
2.3 

(D) 

(D) 

.3 



See footnotes at end of table. 



58 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 



Year 



All establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATI STICAL AREAS l — Con . 
Richmond , Va 

Roanoke, Va 

Rochester, N. Y 

Rockf oral, 111 

Sacramento, Calif 

Saginaw, Mich 

St. Joseph, Mo 

St. Louis, Mo. -Ill 

Salem, Oregon 2 

Salinas-Monterey, Calif . 2 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

San Angelo, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Bernardino-Riverside-Ontario, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco-Oakland, Calif 

San Jose, Calif 

Santa Barbara, Calif 

Savannah , Ga 

Scranton, Pa 

Seattle-Everett, Wash 

Sherman-Denison, Tex. 2 

Shreveport , La 

Sioux City, lowa-Nebr 



1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 

1967 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 



51.4 

46.0 
43.0 

16.9 
14.7 
14.3 

145.7 
121.3 
116.7 

57.7 
43.9 
40.8 

26.6 
35.3 
23.9 

32.0 
25.8 
21.2 

10.7 
10.5 
11.0 

295.5 
259.7 
262.5 

9.5 

7.0 

27.5 
31.8 
21.0 

3.2 
2.0 
2.2 

27.4 
23.6 
20.9 

46.4 
37.5 
29.2 

63.5 
60.3 
71.4 

197.8 
196.2 
190.3 

120.3 

94.7 
53.9 

8.5 
7.9 
3.9 

15.5 
14.8 
14.6 

33.7 
29.1 
27.4 

162.2 
121.6 

114.9 

6.7 

12.9 
9.1 
9.1 

9.2 
7.5 
8.3 



337 
256 
194 

95 

71 
57 

1,197 
837 
640 

430 
272 
211 

227 
272 
141 

269 
191 
120 

65 
57 
50 

2,217 
1,666 
1,353 

55 

43 

182 

187 

97 

15 
7 
6 

142 

102 

75 

340 
238 
156 

521 
453 
447 

1.577 
1,356 
1,080 

1 , 001 
739 
34 

56 

51 
19 

93 
75 
63 

164 
115 

94 

1,366 
855 
659 

33 

75 
45 
40 

57 
41 
38 



47.0 

41.9 
38.9 

(D) 

(D) 

14.3 

137.9 
116.3 
113.3 

(D) 

(D) 
40.8 

(D) 
35.2 
23.9 

31.7 
25.5 
21.2 

(D) 

(D) 

CD) 

278.1 

244.3 

249.0 

9.5 

7.0 

27.1 
31.2 
20.3 

CD) 
2.0 
2.2 

CD) 

(?) 

20.9 

46.3 
37.5 
29.2 

61.1 

CD) 
70.9 

180.8 
178.2 

176.1 

115.4 
93.2 
51.4 

8.4 
5.1 
3.8 

(D) 

(D) 
14.6 

33.0 

CD) 

27.3 

160.6 
120.2 
114.3 

(D) 

(D) 
9.1 
9.0 

9.2 
(D) 
8.3 



294.6 
222.7 
169.3 

(D) 

(D) 

56.8 

1,117.2 
785.5 
611.1 

(D) 

(D) 

211.5 

(D) 
272.0 
141.6 

267.1 
189.0 
120.7 

CD) 

(D) 

(D) 

2,030.8 

1,539.8 

1,258.8 

55.5 

43.9 

179.1 

182.4 

93.0 

(D) 
7.8 
6.9 

(D) 

(D) 

75.1 

338.8 
238.6 
156.3 

493.7 

CD) 

442.0 

1,399.6 
1,188.9 

970.9 

1,035.4 
726.3 
322.7 

55.5 
29.4 
17.7 

(D) 

(D) 

63.7 

159.7 

(D) 

94.8 

1,348.4 
842.7 
655.4 

(D) 

(D) 
45.4 
40.2 

57.4 

(D) 

38.8 



4.4 
4.1 
4.1 

(D) 

CD) 

.1 

7.8 
5.0 
3.4 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(Z) 

(z) 

.3 
.2 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

17.4 

15.5 

13.5 



.4 
.6 
.7 

(D) 



CD) 
(D) 

(Z) 

.1 

(z) 
.1 

2.4 

(D) 

.5 

17.0 
18.0 
14.1 

4.9 
1.6 
2.5 

.1 

2.7 

.1 

(D) 
(D) 
(Z) 

.7 

(D) 

.1 

1.6 

1.4 

.6 

(D) 

(D) 

(Z) 

.1 

(Z) 
(D) 



43.2 
33.9 

25.4 

(D) 

(D) 

.5 

80.6 
52.3 
29.3 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
.2 
.2 

2.7 
2.1 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

186.5 

126.5 

94.2 



3.2 
5.0 
4.2 



(D) 



(D) 

(D) 

.2 

1.9 
.2 

.4 

27.4 
(D) 
4.9 

178.3 
167.8 
109.5 

45.9 
13.5 
17.8 

.6 
22.5 

1.2 

(D) 
(D) 
(Z) 
4.7 
(D) 
.2 

18.3 

12.6 

4.2 

(D) 

(D) 
.2 
.6 

.4 

(D) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



59 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 



Year 



All establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Operating manufacturing 
establishments 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



Administrative offices and 
auxiliaries 



Employees 
(1,000) 



Payroll 
(million dollars) 



STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS L — Con, 
Sioux Falls, S. Dak 

South Bend, Ind 

Spokane, Wash 

Springfield, 111 

Springfield, Mo 

Springfield, Ohio 

Springf i eld -Chicopee -Holy oke, Mass. -Conn. . . . 

Stamford, Conn 

Steubenville-Weirton, Ohio-W. Va....„ 

Stockton, Calif 

Syracuse, N. Y 

Tacoma, Wash 

Tallahassee, Fla. 2 

Tampa-St. Petersburg, Fla 

Terre Haute, Ind 

Texarkana, Tex. -Ark 

Toledo, Ohio-Mich 

Topeka, Kans 

Trenton, N.J 

Tucson, Ariz 

Tulsa, Okla 

Tuscaloosa, Ala 



1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 

1967 
1963 
1958 



6.9 
6.1 
6.1 

35.0 
37.7 
36.9 

12.3 
11.8 
12.8 

11.1 

11.6 
11.2 

13.5 

11.1 

8.6 

19.4 
16.4 
13.1 

73.3 
67.4 
71.8 

24.6 
23.7 
19.4 

28.4 
28.6 
29.8 

16.5 
14.4 
12.7 

68.2 

67.1 
69.5 

19.8 
16.6 
16.6 

1.6 

46.7 
36.7 
32.2 

14.0 
11.5 
12.3 

10.7 
5.6 
3.0 

77.7 
70.7 
70.8 

8.3 
6.6 
6.2 

38.1 
37.8 
36.2 

8.5 
8.3 
8.2 

41.9 
29.9 
33.2 

9.1 
7.8 
7.9 



47.0 
36.8 
29.1 

262.0 
244.2 
204.8 

89.2 
76.4 
70.1 

76.0 
67.7 
56.3 

71.6 
50.8 
33.4 

136.5 

100.6 

69.6 

463.8 
370.3 
344.0 

192.6 
163.1 
105.7 

230.3 
206.0 
172.9 

113.1 
84.4 
61.3 

506.2 
423.5 
366.7 

143.1 
98.9 
82.7 

7.6 

271.6 

189.1 
121.9 

85.6 
60.7 
55.2 

61.0 
25.9 
10.6 

616.4 
486.0 
410.0 

58.2 
40.3 
30.5 

282.7 
244.5 
182.9 

59.8 
50.8 
44.9 

292.7 

174.1 
171.6 

52.0 
39.5 
34.7 



(D) 
6.0 
6.1 

34.9 

(D) 

36.9 

12.0 

(D) 
12.8 

11.1 
11.6 
11.2 

13.5 

11.1 

8.6 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

72.3 
66.3 
70.1 

21.1 
19.4 
17.0 

27.2 

(D) 

29.3 

(D) 

(D) 

12.7 

65.5 
63.7 
66.6 

18.4 

(D) 

15.7 

1.6 

45.9 
36.3 
31.5 

13.9 

(D) 
12.3 

10.7 
5.6 
3.0 

71.2 
65.3 
66.6 

8.0 
6.5 
6.0 

35.0 
33.9 
35.1 

(D) 
8.3 
8.1 

38.9 
27.7 
30.7 

(O) 
7.8 
7.9 



(D) 
36.5 
29.1 

261.0 

(D) 
204.6 

86.4 

(D) 

70.0 

76.0 
67.7 
56.3 

71.6 
50.8 
33.4 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

454.1 
359.7 
331.4 

155.5 

124.9 

91.0 

220.0 

(D) 
168.0 

(D) 

(D) 

61.3 

479.5 
396.0 
349.8 

128.0 

(D) 
76.8 

7.6 

265.6 
186.2 
117.4 

84.8 

(D) 

55.0 

61.0 
25.9 

10.6 

547.7 
435.8 
376.0 

55.3 
39.5 
29.6 

247.6 
210.6 
173.2 

(D) 
50.8 
44.6 

265.8 
158.7 
157.3 

(D) 
39.5 
34.7 



(D) 
(Z) 

.1 
(D) 
(Z) 

.3 

(D) 
(Z) 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

1.0 
1.1 
1.7 

3.5 

4.4 
2.5 

1.2 

(D) 

.6 

(D) 

(D) 

2.7 
3.4 
2.9 

1.4 
(D) 
1.0 



.4 
.7 

.1 
(D) 

.1 



6.5 
5.4 
4.2 

.3 

.1 
.2 

3.1 
3.9 
1.2 

(D) 



3.0 
2.2 
2.5 

(D) 



(D) 



1.0 

(D) 
.2 

2.8 

(D) 
.1 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
9.7 
10.6 
12.6 

37.1 
38.1 
14.6 

10.3 
I'D) 
4.9 

(D) 
(D) 

26.7 
27.5 
16.9 

15.1 

(D) 
5.9 



6.0 
2.9 

4.5 

.8 

(D) 

.3 



68.7 
50.2 
34.0 

2.9 



35.1 

33.9 

9.7 

(D) 

.3 

26.9 

15.4 
14.3 

(D) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



60 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Geographic area 


Year 


All establishments 


Operating manufacturing 
establishments 


Administrat 
aux 


ve offices and 
Maries 


Employees 
(1,000) 


Payroll 
(million dollars) 


Employees 

(1,000) 


Payroll 
(million dollars) 


Employees 
(1,000) 


Payroll 
(million dollars) 


STANDARD METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS ' — Con. 


















1967 
1963 
1958 


8.8 
7.2 
5.6 


48.9 
34.1 
22.5 


8.8 
7.2 
(D) 


48.9 

34.1 

(D) 


(D) 






CD) 




1967 
1963 
1958 


42.9 
38.5 
40.6 


282.5 

218.7 
194.8 


42.2 
38.2 
40.3 


275.3 
216.0 
192.8 


.7 
.3 
.3 


7 .2 
2.7 
2.1 




1967 
1963 
1958 


6.1 
4.5 

4.5 


42.5 
26.3 
22.2 


(D) 
(D) 
4.2 


(D) 

(D) 

20.3 


(D) 

(D) 

.3 


(D) 
(D) 
1.9 




1967 


24.1 


140.4 


24.1 


140.4 


- 


- 


Waco, Tex 


1967 
1963 
1958 


11.0 
9.5 
8.8 


66.0 
47.9 
36.4 


(D) 
(D) 
8.7 


(D) 

(D) 

35.8 


(D) 

CD) 

.1 


(D) 




(D) 
.6 


Washington, D.C. -Md.-Va. 2 


1967 
1963 
1958 


55.5 
50.1 
34.7 


410.1 
324.3 

177.7 


53.5 
47.0 
34.0 


384.3 
291.3 
172.1 


2.0 

3.1 

.7 


25.8 




33.0 
5.6 




1967 
1963 
1958 


42.6 
37.7 
37.4 


277.4 
222.8 

189.8 


42.0 

(D) 
36.6 


272.0 

(D) 

183.8 


.6 

(D) 
.8 


5.4 




(D) 
6.0 




1967 
1963 
1958 


21.0 
18.3 
18.0 


151.6 

119.0 
97.5 


21.0 

(0) 

18.0 


151.0 

(D) 

97.5 


(D) 

(Z) 






(D) 

(Z) 


West Palm Beach, Fla 


1967 
1963 
1958 


15.4 

11.9 

3.4 


106.6 
73.3 
14.4 


15.3 

CD) 

3.4 


106.2 

(D) 

14.4 


.1 
(D) 


.4 




(D) 


Wheeling, W. Va.-Ohio 


1967 
1963 
1958 


16.3 
15.6 

17.2 


106.6 
92.9 
85.3 


15.6 

(D) 
16.3 


100.4 

(D) 

78.8 


.7 

(D) 
.8 


6.2 




(D) 
6.5 




1967 
1963 
1958 


57.7 
43.3 
54.5 


415.4 
286.6 
290.7 


56.9 
42.2 
54.0 


407.9 
278.6 
288.2 


.8 

1.2 

.5 


7.5 




8.0 
2.5 




1967 
1963 
1958 


3.6 
3.2 
3.3 


17.6 
14.9 
13.5 


(D) 
(D) 

3.2 


(D) 

(D) 

13.3 


(D) 
(D) 
(Z) 


(D) 




(D) 
.2 




1967 
1963 
1958 


49.7 
43.8 
38.7 


226.1 
164.8 
122.8 


49.0 
43.5 
38.5 


222.5 
163.6 
122.3 


.7 
.2 
.1 


3.6 

1.2 
.5 




1967 
1963 
1958 


68.0 
59.4 
58.7 


605.1 
468.6 
380.8 


48.2 
42.3 
41.4 


358.0 
283.5 
225.0 


19.8 
17.1 
17.3 


247.1 
185.1 
155.8 




1967 


7.9 


36.1 


7.9 


36.1 


- 


- 




1967 
1963 
1958 


50.9 
47.6 
51.1 


340.8 
266.9 
24 2.0 


50.4 

(D) 

51.1 


336.7 

(D) 

241.6 


.5 
(D) 
(Z) 


4.1 




(D) 
.4 




1967 
1963 
1958 


57.0 
48.7 
48.1 


324.4 
224.1 
195.0 


56.7 
48.4 
47.9 


322.1 
221.0 
194.3 


.3 
.3 
.1 


2.3 

3.1 

.7 




1967 
1963 
1958 


82.9 
69.4 
76.4 


631.7 
479.2 
427.3 


81.7 
68.0 
75.7 


621.7 
467.9 
421.3 


1.2 

1.4 
.7 


10.0 




11.3 
6.0 



Note: See appendix A for explanation of terms used. 

The totals at the State and U.S. level were derived from separate tabulations based on industry rather than State detail. The sum of the State 
detail does not add to the U.S. totals because of (1) independent rounding, and (2) independent correction to the industry tabulations and State 
tabulations. 

Standard Notes: - Represents zero. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. (NA) Not available. (2) Less 
than $50 thousand or under 50 employees. 

L The definitions of the standard metropolitan statistical areas are shown in appendix F. 

Footnotes continued on next page. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



61 



table 6 Manufacturing Employment and Payroll for Geographic Areas: 1967, 1963, and 1958-Continued 



Footnotes — Continued 



2 For the SMSA's listed in the table below (whose definitions were revised in 1967) the 1963 and 1958 data do not include establishments located in 
the specified counties. County data for 1963 and 1958 for these units were not available. 



Standard metropolitan statistical areas 



Baltimore , Md 

Birmingham, Ala 

Corpus Christi, Tex 

Dallas, Tex 

Durham, N.C 

Greensboro-Winston-Salem-High Point, N.C . 

Indianapolis, Ind 

Lima, Ohio 

Little Rock-North Little Rock, Ark 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va 



County 



Hartford 

Shelby and Walker 

San Patricio 

Kaufman and Rockwall 

Orange 

Forsyth, Randolph, and Yadkin 

Boone 

Putnam and Van Wert 

Arkansas and Saline 

Washington 

Loudon and Prince William in Virginia 



For the SMSA's listed in the table below (whose definitions were added in 1967) 1958 or 1963 data are not available. The counties which comprise 
the SMSA are listed on the right. 



Standard metropolitan statistical areas 



Biloxi-Gulf port, Miss 

Bloomington-Normal, 111 

Fayetteville, N.C 

Lafayette-West Lafayette, Ind 

Mansfield, Ohic 

McAllen-Pharr-Edinburg, Tex 

Oxnard-Ventura, Calif 

Salem, Oreg 

Salinas-Monterey, Calif 

Sherman-Denison, Tex 

Tallahassee, Fla 

Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton, N.J. 
Wilmington, N.C 



County 



Harrison 

McLean 

Cumberland 

Tippecanoe 

Richland 

Hidalgo 

Ventura 

Marion and Polk 

Monterey 

Grayson 

Leon 

Cumberland 

Brunswick and New Hanover 



62 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years 



Geographic area 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
news 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 

of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



United States: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

DIVISION AND STATE 

New England Division: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Maine : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

New Hampshire: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Vermont: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947... 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Massachusetts: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



311,140 
311,931 
303,303 
286,814 
240, 807 
173,802 
206,663 
270,231 
264,810 
204,754 



24,286 
24,649 
24,880 
24,625 
20,256 
15,201 
18,272 
24,552 
25,351 
22,576 



,385 
,535 
,755 
,015 
,633 
,118 
,568 
,834 
,546 
,878 



1,481 
1,509 
1,457 
1,609 
1,124 
772 
1,075 
1,451 
1,961 
1,771 



925 

977 

1,040 

1,071 

831 

659 

927 

1,702 

1,958 

1,938 



10,963 
11,311 
11,565 
11,205 
10,509 
8,444 
9,872 
11,627 
11,684 
10,929 



110,256 

102,291 

95,310 

90,470 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



9,164 

8,676 

8,508 

8,380 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



615 
594 
579 
627 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



566 
546 

494 
497 
478 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



281 
267 
277 
296 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



4,471 

4,351 

4,377 

4,229 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



,561.8 
,425.0 
,399.6 
,448.5 
,475.2 
,121.2 
,245.9 
,509.1 
,188.0 
897.3 



110.8 
99.9 
98.3 
104.5 
100.1 
82.2 
76.8 
96.1 
84.8 
73.0 



94.9 
84.1 
79.5 
77.3 
74.8 
61.2 
71.2 
88.7 
82.2 
69.7 



42. 
33. 



36.1 
34.9 
24.1 
30.5 
36.7 
36.5 
29.9 



713.6 
674.0 
680.6 
685.4 
718.1 
549.6 
639.2 
801.3 
633.2 
463.5 



898.8 
348.9 
866.6 
695.6 
706.1 
284.3 
426.9 
105.5 
258.7 



,189.9 
,815.0 
,297.8 
,453.9 
,940.1 
,402.1 
,732.8 
,765.3 
669.9 
421.1 



577.2 

438.6 

377.2 

325.0 

233.9 

83.5 

90.3 

111.2 

43.4 

28.8 



512.6 

378.9 

297.1 

246.7 

177.5 

65.2 

85.3 

92.3 

40.4 

28.0 



259.1 

167.9 

132.5 

123.6 

83.1 

27.4 

41.9 

41.1 

20.1 

13.0 



4,646.3 

3,712.4 

3,070.8 

2,575.6 

1,920.7 

702.5 

910.1 

947.8 

364.5 

224.8 



,955.3 
,232.1 
,665.4 
,372.0 
,917.9 
,808.2 
,369.7 
,464.9 
,261.7 
,501.9 



1,135.9 
1,043.1 
1,048.8 
1,154.1 
1,248.8 

947.4 
1,098.5 
1,347.5 
1,101.3 

851.9 



93.6 
84.1 
83.7 
91.1 
90.3 
74.0 
70.2 
88.3 
80.0 
69.9 



76.6 
68.6 
65.6 
66.0 
66.4 
55.4 
65.5 
82.9 
78.7 
67.6 



25.4 

29.9 

30 

20 

27 

33.2 

33.8 

28.2 



507.9 
480.7 
498.1 
536.5 
601.4 
458.4 
557.5 
712.3 
584.6 
438.2 



27,837.6 

24,510.3 

22,671.4 

24,334.1 

24,316.5 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



2,274.3 
2,084.7 
2,053.0 
2,272.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



186.6 

170.1 

166.2 

180.7 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



151.0 

135.1 

128.1 

128.5 

136.1 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



64. 
52. 
50.3 
59.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



999.0 

948.3 

968.7 

1,047.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



393.6 
090.8 
573.8 
590.5 
244.0 
997.5 
884.9 
664.0 
205.2 
892.6 



,252.2 
,889.3 
,099.1 
,858.7 
,054.4 
,018.7 
,346.4 
,431.7 
557.6 
367.7 



437.3 

335.1 

285.2 

260.0 

199.1 

67.3 

74.2 

93.8 

37.6 

25.7 



364.3 

271.8 

221.1 

190.8 

145.3 

52.4 

70.5 

79.1 

36.2 

25.9 



162,4 
113.4 
92.1 
93.0 
66.4 
19.9 
33.8 
33.8 
17.3 
11.4 



2,755.3 

2,234.6 

1,932.0 

1,769.1 

1,463.1 

498.2 

694.8 

764.6 

301.2 

195.3 



261,983.8 

192,082.9 

141,532.2 

117,032.3 

74,290.5 

24,487.3 

30,591.4 

23,841.6 

8,160.1 

4,647.0 



,972.1 
,589.4 
,439.9 
,128.3 
,798.1 
,414.0 
,239.8 
,221.3 
,193.8 
756.3 



,069, 
785, 
628, 
565, 
429, 
150, 
174, 



931.9 
636.1 
490.7 
408.8 
306.9 
104.2 
147.1 
167.3 
66.4 
47.4 



515.0 

309.3 

235.9 

223.0 

149.7 

49.7 

77.3 

71.8 

33.5 

25.1 



8,715.0 
6,403.8 
5,128.5 
4,356.5 
3,356.3 
1,181.5 
1,710.7 
1,746.5 
659.8 
409.0 



298,513.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



16,396.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,164.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



802.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



622.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,294.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



557,397.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



35,164.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,215.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,716.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,126.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



15,925.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



21,503.0 

11,380.0 

9,543.5 

8,200.7 

5,998.1 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1,223.7 
639.4 
534.0 

424.3 
418.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



98.8 
62.5 
44.3 
58.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



75.6 
30.3 

24.4 
18.5 
24.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



35.1 

15.7 

11.6 

8.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



493.7 
273.0 
228.5 
180.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



8.08 

8.40 

8.73 

8.99 

10.32 

11.77 

12.90 

15.34 

16.94 

18.50 



0.57 
0.59 
0.61 
0.64 
0.70 
0.86 
0.80 
0.98 
1.21 
1.51 



0.49 
0.50 
0.50 
0.49 
0.52 
0.64 
0.74 
0.90 
1.17 
1.44 



0.22 
0.20 
0.20 
0.22 
0.24 
0.25 
0.32 
0.37 
0.52 
0.62 



3.69 
3.97 
4.25 
4.25 
5.02 
5.77 
6.62 
8.15 
9.03 
9.56 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



112 

102 

100 

103 

105 

80 

89 

108 

85 

64 



113 

102 

100 

106 

102 

84 

78 

98 

86 

74 



119 

106 

100 

97 

94 

77 

90 

112 

103 



131 

104 

100 

111 

107 

74 

94 

113 

112 

92 



105 

99 

100 

101 

106 

81 

94 

118 

93 

68 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 



,323.2 
,958.4 
,025.2 
,098.7 
,294.0 
,527.3 
,659.7 
,836.8 
,102.1 
,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4 850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



63 



table 7 General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area' 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
news 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 

of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



DIVISION AND STATE—CON. 

New England Division — Con. 

Rhode Island: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Connecticut: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Middle Atlantic Division: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

New York: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 , 

1909 , 

1899 

New Jersey: 

1967 

1963 , 

1958 , 

1954 , 

1947 , 

1939 , 

1929 , 

1919 , 

1909 , 

1899 

Pennsylvania: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



2,703 
2,710 
2,737 
2,635 
2,213 
1,399 
1,701 
2,367 
1,951 
1,678 



5,829 
5,607 
5,326 
5,090 
3,946 
2,809 
3,129 
4,571 
4,251 
3,382 



76,422 

81,708 

82,997 

82,380 

75,341 

53,226 

64,730 

85,509 

81,31 

65,834 



!,911 
,041 
1,441 
1,402 
,782 
1,672 
,395 
,331 
,935 
,957 



14,740 

15,208 

14,219 

13,183 

10,765 

7,438 

8,388 

10,564 

8,817 

6,415 



19,459 
19,337 
18,795 
16,794 
13,116 
16,947 
26,614 
27,563 
23,462 



922 
868 
907 
867 

(NA) 
(NA 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,309 

2,050 

1,874 

1,864 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



29,00 

28,531 

27,729 

27,535 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



14,730 

15,022 

15,000 

15,156 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



5,903 

5,528 

4,994 

4,748 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



8,369 

7,981 

7,735 

7,631 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



122.3 
113.9 
114.5 
125.0 
147.4 
122.7 
140.1 
153.5 
120.9 
92.2 



477.7 
419.4 
394.2 
420.0 
400.0 
281.4 
288.0 
332.8 
230.4 
169.0 



4,360.0 
4,075.1 
4,112.9 
4,284.3 
3,953.8 
2,757.9 
3,002.8 
3,348.6 
2,491.2 
1,732.2 



,929.2 
.,853.0 
.,915.9 
1,000.7 
,773.1 
,211.0 
,331.4 
,467.4 
,155.7 
794.9 



881.3 
829.2 
795.0 
812.4 
739.0 
531.1 
516.6 
590.9 
363.1 
229.3 



,549.5 
,392.9 
,402.0 
,471.1 
,441.7 
,015.8 
,154.9 
,290.2 
972.4 
707.9 



700.4 

533.4 

453 

431 

375 

141 

182 

168 
65.8 
41.3 



494.3 
583.8 
967.1 
751.0 
149.3 
382 
422.3 
404.8 
135.8 
85 



526 

419 

470 

855 

419 

859 

853 

463 

527.8 

871.3 



1,851.5 
.,289.7 
1,627.7 
1,444.2 
i,277.7 
,749.7 
,294.9 
,961.4 
743.3 
414.1 



325.4 
121.3 
066.5 
507.1 
216.9 
753.9 
808.9 
769.3 
218.0 
114.2 



10,349.7 
8,008.6 
6,776.1 
5,903.9 
3,925.2 
1,356.2 
1,749.3 
1,732.9 
566.5 
343.0 



96 

90.0 

91 
103.8 
128 
106 
126 
139 
113 



88.2 



329.9 
294.0 
284.6 
326.8 
331.9 
233.0 
251.9 
291.6 
210.8 
159 



3,024. 
2,849, 
2,901, 
3,212, 
3,248. 
2,234, 
2,562, 
2,859, 
2,207, 
1,604, 



,284.5 
,247.8 
,303.1 
,470.1 
,425.0 

949.4 
,106.0 
,221.9 
,004.0 

726.9 



603.7 
573.8 
564.2 
605.1 
602.3 
431.6 
442.3 
507.1 
326.2 
214.0 



1,136.2 

1,028.0 

1,034.2 

1,137.2 

1,221.4 

853.4 

1,014.0 

1,130.6 

877.5 

664.0 



188.5 

177.2 

175.9 

204.4 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



684.6 

601.7 

563.8 

652.0 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



5,924.8 

5,578.9 

5,548.7 

6,217.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



2,509.8 

2,431.3 

2,487.1 

2,842.6 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1,203.7 

1,145.4 

1,100.0 

1,187.7 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



2,211.3 

2,002.1 

1,960.6 

2,187.0 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA)| 



466.9 
365.3 
314.3 
314.5 
298.5 
105 
144 
137.1 
55.2 
36.0 



2,066.0 
1,569.1 
1,254.4 
1,231.4 

882.0 

275 

328 

323 

110 
73 



17,441.2 

14,295.2 

12,285.4 

11,524.9 

8,524.6 

2,668.5 

3,640.4 

3,447.8 

1,182.6 

729.4 



,334.7 
1,163.5 
i,423.6 
i,231.9 
i,821.5 
,151.8 
,650.4 
,450.1 
557.2 
337.3 



3,617.8 

3,021.0 

2,508.1 

2,280.1 

1,645.5 

519.1 

610.6 

598.5 

169.7 

95.2 



6,488.7 



5,110 

4,353.7 

4,012.9 

3,057.6 

997.6 

1,379.4 

1,399.2 

455.6 

296.9 



,350 
958.6 
756.2 
697.3 
658.9 
237.7 
324.1 
330.6 
122.2 
77.6 



6,389.8 

4,495.9 

3,200 

2,877 

1,896 

690 

806 

703 

233.0 

14: 



261.7 
540.2 
814.7 
402.7 
768.0 
308.8 
176.0 
399.6 
982.3 
763.3 



25,246.7 
19,539.3 
15,892.6 
14,140.5 
9,655.9 
3,313.6 
4,973.9 
3,908.9 
1,512.6 
853.5 



12,738.2 
9,957.3 
7,499.5 
6,331.7 
4,186.1 
1,518.2 
1,771.4 
1,397.8 
425.5 
218.3 



19,276.8 

14,043.6 

11,422.6 

9,930.5 

6,926.1 

2,476.9 

3,430.6 

3,093.0 

1,044.2 

691.6 



,228.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5,284.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



57,183.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



24,458.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



13,151.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



19,574.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,560.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



11,619.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



113,770.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



49,418.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



25,761.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



38,590.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



74.8 
43.1 
29.8 
27.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



445.7 

214.8 

195 

129.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,768.0 

2,086.1 

2,058.2 

1,551 

1,335.2 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1,310.3 

783 

792.2 

572.1 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



824.3 

525.0 

449.7 

359.8 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



,633.4 

777.4 

816.3 

619.1 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



0.63 
0.67 
0.71 
0.77 
1.03 
1.29 
1.45 
1.56 
1.72 



2.47 
2.47 
46 
60 
80 
95 
98 
38 
28 
48 



22.56 
24.03 
25.66 
26.61 
27.66 
28.95 
31.09 
34.04 
35.53 
35.71 



9.98 
10.92 
11.96 
12.42 
12.40 
12.71 
13.78 
14.92 
16.48 
16.39 



4.56 
4.89 
4.96 
5.04 
5.17 
5.57 
5.34 
6.00 
5.17 
4.73 



8.02 

8.21 

8.75 

9.14 

10.09 

10.66 

11.96 

13.12 

13.87 

14.60 



107 
99 
100 
108 
129 
107 
122 
134 
106 
81 



121 

106 

100 

107 

102 

71 

73 

84 

58 

43 



106 
99 
100 
104 
96 
67 
73 
81 
61 
42 



101 
97 
100 
104 
93 
63 
70 
77 
60 



111 

104 

100 

102 

93 

67 

65 

74 

46 

29 



111 

99 

100 

105 

103 

72 

82 

92 

69 

50 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 
60 



121 
106 

100 
100 
89 
59 
60 
61 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



,323.2 
,958.4 
,025.2 
,098.7 
,294.0 
,527.3 
,659.7 
,836.8 
,012.1 
,850.0 



,323.2 
,958.4 
,025.2 
,098.7 
,294.0 
,527.3 
,659.7 
,836.8 
,012.1 
,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850.0 



,323.2 
,958.4 
,025.2 
,098.7 
,294.0 
,527.3 
,659.7 
,836.8 
,012.1 
,850.0 



,323.2 
,958.4 
,025.2 
,098.7 
,294.0 
,527.3 
,659.7 
,836.8 
,012.1 
,850.0 



See footnotes at end of table. 



64 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 1 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees' 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,0 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 

of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



DIVISION AND STATE— Con. 

East North Central Division: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Ohio: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Indiana: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Illinois: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Michigan: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Wisconsin: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



63,062 
63,094 
61,769 
58,946 
50,569 
38,013 
46,396 
58,717 
60,013 
50,521 



15,428 
15,484 
15,203 
14,550 
12,302 
9,543 
11,855 
15,585 
15,138 
13,868 



6,920 
6,860 
6,612 
6,355 
5,403 
4,192 
5,091 
7,558 
7,969 
7,128 



18,536 
18,593 
18,468 
17,628 
15,993 
11,983 
15,333 
17,808 
18,026 
14,374 



14,340 

14,220 

13,596 

12,711 

9,891 

5,961 

6,686 

8,046 

9,159 

7,310 



7,838 
7,937 
7,890 
7,702 
6,980 
6,334 
7,431 
9,720 
9,721 
7,841 



24,563 
22,325 
20,885 
20,495 
(MA) 
(MA) 

(ma) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5,285 
5,800 
5,534 
5,479 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,917 
2,547 
2,444 
2,344 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 



5,157 

4,537 

3,990 

4,001 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



2,727 
2,467 
2,331 
2,294 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5,150.8 
4,483.7 
4,261.3 
4,598.3 
4,322.8 
2,692.8 
2,949.4 
2,834.6 
1,729.5 
1,176.7 



1,397.0 

1,239.8 

1,201.0 

1,292.2 

1,194.3 

731.7 

853.4 

867.3 

508.3 

336.2 



710.2 
609.8 
551.0 
588.4 
548.3 
337.9 
359.9 
332.4 
210.6 
149.5 



1,397.3 

1,211.2 

1,189.9 

1,222.4 

1,186.1 

752.7 

827.5 

785.9 

543.7 

373.8 



1,134.1 
961.1 
880.0 

1,056.0 
975.5 
618.7 
599.2 
541.2 
262.1 
169.2 



512.2 
461.8 
439.4 
439.2 
418.7 
251.8 
309.4 
308.0 
204.9 
148.0 



38,495. 
29,212. 
22,992. 
20,893. 
13,019. 

4,092. 

4,841, 

3,849. 

1,077, 
574, 



10,523.1 
8,125.4 
6,522.5 
5,821.0 
3,559.5 
1,120.8 
1,404.2 
1,214.6 
317.6 
164.6 



5,023.2 

3,794.3 

2,874.7 

2,533.4 

1,582.8 

474.1 

534.2 

400.9 

121.8 



10,013.9 
7,560.6 
6,224.8 
5,420.9 
3,589.4 
1,107.6 
1,393.6 
1,071.0 
364.8 
199.7 



9,357.2 

6,950.7 

5,161.2 

5,248.9 

3,097.3 

1,025.0 

1,041.8 

787.2 

153.8 

74.9 



577.8 
,781.1 
208.9 
869.1 
190.8 
364.6 
467.5 
375.7 
119.6 
66.2 



3,728. 
3,234. 
3,028. 
3,489, 
3,567. 
2,180. 
2,542. 
2,387. 
1,513. 
1,073. 



998.1 
885.7 
856.5 
985.7 
988.1 
595.5 
741.1 
728.3 
446.9 
308.1 



543.6 
463.1 
407.5 
458.9 
457.5 
275.3 
314.7 
276.7 
187.0 
139.0 



995.1 
855.9 
835.2 
903.0 
955.1 
591.0 
691.6 
650.0 
465.8 
332.9 



816.7 
690.8 
608.9 
809.3 
823.3 
520.2 
530.0 
470.3 
231.5 
155.8 



374.5 
338.5 
320.0 
332.3 
343.9 
198.6 
264.7 
262.2 
182.6 
137.5 



7,495.2 

6,615.6 

5,924.5 

6,958.2 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



2,014.5 
1,799.7 
1,658.5 
1,946.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,078.1 
937.2 
796.0 
904.1 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,978.8 
1,717.0 
1,631.8 
1,787.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,669.2 

1,473.9 

1,204.1 

1,650.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



754.8 

687.8 

634.1 

669.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



24,719.7 

18,883.1 

14,541.7 

14,262.3 

9,940.5 

2,932.4 

3,738.8 

2,981.2 

827.2 

473.0 



6,745.4 

5,257.2 

4,170.2 

4,015.3 

2,727.0 

809.4 

1,102.2 

941.3 

245.5 

136.4 



3,453.5 

2,622.1 

1,912.8 

1,798.8 

1,232.2 

342.7 

418.8 

316.0 

95.5 

59.3 



6,180.0 

4,655.4 

3,833.5 

3,518.6 

2,628.6 

742.5 

1,024.9 

797.1 

273.3 

159.1 



6,008.0 

4,521.0 

3,184.8 

3,661.0 

2,444.6 

788.0 

840.5 

638.4 

119.0 

62.5 



2,332.8 

1,827.4 

1,440.4 

1,268.6 

908.2 

249.9 

352.5 

288.7 

93.9 

55.7 



75,015.6 

56,328.0 

40,961.8 

36,491.4 

23,474.2 

7,744.4 

9,973.5 

7,093.8 

2,177.2 

1,205.5 



435.4 
506.1 
472.5 
154.4 
358.0 
116.4 
889.8 
182.6 
613.7 
339.4 



10,308.0 

7,726.9 

5,502.1 

4,632.0 

2,970.0 

964.7 

1,136.5 

721.7 

244.7 

141.9 



016.5 
641.5 
664.1 
663.8 
683.1 
187.2 
930.0 
929.1 
758.4 
439.4 



17,241.6 

13,090.3 

8,363.6 

8,707.2 

5,200.1 

1,794.0 

2,067.3 

1,544.6 

316.5 

143.7 



7,014.1 

5,363.2 

3,959.5 

3,334.0 

2,263.0 

682.0 

949.8 

715.8 

243.9 

141.1 



85,377.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



21,589.5 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



11,706.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(na) 

(NA) 



159,620.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



41,845.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(na) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



21,856.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(MA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



21,559.6 


41,333.7 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


22,011.1 


39,133.2 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


8,511.3 


15,452.1 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 



6,058.6 
3,221.1 
2,710.8 
2,653.9 
1,863.5 

(na) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,694.1 

847.8 

795.8 

760.9 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1,004.4 
555.2 
515.3 
301.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,493.4 
775.6 
730.7 
551.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,360.2 

761.8 

465.3 

870.5 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



506.6 

280.7 

203.7 

169.4 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



26.66 
26.44 
26.59 
28.56 
30.24 
28.26 
30.53 
28.81 
24.67 
24.26 



7.23 
7.31 
7.50 
8.02 
8.36 
7.68 
8.83 
8.82 
7.25 
6.93 



3.68 
3.60 
3.44 
3.65 
3.83 
3.55 
3.73 
3.38 
3.00 
3.08 



7.23 
7.14 
7.42 
7.59 
5.27 
8.68 
7.65 
8.00 
7.75 
7.71 



5.87 
5.67 
5.49 
6.56 
6.82 
6.49 
6.20 
5.50 
3.74 
3.49 



2.65 
2.72 
2.74 
2.73 
2.93 
2.64 
3.20 
3.13 
2.92 
3.05 



121 
105 
100 
108 
101 
63 



116 
103 
100 
108 
99 
61 
71 



129 

111 

100 

106 

99 

61 

65 

60 

38 

27 



117 
102 
100 
103 
100 
63 
70 
67 
46 
32 



129 
109 
100 
120 
111 
70 
68 
61 
30 



117 
105 
100 
100 
95 
57 
70 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

58 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 
60 
61 



121 

106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850.0 



See footnotes at end of table 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



65 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees' 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 

new 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 

employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 

employ- 
ment 

change 

(1958= 

100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



DIVISION AND STATE-- 
Continued 

West North Central Division; 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



Minnesota: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



Iowa: 
1967. 
1963. 
1958. 
1954. 
1947. 
1939. 
1929. 
1919. 
1909. 
1899. 



Missouri : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939. . .. 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



North Dakota: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



South Dakota: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



20,623 
20,667 
20,406 
19,020 
17,389 
14,066 
17,792 
26,255 
27,171 
20,732 



5,409 
5,500 
5,380 
5,027 
4,563 
3,735 
4,315 
5,633 
5,561 
4,096 



3,388 
3,496 
3,596 
3,320 
2,963 
2,541 
3,317 
5,104 
5,528 
4,828 



6,545 
6,540 
6,588 
6,198 
5,721 
4,487 
5,765 
8,715 
8,375 
6,853 



454 
459 
405 
367 
361 
342 
373 
755 
752 
337 



604 
586 
575 
546 
494 
450 
615 
1,054 
1,020 
624 



6,893 

6,257 

5,836 

5,483 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1,778 
1,587 
1,433 
1,316 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,092 
982 

945 
881 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,457 

2,325 

2,215 

2,179 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



92 
78 
79 
65 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



137 

115 
109 
92 
87 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
fNA) 



,205.9 
,014.4 
964.0 
962. 
786. 1 
490.7 
567.2 
603.9 
437.8 
296. 7 



299.8 
245.9 
220. 8 
208.5 
181. 5 
102.2 
124.2 
140.4 
99.0 
71.2 



210. 1 

178.2 

166.1 

163.7 

140.4 

88.1 

97.4 

98.5 

73.0 

49.6 



452.2 
391.4 
380.5 
381.9 
327.1 
220. 3 
240.6 
235.8 
177.5 
12 0.2 



7. 5 
6. 5 
6.3 
5.6 
5.2 

4. 1 

5. 
5. 
3.4 
1.5 



15.5 

13.2 

12.9 

11.5 

10.3 

7.3 

7. 8 

6. 8 

4.3 

2.5 



8,164.8 

5,894.4 

4,615.5 

3,854.7 

2,069.7 

642.7 

804. 7 

734.6 

274.3 

146.3 



106.5 
478. 6 
094.8 
865.3 
508.4 
143.4 
180. 1 
169.8 
62.9 
35.1 



1,434.6 

1,046.7 

812. 5 

648.4 

372. 3 

114. 1 

137.2 

122.2 

43.5 

22.3 



3,048.9 

2,235.2 

1,771. 1 

1,496.7 

826.2 

280.7 

332.3 

273. 7 

109.8 

60.0 



41. 6 
31. 5 
26.3 
19.2 

12.3 
5. 
7.8 
6.4 
2.4 
0.8 



92. 5 
70.0 
54.8 
41. 1 
25.8 
9. 



855.2 
714. 4 
685.5 
713.2 
635.5 
376.2 
474.1 
492. 1 
374.3 
266. 1 



198.8 

165.6 

149.6 

151.1 

145.0 

78. 

103.4 

113.8 

84.8 

64.6 



154.0 

126.9 

120. 7 

122.8 

112.5 

64.8 

81. 7 

79.2 

61.6 

44.4 



320.9 
276.2 
271. 5 
285.4 
269.4 
176. 
202.9 
193.8 
153.0 
107.7 



5.2 

4.5 
4.4 
3.9 
3.8 
2.6 
4. 
4.2 
2.8 
1.4 



6.5 
5.6 
3.6 
2.2 



,710. 4 

,438,4 

,342. 5 

,426. 5 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



398. 7 
331. 6 
293.9 
305.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



310. 

256.4 

241.0 

248. 7 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



631. 3 
547.8 
519.3 
552. 7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



10.7 
9. 1 
8.8 
8.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



22. 
19. 



17.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5,043.6 

3,673.6 

2,913.7 

2,573.3 

1,507.2 

420.6 

589.2 

536.3 

204. 8 

117. 2 



1,177. 6 

865.4 

654.9 

560. 5 

358.6 

95.3 

132.4 

124.8 

47.5 

29. 



946. 1 

687. 

537.7 

443.6 

275.4 

72.9 

102.3 

88.4 

32.5 



1,851. 7 

1,361.7 

1,088. 7 

977.3 

606.8 

187.5 

240.4 

194.9 

80.8 

46.7 



26. 1 
19. 8 



12.5 
8. 5 
2. 7 



1.8 
0.7 



61.7 

48. 

37.5 

28.0 

19.2 

5.9 

8. 1 

6. 8 

2.3 

1.1 



16,772. 6 

11.809.7 

8,869. 7 

7,113.9 

4,115. 7 

1,348.2 

1,870.0 

1,387.8 

562. 

325.4 



4,080.2 

2,806. 1 

2 , 050. 4 

1,594.5 

1,021.3 

306.8 

405. 

327.9 

127.8 

73.4 



3,250.9 

2,287. 

1,684.3 

1,236. 

671. 

243.4 

323.8 

221.8 

88. 5 

47. 1 



,895. 
,296. 
,250. 8 
,727.3 
,620.9 
581.8 
777.5 
534.6 
219.7 
132. 1 



112. 8 
72.4 
62.6 
35. 
29.4 
11.0 



171.3 
140. 
114.3 

77. 7 
51.4 
19.6 
22.7 
17. 1 
6.4 
3. 



25,610. 8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5,449. 1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5,498. 1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



.229. 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



255.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



494. 5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,142.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



9,443.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 



8,681. 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



14,085.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



365.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



663.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,050. 6 

665. 

560. 8 

389. 1 

340. 5 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



231.3 

159. 1 

108. 5 

82.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



230.7 
127.0 
103.2 
73.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



346.8 

211.1 

185.9 

124.4 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



6.3 

8. 1 

9. 1 
16.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



8.2 

7.3 
5.2 
3.4 
3.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



6.24 
5.98 
6.02 

5.97 
5. 50 
5. 15 

5. 87 

6. 14 
6. 24 
6.12 



1.55 
1.45 
1.38 
1.29 
1.27 
1. 07 
1.28 
1.43 
1.41 
1.47 



1.09 
1. 05 
1. 04 
1. 02 
0.98 
0.92 
1.01 
1. 00 
1.04 
1. 02 



2.34 
2.31 
2.37 
2.38 
2.29 
2. 31 
2.49 
2. 40 
2. 53 
2.48 



0. 04 
0.04 
0. 04 
0.03 
0.04 
0. 04 
0. 05 
0.05 
0.05 
0.03 



0.08 
0.08 
0.08 
0. 07 
0.07 
0.08 
0.08 
0.07 
0.06 
0. 05 



125 

105 

100 

100 

82 

51 

59 

63 

45 

31 



136 
111 

100 
94 
80 
46 
56 
64 
45 
32 



126 
107 
100 
99 
85 
53 
59 



119 
103 
100 
97 
86 
58 
63 
62 



119 
103 
100 



120 
102 
100 
89 
80 
57 
60 
53 
33 
19 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098. 7 

14,294. 

9,527.3 

9,659. 7 

9,836. 8 

7,012. 1 

4,850. 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098. 7 

14,294. 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836. 8 

7,012.1 

4,850. 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098. 7 

14,294. 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836. 8 

7,012. 1 

4,850. 



19.323. 2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294. 

9,527.3 

9,659. 7 

9,836. 8 

7,012.1 

4,850. 



19,323. 2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098. 7 

14,294. 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012. 1 

4,850. 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098. 7 

14,294. 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836. 8 

7,012.1 

4,950. 



See footnotes at end of table. 



66 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 7 General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees 3 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions] 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



DIVISION AND STATE — 
Continued 

West North Central Division 
— Continued 

Nebraska: 

1967 1,672 

1963 1,611 

1958 1,553 

1954 1,423 

1947 1,341 

1939 1,093 

1929 1,491 

1919 2,385 

1909 2,500 

1899 1,695 

Kansas 

1967 2,551 

1963 2,475 

1958 2,309 

1954 2,139 

1947 1,946 

1939 1,418 

1929 1,916 

1919 3,149 

1909 3,435 

1899 2,299 

South Atlantic Division 

1967 37,961 

1963 35,546 

33,425 

1954 30,530 

1947 24,000 

1939 16 , 657 

1929 20,860 

1919 28,682 

1909 28,270 

1899 19,144 

Delaware 

1967 528 

1963 569 

1958 569 

1954 556 

1947 483 

1939 416 

1929 460 

1919 653 

1909 726 

1899 633 

Maryland, 

1967 3,401 

1963 3,519 

1958 3,435 

1954 3,253 

1947 2,826 

1939 2,712 

1929 3,231 

1919 4,725 

1909 4,837 

1899 3 , 886 

District of Columbia: 

1967 593 

1963 617 

1958 561 

1954 484 

1947 428 

1939 452 

1929 547 

1919 568 

1909 518 

1899 491 

See footnotes at end of table. 



525 
474 
412 
378 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



812 
696 
643 
572 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



13,138 

11,809 

10,535 

9,424 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



253 

243 
222 
209 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,463 
1,394 
1,334 
1,279 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



155 

167 
142 
148 
156 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



77.0 
64. 9 
58. 6 
59.4 
47. 
26.2 
34.8 
44.9 
29.4 
21.0 



143.8 

114.3 

118.8 

131.4 

74.6 

42.6 

57.3 

72.5 



,501. 5 
,124.8 
,884.9 
.777.7 
,523.9 
,110.7 
, 000. 
896.6 
715.0 
482.7 



70.7 

58.4 
57.8 



287. 6 
263. 7 
259.1 
255.4 
228.7 
166.1 
150.9 
159.4 
120. 1 
100.9 



23.1 

22. 1 
21.3 
20. 7 
17.8 
14.4 
14. 
13.3 
9.3 
7. 1 



475.9 

348. 

265.2 

223.5 

119.9 

34. 1 

51.3 

60. 1 

19.4 

11. 



964.8 

684.4 

590. 8 

560.5 

204.8 

56.4 

85.2 

93.6 

33.3 

15.9 



14,014. 

10,008.4 

7,253. 6 

5,696.5 

3,371.4 

1,073.7 

1,033.7 

940. 1 

301. 7 

153. 6 



588.4 

429.6 

347.6 

267.4 

92.9 

29. 1 

37.4 



1,956. 

1,549.8 

1,257.4 

1,002. 

612.3 

209.2 

195. 

188.2 

59. 1 

39.3 



178. 7 

147. 6 

114. 

92.3 

55.9 

24.9 

25.4 

18.5 

6.8 

3. 9 



58.4 
47.0 
42.9 
43.4 
37.3 
18.4 
28.2 
35.4 
24.3 
18.7 



106. 5 
84.6 



98.2 
59.4 
30. 9 



60.2 
44.2 



1,948. 9 

1,665.1 

1,498.3 

1,466.3 

1,344.8 

977.6 

912.2 

812. 1 

663.0 

458.3 



38.8 
30.4 
30.0 
31. 
29.3 
19.8 
23.6 
29.0 
21.2 
20.6 



205.4 
188.9 
190.5 
195.9 
188.7 
140.9 
131. 1 
139.2 
107.9 
94.2 



11. 7 

11.3 

11.2 

11.8 

10. 

7.7 

9.8 

10. 3 

7. 7 

6.2 



119.2 
96. 7 
87. 
90.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



218. 1 
176.9 
173.9 
203.1 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,905. 5 
3,347.9 
2,894.8 
2,847.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



75.8 
61.5 
57. 3 
60.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



405.6 
375.9 
368.5 
384.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



21.7 
21.3 
21.3 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



325.0 

228.5 

174.2 

150.7 

87.4 

20.2 

36.9 

44.5 

13.9 



655.4 

463.2 

403.7 

400. 6 

151.3 

36. 1 

63.3 

71.8 

25.9 

12.8 



9,226.2 

6,691.5 

4,974.2 

4,072.2 

2,710. 

818. 1 

825.9 

771.8 

224.4 

130.9 



228. : 
159. 1 
125.1 
104.! 
70. ( 
21.: 
29. : 



1,208. 5 
960.5 
813. 3 
675. 1 
458.3 
155.9 
148. 8 
146.6 
45.4 
32.4 



27.7 
11.5 
11.5 
13. 
5. 
3. 



1,150. 

746. 6 

536.3 

394.2 

260.6 

68. 1 

120. 

112. 6 

47. 9 

34.3 



2,112.4 

1,461.6 

1,171. 

2,049.3 

461. 1 

117.4 

205.4 

161.6 

66.2 

33.3 



29,312.8 

21,148. 5 

14,354.9 

10,657. 7 

6,941. 9 

2,217.0 

2,458.2 

1,847.0 

591.2 

316. 1 



958.4 

658.2 

419.8 

353. 1 

183.1 

54. 1 

69.2 

79.5 

21. 9 

16.6 



3,781.3 

3,017. 2 

2,394.4 

1,888.6 

1,139.2 

420. 6 

422. 1 

322. 1 

116.6 

81. 7 



332.8 

256.8 

198. 1 

157.2 

99. 1 

43.4 

52.8 

37. 4 

15.0 

9. 



2,402. 7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(na) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,281.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



35,325.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,520.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,303. 1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



258. 8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,531.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5,372.3 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



64,398.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,066. 3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



589. 7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



71.4 
46. 1 
49.9 
36.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



155. 9 

106.3 

99. 

53. 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,805. 7 

1,569.9 

1,078.2 

789. 3 

677. 7 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



23.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



251.6 

176. 3 

128. 1 

93. 9 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



17. 
13.0 
14. 7 
6. 5 

4. 5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



0.40 
0.38 
0.37 
0.37 
0.33 
0.27 
0.36 
0.46 
0.42 
0.43 



0. 74 
0.67 
0.74 
0.82 
0.52 
0.45 
0.59 
0.74 
0.73 
0. 63 



12.95 
12. 53 
11.76 
11.04 
10.66 
11.66 
10.35 

9. 11 
10.20 

9.95 



0.37 
0.34 
0.36 
0.34 
0.24 
0.25 
0.27 
0.34 
0.33 
0.45 



1.49 
1. 55 
1.62 
1. 59 
1.60 
1.74 
1. 56 
1.62 

1. 71 

2. 08 



0. 12 
0. 13 
0. 13 
0. 13 
0. 13 
0. 12 
0. 15 
0. 14 
0. 14 
0. 13 



131 
111 
100 
101 
80 



121 
96 
100 
111 
63 
36 
48 
61 
43 
26 



133 
113 
100 
94 
81 
59 
53 
48 
38 
26 



122 
101 
100 



111 
102 
100 



108 
104 
100 
100 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 
106 
100 

100 



121 
106 
100 
100 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294. 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012. 1 

4,850. 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294. 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850. 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294. 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836. 8 

7,012. 1 

4,850. 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098. 7 
14,294. 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836. 8 
7,012. 1 
4,850. 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294. 

9,527.3 

9,659. 7 

9,836.8 

7,012. 1 

4,850. 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294. 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



67 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area' 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or mote 



(number) 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new * 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 

employ- 
ment 

change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



DIVISION AND STATE— 
Continued 

South Atlantic Division- 
Continued 

Virginia: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

West Virginia: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

North Carolina: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

South Carolina: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Georgia: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Florida: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

iyo9 



4,938 
4,543 
4,472 
4,398 
3,643 
2,494 
3,287 
5,487 
5,867 
3,186 



1,844 
1,832 
1,916 
2,027 
1,602 
1,094 
1,488 
2,627 
2,586 
1,824 



8,266 
7,784 
7,352 
6,645 
5,321 
3,158 
3,797 
5,690 
4,931 
3,465 



,465 
,057 
,911 
,720 
,135 
,300 
,659 
,821 
,854 
,369 



6,976 
6,249 
5,860 
5,655 
4,755 
3,055 
4,179 
4,608 
4,792 
3,015 



,950 
,377 
,349 
,792 
,807 
,976 
,212 
,503 
,275 



1,620 

1,573 

1,381 

1,290 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 



.563 
528 

519 
517 
558 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,379 

2,946 

2,628 

2,369 

(NA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 



1,251 
1,076 
939 
834 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 



2,268 

2,056 

1,844 

1,713 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

NA 

(NA) 



2,186 

1,826 

1,526 

1,065 

755 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



339.8 
302.1 
258.1 
242.8 
216.5 
150.2 
131.6 
132.8 
114.2 
70.1 



124.0 

117.0 

116.2 

122.4 

127.4 

87.7 

93.6 

90.7 

68.9 

34.8 



643.8 
530.6 
461.5 
434.9 
381.4 
293.3 
226.4 
167.8 
128.0 
75.2 



304.3 

261.6 

225.5 

219.9 

188.8 

136.1 

113.9 

84.0 

76.3 

48.4 



423.1 
354.0 
314.1 
303.0 
250.0 
177.0 
171.7 
135.3 
112.9 
87.2 



285.1 

215.4 

171.3 

123.9 

78.7 

62.6 

71.3 

80.1 

37.3 



1,905.1 

1,432.0 

986.5 

776.8 

483.6 

150.7 

147.4 

145.4 

47.3 

23.9 



831.6 
700.1 
573.8 
494.9 
337.9 
113.7 
136.3 
118.9 
38.7 
14.5 



3,066.1 

2,092.1 

1,486.7 

1,185.6 

758.8 

245.9 

198.8 

148.4 

41.3 

16.4 



1,502.2 

1,049.3 

732.1 

634.8 

377.1 

103.2 

86.0 

72.3 

24.1 

10.4 



2,231.2 

1,505.6 

1,075.0 

853.5 

484.3 

142.0 

140.7 

125.5 

43.9 

23.2 



,754.7 

,102.3 

680.5 

389.3 

168.8 

55.4 

66.7 

78.0 

12.2 



268.2 
239.6 
204.4 
202.7 
189.9 
132.1 
120.3 
119.0 
105.7 
66.2 



96.7 
90.2 
90.4 
97.3 
109.0 
74.4 
85.3 
82.6 
63.9 
33.1 



537.8 
444.4 
391.7 
380.1 
350.2 
269.2 
209.8 
156.4 
121.5 
72.3 



253.8 

221.9 

193.9 

190.1 

175.9 

126.4 

108.8 

78.9 

73.0 

47.0 



339.3 
290.0 
261.1 
260.1 
225.8 
155.9 
158.8 
122.6 
104.6 
83.3 



197.3 
148.4 
125.1 
97.3 
66.0 
51.1 
64.9 
74.2 
35.5 



535.0 

480.2 

397.6 

394.7 

(NA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(ha) 

(HA) 



189.9 

179.8 

173.1 

185.7 

215.6 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 



1,070.2 

890.2 

747.4 

719.4 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 



523.0 

455.3 

381.5 

378.9 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 



684.6 

582.4 

500.3 

503.5 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 



399.8 

301.3 

247.8 

198.5 

139.9 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



,296.1 
992.1 
686.8 
576.8 
384.3 
113.8 
118.1 
119.6 
38.2 
20.3 



587.3 

491.3 

411.0 

354.7 

268.5 

87.8 

115.3 

101.3 

33.0 

12.6 



2,210.1 
1,527.5 
1,109.7 

915.7 
641.9 
198.5 
160.9 
125.0 
34.4 
14.1 



,106.6 

797.2 

565.0 

487.0 

330.7 

86.3 

73.2 

61.9 



1,522.2 

1,073.0 

775.9 

642.6 

399.9 

106.2 

110.4 

100.1 

34.8 

20.0 



990.0 

626.2 

434.5 

270.7 

128.2 

36.8 

54.6 

67.1 

10.9 



4,067.7 

3,046.2 

2,122.7 

1,629.0 

1,050.6 

376.3 

380.1 

271.1 

94.2 

49.3 



2,169.5 

1,886.4 

1,268.8 

988.2 

663.9 

213.3 

251.6 

199.6 

69.1 

29.8 



6,606.5 

4,566.5 

3,077.9 

2,210.5 

1,646.0 

544.1 

693.0 

413.7 

94.8 

40.4 



3,030.3 

2,111.1 

1,360.1 

1,040.9 

793.9 

169.3 

159.4 

152.3 

46.8 

22.9 



4,683.6 
3,254.0 
2,102.3 
1,592.4 



1,016. 

280, 

294, 

251. 

85, 



3,682.7 

2,352.0 

1,410.8 

797.7 

350.0 

115.9 

135.5 

120.2 

21.3 



,543.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,899.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 



8,592.8 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,448.5 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(HA) 
(HA) 



,054.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 



3,704.1 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



8,605.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



4,046.5 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 



15,129.6 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,440.7 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 



11,713.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 



7,322.9 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 



347.0 

231.8 

146.5 

109.9 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



269.0 
173.0 
171.9 
98.9 
82.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 



664.6 

314.4 

191.3 

129.6 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



416.6 
179.8 
75.6 
59.6 

(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 

(NA) 

. (HA) 

(NA) 



423.3 

202.2 

169.9 

162.8 

(NA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 



300.7 

152.3 

152.3 

104.6 

50.1 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 



1.76 
1.78 
1.61 
1.51 
1.51 
1.58 
1.36 
1.35 
1.63 
1.44 



0.64 
0.69 
0.73 
0.76 



3.33 
3.13 
2.88 
2.70 
2.67 
3.08 
2.34 
1.70 
1.83 
1.55 



1.57 

1.54 
1.41 
1.37 
1.32 
1.43 
1.18 
0.85 
1.09 
1.00 



2.19 
2.09 
1.96 
1.88 
1.75 
1.86 
1.78 
1.38 
1.61 
1.80 



1.48 
1.07 
1.07 
0.77 
0.55 
0.66 
0.74 
0.81 
0.77 



132 
117 
100 
94 
84 
58 
51 
51 
44 



107 

101 

100 

105 

110 

76 

81 

78 

59 

30 



139 
115 
100 
93 
83 
63 
49 
36 
28 
16 



13 5 

116 

100 

98 



135 
113 
100 
96 
80 
56 
55 
43 
36 
28 



166 
100 
100 

72 
46 
37 
42 

47 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 
106 
100 
100 

89 
39 
60 
61 
44 
30 



121 

100 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

30 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

4,850.0 



See footnotes at end of table. 



68 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area' 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 
employees 



(number) 



All employees* 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 

employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



DIVISION AND STATE — 
Continued 

East South Central Division 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Kentucky: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Tennessee: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Alabama: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Mississippi : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

West South Central Division: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



15,746 
14,196 
13,800 
12,854 
10,911 
7,024 
9,860 
14,094 
15,381 
10,058 



2,994 
2,946 
2,903 
2,651 
2,245 
1,582 
2,246 
3,767 
4,776 
3,648 



5,040 
4,787 
4,508 
4,058 
3,345 
2,225 
2,855 
4,426 
4,609 
3,116 



4,951 
4,079 
3,956 
3,893 
3,336 
1,982 
2,848 
3,522 
3,398 
2,000 



2,761 
2,384 
2,433 
2,252 
1,985 
1,235 
1,911 
2,379 
2,598 
1,294 



21,883 
20,237 
18,659 
16,469 
13,183 

9,509 
10,576 
13,239 
12,339 

7,174 



5,528 
4,939 
4,381 
4,034 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,135 
1,025 
927 
851 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,022 
1,809 
L,516 
1,366 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,446 
1,257 
1,195 
1,152 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



925 
848 
743 
665 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



6,727 
5,920 
5,261 
4,601 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,091.8 
887.7 
779.8 
729.5 
635.4 
410.0 
416.9 
364.9 
288.3 
188.4 



224.6 

180.5 

162.2 

151.1 

129.6 

76.5 

88.6 

79.3 

74.0 

56.1 



418.0 

r 334.3 

r 279.3 

267.5 

222.3 

152.2 

142.0 

107.7 

82.3 

49.3 



288.8 
243.8 
229.8 
220.1 
206.2 
129.3 
130.0 
116.4 
78.2 
55.0 



160.4 
128.5 
108.5 
90.9 
77.4 
52.1 
56.3 
61.5 
53.8 
28.1 



1,083.3 
864.6 
794.8 
730.8 
550.8 
330.5 
341.1 
323.6 
228.0 
121.6 



5,908.7 

4,112.8 

3,072.8 

2,364.5 

1,363.6 

389.7 

440.5 

367.6 

131.2 

66.4 



1,351.9 

959.0 

721.4 

553.2 

304.8 

89.0 

113.6 

85.8 

37.5 

22.6 



2,190.0 

F l, 505.2 

r i, 077.0 

882.6 

475.0 

149.5 

149.1 

105.9 

37.4 

17.8 



1,602.8 

1,162.4 

920.0 

690.0 

444.9 
114.7 
126.4 
117.0 
33.8 
17.0 



764.0 

486.2 

354.4 

238.7 

139.0 

36.5 

51.4 

59.0 

22.4 

9.0 



6,854.6 

4,651.2 

3,645.4 

2,778.6 

1,334.1 

362.5 

416.7 

365.4 

123.0 

50.0 



878.4 
713.6 
626.7 
601.5 
559.8 
355.1 
377.9 
327.4 
261.8 
177.2 



175.6 

140.5 

124.7 

119.2 

110.6 

62.5 

77.8 

68.7 

65.4 

51.7 



333.6 

267.0 

220.8 

214.0 

193.2 

131.0 

128.4 

94.6 

73.8 

46.0 



235.3 
197.6 
188.7 
188.4 
185.7 
115.7 
119.6 
106.7 
72.1 
52.7 



133.8 
108.5 
92.5 
79.8 
70.3 
45.9 
52.1 
57.4 
50.4 
26.8 



786.6 
625.9 
580.7 
556.4 
456.6 
258.9 
297.7 
282.8 
204.5 
113.4 



1,735.5 
1,416.1 
1,210.3 
1,166.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



344.5 
280.4 
241.7 
233.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



654.7 

530.2 

426.6 

418.4 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



466.6 

391.0 

363.2 

357.8 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



269.7 

214.5 

178.7 

156.9 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1,606.5 
1,278.7 
1,152.1 
1,128.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



4,162.5 

2,908.3 

2,189.7 

1,713.8 

1,096.5 

288.7 

348.7 

296.5 

102.2 

56.0 



926.7 

657.4 

491.8 

383.9 

236.1 

61.6 

88.6 

66.3 

27.8 

18.5 



1,512.2 

1,040.7 

739.5 

612.5 

371.6 

108.8 

115.9 

80.7 

28.3 

14.7 



1,162.6 

842.3 

677.6 

528.6 

372.5 

91.1 

102.0 

98.5 

27.3 

14.9 



560.9 

367.9 

280.8 

188.8 

116.2 

27.1 

42.2 

51.0 

18.8 

7.9 



4,249.4 

2,896.8 

2,349.6 

1,868.1 

996.3 

235.0 

316.5 

290.1 

97.6 

42.7 



13,717.9 

9,190.0 

6,389.1 

4,701.9 

2,884.4 

823.1 

924.4 

660.2 

294.3 

148.6 



3,636.0 

2,548.5 

1,769.3 

1,236.2 

743.3 

186.5 

236.1 

158.5 

112.0 

59.1 



4,921.1 

3,299.3 

2,207.1 

1,678.8 

961.4 

318.4 

322.9 

210.2 

76.2 

38.2 



3,525.5 

r 2,325.2 

1,770.5 

1,319.2 

877.4 

245.6 

258.1 

191.0 

62.5 

34.1 



1,635.3 

1,017.0 

642.2 

467.6 

302.3 

72.7 

107.3 

100.6 

43.6 

17.2 



16,616.5 

10,974.8 

7,791.5 

5,721.0 

3,030.2 

815.3 

950.5 

724.1 

243.3 

98.8 



16,096.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA 
(NA 
(NA 
(NA 



4,180.5 

(na) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
. (NA) 



5,848.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,956.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,111.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



24,638.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



29,658.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,796.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



10,700.1 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



7,442.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,719.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(na) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



40,942.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,405.8 
747.1 

396.0 
256.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



338.3 
223.6 
112.5 
124.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



412.4 
244.9 
209.7 
152.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



378.9 

147.4 

165.1 

82.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



276.2 
131.2 

67.7 
37.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



!,403.8 

915.0 

894.6 

721.1 

457.9 

. (NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



5.65 
5.23 
4.87 
4.53 
4.45 
4.30 
4.32 
3.71 
4.11 
3.88 



1.16 
1.06 
1.01 
0.94 
0.91 
0.82 
0.92 
0.81 
1.06 
1.16 



2.16 
1.97 
1.74 
1.66 
1.56 
1.60 
1.47 
1.10 
1.17 
1.02 



1.49 
1.44 
1.43 
1.37 
1.44 
1.36 
1.35 
1.18 
1.12 
1.13 



0.83 
0.76 
0.68 
0.56 
0.54 
0.55 
0.58 
0.62 
0.77 
0.58 



5.61 
5.10 
4.95 
4.53 
3.85 
3.47 
3.53 
3.29 
3.25 
2.51 



139 
114 
100 
93 
81 
52 
53 
47 
37 
24 



138 
111 
100 
93 
80 
47 
55 
49 
46 
35 



150 
120 
100 
95 
79 
54 
50 
38 
29 
17 



126 
106 
100 
96 
95 
60 
60 
54 
36 
25 



148 
118 
100 
84 
71 
48 
52 
57 
50 
26 



136 
109 
100 
92 
69 
42 
43 
41 
29 
15 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 

106 

100 

100 

91 

61 

62 

63 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 
60 
61 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



69 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 1 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 

(1,000) 



DIVISION AND STATE— 
Continued 

West South Central Division — 
Continued 

Arkansas: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



Louisiana: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



Oklahoma: 
1967... 
1963... 
1958... 
1954 . . . 
1947... 
1939... 
1929... 
1919.. . 
1909... 
1899.. . 



Texas: 
1967. 
1963. 
1958. 
1954. 
1947. 
1939. 
1929. 
1919. 
1909. 
1899. 



Mountain Division: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



Montana: 
1967... 
1963... 
1958... 
1954... 
1947... 
1939... 
1929.., 
1919... 
1909. .. 
1899... 



2,911 

2,859 
2,589 
2,428 
1,926 
1,115 
1,731 
3,044 
2,925 
1,746 



3,639 
3,222 
3,156 
3,020 
2,388 
1,779 
1,989 
2,489 
2,516 
1,826 



2,611 
2,575 
2,409 
2,131 
1,740 
1,530 
1,658 
2,316 
2,310 
495 



12,722 
11,581 
10,505 
8,890 
7,129 
5,085 
5,198 
5,390 
4,588 
3,107 



8,679 
8,527 
7,631 
6,685 
5,044 
3,787 
4,319 
6,675 
5,254 
3,146 



923 
976 
929 
868 
650 
552 
589 
,235 
677 
395 



927 
840 
666 
568 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,016 
954 
935 
897 
94 9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



745 
648 
572 
524 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



4,039 

3,478 

3,088 

2,612 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



2,243 
2,021 
1,761 
1,467 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



191 
188 

174 
172 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



143.6 
113.6 
88.7 
79.1 
65.8 
41.2 
48.7 
54.2 
48.3 
33.1 



164.5 

139.5 

136.9 

145.2 

132.5 

87.8 

97.6 

109.8 

84.2 

44.5 



117.7 
97.7 
91.6 
89.3 
55.4 
37.6 
38.6 
35.4 
15.3 
2.7 



657.5 
513.8 
477.6 
417.2 
297.1 
164.0 
156.1 
124.1 
80.1 
41.5 



315.1 

283.7 

228.7 

185.0 

140.5 

89.4 

118.8 

122.7 

85.0 

48.0 



20.4 
20.2 
20.3 
18.5 
15.8 
11.9 
17.1 
18.9 
13.0 
10.4 



665.6 

439.6 

292.7 

211.8 

125.2 

33.4 

49.4 

56.2 

22.6 

11.4 



1,084.4 

769.4 

621.4 

533.9 

309.9 

85.3 

108.0 

116.7 

42.4 

17.7 



764.2 

551.7 

446.4 

363.6 

143.6 

47.2 

57.6 

46.2 

9.3 

1.1 



4,340.4 

2,890.5 

2,284.9 

1,659.3 

755.4 

196.7 

201.7 

146.2 

48.8 

19.8 



2,123.3 

1,706.4 

1,145.2 

737.5 

375.9 

119.1 

181.4 

169.0 

69.4 

31.6 



129.5 
109.2 
94.8 
72.1 
42.8 
17.3 
29.5 
28.6 
13.0 
8.2 



120.7 
95.6 
74.4 
67.5 
58.7 
35.7 
44.2 
49.7 
45.0 
31.5 



120.8 
104.7 
103.5 
114.4 
111.6 
70.5 



87 



97.7 



78.7 
64.2 
59.7 
60.6 
44.3 
27.6 
31.7 
29.0 
13.1 
2.4 



466.4 
361.4 
343.1 
313.9 
242.0 
125.1 
134.5 
106.3 
70.2 
38.6 



219.1 
195.7 
167.8 
141.7 
115.1 
67.0 
102.5 
105.7 
75.4 
44.5 



16.1 
16.0 
15.8 
14.7 
13.4 
8.8 
14.9 
16.6 



239.6 
191.8 
144.7 
134.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



250.6 

215.4 

205.7 

232.0 

231.4 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



157.8 

130.1 

118.4 

122.5 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



958.5 

741.4 

683.1 

639.6 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



436.2 

392.5 

334.3 

282.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



32.1 
31.7 
30.2 
27.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



497.3 

331.7 

220.7 

171.1 

102.8 

24.2 

39.5 

46.9 

19.1 

10.2 



712 

526 

426 

375 

229 
54 

83.7 
93.9 
33.4 
14.7 



423.0 

295.0 

248.5 

212.2 

105.3 

30.0 

41.3 

34.4 

7.2 

0.9 



2,617.0 

1,744.0 

1,453.9 

1,109.1 

588.4 

126.4 

151.8 

114.9 

37.9 

16.9 



1,299.7 

1,061.3 

780.3 

522.7 

290.3 

79.1 

144.5 

137.1 

56.9 

27.7 



96.4 
82.8 
70.4 
54.1 
34.8 
11.7 
24.2 
24.0 
10.9 
7.4 



1,557.7 

960.9 

591.7 

457.0 

267.5 

66.4 

94.2 

97.0 

40.0 

21.6 



2,790.3 

1,915.6 

1,429.6 

1,181.6 

694.1 

198.5 

246.5 

243.9 

89.1 

36.0 



1,346.2 

978.8 

72.5 

580.6 

341.1 

101.8 

149.4 

87.6 

19.5 

2.7 



10,922. 

7,119. 

5,045. 

3,501. 

1,727. 

448. 

460. 

295, 

94, 

38, 



4,521.9 

3,471.7 

2,244.3 

1,450.8 

783.8 

269.4 

370.1 

303.8 

135.3 

76.2 



311.6 

236.2 

191.2 

141.2 

90.8 

38.8 

61.2 

43.1 

24.1 

22.4 



,354.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,536.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA, 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,962.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



15,785.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5,615.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,877.1 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



7 , 275 . 2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



26,498.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



10,111.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



967.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



172.6 
73.4 
48.2 

42.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



741.4 

210.8 

173.4 

174.4 

97.2 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



63.6 

61.9 
51.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,408.8 
567.3 
611.1 
452.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
■ (NA) 
(NA) 



428.9 

246.2 

185.5 

125.4 

95.0 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



68.9 

19.9 ; 
20.6 I 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



0.74 
0.67 
0.55 
0.49 
0.46 
0.43 
0.50 
0.55 
0.69 
0.68 



0.85 
0.82 
0.85 
0.90 
0.93 
0.92 
1.01 
1.21 
1.20 
0.92 



0.61 
0.58 
0.57 
0.55 
0.39 
0.40 
0.40 
0.36 
0.22 
0.05 



3.40 
3.03 
2.98 
2.59 
2.08 
1.72 
1.62 
1.26 



u. .. ■ 
0.1L 
0.18 
0.19 
0.19 
0.21 



162 
128 
100 
89 
74 
46 
55 
61 
54 
37 



120 
102 
100 
106 
97 
64 



128 
107 
100 



138 
108 
100 

87 



138 

124 

100 

81 

61 
39 
52 
54 
37 
21 



100 

100 

100 

101 

78 

59 

93 

103 

71 

56 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 
106 
100 
100 



131 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

62 

63 

45 

31 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.0 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



See footnotes at end of table. 



70 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 

materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



DIVISION AND STATE — 
Continued 

Mountain Division — Continued 

Idaho: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Wyoming: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Colorado: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

New Mexico: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Arizona: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Utah: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 



1,131 
1,103 
1,065 
981 
664 
498 
562 
803 
725 
287 



331 
34 2 
330 
328 
256 
300 
248 
437 
268 
139 



2,461 
2,453 
2,274 
2,069 
1,602 
1,219 
1,548 
2,230 
2,034 
1,323 



74 9 
74 2 
668 
593 
431 
262 
250 
387 
313 
174 

1,630 
1,518 
1,158 
817 
544 
313 
348 
399 
311 
154 



1,124 

1,110 

1,000 

852 

771 

549 

651 

1,035 

749 

575 



303 
254 

244 
204 
173 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



664 
593 
535 
4 90 
425 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



169 
169 
153 
101 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

424 
339 
257 
175 
125 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



353 
336 
296 

234 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



17.0 
15.0 



5.9 
6.8 

6.4 
6.3 
5.6 
4.4 
7.2 
7.1 
3.1 
2.1 



104.0 
93.7 
77.5 
64.4 
54.1 
32.2 
39.1 
40.8 
32.4 
21.4 



16.9 
15.3 
13.7 
9.7 
6.7 
4.1 
5.1 
6.3 
4.5 
2,6 

76.8 

56.9 

40.6 

26.2 

14.2 

8.0 

12.2 

9.7 

6.9 

3.3 



47.0 
53.5 
37.6 
29.9 
24.5 
15.5 
18.5 
21.5 
13.4 
6.0 



219.9 

162.6 

128.1 

94.2 

45.7 

14.7 

25.5 

20.6 

6.5 



37.1 

38.0 

31.6 

26.9 

16.7 

6.6 

12.5 

12.2 

2,4 

1.3 



730.5 

596.0 

405.0 

254.8 

144.2 

44.0 

57.2 

53.8 

25.6 

13.8 



98.6 
82.1 
59.4 
32.9 
15.0 
4.2 



3.0 
1.3 

543.2 
347.5 
213.3 

110.7 
39.3 
11.0 
19.3 
14.7 
6.3 
2.6 



314.9 

328.2 

185.9 

120.6 

63.8 

19.0 

26.1 

26.5 

10.4 

3.3 



4.2 

4.6 
4.7 
4.6 
4.3 



71.2 
64.0 
55.1 
47.9 
44.2 
23.4 
32.9 
33.8 
28.1 
19.5 



11.3 

10.2 



5.7 
4.1 
2.5 

50.8 

38.6 

30.0 

20.3 

11.2 

5.9 

10.6 

8.3 

6.4 

3.1 



31.7 
33.4 
26.7 
22.6 

20.0 
11.5 
15.6 
18.4 

11.8 
5.4 



56.9 
48.5 
43.0 
39.3 
31.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



8.1 
9.1 
9.1 
9.2 
8.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



143.4 
128.5 
112.0 
95.8 
92.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



22.3 
20.7 
19.2 
14.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

101.8 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



62.3 
67.0 
52.1 
44.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



157, 

116. 

96, 

73, 

37, 



18.0 
5.5 



444.8 

369.1 

265.2 

173.0 

109.7 

28.0 

43.6 

41.0 

19.9 

11.7 



55.6 

47.2 

38.0 

22.2 

11.4 

2.9 

5.6 

6.7 

2.6 

1.2 

308.6 

210.5 

148.3 

80.6 

29.7 

7.0 

15.1 

11.7 

5.5 

2.3 



182.7 

182.0 

120.8 

82.4 

48.0 

11.9 

19.7 

20.9 

8.4 

2,8 



503.4 

366.4 

255.8 

188.6 

109.7 

29.8 

44.5 

35.7 

12.5 



86.2 
81.7 
62.6 
51.4 
35.0 
15.3 
33.6 
38.1 
3.6 
1.9 



1,509.2 

1,193,8 

781.9 

472.4 

286.8 

90.3 

122.3 

97.2 

49.6 

28.3 



204.5 

149.6 

107.6 

65.7 

32.1 

8.6 

11.3 

10.1 

4.6 

2.1 

995.3 

627.1 

360.2 

192.5 

83.8 

31.6 

32.3 

27.5 

16.7 

12.6 



777.9 

710.6 

417.4 

276.3 

128.3 

43.3 

56.7 

45.8 

20.7 

6.5 



713.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(Na) 
(NA) 



192.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,733.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



284.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

,003.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



911.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



, 224 . 5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



280.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,226.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



486.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

,003.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,672.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



57.7 
28.4 

19.2 
19.2 
11.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



7.6 
14.0 
7.0 
6.9 
10.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



99.6 
68.0 

50.7 
30.1 
32.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



10.6 
10.4 
24.5 
6.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

109.9 
49.5 
27.7 
13.8 
8.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



59.2 
29.6 
31.3 
23.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



0.18 
0.17 
0.15 



0.03 
0.04 
0.04 
0.04 
0.04 
0.05 
0.07 
0.07 
0.04 
0.04 



0.54 
0.55 
0.49 
0.04 
0.38 
0.34 
0.40 
0.41 
0.46 
0.44 



0.09 
0.09 
0.09 
0.06 
0.05 
0.04 
0.05 
0.06 
0.06 
0.05 

0.40 
0.34 
0.25 
0.16 
0.10 
0.08 
0.13 
0.10 
0.10 
0.07 



0.24 
0.32 
0.23 
0.19 
0.17 
0.16 
0.19 
0.22 
0.19 
0.12 



134 

111 

100 

88 

61 

42 

62 

54 

33 

6 



92 
106 

100 



111 
110 
49 
33 



134 
121 
100 
81 
70 
42 
50 
53 
42 
28 



123 
112 
100 
70 
49 
30 
37 
46 



189 
140 
100 
65 
35 
20 
30 
24 
27 



125 
142 
100 
81 
67 
42 
50 
58 
37 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 
60 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.2 

4,850.0 

19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 

7,012.1 

4,850.0 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



71 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 

employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



DIVISION AND STATE — 
Continued 

Mountain Division — Continued 

Nevada: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Pacific Division: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 6 

1939 

1929 e 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Washington: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Oregon: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

California: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

1909 

1899 

Alaska: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 7 

1939 

1919 

1909 

1899 



330 
283 
207 
177 
126 

94 
123 
149 
177 

99 



,433 
,307 
736 
047 
132 
023 
,154 
,759 
,231 
599 



5,014 
5,250 
5,065 
4,9 29 
3,409 
2,858 
3,672 
4,356 
3,674 
1,929 



4,437 
4,881 
5,07 2 
5,870 
3,075 
1,903 
2,463 
2,478 
2,246 
1,406 



31,962 
32,201 
28,735 
24,509 
17,648 
11,558 
12,019 
10,282 
7,659 
4,997 



323 
303 
246 
219 
230 
147 
152 
48 



74 

73 

45 

42 

33 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



L2,972 

11,813 

10,414 

9,188 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1,375 
1,233 
1,157 
1,152 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



L,275 

1,225 

1,151 

L,189 

970 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



,012 
,079 
,858 
,642 
,991 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



95 
73 
69 
68 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NAl 



7.0 

6.8 
5,0 
5.7 
2.7 
1.5 
2.6 
3.4 
2.5 
.5 



2,050.3 

1,798.1 

1,595.0 

1,411.1 

913.7 

548.4 

555.5 

504.4 

253.6 

137.7 



270.7 
224.4 
215.0 
194.1 
144.3 
99.1 
128.7 
144,3 
76.9 
33.6 



163.1 
145.2 
134.0 
135.3 
105.6 
67.2 
73.9 
64.6 
32.2 
15.6 



1,583.5 

1,397.6 

1,217.3 

1,053.3 

663.9 

357.1 

352.9 

276.4 

133.5 

84.1 



4.1 
5.5 
7.3 
3.5 

(NA) 



49.6 
42.2 

27.1 
25.3 
8.4 
2.4 
4.4 
4.8 
2.4 
.4 



15,911 

12,059 

8,806 

6,325 

2,820 

787 

910 

704 

195 

78 



2,119.0 

1,479.1 

1,173.3 

854.1 

437.8 

142.6 

196.6 

222.5 

59.6 

19.1 



1,082.5 

819.6 

648.6 

566.7 

317.8 

87.9 

106.2 

93.9 

23.9 

8.0 



,514.5 
,612.2 
,876.3 
,807.4 
,064.5 
533.7 
607.1 
368.7 
107.1 
47.4 



39.7 
25.7 
20.4 
8.0 
10.9 
2.3 
1.5 



4.8 
3.7 
4.4 
2.1 
1.0 
2.2 
3.1 
2.3 



1,378.5 

1,190.7 

1,127.9 

1,060.0 

745.9 

432.9 

471.2 

442.5 

222.2 

129.1 



177.1 
152.2 
157.3 
148.8 
123.4 
82.3 
114.8 
131.2 
69 .1 
31.5 



131.2 

117.6 

110.2 

114.5 

92.4 

57.5 

65.5 

57.8 

28.8 

14.5 



1,044.9 
897.5 
838.7 
773.7 
530.3 
271.3 
290.9 
236.9 
115.3 
77.2 



3.9 
3.5 
4.8 
6.6 
3.1 
2.3 



9.3 
9.5 
7.4 
9.1 
4.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,736.7 
2,357.5 

2.211.1 
2,073.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



344.6 

297.3 

305.8 

280.8 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



254.8 

226.4 

209.4 

214.7 

182.2 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



2,089.7 

1,791.4 

1,656.7 

1,534.9 

1,070.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



11.7 
9.2 
7.3 
7.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



31.2 

28.4 

18.9 

18.5 

6.4 

1.6 

3.6 

4.2 

2.0 



8,985.4 

6,791.7 

5.440.1 

4,261.2 

2,139.5 

554.9 

670.6 

583.7 

157.9 

66.6 



,179.8 
881.4 
761.4 
594.7 
354.4 
108.2 
160.7 
192,5 
49.8 
17.1 



798.2 

617.1 

499.8 

447.7 

265.8 

69.6 

86.8 

80.1 

19.9 

6.8 



6,877.8 

5,195.2 

4,107.2 

3,151.4 

1,519.3 

358.7 

423.1 

295.7 

84.1 

39.9 



42.7 
30.5 
19.9 
16.5 
6.9 



133.8 

106.3 

67.6 

62.7 

17.3 

11.5 

8.1 

6.2 

3.5 

.6 



674.9 

990.8 

666.3 

364 

.544 

,623 

922 

337 

377 

154 



1.9 



3,764.2 

2,884.9 

2.166.6 

1,549.1 

874.0 

267.7 

367.1 

361.9 

102.9 

32.6 



2,060.5 

1,574.8 

1,222.2 

1,037.5 

675.0 

156.7 

206.5 

158.8 

42.5 

15.8 



23,393.6 

17,185.0 

12,048.0 

8,597.5 

3,994.0 

1,122.5 

1,349.2 

742.5 

204.5 

92.5 



130.4 
85.0 
64.6 
40.2 
17.9 
22.0 
6.2 
2.4 



117.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



32,033.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



4,777.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,552.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



24,156.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



147.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



250.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



il,222.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



8,503.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



4,612.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



47 , 106 . 1 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



278.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



15.4 
8.7 
5.2 
4.9 
3.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,268.8 

1,290.4 

1,057.4 

776.4 

553.7 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



464.7 

143.4 

160.4 

147.1 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



234.2 
132.0 
123.3 
67.8 
61.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,529.2 

985.1 

753.2 

549.8 

410.5 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



14.7 
14.5 
3.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



0.04 
0.04 



0.03 
0.03 
0.02 
0.02 
0.03 
0.03 
0.04 
0.01 



10.61 
10.60 
9.95 
8.76 
6.39 
5.75 
5.75 
5.12 
3.61 
2.84 



1.40 
1.32 
1.34 
1.21 
1.01 
1.04 
1.33 
1.47 
1.10 
0.69 



8.19 
8.24 
7.60 
6.54 
4.64 
3.75 
3.65 
2.81 
1.90 
1.73 



0.04 
0.03 
0.03 
0.02 
0.06 
0.11 
0.04 
(NA) 



140 
136 
100 
114 
53 
29 
51 
67 



129 
113 
100 
88 
57 
34 
35 
32 
16 



126 
104 
100 
90 
67 
46 
60 
67 
36 



122 
108 
100 
101 
79 
50 
55 
48 



130 
115 
100 
86 
54 
29 



158 
121 
100 

85 
114 
152 

72 
(NA) 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 
60 
61 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 
60 
61 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 
60 
61 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

44 

30 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 
60 
61 



121 
106 
100 
100 
59 
60 
61 
30 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7' 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
9,527.3 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850.0 



See footnotes at end of table. 



72 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 





Establishments 2 


All employees 2 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 


Cost of 
materials 

(million 
dollars) 


Value of 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 


Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 


Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 




Total 
(number) 


With 20 

employees 

or more 

(number) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Man- 
hours 

(millions) 


Wages 

(million 
dollars) 


Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 

(percent) 


Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 


United States 


Geographic area 1 
and year 


Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 


Employees 
(1,000) 


DIVISION AND STATE— 
Continued 

Pacific Division — Continued 

Hawaii : 

1967 


697 
672 
618 
520 
474 
496 
500 
222 

14,321 
14,384 
14,285 
13,643 
12,409 
9,116 

45,894 
49,904 
51,289 
51,403 
48,281 
32,132 
36,9 23 
42,293 

877 
854 
824 
780 
562 
384 

633 
732 
765 
802 
(NA) 
601 

1,038 

1,030 

1,022 

1,007 

898 

662 

783 

1,169 

1,773 
1,444 
833 
539 
299 
133 

1,600 
1,487 
1,361 
1,164 
943 
637 


215 
203 
179 
137 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

5,856 
5,464 
5,117 
4,989 
(NA) 
(NA) 

15,915 

16,085 

15,645 

15,551 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

369 
314 
280 
271 
216 
(NA) 

270 
27 2 
281 
298 

(NA) 
(NA) 

580 
552 
539 
538 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

535 
393 

215 
129 

(NA) 
(NA) 

652 
568 
5 23 
450 

(NA) 
(NA) 


25.4 
25.1 
23.9 
24.4 
19.5 
11.7 
7.6 
4.4 

1,088.1 
958.5 
957.2 
991,6 
952.8 
(NA) 

1,818.5 
1,779.0 
1,797.0 
1,835.3 
1,598.7 
1,116,7 
1,110.9 
(NA) 

101.1 
90.7 
88.6 
97.6 

101.2 
(NA) 

65.3 
61.8 
71.5 
85.5 
78.8 
(NA) 

102.6 
93.7 
93.9 
94.2 
88.6 
67.6 
72.5 
(NA) 

125.8 
96.9 

31.8 
15.8 
6.1 

(NA) 

117.2 
95.7 
83.5 
82.0 
51.0 
(NA) 


139.6 
109.0 

82.2 

77.1 

15.3 

8.7 

2.8 

2.0 

8,020.4 
6,195.4 
5,213.4 
4,545.6 
3,012.7 
(NA) 

12,968.2 
10,767.1 
9,045.3 
7,804.9 
4,919.6 
1,646.8 
1,988.8 
(NA) 

807.0 
638.9 

501.5 
445.4 
304.8 

(NA) 

493.2 

395.1 
385.0 
387.8 

(NA) 

(NA) 

663.6 

517.9 
430.1 
354.3 
222.4 

80.8 
107.1 

(NA) 

1,106.8 

687.3 

175.9 

64.8 

16.8 

(NA) 

809.6 
538.6 
379.7 

300.2 
115.4 

(NA) 


19.0 
18.7 
17.8 
19.5 
17.0 
10.0 
5.9 
3.7 

764.3 
669.8 
663.9 
725.3 
762.0 
481.4 

1,202.4 
1,191.0 
1,222.7 
1,336.1 
1,269.3 
868.0 
910.9 
1,057.7 

62.0 
56.4 
59.3 
67.5 
81.6 
43.4 

42.5 
41.0 
45.3 
57.0 
(NA) 
42.3 

75.5 
69.8 
70.3 
74.3 
76.4 
59.2 
64.9 
65.0 

72.1 
53.8 
21.6 
12.0 
4.7 
2,113 

78.8 
68.1 
61.5 
63.0 
42.4 
28.8 


35.9 
33.2 
31.9 
36.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,524.9 
1,344.3 
1,297.4 
1,432.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 

2,342.7 

2,316.8 

2,332.8 

2,566.5 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

120.6 
113.6 
110.1 
129.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 

85.4 
82.2 
88.3 
115.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 

142.2 

131.8 

127.5 

140.4 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

153.3 
109.2 

44.1 
23.4 
(NA) 

(NA) 

159.4 
139.4 
119.4 
125.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 


86.9 

67.5 

51.8 

50.8 

11.5 

6.6 

2.1 

1.5 

4,871.0 
3,781.1 
3 , 177 . 2 
2,921.6 
2,191.2 
(NA) 

6.696.4 
5,786.3 
5,047.3 
4,714.7 
3,485,8 
1,062.2 
1,399.9 
1,300.3 

448.9 
359.7 
300.2 
289.0 
232.0 
69.6 

276.2 
229.7 

211.8 
228.0 

(NA) 

(NA) 

413.6 

322.8 

271.3 

239.7 

177.5 

62.9 

86.5 

72.4 

481.7 
325.8 
106.4 
43.5 
12.0 
2,127 

446.8 
328.8 
232.3 

197.2 
84.0 

(NA) 


326.2 

261.1 
164.9 
140.3 

58.4 
51.9 
21.6 
11.1 

15,561.9 
11,936.8 
9,577.9 
7,959.8 
5,561.9 
1,904.4 

23,767.7 
19,133.4 
15,267.8 
13,115.9 
9,310.9 
3,126.1 
4,452.5 
3,592.0 

1,400.8 
1,014.0 
809.0 
676.5 
493.2 
177.3 

892.5 
692.0 
640.9 
634.7 
361.8 
140.4 

1,093.2 
833.3 
683.8 
593.5 
360.7 
158.2 
216.5 
180.3 

1,963.8 

1,198.1 

315.3 

115.9 

31.2 

8.3 

1,604.0 

1,153.2 

711.9 

561.1 

242.8 

(NA) 


399.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

16,717.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

24,240.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,344.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

780.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,097.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,265.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

2,498.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


723.4 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

32,075.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

47,754.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

2,751.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,665.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

2.176.1 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

3,083.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

4,094.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


26.0 
15.4 
17.2 
11.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,283.0 
715.6 
728.3 
430,3 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,066.2 

723.0 

630.5 

444.1 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

96.4 
63.0 
58.6 

35.9 
(NA) 

(NA) 

79.9 
30.9 
31.3 
49.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 

132.2 
55.4 

44.7 
43.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

105.0 
68.3 

24.5 
14.9 
(NA) 

(NA) 

91.1 
50.7 
57.8 
24.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 


0.13 
0.15 
0.15 
0.15 
0.14 
0.12 
0.11 
0.09 

5.63 
5.65 
5.98 
6.16 
6.66 
(NA) 

9.41 
10.49 
11.22 
11.40 
11.18 
11.72 
11.50 

(NA) 

0.52 
0.53 
0.55 
0.61 
0.66 
0.55 

0.34 
0.36 
0.45 

0.53 
0.55 

(NA) 

0.53 
0.55 
0.59 
0.59 
0.62 
0.71 
0.75 
(NA) 

0.65 
0.57 
0.20 
0.09 
0.04 
(NA) 

0.60 
0.56 
0.52 
0.50 
0.36 
(NA) 


106 
105 
100 
102 
82 
42 
32 
18 

114 
100 
100 
104 
99 
(NA) 

101 
99 
100 
102 
89 
62 
62 
(NA) 

114 
102 
100 
110 
106 
59 

91 
86 
100 
120 

110 

(NA) 

109 
100 
100 
100 
94 
72 
77 
(NA) 

396 

305 

100 

42 

16 

(NA) 

140 
115 
100 
97 
61 
(NA) 


121 
106 
100 
100 
59 
61 
44 
30 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 
60 
61 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 
60 
61 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 


19 323 2 


1963 


16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
9,527.3 
9,836.8 
7,012.1 
4,850.0 

19,323.2 


1958 


1954 7 


1939 


19 19 


1909 


1899 


STANDARD CONSOLIDATED AREAS 

Chicago, 111. -North- 
western Indiana: 




16,958.4 




16,025.2 


1954 


16,098.7 


1947 


14,294.0 


1939 


9,527.3 


New York, N.Y. -North- 
eastern New Jersey: 

1967 


19,323.2 


1963 


16,958 .4 


1958 


16,025.2 


1954 


16,098.7 


1939 


14,294.0 
9,527.3 


1929 


9,659.7 


1919 


9,836.8 


SELECTED STANDARD METRO- 
POLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 
(With 40,000 or more manu- 
facturing employees) 4 

Akron, Ohio: 


19,323.2 


1963 


16,958.4 


1958 


16,025.2 


1954 


16,098.7 


1947 


14,294.0 


1939 


9,527.3 


Albany-Schenectady-Troy , 
N.Y.: 


19,323.2 


1963 


16,958.4 


1958 


16,025.2 




16,098.7 


1947 


14,294.0 


1939 

Allent own-Bet hlehem- 
Easton, Pa. -N.J. : 

1967 


9,527.3 
19,323.2 


1963 


16,958.4 


1958 


16,025.2 


1954 


16,098.7 


1947 


14,294.0 


1939 

1929 


9,527.3 
9,659.7 


19 19 


9,836.8 


Anaheim-Santa Ana- 
Garden Grove, Calif.: 

1967 


19,323.2 


1963 


19,958.4 


1958 


16,025.2 


1954 


16,098.7 


1947 


14,294.0 


1939 


9,527.3 


Atlanta, Ga. : 

1967 

1963 


19,323.2 
16,958.4 


1958 


16,025.2 




16,098.7 


1947 


14,294.0 




9,527.3 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



73 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



SELECTED STANDARD METRO- 
POLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 
(With 40,000 or more manu- 
facturing employees) 4 — Con. 

Baltimore, Md. : 8 

19G7 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 



Binghamton, N.Y. 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 



Birmingham, Ala. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 



Boston, Mass. 

1967 

1963 

1958 



. 5 



Bridgeport, Conn. 

1967 

1963 

1958 



Buffalo, N.Y. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 



Canton, Ohio: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 



Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga.: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 



Chicago, 111. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 



Cincinnati, Ohio-Ky. -Ind. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 



2,049 
2,072 
2,112 
2,015 
1,887 
1,976 



375 
404 
431 
289 
237 
201 



876 
674 
675 
605 
529 
374 
419 
440 



5,200 
5,465 



867 
839 
801 



1,719 
1,808 
1,855 
1,829 
1,693 
1,356 
1,896 
2,900 



514 
519 
477 
456 
385 
323 
338 
584 



515 
455 
434 
410 
387 
271 



13,906 
13,956 
13,831 
13,229 
12,082 



1,921 
1,971 
1,900 
2,082 
1,768 
1,606 



923 
857 
866 
856 

(NA) 
(NA) 



166 
158 
170 
137 
99 
(NA) 



351 
282 
291 
266 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,974 
1,956 
2.042 



341 
309 
290 



717 
679 
701 
729 
706 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



216 
198 
184 
183 
166 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



238 
207 
193 
190 

179 

(NA) 



5,652 
5,276 
4,947 
4,811 

(NA) 



.818 
797 
801 
889 

(NA) 
(NA) 



209.7 
190.5 
197.8 
196.1 
175.0 
(NA) 



46.1 
41.6 
46.5 
45.9 
35.8 
(NA) 



68.0 
59.2 
63.5 
60.7 
53.4 
32.0 
36.3 
(NA) 



316.2 
293.2 
301.0 



79.5 
67.4 
64.7 



176.2 
162.9 
173.9 
203.4 
183.9 
115.6 
128.7 
(NA) 



62.5 
53.0 
51.2 
56.9 
55.6 
32.3 
36.8 
(NA) 



51.6 
38.9 
40.9 
43.0 
38.2 
(NA) 



983.1 
860.8 
857.2 
889.8 
857.8 



166.8 
153.9 
156.5 
160.8 
143.9 
(NA) 



1,486.1 

1,184.0 

1,011.4 

808.9 

491.9 

(NA) 



347.5 
259.0 
227.8 
176.6 
106.0 
(NA) 



450.1 

362.2 

335.7 

253.9 

138.0 

40.4 

49.5 

(NA) 



2,222.3 
1,768.8 



585.2 
419.9 
331.8 



,354.8 
,104.3 
980.7 
946.6 
557.4 
183.8 
212.1 
(NA) 



452.9 

343.6 

269.7 

248.9 

158.6 

50.3 

67.5 

(NA) 



308.3 
193.8 
166.1 
145.2 
84.4 
(NA) 



7,168.1 
5,473.0 
4,599.9 
4,058.1 
2,693,8 



1,258.7 
989.0 
833.3 

713.6 
405.1 

(NA) 



134. 
141. 
147. 
143. 
109. 



27.2 
26.1 
30.7 
32.5 
31.0 
27.2 



52.5 
43.0 
47.2 
46.2 
44.8 
28.8 
31.5 
28.9 



209.7 
192.6 
212.5 



47.1 
45.6 



129.0 
117.9 
122.6 
152.9 
149.8 
90.2 
109.0 
116.6 



46.8 
40.0 
38.2 
45.4 
47.6 
28.9 
32.2 
34.2 



40.1 
30.8 
32.8 
35.7 
33.7 
23.9 



683.6 
593.6 
587.3 
644.1 
682.0 



107.2 
100.1 
111.5 
117.0 
115.6 
76.2 



290.6 
267.4 
274.6 
291.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 



53.1 
50.7 
58.0 
60.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 



104.6 
85.4 
93.9 
89.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



409.3 
379.9 
415.0 



114.3 
97.0 
90.0 



260.4 
239.5 
241.0 
306.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



86.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



81.0 
62.1 
64.4 
69.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,365.9 
1,194.3 
1,153.3 
1,276.6 

(NA) 



217.0 
207.1 
207.7 
237.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 



906.6 
728.9 
641.7 
538.2 
367.1 
(NA) 



155.3 
125.2 
121.8 
112.9 
86.8 
(NA) 



313.8 

240.1 

226.0 

170.7 

106.7 

33.0 

37.9 

33.0 



1,202.6 
964.2 
886.4 



357.1 
259.4 
209.2 



904.7 
731.8 
638.2 
655.3 
424.9 
125.6 
160.8 
152.2 



310.6 
236.3 
181.2 
184.3 
128.6 
42.1 
54.7 



213.0 
136.6 
118.2 
107.5 

67.5 
(NA) 



4,256.6 
3,251.0 
2,740.8 
2,556.7 
1,934.4 



681.9 
554.9 
472.6 
456.0 
293.4 
93.9 



2,858.8 
2,366.4 
1,978.5 
.1,575.8 
921.1 
348.4 



534.7 
341.7 
310.6 
268.7 
159.9 
61.2 



906.5 
r 661.1 
587.0 
481.6 
275.6 
105.4 
111,2 
62.5 



4,155.5 
3,014.0 
2,442.8 



,150.0 
799.5 
570.9 



653.5 
068.8 
715.6 
677.8 



023.2 
391.8 
480.1 
346.6 



896.6 
666.9 
499.6 
449.4 
280.2 
107.8 
142.5 
108.7 



610.6 
391.9 
337.5 
277.3 
149.1 
46.8 



13,755.3 

10,291.1 

8,295.2 

6,979.0 

4,964.1 



2,704.1 
2,057.4 
1,555.3 
1,383.0 
870.2 
282.9 



3,341.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



934.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,040.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,511.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 



942.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,795.1 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



920.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



874.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



13,813.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,767.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



6,188.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,460.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,937.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(na) 
(na) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



,629.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,070.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5,409.3 

(NA) 
NA 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,482.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



27,415.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NAl 
(NA) 



,460.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



191.1 
124.1 
84. 
76.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 



27.5 
19.9 

14.4 
15.2 

8.2 

(NA) 



75.6 
35.9 
42.8 
31.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



213.8 
123.6 
104.8 



54.8 
33.0 
25.8 



223.5 
116.3 
110.2 
139.5 

90.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



84.5 
33.3 

26.7 
19.1 
15.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



74.4 
22.4 

11.9 
33.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 



870.9 
485.2 
477.3 
328.4 
(NA) 



158.3 
78.1 

106.5 
74.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1.09 
1.12 
1.23 

1.21 
1.22 

(NA) 



0.24 
0.25 
0.29 
0.28 
0.25 
(NA) 



0.35 
0.35 
0.40 
0.38 
0.37 
0.34 
0.38 
(NA) 



0.41 
0.40 



0.91 
0.96 
1.08 
1.26 

1.29 
1.21 
1.33 
(NA) 



0.32 
0.31 
0.32 
0.35 
0.39 
0.34 
0.38 
(NA) 



0.27 
0.23 
0.26 
0.27 
0.27 
(NA) 



5.09 
5.08 



5.52 

(NA) 



0.91 
0.98 



1.01 
(NA) 



100 
98 
88 

(NA) 



99 

89 

100 

99 

77 
(NA) 



107 
93 

100 
96 
92 
55 
63 
(NA) 



123 
104 
100 



101 

94 

100 

117 

106 

67 

74 

(NA) 



122 

104 

100 

111 

109 

63 

72 

(NA) 



126 

95 
100 
105 

93 

(NA) 



115 

100 
100 
104 
(NA) 



107 

98 

100 

103 

92 

(NA) 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 

106 

100 

100 

91 

61 

62 

63 



121 
106 
100 



121 
106 
100 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

63 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323,2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



See footnotes at end of table. 



74 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



SELECTED STANDARD 
METROPOLITAN 

STATISTICAL AREAS 
(With 40,000 or more manu- 
facturing employees) 4 — Con. 

Cleveland , Ohio: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Columbus, Ohio: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Dallas, Tex: 8 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Davenport-Rock Island- 
Moline, Iowa-Ill.: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Dayton, Ohio: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Denver, Colo. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

Detroit, Mich: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

Erie, Pa. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

Flint, Mich. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 



4,168 
4,175 
4,045 
3,867 
3,346 
2,494 



947 
976 
911 
858 
745 
550 



2,365 
2,103 
1,809 
1,482 
(NA) 
760 



430 
470 
453 
420 
359 
318 



1,041 
1,054 
968 
933 
787 
592 



1,499 
1,481 
1,314 
1,140 
(NA) 



7,100 
7,023 
6,604 
6,159 
4,761 
2,684 
2,844 
2,634 



461 
472 
428 
422 
368 
296 
366 
455 



342 
336 
337 
329 
253 
164 



1,662 
1,517 
1,425 
1,393 

(NA) 
(NA) 



361 
361 
338 
331 

(NA) 
(NA) 



882 
737 
607 
518 
(NA) 
(NA) 



173 

170 
154 
154 
(NA) 

(NA) 



431 
393 
371 
365 
329 
(NA) 



454 
428 
368 

(NA) 
(NA) 



2,606 
2,236 
1,911 
2,005 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



205 
184 
182 
185 
172 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



110 
98 
84 
87 

(NA) 
(NA) 



306.8 
280.3 
273.7 
308.1 
274.2 
(NA) 



83.0 
80.2 

73.0 
77.1 
56.9 

(NA) 



148.9 
106.4 
95.2 
80.5 
42.2 
(NA) 



41.6 
22.0 



126.2 
104.2 

97.2 
107.9 
103.8 

(NA) 



74.1 
69.5 
53.7 
43.1 
35.2 



584.5 
493.9 
467.4 
589.9 
557.2 
372.9 
328.4 
(NA) 



42.3 
36.4 
34.9 
40.6 
46.3 
22.8 
27.4 
(NA) 



(D) 
68.9 
58.8 
76.6 
56.2 
(NA) 



2,411.4 
1,908.3 
1,558.2 
1,470.1 
881.8 
(NA) 



616.7 
510.7 
381.3 
332.1 
158.2 
(NA) 



992.1 
593.4 
461.6 
319.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 



387.1 
272.5 
213.7 
173.6 
120.2 
28.4 



,022.6 
719.0 
552.5 
(D) 
332.4 
(NA) 



554.5 
461.8 
286.0 
177.6 
(NA) 



5,218.8 

3,847.2 

2,972.1 

3,113.8 

1,852.3 

655.1 

616.2 

(NA) 



298.4 
220.8 
178.8 
173.0 
134.7 
33.4 
45.1 
(NA) 



(D) 
563.5 
348.1 
392.2 
174.7 
(NA) 



209.9 
194.2 
185.8 
227.5 
223.5 
131.9 



56.4 
53.7 
46.8 
54.7 
44.1 
26.3 



99.0 
70.5 
62.9 
57.1 
(NA) 
17.5 



29.9 
28.7 
29.9 
33.7 

(NA) 



95.0 
78.2 
73.0 
85.9 
86.5 
45.0 



48.9 
45.7 
37.0 
30.5 

(NA) 



394.3 
329.7 
295.8 
434.4 
468.2 
315.2 
291.0 
265.0 



30.3 
26.3 
25.2 

31.8 
38.1 
19.2 
23.0 
22.9 



(D) 
56.5 
47.3 
65.0 
48.9 
33.7 



428.3 
397.6 
365.7 
452.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 



113.0 

107.2 

93.6 

110.7 

(NA) 

(NA) 



208.0 
149.1 
127.0 
116.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 



69.8 
59.8 
56.5 

57.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 



196.3 
163.2 
147.1 

(D) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



62.1 

(NA) 



809.8 

706.0 

584.6 

881.6 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



61.4 
52.5 
49.4 
62.1 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(D) 

131.2 

94.9 

140.0 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1,471.5 
1,176.4 
936.6 
961.8 
656.9 
186.2 



365.5 
303.4 
224.8 
214.0 
109.2 
30.6 



530.3 
324.7 
255.5 
191.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 



254.6 
181.4 
142.3 
118.5 
92.4 
(NA) 



720.0 
503.2 
392.4 

(D) 
258.3 

(NA) 



321.7 
276.0 
179.9 
113.2 

(NA) 



3,101.9 

2,293.0 

1,659.9 

2,073.3 

1,457.7 

517.8 

507.4 

402.5 



191.6 

142.4 

116.1 

122.1 

103.6 

25.0 

33.6 

28.9 



(D) 
445.9 
266.8 
320.0 
143.4 
(NA) 



4,297.0 
3,378.8 
2,557.5 
2,443.8 
1,570.3 
511.7 



,162.2 
961.9 
679.8 
617.3 
290.2 
93.4 



1,810.8 

(D) 

842.2 

531.6 

253.1 

63.9 



769.9 
494.3 
404.9 
304.2 
189.4 
70.7 



,908.4 
,318.3 
912.1 
821.0 
542.6 
182.9 



,121.5 
926.1 
562.9 
320.5 
190.2 



8,498.1 
6,690.4 
4,312.4 
4,713.2 
2,912.7 
1,087.6 
1,216.2 
958.8 



575.1 

414.1 

308.0 

286.4 

224.9 

72.1 

91.3 

70.4 



(D) 

1,145.9 

585.9 

720.8 

328.9 

(NA) 



4,263.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,036.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,973.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



892.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,345.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,240.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



456.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(D) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



8,522.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,192.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,760.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,641.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,211.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,352.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



20,456.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,033.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(D) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



331.0 
176.9 
143.3 
219.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 



116.6 
57.5 
52.2 
40.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 



146.5 
77.5 
46.9 
21.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 



74.6 
37.1 
22.6 
20.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 



114.5 
59.8 
41.8 

(D) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



73.6 
51.6 
35.8 
19.0 

(NA) 



667.8 

378.6 

218.4 

480.8 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



33.5 
18.2 
24.5 

13.9 
17.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(D) 

81.5 

20.7 

149.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1.59 
1.65 
1.71 
1.91 
1.88 
1.58 



0.43 
0.47 
0.46 
0.48 
0.38 
0.31 



0.77 
0.63 
0.59 
0.50 
0.30 
(NA) 



0.25 
0.24 
0.24 
0.24 
0.29 
0.23 



0.65 
0.61 
0.61 
0.67 
0.72 
(NA) 



0.38 
0.41 
0.34 
0.27 
0.25 



3.02 
2.91 
2.92 
3.66 
3.90 
3.91 
3.40 
(NA) 



0.22 
0.21 
0.22 
0.25 
0.32 
0.24 
0.28 
(NA) 



(D) 
0.41 
0.37 
0.48 
0.39 
(NA) 



112 
102 
100 
113 
98 
55 



114 
110 
100 
106 
75 
40 



156 
112 
100 
84 
44 
(NA) 



126 
105 
100 
102 
106 
56 



130 
107 
100 
111 
106 
(NA) 



138 
134 
100 
80 
68 



125 

106 
100 
126 
119 
80 
70 
(NA) 



121 

104 

100 

100 

129 

65 

78 

(NA) 



(D) 
117 
100 
130 
96 
(NA) 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 
60 



121 
106 
100 
117 
89 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



19, 323. -t. 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



75 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 
and year 



Establishments 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number^ 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 

materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



SELECTED STANDARD 

METROPOLITAN 
STATISTICAL AREAS 
(With 40,000 or mo re manu- 
facturing employees) 4 — Con. 

Fort Wayne, Ind. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

Fort Worth, Tex. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Gary -Hammond-East 
Chicago, Ind. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Grand Rapids, Mich.: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Greensboro-Winston-Salem- 
High Point, N.C. 9 

1967 

1963 

1958 

Greenville, S.C. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

Hartford, Conn. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

Houston, Tex. : 

1967 , . 

1963 

1958 

1954 .'. .. 

1947 '. . .. 

1939 '. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 8 : 

1967 J 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Jersey City, N.J. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Kansas City, Mo.-Kans: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 



383 
366 
335 



1,120 
954 
794 
637 
456 
316 



415 
428 
454 
414 
327 
237 



1,174 
1,170 
1,094 
1,003 
874 
620 



1,162 
1,092 
1,032 



431 
406 
342 
303 



1,051 
945 
946 



2,621 
2,261 
1,976 
1,557 
1,050 
727 



1,440 
1,382 
1,324 
1,338 
943 
784 



2,080 
2,338 
2,400 
2,363 
(NA) 
1,632 



1,776 
1,755 
1,708' 
1,548 
1,376 
1,043 



157 
134 

126 



369 
307 
271 
216 
161 
(NA) 



204 
188 
170 
178 
149 
(NA) 



460 
416 
394 
364 

(NA) 
(NA) 



517 
459 
420 



203 
107 
137 
116 



892 
727 
594 
494 
402 
(NA) 



541 

475 
475 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



772 
822 
805 
785 
(NA) 
(NA) 



690 
645 
591 
559 
(NA) 
(NA) 



36.1 
31.3 



78.4 
50.5 
55.9 
50.1 
32.4 
(NA) 



105.0 

98.0 

100.0 

101.9 

95.0 
(NA) 



75.7 
64.6 
56.5 
63.8 
59.3 
(NA) 



110.9 
96.6 
86.2 



52.8 
45.3 
36.8 
32.6 



110.6 
90.2 
88.5 



138.1 

108.6 

104.5 

89.0 

66.0 

(NA) 



134.7 
115.8 
105.6 
111.8 
92.3 
50.7 



107.2 
109.5 
124.3 
136.6 
144.0 
(NA) 



129.4 
111.1 
103.1 
118.0 
79.3 
(NA) 



339.0 
247.0 
168.8 



587.4 
322.2 
289.6 
215.7 

83.8 

(NA) 



852.3 
722.4 
613.5 
487.5 
319.0 
(NA) 



540.9 
393.2 
291.7 
294.3 
176.1 
(NA) 



596.6 
431.1 
305.3 



257.1 

177.0 

118.6 

92.4 



901.7 
589.5 
458.6 



,061.8 

720.3 

579.4 

(D) 

(D) 



,009.7 
751.2 
574.3 
499.2 
278.5 
73.8 



337.8 
633.4 
619.2 
590.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 



906.6 
684.5 
523.8 
513.7 
220.2 
(NA) 



29.3 
24.5 
21.0 



56.7 
33.3 
42.2 
38.4 
26.8 
I 8.2 



80.6 
76.2 
76.6 
81.2 
80.0 
58.7 



59.2 
50.5 
43.4 
50.9 
50.6 
30.0 



86.8 
76.0 
72.4 



43.7 

38.0 
31.6 
29.0 



70.6 
58.0 
60.4 



88.4 
70.3 
70.4 
65.1 
52.3 
24.9 



96.5 
80.3 
71.8 
82.1 
72.8 
38.7 



81.2 
82.9 

89.6 

100.9 

(NA) 

85.6 



90.4 
75.4 
69.5 
85.3 
62.2 
38.3 



58.4 
49.9 
41.0 



121.1 
70.0 
82.9 

76.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 



159.0 
150.0 
144.1 
155.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 



119.1 

104.0 

86.7 

106.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 



169.4 
147.7 
137.6 



89.2 
77.6 
63.5 
59.0 



152.1 
121.4 
120.1 



184.8 
145.4 
142.3 
118.6 
(NA) 
(D) 



190.1 
164.2 
143.7 
165.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 



161.6 
163.0 
173.2 

195.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 



179.1 
153.1 
136.1 
169.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 



201.5 
149.9 
102.4 



369.5 
176.1 
205.3 
151.1 
62.4 
(NA) 



614.4 
530.1 
436.4 
364.9 
256.8 
(NA) 



380.4 
280.7 
202.6 
212.3 
138.1 
35.4 



382.4 
279.7 
222.8 



187.1 

132.4 

92.1 

75.1 



485.8 
332.0 
277.8 



586.1 
403.8 
350.2 
243.2 

(D) 
(D) 



636.0 
463.7 
343.4 
326.2 
198.0 
48.0 



488.0 
422.6 
394.5 
380.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 



573.2 
423.1 
317.8 
337.2 
157.1 
47.6 



617.5 
430.1 
289.6 



1,200.7 
586.5 
523.3 
372.7 
147.5 
30.5 



1,806.6 

1,648.4 

1,281.9 

980.9 

597.8 

268.0 



,091.4 
788.7 
548.3 
546.3 
311.1 
90.2 



,567.0 

,169.9 

827.6 



507.2 
314.8 
206.4 
145.4 



1,432.3 
949.3 
722.9 



2,873.0 

1,918.4 

1,358.1 

868.7 

(D) 

(D) 



1,855.6 

1,368.5 

1,026.0 

896.4 

483.4 

138.6 



1,584.9 
1,384.2 
1,225.0 
1,119.2 
889.9 
342.5 



2,070.7 
1,514.2 
1,069.1 
1,042.2 
471.7 
148.1 



869.5 
(NA) 

(NA) 



1,846.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,903.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



947.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,607.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 



578.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,261.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,923.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,700.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,855.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,145.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,478.7 
(NA) 

(NA) 



3,039.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



4,660.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,028.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,162.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,075.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,722.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,739.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,561.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,425.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,180.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



41.2 
15.1 
16.5 



88.4 
28.6 
19.9 
16.7 
(MA) 
(NA) 



412.1 
230.3 
250.8 
102.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 



55.2 
37.4 
22.5 
32.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 



80.3 
44.3 
32.4 



20.9 

9.4 

11.0 



111.1 
41.0 
32.5 



499.1 

160.2 

(D) 

87.2 

(NA) 

(NA) 



147.2 

72.2 

(D) 

51.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 



74.0 
63.8 
49.6 

41.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 



95.3 
76.4 
60.5 
46.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 



0.22 
0.21 
0.20 



0.40 
0.30 
0.35 
0.31 
0.23 
(NA) 



0.54 
0.58 
0.62 
0.63 
0.66 
(NA) 



0.39 
0.38 
0.35 
0.40 
0.41 
0.29 



0.57 
0.57 
0.54 



0.27 
0.27 
0.23 
0.20 



0.57 
0.53 
0.-55 



0.71 

0.64 
0.65 
0.55 
0.46 
(NA) 



0.70 
0.68 
0.66 
0.69 
0.70 
(NA) 



0.55 
0.65 
0.78 
0.85 
1.01 
(NA) 



0.67 
0.66 
0.64 

0.73 
0.55 
(NA) 



137 
115 
100 



140 
90 

100 

90 

58 

(NA) 



105 

98 

100 

102 

95 

(NA) 



134 
114 
100 
113 
105 
52 



129 
112 
100 



143 
123 
100 



125 
102 
100 



132 
104 
100 



(NA) 



128 

110 
100 
106 
95 
(NA) 



86 

88 

100 

110 
115 
(NA) 



126 

108 
100 
114 
77 
(NA) 



121 
106 
100 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
61 



121 
106 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 

106 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098,7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



See footnotes at end of table. 



76 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,0 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 

new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 

employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



SELECTED STANDARD METRO- 
POLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 
(With 40,000 or more manu- 
facturing employees)* — Con. 

Lancaster Pa: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

Lawrence-Haverhill, 
Mass.-N.H. : 5 

1967 

1963 

1958 

Los Angeles- Long 
Beach, Calif. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

Louisville, Ky.-Ind.: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

Memphis, Tenn.-Ark.: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Miami, Fla. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

Milwaukee, Wis.: 8 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Minneapolis-St . Paul, 
Minn. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

Nashville, Tenn. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

New Haven, Conn. : s 

1967 

1963 

1958 

New Orleans, La. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 



660 
673 
638 

612 

(NA) 



465 
476 
501 



17,246 
17,679 
17,083 
14,424 
9,771 
5,505 
5,029 
3,721 



900 
904 
898 
814 
743 
641 
822 
979 



862 
816 
734 
646 

(NA) 
376 



2,094 
1,923 
1,696 
1,238 



2,531 
2,405 
2,387 
2,307 
2,180 
(NA) 



2,696 
2,666 
2,481 
2,289 
2,152 



727 
675 
572 



726 
731 
731 



906 
916 
953 
899 
752 
709 



302 
295 
276 
263 

(NA) 



199 
193 
209 



5,705 

5,186 

4,771 

3,974 

2,722 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



435 
429 

402 
390 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



387 
353 
300 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



663 
534 
446 
293 



1,015 
877 
838 
856 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,093 
1,008 



804 
(NA) 



314 
291 
242 



301 
280 
277 



312 
309 

323 

314 
(NA) 
(NA) 



54.1 
47.9 
43.9 
43.7 
39.1 



39.9 
42.0 

36.4 



855.4 
745.0 
697.2 
633.5 
358.7 
172.8 
127.9 
(NA) 



86.7 
88.2 
73.9 
39.8 
49.5 
(NA) 



57.4 
47.1 
41.9 
43.0 
36.5 
(NA) 



58.3 
43.2 
36.9 
24.3 



216.5 
193.8 
189.5 
192.7 
189.3 
(NA) 



203.7 
163.8 
146.0 

143.1 
123.3 



54.1 
46.5 

40.0 



333.1 
255.1 
190.2 
157.8 
(NA) 



245.3 
214.3 
149.3 



6,692.5 

5,118.5 

3,971.5 

2,929.8 

1,118.3 

259.0 

210.0 

(NA) 



750.5 

542.5 

434.6 

373.6 

193.8 

46.8 

65.3 

(NA) 



332.8 
241.4 
178.1 
158.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 



302.9 

192.6 

143.1 

80.2 



,628.8 

,271.9 

,041.7 

886.7 

569.8 

(NA) 



1,524.9 

1,056.0 

766.2 

628.1 

361.3 



317, 
226. 
166, 



46.4 
(NA) 



321.3 
253.1 
205.8 



380.0 
282.9 
212.4 
197.5 
107.2 
(NA) 



35.9 
33.7 

34.7 
(NA) 



30.7 
30.6 
27.7 



579.3 
494.2 
474.7 
471.7 
281.8 
127.4 
103.7 
63.3 



82.5 
65.2 
63.9 
66.5 
60.9 
35.0 
42.3 
35.2 



42.1 
34.0 
30.1 
32.7 

(NA) 
18.4 



44.3 
31.7 
25.9 
17.8 



149.6 
133.3 
129.5 
138.9 
150.0 
84.1 



124.7 
102.9 



99.2 
96.3 



38.6 
34.1 
28.4 



33.9 
30.7 
31.3 



38.8 
36.5 
35.7 
42.2 
38.9 
26.1 



81.6 
71.8 
66.5 
68.5 

(NA) 



59.6 
58.6 
52.7 



1,163.4 

993.5 

945.9 

946.2 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



158.7 
131.7 
125.5 
135.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



83.3 
70.2 
59.5 
66.5 

(NA) 

(NA) 



87.4 
63.1 
50.2 
34.7 



296.6 
266.5 
252.7 
274.1 

(NA) 
(NA) 



250.0 

205.2 

180.2 

98.9 

(NA) 



78.0 
68.4 
56.3 



78.5 
74.9 
69.5 
83.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 



214.2 
160.2 
124.0 
110.3 

(NA) 



155. 
132. 



3,780.9 

2,747.0 

2,312.5 

1,934.6 

797.1 

167.1 

151.5 

74.3 



499.1 
361.3 
288.2 
253.0 
144.2 
35.6 
48.4 
34.2 



211.2 
153.9 
112.1 
104.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 



192.2 
119.7 
87.8 
50.0 



,004.9 
784.1 
640.0 
572.5 
420.1 
(NA) 



784.2 
573.5 
421.8 
386.4 
245.3 



194.1 
141.0 
101.0 



206.0 
156.6 
130.7 



232.9 
193.5 
145.4 
137.2 
79.9 
78.6 



721.6 
532.6 
368.0 
288.6 
178.0 



435.3 
365.3 
268.2 



12,088.2 

8,980.9 

6,729.4 

5,054.7 

2,052.7 

517.7 

505.4 

183.9 



2,082.5 

1,595.6 

1,161.4 

845.0 

489.4 

128.5 

153.2 

90.7 



796.3 
575.3 
396.9 
338.9 
204.4 
57.5 



589.4 
363.1 
252.1 
141.2 



2,982.5 
2,337.2 
1,764.5 
1,519.7 
1,032.0 
299.8 



2,819.4 
1,956.9 
1,396.1 
1,116.8 
724.6 



641.7 
489.7 
304.8 



605.5 
425.1 
331.6 



860.1 
618.4 
486.0 
378.7 
226.7 
224.0 



650.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



445.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 



11,776.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,363.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



578.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,717.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,885.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



761.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 



552.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,063.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,371.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



880.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 



23,727.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,457.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,073.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,165.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5,671.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5,625.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,392.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,152.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,919.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



46.6 
26.3 
15.6 

16.1 

(NA) 



22.1 
16.3 
15.2 



702.1 

389.4 

297.2 

306.0 

175.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



125.5 
66.7 
52.2 
91.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



52.2 
28.3 
33.4 

31.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 



33.4 

21.9 

17.9 

9.8 



187.6 
96.4 
80.0 

73.1 
(NA) 

(NA) 



144.3 
98.9 
49.9 

49.1 
(NA) 



60.3 
50.2 
26.6 



82.8 
31.2 

27.0 
64.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 



0.28 
0.28 
0.27 
0.27 
0.27 



0.21 
0.25 
0.23 



4.43 
4.39 
4.35 
3.93 

2.51 
1.81 
1.32 

(NA) 



(NA) 



0.30 
0.28 
0.26 
0.26 
0.25 
(NA) 



0.30 
0.25 
0.23 
0.15 



1.12 
1.14 
1.18 
1.10 
1.10 
(NA) 



1.05 
0.97 
0.91 
0.84 
0.86 



0.28 
0.27 
0.25 



0.24 
0.25 
0.27 



0.29 
0.29 
0.29 
0.34 
0.32 
(NA) 



123 

109 

100 

99 

89 



110 
115 
100 



123 

107 
100 
92 
52 
25 
18 
(NA) 



127 
101 
100 
102 

85 
46 
57 

(NA) 



137 
112 
100 
101 
85 
(NA) 



158 
117 
100 
66 



114 

102 
100 
99 
100 

(NA) 



140 
112 
100 



135 
116 
100 



108 
101 
100 



117 
105 
100 
117 
99 
(NA) 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



121 
106 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 
91 
61 



121 
106 
100 
105 
100 
89 
59 
63 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



121 
106 
100 



121 
106 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



77 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



SELECTED STANDARD METRO- 
POLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 
(With 40,000 or more manu- 
facturing employees) 4 — Con. 

New York, N.Y. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Newark, N. J. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Pat erson-C lift on- 
Passaic, N.J. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Peoria, 111. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Philadelphia, Pa.-N.J.: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

Phoenix, Ariz. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

Pittsburgh, Pa. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

Portland, Oreg.-Wash. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 

Providence-Pawtucket- 
Warwick, R.I. -Mass.: 5 

1967 

1963 

1958 



34,425 
39,994 
40,134 
41,012 
(NA) 
26,206 



4,466 
4,692 
4,424 
4,255 
(NA) 
2,458 



3,851 
3,826 
3,364 
2,956 
(NA) 
1,364 



351 
368 
338 
348 
300 
280 



7,938 
8,287 
8,251 
8,079 
7,394 
5,756 
7,136 
11,673 



1,063 
975 
705 
461 



2,464 
2,578 
2,574 
2,381 
2,227 
1,905 
2,544 
3,796 



1,826 
1,863 
1,791 
1,787 
1,298 
943 
1,307 
1,129 



2,925 
2,918 
2,938 



11,316 
11,741 
11,705 
11,754 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,769 
1,705 
1,586 
1,571 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,492 
1,322 
1,138 
1,041 
(NA) 
(NA) 



156 
141 
129 
116 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,317 
3,212 
3,147 
3,159 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



296 
233 

170 
(NA) 



1,023 
947 
921 
917 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



563 
519 
458 
438 
409 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,024 
951 
996 



1,147.4 
1,147.2 
1,184.0 
1,203.4 
1,027.0 
(NA) 



263.7 
250.2 
245.6 
255.5 
222.8 
(NA) 



190.0 
176.5 
158.5 
157.2 
131.0 
(NA) 



46.6 
40.1 
37.2 
41.5 
43.0 
(NA) 



573.8 
535.8 
536.9 
563.8 
531.8 
393.6 
428.9 
(NA) 



59.3 
40.9 
25.8 
15.8 



299.6 
272.2 
305.7 
331.6 
337.9 
229.4 
248.6 
(NA) 



79.8 
65.3 
58.3 
57.5 
51.6 
28.4 
38.1 
(NA) 



138.0 
125.9 
127.2 



8,112.7 
6,849.4 
5,876.9 
5,038.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,958.4 
1,613.8 
1,289.8 
1,138.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,320.8 

1,053.1 

806.5 

674.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 



371.3 
277.6 
195.6 
186.4 
124.7 
(NA) 



4,125.2 

3,310.6 

2,738.9 

2,401.4 

1,530.7 

555.6 

663.0 

(NA) 



433.4 

253.8 

139.7 

67.3 



2,383.0 

1,925.6 

1,798.2 

1,557.8 

1,023.8 

357.0 

423.3 

(NA) 



561.0 

392.8 

296.2 

244.1 

153.7 

38.2 

56.8 

(NA) 



789.9 
596.4 
509.9 



749.6 
760.7 
793.7 
872.1 
(NA) 
540.9 



170.2 
160.3 
163.6 
181.1 
(NA) 
116.1 



130.5 
122.7 
115.1 
119.0 
(NA) 
82.5 



31.9 
27.6 
25.4 
30.9 
34.9 
19.1 



397.5 
374.8 
380.4 
419.9 
437.0 
320.6 
367.8 
465.5 



37.0 
26.3 
18.4 
11.9 



197.1 
181.1 
202.7 
239.8 
284.0 
191.3 
216.5 
245.0 



58.4 
47.5 
43.5 
44.8 
42.7 
25.0 
31.6 
38.1 



108.8 
99.2 

101.0 



1,435.6 
1,455.2 
1,494.3 
1,651.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 



343.4 
321.9 
320.3 
359.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 



260.7 
247.4 
226.3 
235.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 



60.5 
55.2 
46.0 
61.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 



782.4 

743.5 

738.1 

827.0 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



75.1 
52.9 
38.0 
24.8 



380.8 

351.8 

380.1 

454.8 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



113.9 
92.4 
82.9 
85.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



212.7 
197.2 

195.9 



3,968.1 
3,515.6 
3,130.0 
2,943.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,033.4 

852.9 

738.6 

695.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 



758.7 
640.5 
507.9 
451.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 



228. 
172. 
117. 
126. 

94. 

28. 



2,405.6 

1,998.1 

1,688.8 

1,564.3 

1,139.1 

385.8 

497.4 

567.9 



228.2 

142.8 

94.5 

47.7 



1,350.2 
1,119.0 
1,057.1 
995.8 
807.1 
270.4 
338.0 
366.3 



368.4 

258.6 

201.6 

172.0 

119.9 

30.7 

42.3 

54.9 



526.8 
406.7 
347.8 



13,803.5 
11,417.0 
9,388.5 
8,133.2 
5,984.5 
1,969.6 



4,071.1 
3,015.6 
2,292.9 
1,965.0 
1,317.3 
438.6 



2,506.6 
2,002.9 
1,464.6 
1,162.7 
701.6 
227.7 



765.5 
604.2 
496.8 
366.7 
282.2 
85.6 



7,958.8 
6,031.6 
4,826.3 
4,023.7 
2,772.6 
1,037.3 
1,396.5 
1,303.0 



773.3 
435.6 
227.7 
115.3 



3,838.3 

2,879.2 

2,622.3 

2,481.8 

1,704.3 

640.9 

835.3 

803.6 



1,115.4 
768.2 
597.6 
475.0 
314.3 
79.9 
112.6 
111.9 



1,533.9 

1,075.2 

852.1 



13,808.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,117.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,536.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



677.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,242.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



615.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,441.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,304.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,377.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 



27,486. 1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



8,147.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,989.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,433.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



16,016.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,396.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



8,204.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,420.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,885.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 



439.4 
345.8 
316.6 
183.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 



295.6 
155.8 
123.1 
128.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 



132.5 
71.5 
55.5 
39.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 



93.2 
24.1 
29.5 
21.3 

(NA) 

N-A 



624.9 
297.5 
306.1 
275.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



89.4 
38.3 
14.3 

7.5 



385.8 

199.9 

262.6 

164.0 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



77.0 
48.9 
32.2 
27.2 
36.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



89.2 
47.8 
33.4 



5.94 
6.76 

7.40 



(NA) 



1.56 
(NA) 



0.98 
1.04 
0.99 
1.04 
0.92 
(NA) 



0.24 
0.24 
0.23 
0.26 
0.30 
(NA) 



4.44 

(NA) 



0.31 
0.24 
0.16 
0.10 



1.55 
1.60 
1.91 
2.06 
2.36 
2.41 
2.57 
(NA) 



0.41 
0.38 
0.36 
0.36 
0.36 
0.30 
0.39 
(NA) 



97 

97 

100 

102 

87 

(NA) 



107 
102 
100 
104 
91 
(NA) 



120 

111 

100 

99 

83 

(NA) 



125 

108 
100 

111 

116 

(NA) 



107 

100 

100 

105 

99 

73 

79 

(NA) 



230 
159 

100 



98 

89 

100 

108 

111 

75 

81 

(NA) 



137 

112 
100 
98 
89 
49 
65 
(NA) 



108 

99 

100 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 



121 
106 
100 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098.7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 



See footnotes at end of Cable. 



78 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 
and year 



SELECTED STANDARD METRO- 
POLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 
(With 40,000 or more manu- 
facturing employees ) 4 --Con 

Reading, Pa. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 



Richmond, Va. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 



Rochester, N. Y. 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 



Rockford, 111. : 

l=.C7 

1963 

1958 

1954. 

1947 

1939 



St. Louis, Mo. -111. 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 



San Bernardino- 
Riverside-Ontario, Calif. : 
1967 



1963. 
1958. 



San Diego, Calif. 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 



San Francisco-Oakland, 
Calif. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

1929 

1919 



San Jose, Calif. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 



Seattle-Everett, Wash. 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number) 



666 
677 
702 
669 
616 
493 
567 
,031 



595 
577 
571 
535 



1,158 

1,214 

1,032 

979 

907 

775 

1,044 

1,536 



624 
584 
487 
439 
4 03 
283 



3,114 
3,217 
3,220 
3,230 
3,036 



1,033 
957 
768 



,032 
920 
765 
595 



4,719 
4,922 
4,520 
4,043 
3,628 
3,171 
3,923 
3,651 



:,251 

.,095 

798 

567 

(NA) 
289 



1,945 
2,052 
1,935 
1,741 
1,418 
1,282 



336 

311 
319 
317 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



259 
241 
219 
192 



453 

427 

414 
330 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



253 

228 
188 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,313 
1,283 
1,281 
1,256 

(NA) 



279 
218 
162 



254 
191 
159 
114 



1,456 
1,402 
1,298 
1,173 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



431 
344 
253 
164 
(NA) 
(NA) 



572 

497 

477 
444 
435 
(NA) 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



56.4 
50.7 
48.4 
49.4 
53. 

46. 1 

47. 5 
(NA) 



51.4 
46. 
43. 
38.4 



145. 7 

121. 3 

116.7 

125.5 

107.5 

67. 

74. 1 

(NA) 



57.7 
43.9 
40.8 
39.4 
36. 9 
(NA) 



295.5 
259.7 
262.5 
271.4 
253. 



37.5 
29.2 



63.5 
60.3 
71.4 
48.1 



197. 8 
196.2 
190.3 
184.3 
162.4 

(NA) 
109. 1 

(NA) 



120.3 
94. 7 
53.9 
28.4 

189. 9 
(NA) 



162.2 

121.6 

114.9 

88.2 

63.6 

(NA) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



334.3 

255, 1 

194.4 

169.2 

135.8 

54. 

67.8 

(NA) 



337.8 
256. 6 
194.7 
137. 5 



,197.8 
837.8 
640.4 
566. 9 
319.2 
106.5 
119.6 
(NA) 



430. 
272.9 
211. 5 
182. 
116.2 
(NA) 



2,217.3 
1,666.3 
1,353.0 
1,156. 9 
684. 1 



340.7 
238.7 
156. 7 



521. 1 
453.0 
447.8 
225. 



1,577.9 

1,356.6 

1,080.4 

873.4 

522.6 

(NA) 

179.6 

(NA) 



,081. 3 
739. 9 
340.5 
118.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,366.7 
855.2 
659.7 
395. 
199. 
(NA) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



29.4 
29.2 



80.5 
83.2 
85.7 



42.2 
31.4 

28. 1 

29. 3 

30. 3 
18.6 



203.2 
179.4 
184.9 
198.6 
207. 9 



35.0 
27.6 
22. 9 



30.2 
46.5 



128.9 
125.9 
126.2 
127.3 
130.1 
75.3 
89.3 
107.1 



58. 7 
47.3 
36.2 
21.3 
(NA) 
9.3 



90.2 
70.2 
79. 1 
63.0 
52.8 
29. 9 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



88. o 

77. 9 
73.6 

78. 1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



68.6 
62. 4 
57.8 
56.1 



185.6 
160.4 
154.2 
163.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



87.3 
66. 
55.7 
61. 9 

(NA) 
(NA) 



404.2 
359.7 
357.4 
387.9 
(NA) 



69. 
54.6 
45.8 



82.2 
58.9 
95.4 
74.4 



250.7 
243.6 
241. 1 
247.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



119. 9 
94. 9 
70. 7 
41.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 



177. 
139.2 
156.7 
119.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(million 
dollars) 



230.2 

175.4 

137.9 

126.9 

110.8 

41.6 

56.3 

39.9 



186. 

146.7 

113.6 

88.3 



643. 6 

471.1 

377.9 

338.2 

234.9 

70.4 

87.8 

73.3 



280.6 
176.7 
131. 7 
124. 1 
89.5 
22.7 



1,323.9 

1,007.3 

836. 

751. 4 

507.9 



229. 9 
157. 2 
115.8 



293. 7 
186.9 
248.6 
157.0 



897. 
766.3 
640.9 
533.9 
390.2 
109.3 
131.5 
140.6 



416. 5 

286.6 

195.7 

81.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 



629.3 
421.5 
386.6 
251.6 
154.1 
(NA) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



597. 5 
429. 5 
341. 7 
294.3 
230.2 

83.8 
117. 9 

81.7 



777. 3 
558.8 
454.7 
346.3 



2,914.9 
1,761.5 
1,174.6 
919. 8 
514.5 
207.7 
247. 7 
195. 9 



832. 5 
494. 8 
362.8 
312.8 
197.8 
51. 6 



4,158. 9 
3,118. 7 
2,417. 
2,111. 9 
1,337.3 



678. 7 
493.8 
319.6 



803.8 
661.4 
605. 5 
390.2 



3,160.3 

2,567. 6 

2,049.4 

7,656.4 

7,037. 5 

356.6 

448. 1 

360.2 



907. 5 
1,210.3 
631. 6 
263.6 
116.8 
29.6 



2,038.5 

1,480.8 

1,064.9 

599.8 

337.3 

103.3 



Cost Of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



617.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



965. 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



,440.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



921. 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,762. 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 



609. 7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



4,346.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,802. 5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,455.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



,215. o 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,741. 1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



4,380. 7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,733. 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



9,904. 1 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,392.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 



,407.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



7,471.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,654.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,479.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



50.8 
24.6 

16.4 
17.4 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



22. 5 
21. 



217.3 
86.8 

59. 6 
58.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



69. 7 
22.2 
17. 1 
16.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 



300.8 
170.2 
153.5 
134.2 

(NA) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 
employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



47.3 
13.9 
26.3 

8. 



200. 

188. 

161.6 

114.5 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



164.2 
64.3 
39. 6 
19. 9 

(NA) 
(NA) 



262. 
52.3 
56.8 
55.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 



0.29 
0.30 
0.30 
0.31 
0.37 
0.48 
0.49 
(NA) 



0.27 
0.27 
0.27 
0.23 



0. 75 
0. 72 
0.72 
0. 77 
0. 75 
0. 70 
0.77 
(NA) 



0.30 
0.26 
0.26 
0.24 
0.26 
(NA) 



1.53 
1.53 
1.64 
1.68 
1.77 



0.24 
0.22 
0. 18 



0.33 
0.36 

0.45 
0.29 



1.19 

1.10 
1. 14 
1. 06 
1. 13 

(NA) 



0. 62 
0. 56 
0. 34 
0. 18 
0. 13 
(NA) 



0.84 
0. 72 
0. 72 
0. 55 
0.45 
(NA) 



Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



117 

105 

100 

102 

109 

95 

98 

(NA) 



120 
107 
100 
89 



125 

104 

100 

108 

92 

57 

63 

(NA) 



141 

108 

100 

97 

90 

(NA) 



113 

99 

100 

103 

96 



128 
100 



100 
67 



104 

103 

100 

97 



63 

(NA) 



225 

176 

100 

53 

35 

(NA) 



141 
106 
100 
77 
55 
(NA) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 



121 
106 
100 
100 

89 
59 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



106 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 



121 
106 
100 



100 
100 
89 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



Employees 



(1,0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 
9,659.7 
9,836.8 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098. 7 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098. 7 

14,294.0 

9,527.3 

9,659. 7 

9.836. 8 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098. 7 
14,294. 
9,527.3 



19.323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098. 7 
14,294.0 



16,958.4 
16,025.2 



19,323. 2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 



19,323.2 

16,958.4 

16,025.2 

16,098. 7 

14,294. 

9,527.3 

9,659.7 

9,836.8 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098. 7 
14,294. 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958. 4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



79 



table 7. General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 





Establ 


shments 2 


All employees 2 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 


Cost of 
materials 

(million 
dollars) 


Value of 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 


Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 

(million 
dollars) 


Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 




Total 

(number) 


With 20 

employees 

or more 

(number) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Man- 
hours 

(millions) 


Wages 

(million 
dollars) 


Percent 
of U.S. 

employ- 
ment 

(percent) 


Index 
of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 


United States 


Geographic area 
and year 


Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 


Employees 
(1,000) 


SELECTED STANDARD 

METROPOLITAN 
STATISTICAL AREAS 

(With 40,000 or 
more manufacturing 
employees) 4 — Con. 

South Bend, Ind. : 

1967 


452 
439 
403 
401 
316 
224 

1,003 
979 
987 

755 
773 
775 
766 
(NA) 
509 

1,137 

1,136 

996 

984 
1,019 
967 
904 
716 
576 

724 
710 
626 

435 
472 
485 
503 
430 
383 
515 
898 

1,388 

1,276 

1,058 

859 

(NA) 

509 
468 
417 

518 
518 
483 
465 

(NA) 

778 
768 
699 
632 
468 
307 


184 
148 
131 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

426 
397 
390 

291 
280 
281 
274 
(NA) 
(NA) 

347 
270 
264 

371 
347 
316 
331 

(NA) 

(NA) 

247 
213 

181 

181 
169 
171 
184 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

434 
376 
284 
(NA) 
(NA) 

200 
170 
143 

172 
151 
137 
121 
(NA) 

438 
401 
346 

(NA) 

(NA) 


35. 
37.7 

36. 9 
45.3 
46.3 
(NA) 

73.3 
67.4 
71.8 

68.2 
67. 1 
69.5 
70.3 
67.6 
(NA) 

46.7 
36. 7 
31. 5 

77. 7 
70.7 
70.8 
78.6 
76.4 
(NA) 

41.9 
29.9 
30.3 

42.9 
38. 5 
40. 6 
43.1 
51.0 
35.9 
43.2 
(NA) 

55.5 
50.1 
34.7 
30. 7 
22.5 

42.6 
37.7 
37.4 

57. 7 
43.3 
54.5 
54.9 
18.5 

49. 7 
43.8 
38.7 
37.0 
35.6 
(NA) 


262. 
244.2 
204.8 

207. 7 
149. 9 

(NA) 

463.8 
370.3 
344. 

506.2 
423.5 
366. 7 
295. 9 
(NA) 
(NA) 

271.6 
189. 1 
117.4 

616. 4 
486.0 
410. 
391.6 
248.7 
(NA) 

292.7 

174. 1 
155.9 

282.5 

218.7 

194.8 

169.2 

140.6 

41.6 

56.8 

(NA) 

410. 1 
324.3 
177.7 
133.5 

(NA) 

277. 4 
222.8 
189.8 

415.4 
286.6 
290.7 
245. 6 

(NA) 

226.1 

164.8 

122. 8 

97.8 

73. 3 

(NA) 


25.0 
26. 9 
24.4 
34. 4 
39. 
21.6 

54. 5 
49. 7 
53.8 

44. 7 
41. 
43.2 
48. 7 
(NA) 
33. 

33.3 

25. 1 
24.0 

54.4 
49.5 
49.0 
58.2 
63.8 

37. 7 

28. 1 
20. 1 
21.7 

31.3 
27.2 
29.2 
34.0 
44.2 
32.3 

38. 
44. 

31.3 
28. 
20.2 

18. 5 

(NA) 

32. 5 
28.5 
28.3 

41. 
31.4 
38.2 
40.3 

(NA) 

41.9 
37.6 
33.1 
32.9 
31.9 

19. 


51.3 
52.7 
47.2 
64. 1 
(NA) 
(NA) 

107. 9 
98.9 

104. 1 

89.8 
81. 6 
85. 
98. 1 

(NA) 
(NA) 

67.4 
51. 7 
47.2 

110.8 

101.7 

95.2 

115. 6 

(NA) 

(NA) 

58. 1 
40.6 
43.2 

62.3 

54. 7 
57. 7 
66. 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

61. 

55. 6 
39.8 
36. 

(NA) 

62.7 
57.3 
55.6 

85. 1 
64. 5 
76.6 
84. 8 

(NA) 

77. 7 
69. 1 

59. 5 
59.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 


172. 
156.8 
122.2 
144. 7 
121.8 
3. 

304. 1 
240.9 
224.2 

280.9 
225.1 

191. 6 

184.8 

(NA) 

(NA) 

161.9 

110. 

80.3 

389.6 
310.3 
255.4 
264.1 

191. 5 
52. 6 

167.3 
101. 5 
100. 7 

122.3 
133.8 
124.4 
122. 
113. 9 
33.7 
43.9 
45.5 

196. 

154. 9 

90. 1 

67. 6 

(NA) 

181. 1 
150. 6 
128. 1 

276.4 
183. 

192. 9 
175.4 

(NA) 

172.0 
127. 5 
94.8 
79.8 
60.5 
16.4 


458.4 
361. 5 
361.9 
330.7 
243.8 
7.2 

947. 7 
690.6 
597.4 

941. 1 
779. 7 
679.9 
553. 7 
340. 1 

105. 

559. 5 
403. 7 
235.6 

1,200.8 
911. 
715.5 
661.1 
438.2 
140. 

514.6 
292.7 
252.2 

627.9 
447.2 
344.8 
328.2 
233. 

79.9 
106.4 

97.6 

728. 2 
525.3 
312.2 
223.5 
118.8 

503.8 
421.6 
301.6 

730.3 
480. 1 
473.5 
350. 3 

106. 

462.7 
311. 
207.6 
156.3 
126. 1 
41.0 


629.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

fNA) 

760.7 
(NA) 

(NA) 

885.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

625.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,568.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

578. 1 
(NA) 
(NA) 

566.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

606. 9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

560.4 
(NA) 

(NA) 

863.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

413.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


1,068. 7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,701.0 
(NA) 

(NA) 

1,830.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,182.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 

2,755.0 

(NA) 

(na) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

1,077.1 
(NA) 

(NA) 

1,162.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,332.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

1,055.6 
(NA) 

(NA) 

1,599.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

869.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


31. 1 
14.9 

14. 1 

8. 1 

(NA) 
(NA) 

62.9 
27. 9 
25.6 

70.7 
42.8 
25.4 
29.6 

(NA) 

(NA) 

35.4 
21.8 

18. 1 

131. 3 
42. 7 
57.5 
50. 9 
(NA) 
(NA) 

26. 
15.3 
21.8 

33.4 

15. 7 
17.4 
10.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

40.9 
30. 7 
22. 1 
10.6 

(NA) 

32. 7 
15.5 
21.6 

37.6 
22.8 
23.7 
10.7 

(NA) 

18.4 

9. 1 
6. 9 
5.3 

7.2 

(NA) 


0. 18 
0.22 
0.23 
0.28 
0. 32 
((NA) 

0.38 
0.40 
0.45 

0. 35 
0.40 
0.43 
0.44 
0.47 
(NA) 

0.24 
0.22 
0.20 

0.40 
0.42 
0.44 
0.48 
0. 53 
0.39 

0.22 
0. 18 
0. 19 

0.22 
0.23 
0.25 
0.27 
0.36 
0.38 
0.45 
(NA) 

0.29 
0. 30 
0.22 
0. 19 
0. 16 

0.22 
0.22 
0.23 

0.30 
0.26 
0. 34 
0.34 
0. 13 

0.26 
0.26 
0.24 
0.23 
0.25 
(NA) 


95 
102 
100 
123 
125 
(NA) 

102 

94 

100 

98 

97 

100 

101 

97 

(NA) 

148 
117 
100 

110 
100 
100 
111 
108 
54 

138 
99 

100 

106 
95 
100 
106 
126 
88 
107 
(NA) 

160 

144 

100 

88 

65 

114 
101 
100 

106 

79 

100 

101 

34 

128 

113 

100 

96 

92 

(NA) 


121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 

121 
106 
100 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
61 

121 
106 
100 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 

121 
106 
100 

121 

106 

100 

100 

89 

59 

60 

61 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 

121 
106 
100 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 

121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 


19,323. 2 


1963 


16,958.4 


1958 


16,025. 2 


1954 


16,098. 7 


1947 


14,294. 


1939 


9,527. 3 


Springf ield-Chicopee- 
Holyoke, Mass. -Conn. : 5 

1967 

1963 

1958 


19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 


Syracuse, N. Y. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 


19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 


1947 


14,294. 


1939 


9,527.3 


Tampa-St. Petersburg, Fla. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

Toledo, Ohio-Mich. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 


19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 

19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098. 7 


1947 

1939 


14,294. 
9,527. 3 


Tulsa, Okla. : 

1967 

1963 

1958 


19.323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025. 2 


Utica-Rome, N. Y. : 

1967 


19,323.2 


1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 


16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098. 7 
14,294. 


1939 


9,527. 3 


1929 


9,659.7 


1919 


9,836.8 


Washington, D. C. -Md. -Va. : a 
1967 


19,323.2 


1963 

1958 


16,958.4 
16,025.2 


1954 


16,098. 7 


1947 


14,294. 


Waterbury, Conn. : 

1967 


19,323. 2 


1963 

1958 

Wichita, Kans. : 

1967 

1963 


16,958.4 
16,025.2 

19,323.2 
16,958.4 


1958 


16,025.2 


1954 


16,098.7 


1947 


14,294.0 


Wilkes-Barre-Hazleton, Pa. : 


19,323.2 




16,958.4 




16,025.2 


1954 


16,098. 7 


1947 


14,294. 




9,527.3 







See footnotes at end of table. 



80 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



table 7 General and Comparative Statistics by Geographic Areas: 1967 and Earlier Years-Continued 



Geographic area 
and year 



Establishments 2 



Total 



(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 



(number; 



All employees 2 



Number 



(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 



(1,000) 



Man- 
hours 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 3 



(million 
dollars) 



Comparative indexes and 
U.S. employment 



Percent 
of U.S. 

employ- 
ment 



(percent) 



Index 
of 

employ- 
ment 

change 

(1958= 
100) 



United States 



Index of 
employ- 
ment 
change 

(1958= 
100) 



Employees 
(1,000) 



SELECTED STANDARD METRO- 
POLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS 
(With 40,000 or more manu- 
facturing employees ) 4 --Con. 

Wilmington, Del .-N. J .-Md . : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

Worcester, Mass.: 5 

1967 

1963 

1958 

York, Pa . : 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 

Youngstown-Warren, Ohio: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 

1947 

1939 



455 
480 
448 
408 
335 



781 
783 

800 



710 
724 
710 
624 
688 
525 



567 

571 
563 
578 
(NA) 
333 



229 
206 
178 
167 
155 



324 
302 
317 



368 

365 
349 
300 

(NA) 
(NA) 



240 
222 
230 
238 

(NA) 
(NA) 



56.1 
37.8 



50.9 
47.6 
51.1 



57.0 
48.7 
48.1 
50.8 
47.2 
(NA) 



82.9 
69.4 
76.4 
86.8 
88.0 
(NA) 



605.1 
468.6 
380.9 
297.0 
114.3 



340.8 
266.9 
242.0 



324.4 
224.1 
195.0 
176.4 
110.2 
(NA) 



631.7 
479.2 
427.3 
394.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 



36.0 
30.4 
29.8 
31.3 
30.6 



46.1 
39.9 
39.0 
41.0 
40.4 
31.3 



66.5 
55.6 
60.9 
73.1 
(NA) 
52.2 



70.3 
61.1 
57.4 
60.9 

(NA) 



72.3 

67.2 
71.3 



93.9 
80.6 
78.3 
83.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 



134.5 
110.5 
108.4 
138.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 



233.4 
178.2 
142.0 
121.5 
82.6 



212.6 
166.8 
152.5 



229.7 
162.7 
134.2 
125.3 
84.7 
32.2 



469.8 
361.6 
319.1 
309.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 



846.0 
702.6 
470.8 
402.4 
212.7 



602.9 
430.2 
377.7 



662.5 
438.2 
363.4 
307.8 
207.2 
73.4 



,260.5 
901.6 
729.4 
686.0 
445.9 
167.6 



1,445.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



470.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 



651.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,839.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,290.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,064.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,303.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,077.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



127.1 
60.8 
34.7 
25.2 

(NA) 



37.3 
17.0 
22.5 



57.7 
19.7 
14.3 
19.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 



73.6 
57.3 
53.1 
42.1 

(NA) 
(NA) 



0.35 
0.35 
0.37 
0.35 
0.26 



0.26 
0.28 
0.32 



0.29 
0.29 
0.30 
0.32 
0.33 
(NA) 



0.43 
0.41 
0.48 
0.54 
0.62 
(NA) 



116 

101 

100 

96 

64 



119 

101 

100 

104 

97 

(NA) 



109 
91 
100 
114 
115 
(NA) 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 



121 
106 
100 



121 
106 
100 
100 
89 
59 



121 
106 

100 
100 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



19,323.2 
16,958.4 
16,025.2 
16,098.7 
14,294.0 
9,527.3 



The totals at the U.S. 
sed on industry rather 



Note: See appendix A for an explanation of terms, 
and State level were derived from separate tabulations 
than State detail. The sum of the State detail does not add to the U.S. total 
because of (l) independent rounding, and (2) independent corrections to the 
industry and State tabulation. 

Standard Notes: - Represents zero. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing 
figures for individual companies. ( NA ) Not available. Revised. 
(X) Not applicable. (Z) Less than $50 thousand or under 50 employees. 

J The 1958 and subsequent years' figures include establishments classified 
in industry 3273, Ready Mixed Concrete, and establishments classified in indus- 
try 3599, Miscellaneous Machinery, that were engaged exclusively or almost 
exclusively in machine shop repair work. The data for such establishments are 
excluded from the figures for the period 1939 to 1957, but are included for 
1929 and earlier years. The 1954 to 1967 figures include data for establish- 
ments engaged in the processing and distribution of fluid milk, industry group 
202, Dairies. These establishments were not included in the figures for earlier 
census years. In addition, beginning with 1954, the figures include data for 
Logging Camps and Contractors, industry 2411, which were not included within 
the scope of the 1947 census. There were also a number of changes in the defin- 
ition of manufacturing industries during earlier census years that affect the 
comparability of the historical series. Among the more important of these were 
the following: Figures for 1935 and later years exclude data for railroad 
repair shops and manufactured gas which were included in 1899 to 1933 figures: 
the minimum size of establishment included for 1947 to 1963 was 1 employee; for 
1921 to 1939, manufacturing establishments reporting value of shipments of 
$5,000 or more were within scope whereas for 1919 and earlier years the cutoff 
was $500. (These changes in procedure have not appreciably affected the compar- 
ability of the historical data except for the figures on number of establish- 
ments. ) 



a Employment and payroll totals for central administrative offices and 
auxiliaries are included in the statistics shown for the years 1954 to 1967. 
Prior to 1954, this information was not available. The "number of establish- 
ments with 20. or more employees" total for 1958 and all previous years and 
"total number of establishments" total for 1954 and previous years does not 
include data for central administrative offices and auxiliaries. 

3 For the years 1958 to 1967, includes expenditures for plants under con- 
struction but not in operation in addition to expenditures at operating manu- 
facturing establishments. Prior to 1958, the data represents expenditures at 
operating manufacturing establishment s only. 

4 This table includes data only for standard metropolitan statistical areas 
with 40,000 or more manufacturing employees in 1967 or 1963. The definitions 
of the standard metropolitan statistical areas are shown in appendix F. 

5 Comparable data for years prior to 1958 are not available due to a revi- 
sion in the definition of the standard metropolitan statistical area. See the 
1958 or 1954 Census of Manufactures Area Statistics, Volume III, for statistics 
for the area as defined at that time. 

6 Does not include data for Alaska and Hawaii. 

7 Data for 1954 employment and payroll exclude central administrative offices 
and auxiliary units. This information was not collected for Alaska and Hawaii 
in 1954. 

8 This SMSA changed definition in 1967. Historical data prior to that year 
is based on the old definition in this table. (See Volume III, 1963 Census of 
Manufactures for the prior definition.) 

9 The Greensboro-Winston-Salem-High Point SMSA changed definition in 1967. 
Historical data is revised to the current definition in this table. 



MAJOR GROUP 20 



Food and Kindred Products 

20A Meat products 

20B Dairy products 

20C Canned, cured, and frozen foods 

20D Grain mill products 

20E Bakery products 

20F Sugar and confectionery products 

20G Beverages 

20H Fats and oils 

20 I Miscellaneous foods and kindred products 

This major group includes establishments manu- 
facturing foods and beverages for human consumption; 
and certain related products, such as manufactured 
ice, chewing gum, vegetable and animal fats and oils, 
and prepared feeds for animals and fowls. Estab- 
lishments which are primarily engaged in processing 
and distributing fluid milk and cream and those which 
are primarily engaged in extracting animal and 
vegetable oils are also included. Establishments 
producing meat, poultry, dairy, bakery, and con- 
fectionery products for sale chiefly at retail on the 
manufacturing premises are classified in trade 
industries. 



20-1 



20-2 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



table l General Statistics: 1967 and Earlier Years 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Year and item 



Establishments 



Total 

(number) 



With 20 
employees 
or more 

(number) 



All employees' 



Total 



1,000 



Payroll 
(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Total 



1,000 



Man-hours 
(million 
dollars) 



Wages 
(million 
dollars) 



Value added by 
manufacture 2 



(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 3 

(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments' 

(million 
dollars) 



Capital 

expenditures, 

new 4 

(million 

dollars) 



ALL MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS, TOTAL: 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 s 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND AUXILIARY UNITS: 

1967 

1963 s 

1958 s 

1954 s 6 

OPERATING MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS 

1967 

1963 

1958 

1954 s 

OPERATING MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS: 

1966' 

1965 7 

1964 7 

1962' 

1961 ' 

I960 7 

1959 7 

1957 6 ' 

1956 s 7 

1955 s 7 

1953 7 

1952' 

1951 7 

1950 7 

1949 7 

1947 

19 39 

10 37 

1935 

1933 

1931 

1929 

1927 

1925 

1923 

1921. , .. ._ 



33 485 

38 587 

42 843 

(NA) 



967 

1 066 

873 

( NA ) 



32 5 18 
37 521 

41 970 

42 373 



(NAI 
(NA) 
(NA) 
( NA I 
( NA I 
(NA) 
( NA ) 
(NA I 
(NA I 
(NA I 

( NA ) 
36 829 
38 237 
38 466 

(NA I 

42 802 

43 667 
48 763 

48 982 
40 325 
48 729 
55 325 
48 947 
48 151 
51 173 
51 502 



13 934 

14 549 

15 242 
(NA) 



420 

436 

352 

(NA ) 



13 514 

14 113 
14 890 

13 648 



(NA ) 
I NA ) 
( NA I 
( NA I 
( NA ) 
( NA ) 
( NA) 
( NA) 
(NA) 
( NA ) 

( NA) 
(NA) 
( NA ) 
( NA I 
( NA I 
(NA J 
(NA I 
( NA I 

( NA I 
( NA I 
( NA ) 
( NA I 
( NA ) 
( NA I 
(NA ) 
(NA) 



1 726.7 

1 714.6 

1 781.5 

1 709.1 



77. 1 
71.5 
63.3 
62.5 



1 649.6 

1 643.1 

1 718. 1 

1 646.6 



1 642.7 

1 641.2 

1 646.2 

1 682.7 

1 701.6 

1 719. 3 

1 717.5 

1 687.6 

1 706.2 

1 674.3 

1 455.1 
1 479.6 
1 473.6 
1 493.0 
1 463.0 
1 461.4 
( NA I 
( NA I 

9 32.4 

767.7 
(NA ) 
871.9 
795.9 
792.8 
818. 1 
759.9 



10 849.3 

9 233.9 

8 064.4 

6 560.4 



772.5 
596.8 
442. 1 
360.3 



10 076.8 

8 637.2 

7 622.3 

6 200. 1 



9 542. 1 
9 161.7 
9 027.8 
8 592.5 
8 362.8 
8 210.4 
7 910. 1 
7 141.3 
6 963.9 
6 543.6 

5 266.5 
5 097.7 
4 819. 1 
4 415.0 
4 198.6 
3 832.8 
(NA ) 
I NA ) 

1 067.5 
776.8 
(NAI 
1 202.6 
1 104.3 
1 062.0 
1 083.6 
1 016.3 



1 121.7 

1 098. 1 

1 152.8 

1 137.7 



IX) 

( X ) 
(X) 
( XI 



1 121.7 

1 098.1 

1 152.8 

1 137.7 



1 098.0 

1 095.2 

1 095.4 

1 119.2 

1 138.2 

1 154.5 

1 154.6 

1 133.2 

1 166.9 

1 154. 1 

1 059.1 
1 075.1 
1 079.2 
1 074.8 
1 076.8 
1 111.5 
802. 1 
890.5 

800. 1 
668.9 
647.0 
740.9 
668.3 
667.4 
67 6. 1 
620.8 



2 259.4 
2 228.0 
2 309.6 
2 315.8 



(X ) 
I X ) 
( X I 
( X) 



2 259.4 
2 228.0 
2 309.6 
2 315.8 



239.5 
233.4 
269.7 
287.2 
317.3 
347.7 
345.4 
304.0 
378.4 
343.5 

160.3 
215.8 
217.9 
217.6 
221.9 
368.2 
( NA ) 
(NA ) 

( NA I 

I NA I 

I NA I 

(NA I 

( NA I 

( NA I 

(NA I 
(NA) 



6 062.6 
5 159.4 
4 548.9 
3 758.0 



IX) 
( X) 
( X I 
(XI 



6 062.6 
5 159.4 
4 5 48.9 
3 758.0 



5 675.9 
5 445.5 
5 367.0 
5 059.7 
4 933.7 
4 856.9 
4 702. 1 
4 243.8 
4 201.5 
3 940.2 

3 435.5 
3 312.5 
3 142.9 
2 857.6 
2 706.9 
2 616.5 
888.4 
981.4 



26 620.9 
21 825.5 
17 700.9 
13 767.0 



(X) 
(X I 



26 620.9 
21 825.5 
17 700.9 
13 767.0 



24 895.9 
23 537.5 

25 053.2 
20 870.4 
20 123.9 
19 753.2 
18 646.2 
16 347.0 
15 939.2 
14 790. 1 

11 937.5 
11 340.1 
10 578.8 
10 104.3 
9 426.0 
9 116.0 
3 484.7 
3 370.8 



804.2 
624.2 
740.2 
895.7 
817.2 
798.9 
791.7 
742.4 



804.2 
412.9 
745.4 
339.8 
840. 
718.2 
505 .6 
119.6 



57 540.6 

46 784.4 

I NA I 

(NA ) 



( X) 

( X I 

( XI 

( X I 



57 540.6 
46 784.4 

(NA! 

(NA) 



55 071.5 

50 805.5 

48 675.0 

46 037. 1 

44 469.4 

I NAI 

( NA I 

(NA I 

(NA I 

( NA I 

( NA I 

( NA I 

(NA I 

( NA I 

( NA I 

I NA I 

( NA I 

( NA I 

(NA) 
( NA I 
I NA I 
( NA I 
( NA I 
( NA I 
I NA I 
(NA) 



83 975.2 

68 466.5 

59 785.3 

(NA I 



(X) 
(XI 
( X I 
(X I 



83 .975.2 

68 466.5 

59 785.3 

(NA) 



79 750.9 

74 248.4 

71 597.5 

66 906.0 

64 590.8 

(NA I 

I NA ) 

(NA I 

I NA) 

(NA I 

(NA I 

( NA I 

( NA I 

( NA I 

( NA I 

(NA I 

( NA I 

I NA I 

I NA I 
( NA ) 
(NA ) 
( NA I 
( NA ) 
( NA I 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1 730. 1 

1 249.2 

1 021.2 

787. 6, 



(XI 

(XI 
(X) 



1 730.1 

1 249.2 

1 021.2 

787.6 



1 692.0 

1 475.5 

1 412.9 

1 234.5 

1 044. 1 

1 034. 1 

1 078.1 

922.6 

886.9 

797.7 

544.7 
526.7 
687.3 
649.4 
723.4 
820.8 
(NA I 
( NA I 

( NAI 
( NA I 
I NA I 
(NA I 
I NAI 
( NA ) 
(NA) , 



(NA)/ 



Standard Notes: Reoresents zero. (n^ Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for 
individual companies. (NA) Not available. (X) Not applicable. 

'The "All employees" figures for 1939 through 1967 include data for employees of man- 
ufacturing establishments who were engaged in distribution and construction work. The 
extent to which data for such employees are included in the figures for earlier years is 
not known. "Production workers" includes driver-salesmen in the bakery products indus- 
try (SIC 205ll for 1939 and prior years, but not for 1947 to 1967. The number of driver- 
salesmen for 1939 was at least 120,000. 

2 For the period 1954 to 1967, figures represent adjusted value added by manufacture 
and for earlier years, unadjusted value added. Adjusted value added is equal to value 
of shipments (including resales of finished products) less cost of finished products, 
materials, supplies, fuel, electric energy, and contract work, plus the net change in 
the value of finished products and work-in-process inventories between the beginning and 
end of the year, without adjustment for price changes. Unadjusted value added is equal 
to value of products f excluding resales of finished products^ less cost of materials, 
supplies, fuel, electric energy and contract work; no adjustment is made for changes in 
inventories of finished products and work-in-process during the year. For 1921 to 1933, 
cost of contract work was not subtracted from value of products in calculating value 
added by manufacture. See Introduction, "Value added by Manufacture." 



arising from 
or a more complet 
lude expenditures 



J The total value of shipments 
digit) include extensive duplica 
the same industry classification 

"The figures for 1958 to 1967 
not yet in operation. 

s The figures for 1954 to 1967, include data for mi 
were not covered in prior years. Value added for thi 
in 1954. 

6 In addition to data for operating establishments, 
for manufacturing centeal administrative offices and 
years 1949 to 1953 in the annual survey of manufactur 
are not available for the years 1955-to 1957, 1959, t 

7 These figures represent estimates derived from a 
turing establishments canvassed in the annual survey 
consequently, may differ from the results that would 
canvass of all manufacturing establishments. The sta 
estimates are published in the annual survey of manuf 



s for industry groups (2- and 3- 
pments between establishments in 

explanation, see Introduction. 

or plants under construction and 



Ik bottling plants (SIC 2026), which 
s industry was $1,475,638 thousand 

figures for employment and payroll 
auxiliary units are shown for the 
es volumes. Data for these units 
o 1962, and prior to 1949. 
representative sample of manufac- 
of manufactures. These estimates, 
have been obtained from a complete 
ndard errors associated with these 
actures volumes for this period. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



20-3 



table 2 General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963 

(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Industry and 



Establishments 



Total 

(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost ol 
materials' 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 1 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 

employees 

(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS. • 

NORTHEAST REGION .... 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION . . . 

MAINE. ...... 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

VERMONT 

MASSACHUSETTS 

RHODE ISLAND 

CONNECTICUT 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

OHIO 

INDIANA. ., 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . 

DELAWARE 

MARYLAND 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA .... 

VIRGINIA 

WEST VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA 

MISSISSIPPI 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

MONTANA. ... 

IDAHO 

WYOMING 

COLORADO ..... 

NEW MEXICO 

ARIZONA 

UTAH 

NEVADA 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA 

ALASKA 

HAWAII 

MEAT PRODUCTS 

NORTHEAST REGION .... 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION . . . 

MAINE 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

RHODE ISLAND 

CONNECTICUT 

MIDOLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 



32 51{ 



2 008 
290 
127 
111 
932 
192 
356 

5 668 
2 500 

918 

2 220 

10 117 

6 160 
1 155 

751 
1 631 
1 073 
1 550 

3 687 

917 
770 
765 
151 
152 
152 
150 

9 111 

1 085 
93 
507 
16 
567 
210 
793 
310 
762 
797 

1 906 
131 
618 
175 
379 

3 123 
392 
612 
399 

1 720 

5 581 

1 178 
170 
215 

70 
103 
139 
201 
233 

17 

1 103 
598 
111 

2 722 
122 
217 



1 911 



172 
17 
12 
87 
17 
31 

729 
288 
111 
327 



13 511 



696 

119 
39 
37 

336 
19 

116 

2 225 
931 
123 

871 

1 111 

2 665 

609 
353 
769 
118 
186 

1 119 
352 
303 
315 

16 

57 

178 

168 

1 171 

1 918 

56 

289 

23 

302 

88 

317 

121 

327 

362 

882 
205 
291 
209 
171 

1 371 
189 

301 

151 
721 



518 
18 
89 
17 

151 
11 
69 
85 
15 

1 790 
268 
182 

1 200 

61 
79 



2 029 



302 

111 

55 

136 



1 619.6 



351.3 

72.6 

11.6 
2.9 
2.2 

37.7 
5.3 

12.8 

281/7 

112.6 

60.6 

108.5 

552.0 

319.7 
78.5 
12.7 

120.1 
51.6 
56.7 

202.3 
18.8 
19.2 
18.5 
3.2 
7.8 
26.0 
18.8 

161.9 

221 .Ji 

8.7 

35.1 

1.1 

31.5 

6.8 

36.2 

11. 5 

15.7 

11.5 

93.5 
23.0 

32.1 
23.6 
11.6 

113.6 
21.5 
29.6 
13.8 
78.7 

281.3 

51.3 
3.7 

12.2 
1.3 

18.7 
3.5 
6.1 
7.6 
1.0 

227.0 
28.1 
20.9 

159.8 
3.8 
11.2 



7.5 
1.7 
CC 
1.3 
.2 
.8 

30.3 
10.7 
1.9 

11.6 



121.9 
55.1 
16.7 
12.8 

227.0 
33.7 
79.7 

1 815.5 
711.5 
121.6 
619.1 

3 663.3 

2 313.5 
196.8 
271,8 
837.5 
312.5 
361.9 

1 319.7 
315.9 
353.9 
318.1 
17.7 
51.9 
170.2 
122.2 

I 2 ~~5SSQ~.2. 

1 130.9 

10.5 
192.7 

31.0 
156.5 

37.1 
173.2 

53. 1 
221.6 
221.9 

507.6 
H6.3 
178.9 
111.5 
67.9 

711.7 
92.1 

151.6 

77.3 

117.8 

1 793.1 

311.6 

23.1 

59.3 

6,6 

118.1 

18.7 

36.5 

12.0 

7.5 

1 181.5 
181.2 
119.6 

1 081,1 
21.7 
71.5 



250.6 

17.5 
7.8 
(D) 

31.2 
1.0 
1.0 

203.1 
77,6 
31.6 
90.9 



189 
75 
12 
71 

379 

235 
16 
29 
83 
35 
11 

113 
35 
35 
33 
2 
5 
19 
12 



150 

7 
21 

2 
21 

3 
22 

7 
32 
30 

59 
15 
20 

11 



163 
21 



112 
3 
11 



2 259.1 



6 
13 

381 

152 

81 

111 

(777 

183 
95 
60 

173 

70 
83 

293 
72 
73 
65 
1 
11 
10 
26 

625 

302 
13 
15 

1 
11 

7 
11 
13 
65 
63 

121 
31 
13 
29 
20 

198 
31 

11 

17 

105 



310 
10 
29 

211 

5 

21 



228 

35 

7 

7 

123 

16 

37 

078 
135 
261 
378 



10 5 
269 
166 
527 
205 
237 

897 

213 

210 

201 

10 

35 

120 

75 



628 
26 

109 
11 
88 
16 
83 
26 

132 

133 

278 
86 
97 
56 
38 

126 
61 

91 

10 

231 



18 

21 

2 

929 

119 

78 

666 

16 

17 



31 
5 
(D) 

1 

7 

6 



111 
51 
23 
63 



26 620.9 



1 033.0 
121.5 
38.1 
39.9 
561.1 
69.2 
196.9 

1 _ 817.7 
1 957.2 
1 256.5 
1 631.1 

9 618.5 



1 613.1 21 825.5 



113.5 
306.7 
757.9 
512.6 
926.0 
910.3 

205.0 
751.3 
816.8 
799.8 
39.9 
95.0 
121.1 
277.7 



931.1 
156.5 
525.6 

60.6 
392.7 

87.9 
103.3 
120.0 
556.0 
631.6 

389.0 
513.3 
157.6 
261.6 
156.6 

066.5 
262.8 
155.0 
176.1 
172.3 



761.0 
55.2 

113.1 
11.1 

310.7 
10.5 
82.1 

102.9 
11.8 

3 968.3 
111.3 
299.5 

2 9B6.1 

52.6 

185.1 



9 698.1 

1 779.2 
223.2 

79.1 
130.1 
961.7 

89.9 
292.2 

7 919.2 
3 207.6 

1 919.7 

2 761.9 

23 911.3 

12_H3.2| 
2 506.5 
1 500.1 
1 183.2 

1 185.2 

2 138.2 

11 528.1 

2 550.5 

3 152.1 

2 085.1 
150.8 
130.8 

1 717.2 
1 111.1 

11 281.2 

6 059.0 
250.5 
925.7 

85.7 
881.1 
129.6 
906.7 
256.1 
1 360.9 
1 262.6 

3 219.1 
713.1 

1 311.1 
651.1 
507.8 

5 005.8 
813.5 

1 025.2 
131.2 

2 702.8 

9 616.5 

1 960.9 
111.2 
316.1 

37.0 
861.5 
119.1 
191.3 
263.1 

25.6 

7 655.6 
897.1 
529.5 

5 906.3 

69.0 

253.8 



2 808.0 
317.3 
116.7 
169.7 

1 527.7 
158.5 
188.0 

12 730.9 
5 155.1 

3 192.8 

1 382.9 

33 185.1 

18 787.5 
3 807.0 

2 219.8 
_6 987.6 

2 101.3 

3 338.8 



11 697.8 
3 297.8 

1 257.9 

2 882.8 
189.8 
521.2 

2 166.2 
1 379.2 

20 628.3 

8 973.8 

106.2 
1 115.5 

115.6 
1 272.9 

216.8 
1 308.5 

377.6 
1 912.8 
1 887.9 

1 609.1 

1 257.1 

1 769.2 

918.2 

661.3 

7 015.4 
1 096.2 

1 170.8 
609.0 

3 869.3 

14 '322.6 

2 725.2 
198.1 
160.9 

52.0 

1 172.0 

159.7 

275.7 

365.9 

10.5 

11 597.1 

1 312.3 

826.0 

8 868.1 
121.6 
139.0 



3 551.0 18 003.7 21 520.1 



187.5 

91.0 
12.3 
(D) 

60.9 
1.7 
9.4 

396.5 
151.1 
70.2 
172.3 



331.1 

55.8 

(D) 

211.1 

6.2 

22.0 

1 560.1 
171.9 
321.7 
766,8 



121.5 

68.0 

(0) 

275.0 

7.9 

31.5 



1 953.2 
621.8 
391.1 
937.0 



1.7 

3.0 

25.2 



292.7 

91.8 

100.1 



625.6 

137.3 
98.3 
59.7 

167.8 
52.1 
59.5 

188.3 
13.7 
17.1 
11.5 
2.1 
3.3 
27.1 
22.9 

155.1 

205.3 

8.2 
30.9 

1.6 
21.1 

5.3 
31.6 

9.6 
13.9 
16.8 

88.1 
32.7 
28.5 
13.5 
13.7 

161.1 
18.1 
35.2 
11.6 
93.2 

305.8 

66.1 
5.0 

11.8 



239.7 
30.7 
20.2 

166.8 

1.2 

17.8 



3.2 

1.1 
(0) 
1.5 
<Z> 



1.3 
8.8 



75.8 

11.7 
2.9 
2.7 

11.0 
6.0 

11.1 

297.1 

128.8 

61.1 

107.5 

555.0 

318.9 
76.3 
45.4 

116.1 
52.5 
58.7 

206.0 
48.6 
50.4 
48.2 
3.1 
7.9 
26.7 
21.2 

441.3 



211.4 

6.1 

35.9 

4.5 

32.0 

7.3 

32.9 

11.0 

41.9 

39.6 

92.8 
23.8 
31.9 
22.4 
14.6 

137.0 
17.9 
29.6 



53.0 
4.0 
9. 1 
1.5 

18.6 
3.6 
6.6 
8.5 
1.0 

220.5 
26.7 
19,9 

155.7 
2.9 
15.2 



1.3 

.2 

1.3 

31.0 
12.3 

5.3 
13.3 



910.8 

109.2 
31.5 
35.0 

505.0 
61.2 

168.9 

1 236.7 
1 846.1 
1 031.6 
1 355.7 

7 795.6 

5 237.5 

1 051.9 
612.9 

2 059.0 
729.2 
751.5 

2 558.1 
587.5 
653.1 
629.9 
36.7 
91.9 
316.6 
239.2 



291.1 

51.6 
119.8 

55.7 
326.5 

71.7 
322.9 

98.2 
112.0 
199.7 

127.9 
111.2 
319.3 
203.1 
130.9 

601.5 
155.9 
367.9 
118.2 
929.5 



618.1 
17.5 

108.2 
17.1 

252.3 
31.5 
78.2 
99.1 
11.5 

3 215.5 
361.0 
231.7 

2 113.0 

39.8 

167.0 



2 882.6 



106.3 

83.3 
12.8 

1.1 
51.0 

1.8 
12.7 

322.9 
131.8 
61.1 
127.1 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20-4 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



table 2 General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



Code 



Industry and geographic area' 



MEAT PRODUCTS — CONTINUED 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . 

DELAWARE 

MARYLAND 

VIRGINIA 

WEST VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA. 

MISSISSIPPI 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

MONTANA 

IDAHO 

WYOMING 

COLORADO 

NEW MEXICO 

ARIZONA 

UTAH 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON .... 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA 

HAWAII 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 

NORTHEAST REGION .... 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION . . . 

MAINE 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

VERMONT. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

RHODE ISLAND 

CONNECTICUT 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA . 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

MINNESOTA 

IOAA 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 

3 footnotes at end of table. 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



1967 



Establishments 



Total 

(number) 



1 633 

1 048 
284 
143 
261 
215 
145 

585 
93 

114 

143 
19 
26 

101 
89 



679 
16 
68 
75 
39 

171 
58 

164 
86 

362 
94 

103 
93 
72 

582 
81 
92 
87 

322 

757 

260 
30 

40 
14 
73 
21 
28 
45 

497 
84 
81 

313 
16 



525 
59 
46 
52 

217 
49 

102 

1 099 
518 
127 

454 

2 807 

1 745 
282 
129 
240 
235 
859 

1 062 

422 

246 

114 

73 

52 

68 

87 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



680 

395 

107 

48 

105 

78 
57 

285 
55 
61 
59 
7 
12 
56 
35 

667 

296 
9 
35 
38 
9 
66 
26 
66 
47 

140 
24 
38 
46 
32 

231 
42 
27 
33 

129 

319 

85 
8 

14 
3 

26 
7 
8 

18 

234 
37 
19 

168 
9 



175 
16 
13 
18 
76 
18 
34 

454 

194 

65 

195 

945 

613 
138 
69 
125 
102 
179 

332 
103 
73 
64 
14 
19 
30 
29 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



134.1 

52.8 

13.0 

7.5 

16.3 

6.1 

9.9 

81.3 
19.3 

25.3 

11.1 

.5 

5.0 
13.1 

7.1 

104.2 

50.1 

2.4 
7.6 
7.4 
CC 
9.7 
3.8 
13.6 
4.9 

23.2 
3.1 
6.5 

7.6 
6.0 

31.0 
8.5 
3.1 
3.1 

16.2 

34.0 

9.7 
.8 

1.0 
.2 

4.4 



1.5 

24.3 
4.0 
1.8 

18.0 
BB 



14.3 
1.3 
.9 
1.0 
6.5 
1.2 
3.4 

39.8 

16.3 

4.7 

18.8 

86.9 

58.4 
17.9 

5.9 
10.1 

8.2 
16.3 

28.5 
8.5 
5.6 
7.2 
1.0 
1.3 
2.5 
2.4 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



972.8 

380.4 
90.2 
50.5 

122.5 

42.8 
74.4 

592.4 
135.9 
196.1 
73.8 
3.0 
36.3 
93.7 
53.6 

490.1 

223.8 
9.2 
38.7 
37.8 
(Dl 
37.5 
16.4 
57.5 
22.8 

119.0 
20.9 
39.8 
32.0 
26.3 

147.3 
31.0 
13.1 

18.7 
84.6 

240.0 

64.6 

5.7 

5.9 

.9 

31.7 
4.6 
5.7 
9.6 

175.4 
27.7 
U.2 

134.7 
(D) 



348.4 

88.8 
7.2 
4.6 
5.6 

39.8 
7.4 

24.2 

259.6 
108.8 
32.5 
118.3 

534.0 

364.1 
104.8 
38.4 
70.6 
55.6 
94.6 

169.9 
51.6 
34.0 
44.7 
5.2 
6.5 
14.1 
13.8 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



.7 
3.0 

.5 
1.3 



18.5 



2.3 

7.4 



29.9 
6.4 
2.7 
5.0 
4.0 

11.8 



16.0 
5.4 
3.1 
3.9 
.6 
.7 
1.1 
1.1 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



217.7 

85.3 
20.7 
12.2 
27.0 

9 
15.9 

132.3 
29.7 
42.3 
18.1 
.9 
7.7 
22.5 
U.2 



4.5 
11.4 
13.4 

(D) 
16.1 

6.0 
24.2 

8.1 



40.9 
5.1 
10.8 
14.3 
10.6 

52.2 

15.9 

4.9 

5.2 

26.2 

52.8 

15.6 

1.2 

1.5 

.3 

7.4 
1.4 
1.3 
2.4 

37.1 
6.2 
2.7 

27.7 

(D) 



12.7 
1.2 

.8 
1.4 
5.9 

.9 
2.5 

38.1 
18.2 
4.8 
15.2 

95.0 

61.4 
13.3 

5.5 
10.2 

8.5 
23.9 

33.6 
11.6 
6.8 
7.8 
1.3 
1.6 
2.3 
2.3 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



731.0 



272 i 
63. 
35 , 
88, 

28, 
56, 



459.0 
104.8 
155.2 
54.8 
2.4 
28.2 
74.7 
39.0 

362.0 

165.0 
7.9 
27.7 
27.7 
(D) 
27.9 
11.6 
43.9 
15.8 

87.0 

14.7 
27.4 
25.8 
19.1 

110.0 

26.9 

9.0 



.7 
24.5 



6.9 

121.9 

20.9 

8.4 

91.4 

(D) 



34.0 
2.8 
1.9 
3.3 

16.6 

2.4 
7.0 

109.2 
54.4 
14.0 
40.8 

255.7 

171.4 
36.6 
14.5 
33.7 
25.2 
61.3 

84.3 

29.0 

16.5 

21.3 

3.0 

3.3 

5.7 

5.5 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 1 



(million 
dollars) 



642.8 
154.9 

92.7 
204.3 

82.1 
108.8 

1 005.9 

222.3 

338.8 

126.9 

3.1 

48.6 

178.9 

87.2 

948.2 

426.0 
17.3 
69.3 
74.9 
(D) 
73.8 
36.3 
97.0 
50.0 

217.6 
37.7 
72.3 
61.3 
46.3 

304.5 
60.4 
30.6 
38.3 

175.3 

466.5 

134.5 

12.8 

13.8 

2.3 

68.4 

8.7 

8.7 

18.6 

332.0 
48.9 
20.1 

258.7 
(D) 



809.8 

236.7 
15.3 
11.8 
15.0 

124.2 
19.7 
50.7 

573.1 

251.1 

75.1 

246.9 



952.5 
238.0 
114.4 
189.1 
144.5 
266.4 

405.1 
115.2 
104.7 
88.1 
11.6 
23.8 
31.1 
30.7 



9 404.2 

3 063.9 
697.5 
378.0 
996.7 
398.4 
593.3 

6 340.3 

1 094.2 

2 279.8 
721.1 

52.4 

324.7 

1 292.2 

576.0 



708.5 

60.6 

244.5 

320.7 

ID) 

316.5 

87.0 

431.7 

216.9 

986.2 
144.2 
358.1 
262.0 
222.0 

309.4 
246.0 
100.4 
148.8 
814.3 



904.7 

62.2 

73.1 

7.5 

523.5 
67.0 
64.0 

101.7 

799.1 
244.3 
104.2 
436.4 
ID) 



492.5 
33.7 
19.6 
60.5 

212.0 
29.7 

137.0 

1 383.2 
694.6 
180.2 
508.5 

4 416.8 

2 755.0 
532.8 
222.3 
446.7 
366.5 

1 186,6 

1 661.8 

671.4 

316.6 

368.7 

48.5 

67.2 

96.6 

92.8 



Value of 
shipments 5 

(million 
dollars) 



U 025.8 

3 706.8 
852.0 
470.6 

1 203.5 
479.9 
700.9 

7 319.0 

1 313.4 

2 605.4 
847.3 

55.1 

371.8 

1 470.6 

655.3 



2 130.0 

78.0 
312.0 
395.3 
(D) 
389.1 
123.9 
526.9 
266.8 

1 206.1 
183.0 
429.7 
325.1 
268.4 

1 607.9 
305.0 
130.3 
186.5 
986.2 

3 175.4 

1 041.3 

75.0 

86.9 

9.8 

592.9 
76.0 
72.6 

121.2 

2 134.2 
294.0 
123.7 

1 698.1 
ID) 



727.6 
48.8 
31.3 
75.4 

335.7 
49.1 

187.3 

1 950.4 
943.6 
254.5 
752.3 

5 760.5 

3 692.0 
768.9 
330.3 
636.7 
510.0 

1 446.2 

2 068.5 
787.4 
421.6 
458.1 

59.8 
90.7 
127.7 
123.2 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



83.5 

42.7 
12.8 
4.8 
17.3 
3.5 
4.4 

40.7 
6.7 
11.8 

5.1 

.2 

.8 

11.0 

5.2 

69.3 

36.2 
1.3 
2.3 

5.0 
ID) 
5.8 
3.9 
14.0 
3.5 



14 



5 
6.1 
3.6 
2.2 
2.6 

18.6 
4.8 
1.6 
5.2 
7.0 



10.5 
.9 



5.8 
.6 



12.8 
2.0 

.8 
9.7 
ID) 



.9 
3.9 

.7 

1.4 

33.8 
15.5 
3.4 
14.9 

86.9 

59.0 
17.4 

4.3 
11.5 

8.6 
17.3 

27.9 

9.1 
4.7 
7.6 
.9 
.9 
2.5 
2.2 



1963 



All 
employees 

(1,000) 



138.6 

56.5 
12.2 
10.1 
18.4 
6.2 
9.6 

82.1 

18.4 
25.7 

11.1 
.4 

4.9 
12.6 

9.0 

89.8 



40 



11 



21.9 
3.3 

6.4 
6.9 
5.3 

27.3 
(D) 
(Dl 
ID'J 

15.6 

32.0 



{ DJ 
1.0 
(D; 



1.8 

22.0 
3.6 

1.9 
16.1 

(D) 



63.4 

15.7 
1.4 
1.0 
1.2 
7.3 
1.4 
3.5 

47.7 

19.8 

6.5 

21.4 

94.7 

64.2 

18.6 

6.8 

11.6 

9.6 

17.7 

30.5 
9.1 
5.9 
7.0 
1.1 
1.4 
2.7 
3.3 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



20-5 



table 2 General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Industry and geographic area* 



1967 



Total 
(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials' 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments' 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 
employees 



(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 

: 1 lis 



DAIRY PRODUCTS — CONTINUED 



SOUTH REGION . 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . . 

DELAWARE 

MARYLAND 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

VIRGINIA 

WEST VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION, 

KENTUCKY , 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA 

MISSISSIPPI 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION, 

ARKANSAS , 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA , 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

MONTANA 

IDAHO 

WYOMING , 

COLORADO i 

NEW MEXICO i 

ARIZONA , 

UTAH , 

NEVADA , 

PACIFIC DIVISION i 

WASHINGTON 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA , 

ALASKA , 

HAWAII , 



CANNED. CUREDt AND FROZEN FOODS. 



NORTHEAST REGION 



NEW ENGLAND DIVISION 

MAINE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

RHODE ISLAND 

CONNECTICUT 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 



NORTH CENTRAL REGION 



EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 



WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 



SOUTH REGION 



SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. 

DELAWARE 

MARYLAND 

VIRGINIA 

WEST VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 



EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA 

MISSISSIPPI 

See footnotes at end of table. 



957 

399 

14 
51 
7 
64 
38 
5<4 
33 
61 
77 

270 

75 
90 
54 
51 

288 
44 
61 



800 

273 

46 
54 
15 
62 
16 
27 
43 
10 

527 

84 

70 

356 

4 

13 



7 58 

222 

80 

107 

11 

18 

536 
289 
117 
130 

7 46 

608 
122 
72 
143 
142 
129 

138 
48 
28 
35 
3 
11 
11 

977 

640 
24 

154 

140 
11 
70 
25 
57 

156 

71 
8 
30 
16 
17 



588 

252 

6 

36 

6 

47 
22 
42 
18 
30 
45 

175 
52 
62 
29 
32 

161 
21 
33 
23 
84 



104 
13 
25 

7 
25 

7 
10 
12 

5 

240 
39 
28 

166 

2 
5 



110 
52 



269 
135 

57 
77 

407 

342 

54 
44 
70 
77 
97 

65 
32 

9 
15 
3 
3 

3 

514 

329 

23 
87 
60 

4 
27 

7 
31 
89 

41 
5 
15 
11 
10 



56.9 

27.1 
.4 
4.0 
1.9 
4.2 
1.4 
4.6 
1.6 
3.5 
5.5 

13.6 
3.6 
4.4 
3.9 

1.8 

16.2 

1.4 
2.9 
2.6 
9.3 

33.8 

9.5 
.9 

1.7 
.3 

2.5 
.7 

1.2 

1.6 



24.3 
3.7 
2.3 

17.6 

AA 
CC 



10.0 

5.3 

4.1 

.2 

.3 

38.1 
15.9 
10.4 
11.9 

53.0 

41.6 
7.8 
5.6 

11.0 
8.0 
9.2 

11.3 
5.3 
1.0 
3.1 

AA 
EE 
BB 

67.7 

43.6 
3.2 

7.7 

6.1 

.7 

2.7 

CC 

5.9 

16.8 

5.5 

.7 

2.9 

1.2 

.7 



330.3 

158.6 

2.1 

26.4 

14.4 

23.1 

8.4 

24.2 

8.3 

20.0 

31.6 

78.4 
21.2 
25.2 
22.3 
9.7 

93.3 
7.2 
17.6 
14.8 
53.7 

236.6 

52.2 
5.3 

9.2 

1.6 

12.0 

4.2 
7.4 
9.0 
3.4 

184.3 
28.5 
15.9 

134.8 
(Dl 
ID! 



243.6 

' 45.6 

21.1 

21.9 

.7 

1.3 

198.0 
79.5 
60.4 
58.1 

261.2 

210.9 
43.3 
26.8 
64.1 
35.4 
41.2 

50.2 
24.0 
4.7 
13.1 
IDI 
ID) 
(D) 

251.0 

163.2 

10.3 

23.8 

22.0 

2.9 

9.4 

ID) 

20.4 

72.4 

20.3 
3.5 
9.9 
4.8 
2.1 



9.9 

.2 
1.4 

.5 
1.6 

.5 
1.7 

.7 
1.5 



5.8 
1.7 
2.1 
1.1 



6.1 

.6 
1.1 
1.0 

3.4 

14.6 

4.3 
.4 

1.1 
.2 
.9 
.3 
.5 
.8 



10.3 
1.7 
1.0 
7.4 
ID) 
(D) 



41.4 

8.7 

4.8 

3.4 

.1 

.3 

32.8 

13.8 

8.7 

10.2 

45.4 

35.4 
6.3 
5.0 
8.9 
7.0 
8.3 

10.0 
4.7 
.8 
2.8 
ID) 
ID) 
ID) 

59.6 

3B.7 
3.0 
6.8 
5.5 
.6 
2.3 
ID) 
5.2 

14.7 

4.7 

.5 

2.6 

1.0 

.6 



2.9 

1.1 
3.3 

1.2 

3.8 
1.4 
3.4 
4.2 

12.1 
3.5 
4.5 
2.4 

1.7 

13.7 
1.3 
2.5 

2.1 
7.8 

28.9 



2.1 
.3 

1.5 



1.5 
.3 

20.6 

3.4 
1.9 
14.9 
ID) 
ID) 



82.6 

16.6 

9.0 

6.7 

.3 

.5 

66.0 
28.9 
17.3 
19.9 



72.8 
13.3 

10.2 
18.6 
13.5 
17.1 

20.1 
9.5 
1.8 
5.7 
ID) 
ID) 
ID) 

110.1 

70.7 
5.1 

10.8 
9.6 
1.2 
4.1 
ID) 
8.9 

30.2 

8.6 
.9 
4.7 
2.0 
1.0 



109.9 

51.2 
1.1 
7.8 
3.2 
7.8 
2.8 
7.6 
3.2 
7.9 

10.0 

27.9 
8.2 

10.4 
5.3 
3.9 

30.8 
3.1 
5.6 
5.1 

17.0 



21.0 
1.9 
5.6 

.6 
4.1 
1.4 
2.9 
3.5 

.9 

74.7 

12.4 

6.6 

54.0 

ID) 

ID) 



186.0 

34.1 

17.3 

15.0 

.6 

.9 

151.8 
61.8 
45.5 

44.5 



92.9 195.1 



156.3 
30.4 
20.3 
45.2 
26.9 
33.5 

38.8 
17.4 
3.7 
11.2 
ID) 
ID) 
(D) 

191.8 

126.1 

8.3 

18.2 

16.8 

2.2 

6.8 

(D) 

15.7 

56.6 

14.6 
1.9 
7.8 
3.3 
1.6 



775.4 

372.1 
3.9 
61.0 
26.6 
45.7 
20.2 
63.6 
24.3 
38.3 
88.6 

180.7 
50.6 
57.9 
45.2 
27.1 

222.6 
16.8 
42.5 
36.0 

127.3 

523.6 

119.1 
10.7 
18.9 

3.1 
28.6 
10.4 
16.1 
24.9 

6.4 



404.5 

58.8 

40.3 

294.8 

ID) 

(D) 



818.2 

122.9 

51.3 

60.0 

1.2 

9.2 

695.3 
295.7 
158.9 
240.6 

853.2 

681.9 
180.6 
61.0 
196.5 
131.5 
112.3 

171.3 

89.0 

16.8 

43.9 

ID) 

ID) 

ID) 

669.2 

423.8 
27.1 
58.6 
54.2 
9.9 
28.3 
ID) 
43.1 
197.0 

50.2 
10.4 
23.1 
12.2 

4.5 



801.8 

9.9 

132.5 

45.1 
113.0 

38.3 
131.3 

53.4 
125.1 
153.0 

433.7 
137.7 
158.4 
77.6 
60.0 

497.6 
52.6 
83.2 
73.6 

288.2 



321.8 
23.0 
87.4 
9.1 
65.9 
21.5 
44.7 
56.0 
14.3 

025.6 

149.6 

79.0 

773.0 

ID) 

ID) 



183.4 
61.8 

111.7 
2.0 
5.2 

913.6 
399.8 

244.3 
269.4 



992.5 
242.5 
119.0 
306.2 
174.9 
150.1 

284.2 

97,2 

23.7 

127.1 

ID) 

(D) 

ID) 



829.9 

34.3 

94.2 

91.8 

13.7 

36.1 

ID) 

102.7 

447.1 

97.5 
10.9 
47.8 
29.3 
9.5 



172.2 

13.8 
193.8 

71.2 
159.6 

58.3 
194.6 

77.4 
162.3 
241.1 

615.3 
189.5 
216.8 
122.2 
86.8 

719.1 
69.0 
125.1 
109.6 
415.3 



441.7 
33.6 

107.6 
12.3 
94.2 
31.8 
60.7 
80.9 
20.7 

1 428.4 
208.7 
116.8 

1 068.3 

ID) 
ID) 



1 914.5 

306.4 

113.1 

171.8 

3.3 

14.4 

1 608.1 
696.1 
403.0 
508.9 



671.4 
422.0 
179.8 
502.9 
304.3 
262.3 

455.5 

186.1 

40.4 

171.1 

ID) 

ID) 

ID) 



251.8 

61.4 

152.4 

146.0 

23.6 

64.1 

ID) 

144.8 

644.0 

147.3 
20.8 
70.9 
41.6 
14.0 



20.2 
.2 
2.7 
.4 
2.4 
1.5 
4.0 
1.2 
2.9 
4.9 

10.0 
2.1 
3.7 
1.6 
2.6 

12.4 

.9 

1.3 

4.5 

5.6 



6.9 
.7 

1.1 
.4 

1.9 
.7 

1.2 



15.2 
1.6 
1.6 

10.9 

ID) 
ID) 



5.2 
3.3 

1.7 

ID) 

.2 

39.0 

20.7 

7.2 

11.0 

71.2 

57.1 
17.1 

9.4 
10.8 

9.2 
10.6 

14.1 
10.1 
.6 
2.2 
ID) 
ID) 
ID) 

48.3 

32.7 
3.7 
5.5 
2.6 
.5 
1.8 
ID) 
2.9 

15.5 

5.3 
.2 

4.2 
.5 
.5 



1.8 
4.4 
1.9 
4.9 
1.9 
4.2 
5.6 



15.0 
3.9 
5.0 
3.9 
2.2 

17.1 
ID) 
(0) 
2.9 

10.0 

36.8 

10.4 
1.0 
1.7 
ID) 
2.5 
ID) 
1.8 
1.9 
.5 

26.4 
3.9 
2.5 

19.1 

ID) 
ID) 



46.0 

10.4 

5.2 

4.5 

ID) 

.3 

35.6 

15.4 
10.2 



50.3 

38.8 
6.4 
6.2 

10.4 

7.4 
8.4 

11.5 
5.3 
1.9 
(D) 
.2 
1.4 



62.9 

42.1 
2.4 
9.0 
7.0 
.7 
2.4 
1.0 
5.4 

14.2 

5.2 
ID) 

2.4 
ID) 



721.5 

343.2 
8.7 
56.7 
22.6 
45.3 
20.8 
58.7 
19.2 
36.3 
74.7 

168.9 
47.4 
57.5 
39.1 
25.0 

209.4 

ID) 

ID) 

32.5 

124.7 

472.6 

115.8 
10.3 
19.7 

ID) 
30.1 

ID) 
17.0 
21.7 

3.8 

356.8 

54.9 

29.6 

262.3 

ID) 

ID) 



94.3 

38.2 

44.7 

ID) 

8.8 

525.0 
211.3 
153.1 
160.7 

664.0 

532.1 

125.9 

73.7 

169.0 

91.7 

71.9 

131.8 
54.6 
24.4 

Co) 

4.5 

16.4 

ID) 

509.5 

365.6 

16.0 

46.2 

56.9 

5.9 

22.7 

6.3 

32.9 

177.8 

39.6 

(D> 

15.1 

(D) 

4.3 



20-6 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



table 2 General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Industry and geographic area 1 



Establishments 



Total 

(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 2 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 2 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 
employees 



(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN 
FOODS — CONTINUED 



WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 



WEST REGION. 



MOUNTAIN DIVISION. 

IDAHO 

COLORADO 

ARIZONA 

UTAH 



PACIFIC DIVISION 
WASHINGTON .... 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA .... 

ALASKA 

HAWAII . 



GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS. 



NORTHEAST REGION 



NEW ENGLAND DIVISION 

MAINE 

VERMONT 

MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION 

NEW YORK ... 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 



NORTH CENTRAL REGION 



EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN. ... 



WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 



SOUTH REGION 



SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. 

DELAWARE 

MARYLAND 

VIRGINIA 

WEST VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 



EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA 

MISSISSIPPI 



WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 



WEST REGION. 



MOUNTAIN DIVISION. 

MONTANA 

IDAHO 

COLORADO 

NEW MEXICO 

ARIZONA 6 

UTAH 



PACIFIC DIVISION 
WASHINGTON .... 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA .... 
HAWAII 



266 
30 
84 
23 

129 



31 
11 

20 

936 
181 
108 
508 
96 
43 



76 
23 
12 

24 

313 

103 
37 
173 



491 

111 

91 

149 

59 

81 

686 

121 

165 

99 

14 

21 

155 

111 



495 
11 
27 
62 
11 

164 
37 

136 
45 

271 
47 
99 
75 
50 

374 
62 

51 

47 

214 

496 

175 
17 
27 
68 
13 
17 
29 

321 
52 
40 

221 
8 



144 
23 
41 
12 
68 



498 
95 
68 

272 
54 



192 

34 
41 
74 
21 
22 

242 
38 
71 
38 
5 
8 
40 
42 



126 
6 

13 

15 
2 

35 
9 

29 



83 
14 
36 

16 
17 

166 
29 
32 

21 
84 



113 

15 

12 

83 

3 



18.6 
4.1 
3.9 
1.0 
9.5 

91.2 



1.0 
.3 

.5 

82.4 
10.5 
10.3 
51.2 
3.3 
7.1 



1.9 
.3 

.5 



9.9 

5.1 
1.3 
3.6 

59.0 

34.4 
3.8 
5.7 

15.6 
7.5 
1.7 

24.6 
3.0 
9.5 
4.6 
.4 
.4 
3.7 
3.0 



8.6 
BB 
CC 
.9 
.2 

2.8 
.5 

2.0 



3.4 
1.8 
1.1 

12.6 
2.2 
1.7 
1.4 
7.3 

12.8 



9.3 
1.5 



6.5 
.2 



67.5 
16.1 
12.1 
3.6 
35.7 

475.5 

38.5 

30.3 

4.2 

1.4 

2.3 

437.0 
54.2 
47,5 

288.8 
18.5 
27.9 



758.2 

81.4 

11.5 
1.9 
3.4 

4.8 

69.9 

37.4 

9.8 

22.7 

434.9 

260.7 
27.1 
42.0 

120.3 
59.1 
12.2 

174.3 
21.7 
72,4 
31.1 
2.2 
3.0 
24.5 
19.5 

153.9 

45.5 

(Dl 

ID) 

4.2 

.9 

13.8 
2.4 

U.l 
5.1 

40.4 

4.3 

20.4 

10.3 

5.4 

67.9 
10.7 
7,5 
8.2 

41.5 

88.0 

20.7 
2.2 
2.8 
6.6 
(Dl 
4.0 
3.7 

67,3 

10.0 

7.2 

49.2 

.8 



16.2 
3.6 

3.4 



.2 

.4 

72.4 
9.2 
9.3 

44.6 
2.9 
6.4 



7.2 

3.9 

.7 

2.6 

41.4 

25.1 
2.8 
3.9 

11.0 
6.3 
1.1 

16.3 
2.0 
5.9 
3.2 
.2 
.2 
2.6 
2.2 

18.9 

5.4 

(D) 

(D) 

.6 

.1 

1.8 

.3 

1.3 



4.9 

.5 

2.5 

1.0 

.8 

8.7 
1.5 
1.3 
1.0 

4.9 

9.0 



6.5 
1.1 

.7 
4.5 

.1 



30.8 
7.1 
5.8 
1.6 

16.3 

150.3 

15.5 
12.0 

1.8 
.5 

1.0 

134.8 
17.8 
17.1 
83.1 
5.1 
11.6 



1.3 

15.6 
S.5 
1.5 

5.6 

88.6 

52.1 

6.3 

8.5 

23.1 

11.9 

2.4 

36.5 

4.4 

13.0 

6.8 

.5 

.5 
6.4 
5.1 

41.2 

11.6 
(D) 
(D) 
1.3 

.3 
3.9 

.6 
2.7 
1.3 

10.6 
1.2 
5.4 
2.2 

1.8 

19.0 
3.6 
2.8 



5.7 
.6 
.9 
1.9 
(D) 
1.0 



13.3 

2.0 
1.5 



51.1 

12.5 

9.0 

2.7 

27.0 

379.4 

31.3 

25.1 

3.1 

1.0 

1.8 

348.1 
43.0 
39.3 

229.0 
15.2 
21.6 



53.7 

7.2 
1.2 
2.3 
3.0 

46.5 
27.4 

4.4 
14.7 

281.2 

176.5 
18.5 
27.2 
78.9 
45.2 
6.7 

104.6 
12.3 
40.5 
20.1 
1.0 
1.3 
16.3 
13.0 

88.9 

23.8 
ID) 
(D) 
2.5 

.4 
7.6 

.9 
5.8 
2.5 



4.9 
24.1 

56.4 

13.4 
,1.6 
1.8 
4.6 
(0) 
2.1 
2.4 

43.0 



195.2 
49.0 
37.2 



93.7 

70.6 

10.4 

4.1 

8.1 

154.0 
142.1 
109.0 
787.5 
45.7 
69.6 



303.4 

• 48.8 

7.7 

16.8 

20.6 

254.6 
140.2 
25.1 
89.3 

1 682.3 

1 069. 6_ 
145 ."4 
137.9 
484.7 
249.7 
51.8 

612.7 
72.3 

247.9 

108.2 

6.1 

10.4 
100.3 

67.4 

561.3 

153.8 
(D) 
ID) 

14.3 
4.3 

41.2 
5.8 

40.5 

13.4 

174.1 
17.6 
98.9 
38.0 
19.7 

233.4 
47.7 
30.3 
21.9 

133.5 

334.9 

65.0 
7.2 
6.3 

27.8 
(D> 
7.5 

12.5 

269.9 
25.5 
25.6 

215.1 
3.7 



362.9 
95.3 
45.2 
15.9 

206.6 



122.1 
89.9 

14.8 
5.0 
11.1 

874.1 
216.2 
175.7 
347.2 
59.3 
75.7 



772.0 

149.4 
37.1 

54,0 
37.4 

622.6 

345.0 

66.8 

210.7 

3 211.7 

1 599.6 
267.4 
290.1 
716.3 
208.7 
117.0 

612.2 
279.3 
434.0 
343.3 
27.7 
26.1 
219.7 
282.1 



692.5 

(D) 

(D) 

56.2 

6.2 

210.0 

19.5 

219.1 

55.0 

494.1 

45.5 

237.2 

132.6 

78.9 

953.8 
263.6 
126.8 

102.4 
461.0 

907.9 

198.7 
26.5 
19.9 
63.8 
ID) 
24.4 
48.7 

709.2 
100.5 

75.1 
521.0 

12.5 



557.3 

144.2 

82.4 

23.3 

307.5 



216.7 
161.0 

25.4 
9.1 

19.2 

017.1 

355.4 
284.6' 
126.7 
105.0 
145.4 



196.3 
44.7 
70.4 
56.8 

877.0 

485.8 

91.7 

299.5 



662.6 
412.0 
426.4 
198.5 
456.8 
168.8 

2 221.2 
351.2 
681.1 
450.6 
34.1 
36.5 
319.2 
348.5 

2 698.3 

844.2 

ID) 

(D) 

70.5 

10.3 

250.6 

25.3 

259.3 

68.2 

668.4 

63.1 

336.3 

171.3 

97.8 

185.6 
309.1 
155.6 
124.2 
596.7 



263.6 
33.7 
26.0 
91.6 
(D) 
31.9 
61.1 

975.5 
126.6 
100.6 
732.1 
16.2 



10.3 
1.2 
1.2 



8.5 
7.2 

.8 
(D) 

.2 

80.6 

12.1 

9.6 

51.8 

3.5 

3.5 



21.4 

3.4 
.8 

1.6 
.7 

18.0 
6.1 
2.0 
9.9 

102.7 

59.4 
5.8 
16.9 
24.0 
11.1 
1.8 

43.3 
3.4 

22.6 
5.5 
.5 
1.1 
6.2 
3.9 

38.8 

8.7 
(D) 
(D) 



3.1 
.4 

2.5 
.9 

9.7 
1.9 
4.5 
1.7 
1.7 



4.0 
1.3 
7.7 

18.2 

5.5 

1. 1 

.6 

2.4 

(D) 

.5 

.7 

12.7 
2.2 

2.0 

8.3 

.2 



15.6 
2.8 

4.6 
(Dl 
(D) 

85.7 

6.2 

4.1 
1. 1 



.79.6 
9.0 
9.2 

51.6 
2.3 
7.5 



(0) 
.3 

.6 
(0) 

(Dl 
(0) 
1.2 
3.2 

57.0 

32.5 

4.1 

5.1 

14.6 

6.9 

1.8 

24.5 
3.2 
8.4 



3.6 

3.7 

29.9 

9.6 
.5 
(D) 
(D) 
(0) 
(01 
.8 
2.1 
(D) 

7.5 
(D) 
3.4 
1.9 
(D) 

12.8 
2.1 
1.9 

1.4 
7.4 

13.0 

3.4 
.3 
(D) 
(D) 
.3 
.5 



(0) 
6.9 
(Dl 



See footnotes at end of table. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



20-7 



table 2 General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Industry and geographic area' 



1967 



Establishments 



Total 
(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials' 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments : 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 

employees 

(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



BAKERY PRODUCTS 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION .... 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION . . . 

MAINE 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

VERMONT 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

RHODE ISLAND 

CONNECTICUT 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN . . . . • 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . 

DELAWARE 

MARYLAND 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA .... 

VIRGINIA 

WEST VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA . 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA 

MISSISSIPPI 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

MONTANA 

IDAHO 

COLORADO 

NEW MEXICO 

ARIZONA 

UTAH 

NEVADA 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA 

HAWAII 

SUGAR 

NORTHEAST REGION .... 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION . . . 
MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . 

NEW YORK 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

OHIO ..... 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 



4 390 
1 615 

423 
45 
24 
12 

197 
49 
96 

1 192 

536 
204 
452 

1 174 

806 
223 

99 
235 
168 

81 

368 
79 
70 
98 
24 
26 
23 
48 

955 

447 
10 
68 
13 
56 
36 
79 
17 
63 

105 

176 
38 
68 
45 
25 

332 
34 
53 
60 

185 

646 

194 
23 
15 
52 
23 
32 
23 
13 

452 
60 
45 

320 
19 



1 808 

537 

124 
15 
3 
3 
62 
11 
30 

413 

173 

78 

162 

512 

356 
98 
47 

109 
65 
37 

156 
30 
26 
53 
8 
6 
13 
20 

500 

252 
3 

38 
9 
39 
23 
53 
11 
34 
42 

99 
21 

44 
23 

11 



190 
25 
22 

134 
8 



264.2 

78.8 

17.6 

1.8 

.6 

.3 

8.3 
1.6 
5.0 

61.2 
23.3 

13.5 
24.4 

77.8 

58.0 
16.3 

5.5 
20.7 
10.3 

5.2 

19.7 
3.5 

3.4 

7.3 

.6 

CC 

1.4 

FF 



5.3 

1.7 
4.6 
2.1 
8.8 
1.8 
7.7 
5.9 

13.7 
2.7 
6.1 
3.6 
1.3 

19.1 
2.0 
3.8 
1.9 

11.3 

36.5 

7.1 
.6 
.4 

3.0 
.7 

1.2 

1.1 
.2 

29.4 
3.0 
2.6 

23.0 

.7 




499.2 

109.5 
10.9 
4.1 
1.6 
52.0 
10.6 
30,3 

389.7 
157.3 
84.4 
148.0 

489.5 

368.9 
100. 1 
33.7 
137.3 
68.8 
29.0 

120.6 

20.6 

20.3 

46.0 

3.3 

(D) 

9.0 

ID) 

407.0 

219.6 
3.1 
31.2 
11.7 
25.5 
13.4 
49.5 
9.3 
43.8 
32.0 

77.5 
16.9 
34.4 
19.0 
7.3 

109.9 
U.2 
22.7 
11.8 
64.3 

269.2 

42.0 
3.3 

2.4 
18.6 
3.6 
6.7 
5.6 
1.6 

227.2 
21.7 
19.7 

180.0 
4.7 



(Dl 
(D) 

ID) 

17.5 

(D) 

21.0 

9.3 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 



49.2 

10.1 

1.1 

.3 

.2 
5.0 

.7 
2.8 

39.1 

14.1 



48.0 

36.4 
9.5 
3.2 

13.7 
6.7 
3.2 

11.6 
2.1 
2.1 
4.4 
.4 
(D) 



40.8 

22.7 

.2 

3.3 

1.1 
2.8 
1.1 
4.6 
1.0 
5.3 
3.3 

7.5 
1.7 
3.7 
1.6 
.5 

10.6 
1.1 
2.0 
1.1 
6.4 



4.4 
.3 

.3 

2.1 
.3 

.6 
.7 

.1 

17.3 
1.9 
1.7 

13.1 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
1.5 
(D) 



1.1 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



320.1 

97.9 

19.9 
2.4 
.6 
.3 
9.8 
1.5 
5.2 

78.0 
27.7 
19.1 
31.2 

96.7 

73.5 
19.3 

6.7 
28.1 
13.2 

6.1 

23.2 

4.1 
4.1 
8.6 
.7 
(Dl 
1.6 
I DJ 

84.7 

47.0 
.3 



2.0 

10.7 

6.8 

15.6 
3.5 

7.6 

3.4 
1.1 

22.1 
2.3 

4.1 
2.3 
13.5 

40.9 



.6 
4.0 

.7 
1.1 
1.3 

.3 

32.3 
3.5 
3.2 

24.7 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
3.2 

(D) 

6.1 

2.9 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



891.5 
278.7 

56.4 

5.8 

1.6 

.8 

26.5 
4.3 

17.4 

222.3 
83.3 
53.5 
85.5 

278.0 

214.0 
55.9 
17.6 
85.3 
39.6 
15.6 

64.1 

10.8 

10.5 

25.4 

1.5 

(D) 

4.2 

(Dl 

196.5 

109.7 

1.0 
16.2 

6.9 
13.6 

6.0 
20.1 

4.2 
26.3 
15.6 

35.5 



7.3 

2.5 

51.3 
5.2 
9.2 
5.7 

31.1 

138.3 

23.6 

1.7 
1.2 
12.0 
1.5 
3.0 
3.4 
.7 

114.7 

12.1 

11.3 

88.3 

2.3 



(Dl 
(0) 

(D) 
11.5 

(Dl 



7.4 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 



219.2 

23.7 

9.3 

3.5 

108.9 

17.7 

55.9 

827.7 
285.2 
211.4 
331. 1 



772.0 
220.4 

65.8 
304.8 
125.7 

55.4 

245.9 

38.3 

39.6 

95.0 

6.7 

(Dl 

17.2 

(Dl 

878.5 

489.7 
7.0 
60.8 
26.0 
54.3 
28.9 

108.2 
19.5 

119.8 
65.1 

152.0 
31.1 
65.5 
36.2 
19.2 

236.8 
27.9 
46.2 
23.3 

139.4 

551.4 

95.5 
6.2 

4.3 
46.3 

7.5 
15.9 
12.4 

2.6 

455.9 
42.5 
46.7 

355.5 
8.7 



(Dl 
(D) 

(D) 

49.8 

(Dl 

64.7 

27.3 

(Dl 
(D) 
(Dl 



2 973.3 

879.0 

190.3 

20.6 

6.9 

3.3 

92.6 
15.4 

51.4 

688.7 
257.6 
169.8 
261.4 

878.2 

661.2 

196.1 

64.8 

233.5 

120.3 
46.5 

217.0 

34.2 

38.1 

82.1 

5.5 

(Dl 

14.5 

(Dl 

814.2 

451.7 
5.4 
59.6 
23.7 
53.2 
27.3 
94.5 
19.0 

107.0 
61.9 

154.6 
37.8 

64.6 

34.8 
17.5 

207.9 
20.4 
43.5 
22.3 

121.7 

401.9 

78.0 
4.4 
3.2 

37.3 
7.3 

12.1 

11.5 
1.9 

323.9 
32.2 
33.0 

250.7 
6.5 



(D) 
(D) 



141.9 

75.4 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



6 466.5 
1 926.2 

409.6 

44.4 

16.2 

6.8 

201.8 
33.1 

107.3 

1 516.5 
542.3 
381.5 
592.8 

1 896.6 

1 433.8 
416.2 
130.6 
538.7 
246.2 
102.1 

462.8 

72.5 

77.7 

177.0 

12.2 

(D) 

31.7 

(Dl 



940.6 

12.3 
120.3 

49.7 
107.3 

56.3 
202.6 

38.4 
226.7 
126.9 

306.5 
68.9 

130.0 
71.0 
36.6 

444.5 
48.3 
89.6 
45.6 

260.9 

952.3 

173.5 
10.6 

7.5 
83.6 
14.8 
28.0 
23.9 

4.5 

778.7 
74.7 
79.6 

605.3 
15.2 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

223. 1 

(D) 

202.0 

101.1 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 



152.0 

41.0 

11.0 

1.2 

.1 

.2 

4.4 

.7 

4.3 

30.0 
9.9 
5.8 

14.2 

43.3 

28.5 

8.9 
2.7 
9.7 
5.3 
2.0 

14.8 
1.2 
1.6 
6.8 
.5 
(Dl 
2.4 
(0) 

44.3 



3.2 

.8 
1.9 
1.3 

8.7 

1.1 
5.8 
2.1 



9.8 
(D) 
3.2 

(D) 



9.6 
1.0 
2.4 
.6 
5.5 

23.4 

3.5 
.3 

.1 

1.7 

,4 

.5 



19.9 
1.3 
1.8 

16.0 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
4.2 
(Dl 



2.1 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



280.1 

89.0 

18.0 
2.0 
.5 
.4 
9.7 
2.2 
3.2 

71.0 
30.8 
13.5 
26.7 

82.4 

60.7 
17.0 

6.2 
19.6 
11.0 

6.8 

21.8 
(Dl 
3.9 
8.2 
.6 
(D) 
2.1 
2.5 

70.4 



37 



1 
.5 
5.1 
1.8 
4.7 
2.3 
8.1 
1.8 
7.1 
5.7 

13.5 
2.8 
5.8 

3.5 

1.4 



1.6 
3.9 



1.1 
.2 

30.3 
3.7 
3.1 

22.6 
.8 



(Dl 
(D) 

(D) 
3.0 
(D) 



1.3 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



3 030.8 

964.3 

170.1 
23.8 
5.2 
3.9 
88.1 
17.8 
31.3 

794.2 
336.3 
170.8 
287.1 

882.5 

671.8 
192.6 

59.2 
264.3 
100.3 

55.5 

210.8 

(Dl 

33.7 

86.7 

5.3 

(D) 

17.6 

28.8 

699.4 

377.6 

5.1 
48.8 
20.6 
43.4 
22.9 
76.2 
IS. 4 
91.4 
53.9 

123.9 
26.8 
50.7 
31.3 
15.2 

197.8 
15.8 
37.3 
22.5 

122.2 

485.8 

86.4 
6.6 
4.2 

39.2 
7.5 

13.8 

10.8 
2.8 

399.4 
40.2 
45.9 

303.7 
7.0 



(D) 
(D) 

(Dl 

53.4 

(D) 



51.3 

16.7 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20-8 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



table 2 General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Industry and geographic area 1 



SUGAR — CONTINUED 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

NEBRASKA 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . . 

MARYLAND 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

LOUISIANA 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

MONTANA 

IDAHO 

WYOMING 

COLORADO 

ARIZONA 

UTAH 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA 

HAWAII 



CONFECTIONERY AND RELATED PRODUCTS 



NORTHEAST REGION 



NEW ENGLAND DIVISION 

MASSACHUSETTS 

RHODE ISLAND 

CONNECTICUT 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 



NORTH CENTRAL REGION 



1967 



Establishments 



EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 



WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

MINNESOTA , . . . . 

IOWA . 

MISSOURI 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 



SOUTH REGION 



SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. 

MARYLAND" 5 . . . 

VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 



EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA 



WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

LOUISIANA" 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 



WEST REGION. 



MOUNTAIN DIVISION. 

COLORADO 

UTAH 



PACIFIC DIVISION 
WASHINGTON .... 
CALIFORNIA .... 
HAWAII . 



Total 

(number) 



83 

57 

5 

12 

355 

119 
59 
177 

316 

251 
76 
13 

115 
24 
23 

65 
18 
10 
27 



113 
20 
21 
13 
29 
20 

50 
21 
12 

91 
12 
11 
66 



43 
13 
20 

189 
20 

142 
17 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



141 
50 
24 
67 



110 

24 
7 

65 
3 

11 

30 
10 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



1.6 

cc 



FF 
CC 
CC 
1.6 

6.2 

FF 
CC 



4.5 
BB 
EE 
BB 
EE 
BB 
CC 



27.2 

22.4 

EE 
1.3 
FF 
CC 
EE 

4.9 

EE 
BB 
EE 
AA 
EE 



FF 

BB 

2.3 



EE 
1.3 
CC 

2.8 
.3 

.5 
EE 

8.3 

1.3 

CC 
CC 

7.0 
CC 

5.9 
BB 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



11.7 
(D) 
(D) 
ID] 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

11.8 

40.4 
(D) 
ID) 

84.9 

27.0 
ID) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

57.9 
(D) 
(0) 

28.0 
(D) 



(Dl 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

(D) 
63.3 

(0) 
(D) 

153.5 

132.4 

(D) 
7.4 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

21.1 

(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

48.3 

(D) 
(D) 
10.6 
1.3 
(Dl 
1.8 

(D) 
6.3 
(D) 

12.0 
1.2 
1.8 

ID) 

43.1 

4.9 
(Dl 
(Dl 

38.2 

(Dl 

32.3 

(Dl 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



1.3 
(0) 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



5.1 

(D) 
(D) 

11.6 

4.0 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

7.6 

(D) 
(D) 
4.0 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

(D) 
9.1 
(D) 
(D) 

22.7 

18.5 
(Dl 
1.2 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

4.2 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 

9.3 

(D) 

(D) 

2.1 

.3 

(D) 
.4 

(Dl 
1.1 
(D) 

2.4 
.3 

.4 
(D) 

7.1 

1.1 
(D) 
(D) 

5.9 
(D) 
5.0 
(D) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



3.2 

(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

(Dl 

(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 
3.3 

12.2 

(D) 
(D) 



8.1 
(Dl 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

14.1 
(D) 
(D) 
6.6 
ID) 



(Dl 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

17.7 

(0) 

(D) 

45.2 

37.4 
(D) 
2.4 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

7.7 
(Dl 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 

18.4 

(D) 
(D) 
4.5 
.6 
(D) 



(D) 
2.2 

(D) 

4.6 
.5 

.8 

(Dl 

12.6 

2.0 
(D) 
(D) 

10.6 
(D) 
9.1 

(0) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



9.0 
(D) 
(D) 



(Dl 

(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 
9.6 

32.4 

(D) 
(D) 

66.0 

22.5 

(0) 
(D) 
(D) 
(0) 
(Dl 
(D) 

43.5 
(D) 
(D) 

22.4 
(D) 



(Dl 
(Dl 
(Dl 
(0) 



(D) 
(D) 

111.0 

94.8 

(0) 
5.8 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

16.2 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 

34.8 

(D) 
(D) 
8.9 
1.0 
(D) 
1.3 

(D) 
4.2 
(D) 



1.5 
(D) 



3.8 

(D) 
(D) 

28.3 

(Dl 

24.5 

(Dl 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



37.4 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

(Dl 

(D) 

35.7 

128.4 

(D) 
(D) 



82.6 

(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 

177.9 

(D) 

(Dl 

88.2 

(D) 



(Dl 
(D) 
(Dl 
(Dl 

(D) 

214.8 

(Dl 

(D) 

433.3 

379.8 

(D) 

18.0 

ID) 

(Dl 
ID) 

53.5 

(D) 
ID) 
(D) 
(Dl 
ID) 

131.2 

(D) 
(D) 
41.1 
3.6 
(D) 
4.2 

(D) 
15.5 

(D) 

29.0 
2.8 
6.8 
(Dl 

119.1 

12.3 

(Dl 
(D) 

106.8 

(Dl 

92.5 

(D) 



Cost of 
materials 1 

(million 
dollars) 



66.5 

(D) 
(Dl 
(Dl 

(01 

(01 

(Dl 

(D) 

78.0 

428.1 
(D) 
(Dl 

496.2 

131.6 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 
(Dl 

364.6 
(Dl 
(D) 

219.2 
(D) 



(Dl 
(D) 
(Dl 
(Dl 

(Dl 

168.7 

(D) 

(D) 

493.0 

425.9 
(D) 
30.0 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 

67.1 
(Dl 
(Dl 
(D) 
ID) 
(Dl 

195.7 

(Dl 
(D) 
80.3 
3.8 
(D) 
5.7 

(D) 
15.8 

(D) 

34.6 
2.8 
5.4 
(D) 

158.0 

11.4 
(Dl 
(D) 

146.7 

(Dl 

135.2 

(Dl 



Value of 
shipments : 



(million 
dollars) 



100.8 
(D) 
(D) 
(0) 

(D I 

(D) 

(Dl 

(D) 

109.7 

546.3 
(Dl 
(Dl 

768.1 

211.3 

(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 

556.8 
(D) 
(D) 

317.4 
(D) 



(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 
(Dl 

(D) 

383.3 

(D) 

(Dl 

915.8 

795.4 
(D) 
47.9 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 

120.4 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 

325.2 

(D) 
(D) 
120.2 
7.4 
(D) 
10.6 

(D) 

30.5 

(D) 

62.7 
5.6 
12.2 

(Dl 

276.5 

23.4 
(D) 
(D) 

253.1 

(D) 

227.5 

(D) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



10.1 
(Dl 
(D) 
(Dl 

(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
5.3 

12.4 

(D) 
ID) 



8.2 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

29.2 
(D) 
(D) 

16.4 

(Dl 



(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

(D) 
4.5 
(D) 
(D) 

35.3 

32.2 

(D) 
1.0 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

3.0 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 
(0) 
(D) 

14.4 

(D) 
(Dl 
4.5 

.5 
(D) 

.3 

ID) 

.5 

(D) 

3.0 
.1 
.3 

(D) 



.5 

(D) 
(D) 

2.6 

(D) 
2.1 
(D) 



1963 



All 
employees 



(1,000) 



1.8 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

9.0 

2.9 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

6.1 
(D) 
(D) 



(0) 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

8.7 
(D) 
(D) 
4.5 
(D) 



36.3 

6.9 

6.0 
(D) 
(D) 

29.4 
(D) 
4.0 

(D) 

23.9 

19.6 

(D) 
1.1 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

4.3 
1.2 
(D) 
1.5 
(D) 
(Dl 

10.5 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



34.6 
(Dl 
(D) 
(Dl 

172.7 



(D) 
(D) 
ID) 

108.8 
(D) 
(D) 



81.7 
8.6 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

172.2 

(D) 

(Dl 

76.5 

(Dl 



477.7 

83.5 
72.3 

(D) 
(D) 

394.2 

(Dl 

54.0 

(0) 

304.8 

272.5 

(D) 
14.6 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

32.2 
11.8 

(0) 



(D) 


(D) 


.5 


3.7 


(D) 


(0) 


(Dl 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


.3 


2.8 


(D) 


(D) 


1.0 


8.7 


.5 


2.0 


(0) 


(0) 


.4 


1.8 


.5 


2.3 


1.6 


12.6 


7.2 


89.9 


1.2 


8.2 


.5 


3.8 


.6 


3.9 


6.0 


81.7 


(D) 


(Dl 


4.8 


69.4 


(D) 


(D) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



20-9 



table 2 General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Industry and geographic area* 



1967 



Establishments 



Total 
(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 2 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 2 

(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 
employees 



(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



BEVERAGES 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION 

MAINE 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

VERMONT 

MASSACHUSETTS 

RHODE ISLAND 

CONNECTICUT 

MIODLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . . . 

NEW YORK • 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . • . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 

MINNESOTA 

IO*A 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . . . 

DELAWARE 

MARYLAND 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

VIRGINIA 

WEST VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA 

MISSISSIPPI 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 

ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

MONTANA 

IDAHO 

COLORADO 

NEW MEXICO 

ARIZONA 

UTAH 

NEVADA ....... 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA 

ALASKA e 

HAWAII 

MISC. FOODS AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



NORTHEAST REGION 



NEW ENGLAND DIVISION 

MAINE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

RHODE ISLAND 

CONNECTICUT 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 



It 376 
1 038 

291 

38 
22 
11 
124 
34 
62 

747 
325 
149 
273 



766 
169 
110 
211 
120 
156 

378 
90 
54 

121 
12 
14 
41 
46 



671 
8 

64 
5 

84 

57 
120 

71 
122 
140 

383 
115 
99 
86 

83 

463 
66 
81 
65 

251 

677 

198 
28 
18 
43 
30 
32 
28 
7 

479 
52 
41 

352 

5 

29 



897 

212 
23 

115 
22 
25 

685 
315 
140 
230 



2 144 

415 

99 

11 
10 

5 
41 

7 
25 

316 
131 
63 
122 

558 

379 
92 
62 
98 
63 
64 

179 
43 
29 
56 
6 
8 
16 
21 

879 

421 
3 
46 
2 
62 
26 
89 
40 
79 
74 

226 
75 
59 
50 
42 

232 

31 
45 
29 
127 

292 



6 
21 
15 
16 
13 

5 

208 
26 
14 

155 

2 

11 



231 
97 
66 
68 



220.7 

51.6 

9.1 

.5 

.6 

.2 

4.7 

1.2 

1.9 

42.4 
18.5 
11.0 
13.0 

69.4 

50.3 
10.3 

7.5 
13.4 

7.3 
11.8 



19 



2 
4.5 
1.6 
9.9 
.2 
.3 
1.2 
1.5 



31.4 
AA 
6.5 
BB 
4.1 
1.5 
5.1 
2.4 
5.5 
5.7 



19.8 

10.5 



2.9 
2.1 



21.4 
2.9 
1.2 

16.4 
.2 



1 525.4 
386.7 

59.4 
2.8 
3.4 
1.1 

31.3 
9,5 

11.4 

327.3 
148.0 
91.9 
87.4 

516.2 

376.0 
69.9 
52.9 

104.3 
54.2 
94.6 

140.3 
33.4 
9.0 
79.6 
1.3 
1.5 
8.2 
7.3 

411.2 

179.3 

(D) 

46.6 

(0) 

22.3 

7.7 

26.2 

11.0 

30.1 

32.0 

115.7 

69.1 

23.2 

13.5 

9.9 

116.2 

(D) 

(Dl 

(D) 

69.2 

211.2 

45.2 
2.2 
ID) 
(0) 
3.3 
6.4 
4.3 
1.7 

166.0 
24.9 



25.9 
8.7 

10.6 
6.6 



(0) 

(0) 
3.3 

17.0 
2.3 

4.3 

174.1 
55.2 
81.3 
37.5 



113.5 

28.1 

4.6 
.3 

.3 

.1 
2.3 

.8 
.9 

23.5 

9.8 
6.6 
7.2 

39.3 

27.9 
5.0 



7.1 

11.3 
2.7 
.6 
6.5 
.1 
.2 
.7 



31.8 

12.5 
ID) 
3.5 

(D) 
1.4 

.6 
1.7 

.8 
2.0 
2.3 

10.5 

7.2 

1.5 

1.0 

.8 

8.7 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
5.0 



.2 
(D) 
(D) 

.3 



11.5 

1.7 

.5 

8.9 

.1 

.3 



226.8 

54.7 

9.5 
.5 
.6 



1.9 

45.2 
18.6 
12.5 
14.0 

77.9 

56.2 
10.0 

9.7 
15.3 

7.4 
13.9 

21.7 

5.2 

1.3 

11.9 

.2 

.3 

1.4 

1.4 

66.5 

27.0 
(Dl 
7.8 
(D) 
3.2 
1.2 
3.9 
1.6 
4.0 
4.8 

21.4 

14.5 

3.2 

2.0 
1.7 

18.1 
(D) 
(D) 
(0) 

10.7 

27.7 



.4 
(D) 
(D) 
.6 
.8 



21.9 

3.1 

1.1 

16.9 

.2 

.6 



(D) 

ID) 
.9 
3.7 
.6 
.9 

37.8 
12.8 
15.5 
9.5 



1.0 
1.3 
.3 
12.6 
5.7 
4.6 



162.3 
67.6 
52.8 
41.9 

273.3 

191.8 
30.1 
30.3 
53.8 
23.4 
54.2 

81.5 

19.3 

2.7 

51.5 

.4 

.5 

4.3 



166.8 

62.9 

(D) 
23.4 
ID) 
5.9 
2.3 
6.9 
3.0 
8.7 
11.9 

57.3 

43.8 

6.8 

3.7 

2.9 

46.6 

(D) 

(D) 

ID) 

27.8 

97.5 



1.0 
10) 
(D) 
1.1 



80.9 
13.3 

3.6 

62.0 

.3 

1.7 



1.4 
2.4 



1 
5 
6 
21.9 



32. 



154.2 

6.6 

6.7 

1.7 

71.9 

20.3 

46.9 

907.7 
409.7 
285.1 
212.9 



188.9 
187.4 
195.2 
400.0 
135.6 
270.7 

436.9 

119.9 

22.3 

251.9 

2.9 

3.4 

20.3 

16.1 



545.1 
ID) 

180.5 
(Dl 
57.0 
16.5 
59.4 
22.1 

108.8 
93.6 

467.3 

338.8 

71.2 

34.4 

22.8 

363.7 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

231.4 

726.5 

119.9 
4.7 
ID) 
(0) 
7.6 
17.3 
10.9 
4.1 

606.5 

86.0 

28.5 

481.7 

1.8 

8.6 



(Oj 

(0) 
7.3 

42.7 
5.5 

10.8 

606.4 
156.6 
358.6 
91.1 



170.5 
5.9 
9.6 
2.6 
93.9 
18.0 
40.5 

881.9 
408.8 
261.9 
211.2 



043.2 
151.2 
136.2 
364.8 
120.6 
270.4 

391.9 

100.2 

21.9 

230.1 

2.2 

2.9 

19.0 

15.6 



495.4 
(D) 

153.3 
(D) 
55.3 
13.5 
51.4 
23.9 
88.0 

101.6 

331.7 

242.7 

43.5 

27.4 

18.0 

293.1 

(D) 

(D) 

(0) 

188.5 

755.3 

128.0 
4.3 
(D) 
(D) 
5.9 
14.0 
11.8 
3.4 

627.3 
92.9 
20.8 

501.9 

1.6 

10.0 



71.8 
13.2 
9.2 

030.8 
286.4 
614.2 
130.2 



323.7 
12.5 
16.3 
4.4 

165.2 
38.2 
87.1 

1 781.1 
814.8 
544.1 
422.1 

3 054.5 

2 227.2 

337.6 
330.5 
761.2 
256.0 
541.9 

827.3 

219.8 

44.1 

481.2 

5.1 

6.3 

39.2 

31.7 



037.6 

(D) 

332.8 

(Dl 

111.8 

29.8 
110.7 

45.9 
196.4 
194.6 

789.7 

579.3 

107.8 

61.9 

40.6 

656.8 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

420.2 



248.2 

9.0 

(Dl 

(01 

13.5 

31.3 

22.8 

7.5 

1 211.2 

177.7 

49.3 

962.2 

3.4 

18.7 



' (0) 

ID) 

15.5 

113.8 

18.7 

19.8 

1 628.3 

441.3 
965.5 
221.6 



9.6 

1.1 
.5 
.1 
5.1 
1.0 
1.6 

84.0 
23.2 
41.5 
19.3 

99.6 

79.4 
18.8 
16.2 
17.5 
10.0 
17.0 

20.1 
7.3 
2.3 
7.1 
.2 
.2 
2.0 
1.0 

114.1 

47.1 
(D) 

11.2 
(D) 
5.3 
1.6 
8.1 
1.7 
8.3 

10.4 

25.1 

16.7 

3.7 

1.9 

2.9 

41.8 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

30.2 

63.0 

19.9 

,4 
(D) 
(D) 

.9 
2.2 
1.5 

.4 

43.1 
9.4 
2.1 

30.1 

.1 

1.3 



(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

2.5 

.2 

.7 

43.2 
5.8 

30.0 
7.4 



8.5 
.6 
(D) 
(0) 



41.5 
18.9 
10.2 
12.3 

64.6 



6. 

12. 



18.7 
4.3 
2.0 
9.3 
(D) 
.2 
(D) 
(0) 



(0) 
(D) 



2.3 

5.0 
5.1 

(0) 
10.0 
(01 
(D) 
(D) 

(D.) 
(D) 
4. 4 
(D) 
9.8 



19. 

2. 



30.6 

5.1 
.5 

3.3 
.3 

.7 

25.5 
10) 

10.2 
(D) 



3 724.8 

909.9 

134.3 

6.3 

(01 

ID) 

54.5 

18.2 

46.8 

775.5 
378.6 
204.4 
192.6 



911.5 
141.2 
149.6 
307.1 
94.2 
219.3 

325.2 

75.7 

23.5 

186.1 

(D) 

1.8 

(D) 

(Dl 



(D) 

(Dl 
130.5 

3.3 
43.9 

(01 
51.7 
19.8 
84.3 
65.7 

(01 

279.5 

(01 

(0) 

(01 

(01 

(Dl 

58.9 

(D) 

144. 3 

550.1 



5 


7.1 


3 


3.4 


4 


56.8 


6 


4.9 





12.7 


7 


10.7 


2 


2.5 


4 


450.7 


5 


60.0 


9 


16.1 


3 


367.6 


2 


1.8 


6 


5.3 



594.1 

70.3 
4.9 

49.5 
2.5 

10.0 

523.8 
(D) 

287.6 
(0) 



See footnotes 



end of table. 



2010 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



table 2. General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963 -Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Industry and geographic area 1 



1967 



Establishments 



Total 

(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials : 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments : 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 
employees 



(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



MISC. FOODS AND KINDRED 
PRODUCTS — CONT INUED 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . 

DELAWARE 

MARYLAND 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA .... 

VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA 

MISSISSIPPI 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA . 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

IDAHO 

COLORADO 

NEW MEXICO 

ARIZONA. ... 

UTAH 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA 

HAWAII 6 



732 
184 

94 
274 
105 

75 

392 

71 
82 
127 

44 
54 



627 

9 

54 

12 

65 

122 
64 

129 

156 

320 

45 
108 
93 

74 

672 

73 
126 

62 
411 

858 

197 
16 

48 
30 
48 
22 

661 
63 



415 

268 
59 
35 

121 

34 
19 

147 
36 
29 
46 



508 

187 
5 
26 
4 
29 
31 
12 
45 
33 

105 
13 
34 
28 
30 

216 
24 
46 
16 

130 

255 

49 
4 

17 
6 

15 
6 

206 
22 
16 

161 
6 



30.5 
7.1 
3.6 

15.3 
2.9 
1.6 



11 



2 
2.6 
2.2 
3.6 
1.2 
1.3 

FF 

FF 

EE 
2.3 

.3 
1.9 
2.3 

CC 
4.2 
2.9 

8.6 
1.6 
3.4 
2.0 



1.5 
3.5 



3.2 

.3 

1.2 

.3 



CC 
16.6 



280.1 

210.8 
49.7 
23.1 

109.8 
19.1 
9.2 

69.3 
17.1 
14.5 
21.9 
7.3 
7.4 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 
12.8 

1.9 
11.0 
11.4 

(Dl 
21.3 
15.3 

47.6 
1-0.0 
19.7 
10.8 
7.1 

I D! 

7.2 
17.5 

8.3 
54.1 

144.5 

16.3 
1.4 
6.0 
1.4 
4.1 
2.3 

128.2 

10.0 

(0) 

109.7 

2.0 



27.8 

20.4 
4.5 
2.6 

10.2 
1.8 
1.2 

7.4 
1.9 
1.5 
2.3 



(0) 
(D) 
1.7 



1.3 
1.4 
(Dl 
3.1 
2.1 

5.7 
1.0 
2.3 

1.2 

1.2 

(D) 



57.7 

42.3 
9.2 
5.4 

21.4 
3.8 
2.5 

15.5 
4.0 
3.3 
4.6 
1.7 
1.6 

(D) 

(D) 
(Dl 
3.5 
.4 
2.6 
2.8 
(D) 
6.2 
4.4 

12.3 
2.2 
4.9 
2.5 
2.6 

(Dl 
2.4 
5.4 
1.8 
16.0 

29.6 



25.4 
2.1 
(D) 

21.5 



161.1 

121.2 
25.8 
15.6 
63.4 
10.2 
6.0 

39.9 
10.3 
9.2 
12.0 

4.0 
3.7 

ID) 

(Dl 
(D) 
8.4 
.8 
5.8 
5.6 
(D) 
12.8 
9.7 

25.6 

5.5 
10.9 
4.6 

4.6 

(Dl 
4.5 

11.7 
4.0 

35.8 

83.6 



(Dl 
64.1 

1.3 



935.0 

698.7 
151.6 
73.1 
411.4 
39.6 
23.0 

236.3 
67.6 
40.9 
61.3 
36.7 
26.9 

(Dl 

(0) 

(D) 
42.2 

3.4 
51.2 
25.2 

(Dl 
58.8 
84.1 

126.4 
26.5 
53.3 
29.5 
17.1 

(D) 

40.7 

72.6 

19.8 

219.8 

502.1 

41.3 
4.5 

14.4 
2.9 

12.4 
5.1 

460.8 

24.5 

(D) 

412.5 

4.2 



796.5 
379.2 
259.6 
052.6 
68.6 
36.5 

887.0 
212.8 
325.6 
187.1 
61.0 
98.2 

(D) 

(01 

(Dl 

87.6 

6.6 

110.6 

63.0 

(Dl 

179.9 

143.3 

695.2 
123.8 
389.1 
80.8 
101.5 

(Dl 

151.2 

189.2 

49.6 

528.2 

849.9 

64.7 
4.3 

20.0 
4.1 

26.9 
6.5 

785.2 

31.4 

(Dl 

721.8 

4.2 



3 619.5 

2 497.1 
531.0 
333.7 

1 465.5 

107.7 

59.2 

1 122.4 
276.9 
369.5 
247.2 
98.8 
124.6 

101 

(0) 

(01 

128.9 

10.0 

162.1 

89.5 

(D) 

240.2 

226.0 

828.9 
151.8 
447.2 
110.5 
119.4 

( D I 

186.0 

263.6 

68.6 

746.9 



>6.0 
(0) 



90.9 

76.7 

16.0 

4.6 

49.8 

3.2 

3.0 

14.3 
4.1 
2.9 
5.2 
1.0 
1.0 

(D) 

(D! 
(Dl 
2.1 
.1 
2.1 
2.5 
(Dl 
3.2 
4.0 

11.5 
2.0 
5.2 
1.6 
2.7 

( D I 

1.5 

5.4 

.6 

25.4 

26.2 



.3.5 
.6 
(D) 



29.5 
6.9 
3.5 

13.7 
3.5 
1.8 



11.0 
2.4 
2.1 
3.9 
1.1 
1.2 

42.3 



1.9 
.5 
2.0 
2.4 
.9 
4.0 
2.6 

9.6 

1.7 
4.3 
1.9 



18.0 
1.8 
3.7 
1.3 

11.2 

20.8 



17.4 
1.3 



14.8 
(Dl 



764.4 

574.9 

109.7 

56.8 

343.6 

38.8 

26.1 

189.5 
47.6 
40.7 
55,7 
27.6 
15.9 

660.9 

227.9 
2.3 
34.0 
7.5 
44.8 
20.7 
V.f 
49,7 
58.9 

113.0 
27.8 
48.5 
18.5 
18.2 

320.0 
18,7 
68.0 
11.9 

221.5 

386.2 



11.5 
3.0 

14.8 
6.8 

346.0 
21.9 
13.0 

307.1 
(0) 



., Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) in computer operations. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 8 For 1967, over 30 percent 
of the data for this line was estimated. (Z) Under 50 thousand (or under 50 employees). 

'General statistics for some producing States have to be withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. However, for such States, the number of establishments is shown 
and the employment size range is indicated by one of the following symbols: 



AA - less than 250 employees 
BB - 250-499 employees 



CC - 500-999 employees 

EE - 1,000-2,499 employees 



2 Trie value of shipments and cost of materials for industry groups (2- and 3-digit) includes exte 
same industry. For a more complete explanation, see Introduction. 



FF - 2,500 employees and over 
duplication arising from shipments between establishments in the 



FOOD AND KINDRED PRODUCTS 



20-11 



table 3 Detailed Statistics: 1967 



Item 



ESTABLISHMENTS! TOTAL NUMBER 

WITH i TO 19 EMPLOYEES DO . 

WITH 20 TO 99 EMPLOYEES DO . 

WITH 100 EMPLOYEES OR MORE DO . 

ALL EMPLOYEES i AVERAGE FOR YEAR liOOO 

PAYROLL FOR YEAR. ALL EMPLOYEES . . . MILLION DOLLARS 

PRODUCTION WORKERSI 

AVERAGE FOR YEAR 1.000 

MARCH DO . 

MAY DO . 

AUGUST DO . 

NOVEMBER DO . 

MAN-HOURS MILLIONS 

JANUARY-MARCH DO . 

APRIL-JUNE DO . 

JULY-SEPTEMBER DO . 

OCTOBER-DECEMBER DO . 

WAGES ■ • . MILLION DOLLARS 

COST OF MATERIALS. ETC.. TOTAL* DO . 

MATERIALS. PARTS. CONTAINERS. ETC. CONSUMED . .DO . 

COST OF RESALES DO . 

FUELS CONSUMED DO . 

PURCHASED ELECTRIC ENERGY DO . 

CONTRACT WORK . DO . 

VALUE OF SHIPMENTS. INCLUDING RESALES* DO . 

VALUE OF RESALES DO . 

VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURE DO . 

MANUFACTURERS' INVENTORIES! 

BEGINNING OF YEAR. TOTAL 00 . 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO . 

WORK IN PROCESS DO . 

MATERIALS. SUPPLIES. FUEL. ETC DO . 

END OF YEAR. TOTAL. DO . 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO . 

WORK IN PROCESS • DO . 

MATERIALS. SUPPLIES. FUEL. ETC DO . 

EXPENDITURES FOR PLANT AND EQUIPMENT. TOTAL . . .DO . 

NEW PLANT AND EQUIPMENT. TOTAL. ....... .DO . 

NEW STRUCTURES AND ADDITIONS TO PLANT ... .DO . 

NEW MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT DO . 

USED PLANT AND EQUIPMENT DO . 



Food and 
kindred 
products 
(SIC 20) 



32 518 

19 004 
9 409 
4 101 

1 649.6 
10 076.8 



1 121.7 
1 048.7 
1 063.2 
1 223.4 

1 152.0 

2 259.4 
521.7 
540.8 
612.6 
584.6 

6 062.6 

57 540.6 
52 548.8 

4 157.4 
345.4 
316.2 
172.8 

83 975.2 

5 020.2 

26 620.9 



7 240.2 

4 176.9 

479.9 

2 583.3 

7 748.8 

4 448.7 

514.9 

2 745.1 

1 827.2 

1 730.1 

466.1 

1 264.0 

91.3 



Meat 
products 
(SIC 201) 



4 914 

2 885 

1 284 

745 

310.1 
953.5 



248.9 
241.0 
242.6 
255.0 
257.0 

508.0 
121.3 
123.8 
130.8 
132.1 

1 435.1 

18 003.8 

16 822.2 

1 063.3 

42.1 

48.9 

27.3 

21 520.1 
1 177.1 



697.9 

514.2 

53.4 

130.4 



742. 

550, 

52. 

140. 



209.4 
197.0 

73.7 
123.4 

11.5 



Daily 
products 
(SIC 202) 



6 188 
3 682 

1 880 
626 

231.7 
449.3 



107.3 
106.1 
108.7 
111.2 
103.2 

222.1 
53.6 
56.9 
58.0 
53.5 

604.5 

9 373.0 

8 383.2 

846.3 

54.3 

62.3 

26.8 

12 815.1 
990.8 



463.1 

255.2 

14.0 

193.9 

490.0 

273.2 

20.4 

196.4 

214.1 
194.4 

51.4 
143.0 

18.6 



Canned 

cured and 

frozen 

foods 

(SIC 203) 



3 528 

1 685 

1 161 

680 

259.9 
231.1 



226.7 
179.9 
188.3 
313.6 
225.3 

435.9 
85.2 
92.1 

147.6 

111.1 

952.3 

5 660.3 

5 187.4 

320.5 

46.7 

38.6 

67.1 

9 231.5 

384.3 



1 968.9 

1 501.4 

103.4 

364.0 



162.0 
630.4 
119.4 
412.2 

263.2 

252.9 

69.6 

183.2 

9.9 



Grain 

mill 
products 
(SIC 204) 



3 202 

2 115 

887 

200 

111.8 
758.2 



77.9 
76.7 
77.1 
79.9 
78.1 

167.5 
41.0 

41.4 
43.2 
42.1 

480.1 

7 032.1 

6 478.1 

451.1 

40.5 

47.2 

15.1 

9 394.5 
581.7 



762.4 

267.5 

33.4 

461.6 

762.5 

283.3 

37.0 

442.2 

190.3 

181.1 

47.3 

133.8 

8.6 



Bakery 
products 
(SIC 205) 



4 390 

2 582 

1 029 

779 

264.2 
1 664.8 



159.6 
155.8 
155.9 
161.8 
164.7 

320.1 
77.5 
79.4 
82.1 
81.1 

891.5 



973. 

417. 

499, 

28, 

24. 

3, 



466.5 
696.1 



201.7 

40.7 

2.2 

158.8 

213.1 

42.5 

1.8 

168.8 

162.2 

152.0 

29.1 

122.9 

9.1 



Sugar 
(SIC 206) 



182 
20 
57 

105 

30.9 
209.6 



24.9 
20.3 
20.6 
20.3 
38.4 



160.9 

1 662.7 

1 591.9 

26.4 

36.8 

3.9 

3.8 

2 305.0 

28.1 

652.0 



359.5 

221.8 

19.6 

118.1 

391.4 

229.7 

21.4 

140.4 

82.8 
81.1 
12.1 
69.0 
1.6 



Confectionery 

and 

related 

products 

(SIC 207) 



1 240 
777 
279 

184 

B3.1 
434.2 



68. 
66. 
64. 
68. 
75. 

132, 

31, 
31, 
31, 
37, 



312.1 

464.9 

373.9 

69.8 

7.6 

11.7 

2.0 



379.8 

136.8 

23.8 

219.1 

395.4 

153.4 

25.9 

216.1 

78.2 
75.6 
20.8 
54.8 
2.4 



Beverages 
(SIC 208) 



4 376 
2 232 

1 671 

473 

220.7 
525.4 



113, 
109, 
113, 
118. 
113. 



226.8 
51.9 
58.1 
60.3 
56.5 

725.4 

363.0 

960.8 

318.8 

39.4 

30.2 

13.8 

102.8 
404.0 



388.6 
895.6 
111.3 
381.8 

507.9 
962.1 
127.2 
418.6 

383.3 
370.2 
105.2 
265.0 
12.5 



Misc. food 

and 
kindred 
products 
(SIC 209) 



4 498 

3 026 

1 161 

309 

137.0 
850.7 



94.3 
92.7 
92.8 
95.4 
96.4 

193.1 

47.2 
47.2 



500.5 

007.7 

333.7 

561.9 

49.4 

49.0 

13.5 

945.3 
667.7 



1 018.3 
343.7 
118.9 
555.6 

1 083.7 
364.0 
109.5 
609.9 

243.6 
225.7 

56.8 
168.9 

17.1 



Note- Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or indepe 
Appendix, Explanation of Terms. 



at dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) in compute 



(X) Not applicable 



(NA) Not available. 



Standard notes - Represents zero 
and (or under 50 employees). 

*The value of shipments and cost of materials for industry groups (2- and 3-digit) includes extens 
For a more complete explanation, see Introduction. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. (Z) Under 50 thous 
duplication arising from shipments between establishments in the same industry. 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



This report shows 1967 Census of Manufactures statistics for establishments classified 
in each of the following industries: 

SIC Code and Title 

201 1-- Meatpacking Plants 

2013--Sausages and Other Prepared Meat Products 

2015--Poultry and Small Game Dressing and Packing, Wholesale 

The general statistics (employment, payrolls, value of shipments, cost of materials, 
inventories, etc.) are reported for each establishment as a whole. Aggregates of 
such data for an industry reflect not only the primary activities of the establishments 
in the industry, but also their activities in the manufacture of secondary products and, 
for that matter, their miscellaneous activities (contract work on materials owned by 
others, repair work, etc.). This fact should be taken into account in comparing industry 
statistics (tables 1 to 4) with product statistics (table 6 A) showing shipments by all 
industries of the primary products of the specified industry. The extent of the "product 
mix" is indicated in table 5A which shows the value of primary and secondary products 
shipped by establishments classified in the specified industry and also the value of primary 
products of the industry shipped as secondary products by establishments classified in 
other industries. 

2011--MEATPACKING PLANTS 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in the slaughtering, for their 
own account or on a contract basis for the trade, of cattle, hogs, sheep, lambs, calves, 
horses and other animals except small game, for meat to be sold or to be used on the 
same premises in canning and curing, and in making sausage, lard, and other products. 
Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing sausages and meat specialties from 
purchased meats are classified in industry 2013; and establishments primarily engaged 
in killing, dressing, packing, and canning poultry, rabbits and other small game in 
industry 2015. For a detailed list of products of industry 2011, refer to table 6A, 
product codes 2011000 to 2011998. 

Some slaughtering operations are conducted in establishments which are not included 
in the census of manufactures, such as those chiefly engaged in wholesale or retail 
trade, locker plant services, etc. A check of the 1963 Census of Manufactures records 
with those of the U.S. Department of Agriculture indicated that the census of manufactures 
included about 90 percent of the volume of commercial livestock slaughter. A similar 
comparison of the 1967 census slaughter statistics with those of the U.S. D. A. indicates 
that coverage of commerical slaughter is about at the same level. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of Meatpacking plants in 1967 totaled$15,576.3 
million. This included shipments of meatpacking plant products (primary products), 
valued at $14,619.5 million, shipments of other products (secondary products) valued 
at $251.0 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract work on materials owned 
by others) of $705.8 million. 



20A-1 



This industry's shipments of meatpacking plant products (primary products) in 1967 
represented 98 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary 
and secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 98 percent. Secondary 
products shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of sausages and other prepared 
meats ($2,860.3 million), and animal and marine fats and oils ($180.1 million). 

Industry 2011 shipments of meatpacking plant products (primary products) in 1967 
represented 85 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $17,248.4 million 
shipped by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 86 percent. Other industries 
shipping meatpacking plant products (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 
2013, Sausages and Other Prepared Meats, $46.0 million; industry 2094, Animal and 
Marine Fats and Oils, $13.8 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 
employees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2011, these establishments accounted for approximately 0.9 percent of 
payroll and 1.7 percent of value added by manufacture. 

2013--SAUSAGES AND OTHER PREPARED MEAT PRODUCTS 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing sausages, 
cured meats, smoked meats, canned meats, frozen meats, and other prepared meats 
and meat specialties, from purchased carcasses and other materials. Sausage kitchens 
and other prepared meat plants operated by packing houses as separate establishments 
also are included in this industry. Establishments primarily engaged in killing, dressing, 
and packing poultry, rabbits, and other small game, and those canning poultry are clas- 
sified in industry 2015. Establishments primarily engaged in the cutting up and resale 
of purchased fresh carcasses are classified in trade industries. For a detailed list of 
products of industry 2013, refer to table 6A, product codes 2013000 to 2013961. 

A considerable volume of prepared meats are produced in manufacturers wholesale 
branches that are primarily engaged in the wholesale distribution of meat and therefore 
classified as wholesale establishments in the 1967 census. The volume of prepared meats 
manufactured in these establishments was not measured in the 1967 census. Prepared 
meats manufactured in retail and independent wholesale establishments are also not 
included in the census of manufactures statistics. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the sausages and other prepared meats 
industry in 1967 totaled $3,007.7 million. This included shipments of meat processing 
plant products (primary products), valued at $2, 500. 4 million, shipments of other products 
(secondary products) valued at $94.4 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract 
work on materials owned by others) of $412.9 million. 

This industry's shipments of meat processing plant products (primary products) in 
1967 represented 96 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary 
and secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 94 percent. Secondary 
products shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of meatpacking plant products 
($46.0 million), and canned specialties ($15.6 million). 



20A-2 



Industry 2013 shipments of sausages and other prepared meats (primary products) in 
1967 represented 46 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $5,418.2 million 
shipped by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 40 percent. Other industries 
shipping sausages and other prepared meats (primary products) consisted mainly of 
industry 2011, Meatpacking Plants, $2,860.3 million; industry 2032, Canned Specialties, 
$41.7 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 
employees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 201 3, these establishments accounted for approximately 1.3 percent of 
payroll and 2.0 percent of value added by manufacture. 

2015-- POULTRY AND SMALL GAME DRESSING AND PACKING, WHOLESALE 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in slaughtering, dressing, 
packing, freezing, and canning poultry, rabbits, and other small game for their own 
account or on a contract basis for the trade. This industry also includes the drying, 
freezing, and breaking of eggs; but not the cleaning, oil treating, packing and grading of 
eggs which are classified in industry 5044. For a detailed list of products of industry 
2015, refer to table 6A, product codes 2015000 to 2015657. 



The code 
and 1963. 



number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 



Value of shipments and other receipts of the Poultry Dressing Plants in 1967 totaled 
$2,936.1 million. This included shipments of poultry dressing plant products (primary 
products), valued at $2,752.4 million, shipments of other products (secondary products) 
valued at $37.2 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract work on materials 
owned by others) of $146.5 million. 

This industry's shipments of poultry dressing plant products (primary products) in 
1967 represented 99 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary 
and secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 98 percent. Secondary 
products shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of creamery butter ($6.3 
million), and frozen fruits and vegetables ($6.7 million). 

Industry 2015 shipments of poultry dressing plant products (primary products) in 
1967 represented 98 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $2,809.6 million 
shipped by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 98 percent. Other industries 
shipping poultry dressing plant products (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 
2021, Creamery Butter, $6.8 million; industry 2037, Frozen Fruits and Vegetables, $15.5 
million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 
employees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. For 
industry 2015, these establishments accounted for approximately 0.8 percent of payroll and 
1.4 percent of value added by manufacture. 



20A-3 



20A-4 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



table ia. General Statistics: 1958 to 1967 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 





Establishments 


All employees 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 


Cost of 
materials 

(million 
dollars) 


Value of 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 


Capital 
expend- 
itures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 


End-of- 

year 
inven- 
tories 

(million 
dollars) 


Special- 
ization 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




Year 


Total 
(number) 


With 20 
employ- 
ees 
or more 
(number) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Man-hours 
(millions) 


Wages 

(million 
dollars) 


Coverage 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




INDUSTRY 2011. — MEATPACKING PLANTS 


1967 Census. . . . 
1966 ASM' 

1963 Census. . . . 

1960 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


3 2,697 

(NA) 

(na) 

(NA) 
2,992 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
2,810 


955 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

976 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

980 


170.5 
173.4 
179.8 
182.7 
180.9 
185.7 
189.4 
194.3 
197.3 
201.0 


1,258.1 
1,207.4 
1,210.5 
1,226.5 
1,146.9 
1,162.0 
1,144.2 
1,139.5 
1,102.0 
1,068.8 


130.8 
132.0 
136.9 
138.6 
138.4 
141.7 
143.5 
147.8 
149.7 
150.9 


274.1 
278. 1 
285.9 
310.1 
289.3 
298.2 
303.0 
312.9 
312.7 
309. 3 


920.8 
880.3 
883.1 
902.5 
847.0 
845.5 
828.4 
827.1 
797.8 
768.6 


2,220.5 
2,021.3 
2,056.4 
2,127.9 
1,908.3 
1,987.0 
1,890.3 
1,911.8 
1,834.0 
1,749.3 


13,384.3 
13,045.3 
11,879.5 
10,858.7 
10,530.9 
10,531.2 
10,068.4 
9,911.9 
9,960.4 
10,251.1 


15,576.3 
15,040.8 
13,909.2 
12,973.3 
12,435.5 
12,491.4 
11,938.7 
11,828.3 
11,810.4 
11,972.5 


109.4 
104.1 
101.0 
94.7 
80.2 
90.9 
75.5 
77.2 
67.5 
65.9 


478.0 
451.3 
435.8 
416.1 
408. 1 
411.3 
395.6 
381.6 
370.0 
408.0 


98 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

98 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

98 


85 

(na) 
(na) 
(na) 

86 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(na) 

88 




INDUSTRY 2013.— SAUSAGES AND OTHER PREPARED MEATS 


1967 Census. . . . 

1965 ASM 1 

1964 ASM 1 

1963 Census. 

1961 ASM 1 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


1,374 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,341 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,494 


560 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

483 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

496 


54.4 
48.4 
49.0 
50.9 
48.6 
46.9 
46.5 
48.4 
49.5 
48.6 


378.4 
316.6 
307.8 
314.5 
289.4 
268.1 
257.1 
254.6 
247.8 
236.9 


40.4 
35.6 
36.6 
38.0 
36.4 
36.6 
36.4 
38.4 
38.3 
36.5 


84.0 
74.7 
75.3 
81.5 
76.0 
73.3 
73.0 
76.8 
76.6 
74.1 


250.8 
208.3 

205.1 
213.0 
195.2 
179.9 
171.1 
173.8 
169.0 
161.8 


742.5 
624.6 
607.3 
596.9 
563.4 
492.7 
458.3 
461.5 
461.4 
442.1 


2,261.0 
1,888.6 
1,721.7 
1,699.8 
1,568.7 
1,637.3 
1,580.8 
1,539.9 
1,538.9 
1,636.2 


3,007.7 
2,502.4 
2,323.1 
2,296.6 
2,130.3 
2,133.7 
2,048.2 
2,007.9 
2,005.4 
2,066.3 


30.4 
33.2 
51.6 
29.8 
21.4 
19.3 
17.3 
20.1 
14.0 
17.2 


129.3 

119.6 

109.8 

101.6 

96.6 

99.2 

94.5 

103.8 

107.2 

115.4 


96 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

94 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

97 


46 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

40 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

33 




INDUSTRY 2015 .-POULTRY DRESSING PLANTS 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM' 

1965 ASM' 

1964 ASM' 

1963 Census. . . . 

1962 ASM' 

1961 ASM' 

1960 ASM' 

1959 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


843 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
967 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
1,233 


514 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

559 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

594 


85.2 

75.2 
72.2 
71.3 
70.1 
66.9 
71.1 
67.8 
66.3 
62.4 


317.1 

263.2 
232.0 
218.8 
204.4 

190.2 
194.0 
178.1 
171.7 
160.8 


77.7 

68.2 
65.4 
64.8 
63.8 
61.9 
65.5 
62.7 
61.1 
56.1 


149.9 

134.1 
127.4 
123.6 
120.2 
115.2 
122.0 
112.4 
111 .0 
104 .2 


263.5 

217 .0 
191. S 

181.5 
169.9 
156.7 
160.4 
147.3 
140.9 
132.0 


588.0 

559.3 
465.8 
422.2 
410.9 
374.4 
366.8 
369.1 
331.4 
310.6 


2,358.5 

2,20 9.9 
2,024.3 
1,908.8 
1,840.8 
1,710.6 
1,706.7 
1,699.2 
1,564.7 
1,582.9 


2,936.1 

2,754.1 
2,490 .2 
2,329.5 
2,240 .9 
2,078.2 
2,084 .0 
2,053.8 
1,897 .9 
1,888.2 


57.2 

43.6 
31 .9 
21 .3 
34 .3 
19.3 
19.2 
23.0 
24.5 
28.1 


135.6 

10 9.9 
93.4 
95 .8 
93.3 
77.5 
77.3 
82.6 
71.4 
77 .1 


99 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
98 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(na) 

98 


98 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(na) 

98 
(NA) 

(na) 
(na) 
(na) 

98 



Note: In 1967, 1963, and 1958, the number of companies in industry 2011 was 2,529, 2,833, and 2,646, resprctively ; in industry 2013: 1,294, 1,273, 
and 1,430; industry 2015: 709, 842, and 1,095. The 1967 company counts include the small companies whose data were estimated from administrative 
records. The number of such companies is shown in table 4. 



Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 
companies. (s) Withheld because the estimate did not meet publication standards, either on the basis of the associated standard error of 
estimate or on the basis of a consistency review. *These figures either have associated standard errors exceeding 15 percent or are not 
consistent with other Census series and related data. Thus, these estimates may be of limited reliability. 

'Based on representative sample of establishments canvassed in the annual survey of manufactures (ASM). These estimates may differ from the 
results of a complete canvass of all manufacturing establishments. The percentage standard errors are shown in the ASM volume. 
2 Data prioi to 1958 appear in Volume II, 1963 census of Manufactures, in table 1 of the chapter devoted to this industry. 

3 Some of the small establishments in this industry may have been misclassif led as to industry. This does not significantly affect the statistics 
other than the number of establishments (See section of text on scope and coverage for further explanation). 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



20A-5 



table ib Selected Operating Ratios: 1958 to 1967 



'See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Year 


Payroll 

per 
employee 

(dollars) 


Production 
worker as 

percent of 
total 

employment 
(percent) 


Annual 
man-hours 

of 
production 

workers 
(number) 


Average 

hourly 

earnings of 

production 

workers 

(dollars) 


Cost Of 

materials 

per dollar 

of shipments 

(dollars) 


Cost Of 
materials and 
payrolls per 

dollar 
shipments 
(dollars) 


Value 
added per 
employee 

(dollars) 


Payrolls 

as percent 

of value 

added 

(percent) 


Value 
added per 
man-hour of 
production 

worker 
(dollars) 




INDUSTRY 2011.— MEATPACKING PLANTS 




7,379 
6,964 
6,732 
6,714 
6,341 
6,257 
6,043 
5,865 
5,584 
5,317 


77 
76 
76 
76 
76 
76 
76 
76 
76 
75 


2,096 
2,107 
2,088 
2,237 
2,091 
2,104 
2,112 
2,117 
2,090 
2,049 


3.36 
3.17 
3.09 
2.91 
2.93 
2.84 
2.73 
2.64 
2.55 
2.48 


.86 
.87 
.85 
.84 
.85 
.84 
.84 
.84 
.84 
.86 


.94 
.95 
.94 
.93 
.94 
.94 
.94 
.93 
.94 
.95 


12,949 

11,658 

11,436 

11,649 

10,551 

10,699 

9,983 

9,840 

9,294 

8,702 


57 
60 
59 
58 
60 
58 
61 
60 
60 
61 






8.05 


1965 ASM 

1964 ASM 


7 .27 
7.19 




6.86 




6.60 


1961 ASM 


6 .66 




6.24 


1959 ASM 


6.11 




5 .86 
5.66 






INDUSTRY 2013.— SAUSAGES AND OTHER PREPARED MEATS 




6,954 
6,548 
6,287 
6,185 
5,955 
5,715 
5,533 
5,255 
5,007 
4,876 


74 
74 
75 
75 
75 
78 
78 
79 
77 
75 


2,079 
2,098 
2,056 
2,147 
2,090 
2,004 
2,006 
2,001 
2,001 
2,032 


2.99 
2.79 
2.72 
2.61 
2.57 
2.46 
2.35 
2.26 
2.20 
2.18 


.75 
.75 
.74 
.74 
.74 
.77 
.77 
.77 
.77 
.79 




13,627 

12,918 

12,405 

11,737 

11,592 

10,503 

9,864 

9,526 

9,324 

9,098 


51 
51 
51 
53 
51 
54 
56 
55 
54 
54 


8.83 






88 
87 
88 
87 
89 
90 
89 
89 
91 


1965 ASM 






7 .32 
7 .42 
6.73 
6.28 
6.01 
6.02 
5.97 


1962 ASM 




1960 ASM 


1959 ASM 






INDUSTRY 2015.— POULTRY DRESSING PLANTS 




3,723 
3,501 
3,213 
3,067 
2,916 
2,842 
2,729 
2,628 
2,589 
2,578 


91 
91 
91 
91 
91 
93 
92 
93 
92 
90 


1,929 
1,965 
1,947 
1,906 
1,883 
1,861 
1,863 
1,792 
1,819 
1,856 


1.76 
1.62 
1.51 

1.47 
1.41 
1.36 
1.31 
1.31 
1.27 
1.27 


.80 
.80 
.81 
.82 
.82 
.82 
.82 
.83 
.82 
.84 


.91 
.90 
.91 
.91 
.91 
.91 
.91 
.91 
.91 


6,922 
7,439 
6,450 
5,917 
5,861 
5,595 
5,159 
5,444 
4,998 
4.978 


54 
47 
50 
52 
50 
51 
53 
48 
52 
52 




1966 ASM 


3.93 


1965 ASM 


4 .17 


1964 ASM 

1963 Census 


3.65 
3.42 


1962 ASM 


3.42 


1961 ASM 


3.25 


1960 ASM 


3.01 


1959 ASM 


3.28 


1958 Census 













Standard notes: 
companies . 



- Represents zero. 



[X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not available. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



20A-6 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



table 2. General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Industry and geographic area 1 



1967 



Establishments 



Total 

(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 
employees 

(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



2011 — MEATPACKING PLANTS 



UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION .... 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION . . . 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 2 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

OHIO 

INDIANA. . 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN . 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA . . 

KANSAS 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . 

MARYLAND 

VIRGINIA 

WEST VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH CAROLINA . . 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA 

MISSISSIPPI 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

MONTANA 

IDAHO. . 

WYOMING 

COLORADO 

NEW MEXICO 

ARIZONA 

UTAH 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA 

HAWAII 



2013— SAUSAGES AND OTHER PREPARED MEATS 

UNITED STATES. . . 

NORTHEAST REGION 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION 

MAINE 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

CONNECTICUT 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . . . . 

NEW YORK , 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

See footnotes at end of table. 



2 697 
354 



309 
86 
35 

188 

936 

569 
172 

90 
111 
127 

69 

367 
40 

66 
83 
13 
20 
75 
70 

958 

355 
31 
45 
32 
85 
37 
88 
34 

227 

70 
67 

47 
43 

376 

44 

67 

66 

199 

449 

203 
27 
35 
13 
54 
18 
20 
31 

246 
58 
58 

121 



1 374 

443 

111 

5 

8 

61 

25 

332 

175 

62 

95 



955 
109 

10 
1 
4 

99 
23 
13 
63 

351 

196 
62 
26 

45 
40 
23 

155 
16 
38 
26 
2 
10 
39 
24 

314 

116 
10 
20 
7 
27 
12 
22 
18 

76 
17 
26 
19 

14 

122 

11 
12 
23 
76 

181 

68 
8 

12 
3 

18 
6 



113 
21 
12 
75 



560 
203 

43 
3 
5 

28 

7 

160 

77 
32 
51 



170.5 
12.2 



11.6 
3.1 
1.3 
7.2 

95.9 

31.7 
9.3 
4.8 
7.9 
2.7 
7.1 

64.1 

13.3 

22.6 

7.2 

AA 

FF 

10.1 

6.0 

42.1 

15.7 
2.1 
4.3 
.6 
2.3 
1.4 
3.2 
1.7 

12.2 
2.5 

4.9 
2.3 
2.5 

14.2 
CC 
.9 

EE 
10.1 

20.3 



CC 

.7 

1.1 



12.2 

2.7 

CC 

8. 2 

AA 



54.4 
18.8 



4.7 
.2 



BB 

14.1 
6.7 
3.0 
4.3 



1 258.1 
85.3 

3.9 

(D) 
1.4 

81.4 

22.1 

9.3 

49.9 

764.0 

245.2 
68.3 
36.9 
61.9 
18.5 
59.6 

516.8 
111.0 

184.4 
56.2 

(D) 

(D) 

82.0 

47.4 

252.7 

89.6 
13.5 
26.0 

3.1 
U.7 

7.5 
18.1 

9.7 

77.4 
18.8 
32.7 
11.9 
14.0 

85.7 
(Dl 
4.8 
(Dl 

61.1 

156.1 

57.8 
5.7 
(D) 
(D) 

27.9 
(D) 
5.6 
8.2 

98.3 
20.5 

(D) 
68.9 

(D) 



378.4 
136.6 

34.3 
1.4 
2.1 

27.9 
(Dl 

102.4 
51.6 
23.2 
27.5 



130.8 

9.2 

.5 

(0) 

.2 

8.6 
2.3 
1.1 
5.2 

74.5 

24.4 
7.0 
3.5 
6.1 
2.1 
5.6 

50.1 
9.9 

18.3 
5.4 
(D) 
(D) 
8.2 
4.4 



11.8 
1.5 
3.3 



1.1 

2.4 
1.4 

9.2 
1.8 
3.6 
1.9 
1.9 

10.9 

(D) 

.7 

(D) 

7.8 

15.3 

6.3 
.6 

ID) 
(D) 
3.1 
(D) 
.6 



9.0 
2.1 
(D) 
5.9 
(0) 



40.4 

14.0 

3.5 
.2 
.3 

2.7 
(0) 

10.5 
5.2 
2.1 
3.2 



274.1 
18.9 



(Dl 
.4 

17.8 
4.7 
2.2 



154.3 

51.3 
14.6 
7.8 
13.0 

4.3 
11.6 

103.0 
19.6 
37.8 

11.3 
(D) 
(D) 

17.2 
9.4 

69.6 



2.6 

7.6 
.9 
3.6 
2.3 
5.3 
3.1 

21.0 
4.2 
8.3 
4.0 
4.4 

23.3 

(D) 

1.5 

(D) 

16.4 

31.3 

13.1 
1.2 

(D) 
(D) 
6.3 
(D) 
1.2 
1.7 

18.2 
4.2 
(D) 

12.1 

(D) 



84.0 

28.9 

7.1 

.3 

.6 

5.5 

(Dl 

21.9 
11.0 

4.4 
6.4 



920.8 

60.2 

2.7 
(D) 
1.1 

57.5 

15.0 

7.6 

34.8 

579.8 

178.3 
48.4 
25.7 
45.1 
13.4 
45.8 

401.5 

85.0 

146.4 

40.9 

(0) 

(D) 

64.9 

34.9 

172.2 

59.2 

8.6 
17.5 
1.9 
8.0 
5.0 
11.5 
6.6 

S3. 5 

13.1 

22.4 
8.6 
9.4 

59.5 

(D) 

3.2 

(D) 

42.9 

108.6 

41.9 
3.8 
(D) 
(Dl 

21.5 
(D! 
4.1 
5.7 

66.7 
15.1 

(Dl 

45.2 

(Dl 



250.8 
90.0 



1.6 

17.6 

(0) 

68.3 
35.8 
14.2 
18.4 



2 220.5 

179.1 

8.6 

(D) 
4.2 

170.6 
52.0 
23.2 
95.4 



392.0 
118.0 
59.0 
99.4 
32.5 
83.0 

864.9 
183.0 
317.8 

92.0 

(Dl 

■ (Dl 

152.9 

71 .2 

483.5 

179.9 
24.4 
52.4 
6.3 
22.8 
22.5 
28.1 
21.7 

140.4 
35.2 
59.0 
19.0 
27.1 

164.6 

(D) 

13.8 

(D) 

113.3 

301 .0 

120.4 

12.7 

(D) 

(D) 

61.6 

(D) 

8.5 

15.1 

180.6 
39.6 

(D) 
123.1 

(D) 



257.2 

68.6 
2.7 
4.8 

52.7 
(0) 

188.6 
95.1 
41.5 
52.0 



13 384.3 
893.2 



27.5 

835.9 
167.2 
193.7 
474.9 

8 140.5 

2 288.1 
574.6 
303.5 
629.6 
272.7 
507,7 

5 852.4 
937,3 

2 193.4 
591.2 

(01 

(Dl 

1 230.0 

536.9 



718.5 
76.9 

216.9 
23.3 

105.3 
48.9 

140.5 

106.4 

660.8 
128.2 
305.6 
96.7 
130.3 

820.9 

(D) 

34.0 

(D) 

622.1 



861 .0 

61.8 

(D) 

(D) 

496.8 

(D) 

63.4 

93.2 

289.3 
204.9 

(Dl 
991.0 

(Dl 



793.9 

207.4 

9.2 

16.2 

168.2 

(D) 

586.5 
281.7 
112.2 
192.5 



15 576.3 

1 070.9 

65.8 

(0) 

31.5 

1 005.1 
218.6 
216.9 
569.6 

9 368.6 

2 675.0 
692.6 
361.9 
726.4 
304.9 
589.2 

6 693.7 

1 119.6 

2 497.7 
682.4 

(Dl 
(D) 

1 382.9 
601 .3 

2 681 .1 

897.7 
100.4 
268.3 

29.5 
128.3 

71.4 
169.1 
128.6 

802.7 
164.5 
363.8 
116.8 
157.5 

982.2 

(D) 

47.7 

(D) 

732.8 



983.6 

74.6 

ID) 

(D) 

559.2 

(D) 

71.8 

109.6 

1 472.1 

244.9 

(Dl 

1 116.1 

(Dl 



275.2 
11.8 
20.6 

220.6 
(Dl 

773.8 
376.1 
153.6 
244.0 



109.4 
7.3 

.2 

(D) 
(Z) 

7.1 

2.1 

.5 

4.5 

56.4 

26,1 
4.1 
3.2 

14.3 
1.2 
3.3 

30.3 
3.6 
9.6 
2.2 

(Dl 
(Dl 
9.9 

4.1 

30.1 

9.0 
.5 

2.4 
.3 

1.5 

.4 

2.1 

1.7 

10.8 

6.0 

2.6 

.8 

1.5 

10.3 

(D) 

.3 

(D) 
4.9 

15.6 

9.0 
.9 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 
5.8 
(D) 

6.6 
1.2 
(D! 

4.9 
(Dl 



180.9 

15.8 

1.2 

2 (D) 

.3 

14.6 
4.1 
3.0 
7.5 

104.0 

36.1 
9.2 
7.6 
9.9 
2.7 
6.8 

67.9 
13.5 
23.6 
7.7 
2 (D) 
2 (D) 
3 
1 



10 



41.1 

15.6 
2.4 
3.9 
.7 
2.0 
1.4 
3.2 
1.9 

11,5 
2.7 
4.6 
2.1 
2.1 

14.0 
1.1 

1.0 
2.3 
10.0 

19.5 

8.4 

.7 

.8 

2 (DI 

4.0 
.6 
.8 

1.3 

11.1 

2.3 

1.3 

7.1 

.3 



.1 


.1 


.1 


.3 


1.4 


3.6 


(Dl 


(3) 


8,5 


12.3 


2,3 


7.0 


3.6 


1.8 


2.5 


3.5 



1 908.3 
175.5 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



20A-7 



table 2. General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Industry and geographic area 1 



Total 
(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 
employees 



(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



2013 — SAUSAGES AND OTHER PREPARED 
MEATS — CON. 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . • 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

OHIO 

INDIANA. ........... 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION, 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA . . . ' 

MISSOURI 

NEBRASKA . . . . 

KANSAS 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . , 

MARYLAND . . . , 

VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA. . 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION, 

TENNESSEE 6 

ALABAMA 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION, 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION. . . . . , 
COLORADO , 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON 

CALIFORNIA 



2015 — POULTRY DRESSING PLANTS 



UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION . . . , 

MAINE 

'MASSACHUSETTS 6 . , 

CONNECTICUT 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . , 

NEW YORK . . , 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . , 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION, 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN. ... 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION, 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA , 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . , 

DELAWARE 

MARYLAND 

VIRGINIA , 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH CAROLINA , 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA , 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION, 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA 

MISSISSIPPI , 

> footnotes at end of tabj.e. 



432 
337 

57 
23 
127 
74 
56 

95 
22 
20 
27 
11 



155 
20 
13 
40 
8 
34 
34 

63 
26 
13 

97 
14 
14 
66 



35 

12 

149 

11 

117 



88 
27 
17 

44 



142 
55 
30 
23 
14 
20 

123 
31 
28 
33 

4 
2 
15 
10 



169 
9 
17 
17 
46 
13 
42 
18 

72 
8 
10 
33 
21 



184 

14h 



51 
35 
25 

40 
13 



59 
12 
6 
11 

3 



12 
6 

3 

28 
6 
5 

17 



9 
6 

65 

7 

54 



514 
51 



3 
1 

43 
11 
10 

22 



55 

20 

14 

9 

3 



90 
26 

17 

25 

4 

1 

11 

6 



121 
7 
13 
12 
28 
11 
35 
14 

52 

5 

6 

24 

17 



19.9 

15.4 

2.3 

.9 
7.4 
3.2 

1.5 

4.5 

1.3 

CC 

1.2 

.6 

.4 

9.0 

5.3 

1.7 

.3 

.7 
.3 

.5 

1.7 



6.7 

2.2 
EE 
.5 

BB 

4.6 
.9 
.6 

3.1 

18.3 

5.7 
1.5 
1.7 
1.0 
.3 
1.3 



53.1 

29.1 
EE 
3.7 
2.8 
6.7 
2.1 
9.8 
1.5 

10.1 

.4 

1.2 

5.0 

3.5 



139.6 
112.9 

16.1 

7.6 

56.3 

23.2 

9.7 

26.6 
7.7 
ID) 
7.4 
3.1 
2.9 

49.5 

29.9 
11.5 

1.6 
3.4 
1.5 
2.9 
8.3 

5.3 
2.5 
2.0 

14.3 
2.9 
(D) 
9.7 

52.7 

4.0 
2.7 

48.7 

2.6 

45.1 



317.1 

28.7 

9.3 
(D) 
1.9 
(Dl 

19.4 
3.9 
2.1 

13.4 

69.2 

22.3 
5.7 
6.0 
4.3 
1.1 
5.1 

46.9 
17.2 
'01 
10.2 
(D) 
(D) 
8.6 
3.3 

188.0 

104.3 

(D) 

13.7 

10.2 

22.4 

7.4 

36.6 

4.8 

36.3 

1.5 
4.6 
18,2 
12.0 



15.1 
11.5 



2.2 

1.0 

3.5 
1.1 
(01 
1.0 



6.3 

3.7 
1.2 
.2 
.5 
.2 
.4 
1.2 

.7 
.3 

.2 

1.9 

.4 

(D) 

1.4 



1.9 
(D) 



5.1 
1.3 
1.5 
.8 
.3 
1.2 

11.7 
4.3 
(D) 
2.5 
(D) 
(D) 
2.3 
.6 

48.7 

26.6 

(0) 
3.4 
2.7 
6.0 
1.9 
9.0 
1.4 

9.2 

.4 
1.0 
4.7 
3.1 



31.8 
24.4 

3.7 
1.5 
12.4 
4.7 
2.1 

7.4 
2.0 
(Dl 
2.2 



7.6 
2.4 
.4 
.9 
.4 
.8 
2.6 



(D) 
2.8 



10.3 
1.2 



9.1 

.5 

8.3 



149.9 

11.7 

3.6 

(D) 

.9 

(D) 

8.1 
1.5 

.8 
5.8 

31.6 

9.6 
2.4 
2.9 
1.6 
.5 
2.2 

22.0 
8.0 
(0) 
4.6 
(0) 
ID) 
4.5 
1.2 

95.4 

51.9 
(D) 
6.5 
5.4 

11.5 
3.3 

18.1 
2.4 

18.6 

.8 

1.9 

9.8 

6.0 



94.8 
76.3 



40.3 
14.4 
6.0 

18.5 
5.4 
<0l 
5.5 
2.1 
1.8 

30.6 

18.1 
7.6 
1.0 
1.8 
.7 
1.5 
5.3 

3.0 
1.4 
1.0 

9.5 
1.7 

(D) 
6.8 

35.4 

3.2 

2.2 

32.3 

1.7 
29.9 



22.7 

7.2 
(D) 
1.7 
(Dl 

15.4 
3.1 
1.7 

10.6 

56.4 

17.4 
4.3 
4.7 
3.2 
.9 
4.2 

39.0 
14.4 
(Dl 
8.3 
(Dl 
(01 
7.7 
2.2 

159.3 

87.7 

(D) 
11.6 

9.2 
18.1 

5.9 
30.9 

4.0 

30.6 
1.3 
3.6 

16.2 
9.5 



266.6 
211.9 



29. 
21. 



• 1 
.3 

96.0 
48.0 
17.5 

54.7 
12.5 
(D) 
15.3 
6.7 
9.5 

112.2 

61.2 
22.2 
4.2 
7.3 
3.1 
6.6 
16.3 

11.8 
5.9 
3.6 

40.3 
5.4 
(D) 

30.4 

105.5 

7.6 
4.7 

97.9 

3.8 
92.2 



51.2 

13.8 
(D) 
4.0 
(D) 

37.4 
6.9 
5.5 

24.9 

125.3 

39.0 
7.8 

12.4 
8.9 
1.7 
8.3 

86.3 
26.8 

(Oi 
19.6 

(D) 

(D) 
19.4 

6.5 

351.4 

186.3 
(Dl 
22.7 
18.3 
43.6 
10.8 
62.3 
12.0 

65.5 

1.4 

7.3 

38.7 

18.0 



790.4 
624.8 

80.9 
34.2 
347.4 
121.7 
40.4 

165.6 
41.8 
(0) 
53.9 
18.3 
16.1 

341.9 

206.0 
66.1 
10,8 
29.0 
8.1 
17.4 
71.7 

34.5 
17.5 
12.6 

101.3 

16.3 

(Dl 

73.6 

334.7 

22.6 

17.5 

312.1 

13.3 

292.9 



204.4 

66.3 

(D) 

18.7 

(D) 

138.1 
23.0 
15.7 
99.4 

473.2 

150.9 
41.9 
40.3 
19.6 
3.9 
45.2 

322.3 

115.0 

(0) 

76.0 

(D) 

(D) 

43.9 

23.0 



784.0 

ID) 

101.5 

92.9 
182.2 

30.0 
273.9 

38.9 

290.8 
13.8 
34.9 

152.7 
89.5 



1 062.7 
842.9 

110.2 

56.1 

449.2 

169.3 

58.0 

219.8 
54.0 
(D) 
68.7 
25.6 
25.6 

453.7 

267.4 
88.3 
15.4 
36.2 
11.3 
24.1 
87.6 

46.4 
23.6 
16.2 

141.0 

21.6 

(D) 

103.4 

441.2 

30.4 
22.2 

410.8 

17.0 

386.0 



254.9 

80.5 
(Dl 

22.8 
(D) 

174.4 
30.1 
20.8 

123.5 

594.4 

188.9 
49.2 
52.6 
27.8 
5.7 
53.7 

405.5 

139.8 

(0) 

96.2 

(D) 

(D) 

62.2 

28.4 



966.4 
(Dl 
123.2 
111.6 
224.6 

41.2 
333.7 

50.6 

357.1 

15.2 

42.3 

192.1 

107.5 



9.7 

7.4 

1.4 

.6 

2.7 

2.1 

.6 

2.2 
.5 

'Dl 
.7 

(Dl 
.1 

5.7 

3.5 
1.0 
.1 
.6 
.2 
.2 



1.4 

.4 

(D) 



1.3 
(D) 

3.4 
(D) 
3.1 



1.1 

(D) 

.1 

(Dl 

2.3 
.3 

.1 
1.8 

17.4 

9.2 

7.3 

.9 

.3 

.1 
.6 

8.2 
2.6 
(D) 
2.2 

(Dl 

(Dl 

.8 

.9 

33.5 

23.8 
(D) 
.8 
2.5 
3.7 
3.4 

11.7 



2.9 

(Zl 

.4 

1.2 

1.2 



18.2 
14.9 

1.8 
1.0 
7.5 
3.1 
1.5 

3.3 

1.0 
.3 

1.1 
2.4 
101 

7.6 



1.8 
.2 
.4 

a <o 

.5 
.9 



.3 

*(DI 

4.1 

1.2 

.6 

2.3 

16.4 

5.5 
1.2 
1.5 
.9 
.5 
1.3 

11.0 
3.9 
1.8 
2.3 
! (D) 
.3 
2.0 
a -(D) 

41,1 

20.7 
1.4 
3.4 
2.3 

4.8 

.6 

7.3 



9.5 
.5 
1.3 
4.5 
3.2 



223.3 
187.8 

22.3 

14.7 
98.2 
37.3 
15.3 

35.5 

10.3 

3.2 

11.8 

24.2 

(D) 

77.0 

40.9 
18.0 
3.0 
3.1 
2 ID' 
7.1 
6.4 



2.0 
3 (D) 
2 (D) 

1.3 


23.8 

■".0) 
2 (D) 
15.1 


6.4 


77.6 


.5 
.3 


5.8 

4.3 


5.9 

.4 

5.1 


71.7 

4.6 

65.0 



411.0 

43.3 

18.6 
10.8 
2.7 
"(D) 

24.7 
8.5 
3.8 

12.4 

95.7 

32,9 

7.8 
8.3 
5.9 
2.3 
8.6 

62.8 
20.7 
11.9 
12,4 
2 (D) 
.9 
11.4 
2 (Dl 

223.8 

120.9 

8.7 

20.4 

15.0 

29.3 

2.3 

40.4 

4.0 

48.2 

2.6 

8.1 

23.3 

14.2 



20A-8 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



table 2 General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Industry and geographic area 1 



Establishments 



Total 

(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 

materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 
employees 

(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



2015— POULTRY DRESSING PLANTS 



WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

ARKANSAS ... 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 



WEST REGION. 



MOUNTAIN DIVISION. 

IDAHO 

COLORADO 

UTAH 



PACIFIC DIVISION 
WASHINGTON .... 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA .... 



22 
3 

7 
7 

102 
15 
10 
75 



1.6 
.6 

4.2 



47. a 

26.4 

5.3 

1.9 

13.7 

31.3 



AA 


ID) 


.2 


1.1 


.3 


.9 


.1 


28.4 


.9 


4.7 


CC 


(D) 


.4 


20.6 



12.9 
7.2 
1.5 



(D) 
.2 



(D) 

4.0 



25.0 

14.1 

2.7 

1.0 

7.1 

11.2 

1.3 

(D) 
.4 
.5 



1.5 
(D) 
7.3 



40.9 
23.7 



1.7 
11.4 



2.3 
(D) 



22.9 

4.1 

(D) 
16.4 



99.6 
51.1 
11.5 
5.4 
31.7 

61.7 

6.6 
(D) 
2.3 
2.2 

53.5 
5.6 

(D) 
43.3 



387.2 

203.6 

50.2 

14.9 

118.5 

218.8 

21.0 
(D) 
9.2 
6.2 

197.7 
26.1 

(D) 
152.5 



484.8 

253.4 

61.1 

20.3 

150.0 

280.2 

27.3 
(Dl 

11.6 
8.1 

251.2 

32.1 

(D) 

195.9 



(D) 

.1 
(Z) 

2.7 
(D) 
(D) 
1.8 



10.9 

5.2 

1.0 

.6 

4.2 

6.1 

1.0 
.2 
.3 



2 (D) 
3.8 



54,8 

23.6 

5.4 

2.3 

23.5 

4B.2 

3.3 
1. 1 
1.5 

.5 

44.8 
7.1 
2 (D) 

34.9 



Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) in computer operations. 



Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. For 1967, over 30 

percent of the data for this line was estimated. 

x General statistics for some producing states have to be withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. However, for such States, the number of establishments is 
shown and the employment size range is indicated by one of the following symbols. 



AA - less than 250 employe 
BB - 250 to 499 employees 



CC - 500 to 999 employees 

EE - 1,000 to 2,499 employees 



FF - 2,500 employees and over 



a This State or division was not shown as a separate line in table 2 in the 1963 report for this industry. A footnote to table 2 in the 1963 report showed the number of establishments 
and total employment (either actual or in size ranges) for such States. 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



20A-9 



table 3 Detailed Statistics: 1967 



Hem 



Meatpacking 

plants 
(SIC 2011) 



Sausages 
and other 
prepared 
meats 
(SIC 2013) 



Poultry 
dressing 
plants 
(SIC 2015) 



PRIMARY PRODUCT SPECIALIZATION RATIO 
COVERAGE RATIO 2 . . • . 



ESTABLISHMENTS! TOTAL . .NUMBER 

WITH 1 TO 19 EMPLOYEES DO . 

WITH 20 TO 99 EMPLOYEES DO . 

WITH 100 EMPLOYEES OR MORE. . .DO . 



ALL EMPLOYEES! AVERAGE FOR YEAR 
PAYROLL FOR YEARi ALL EMPLOYEES 



1.000 

MILLION DOLLARS 



PRODUCTION WORKERSI 

AVERAGE FOR YEAR l!000 

MARCH DO . 

MAY . DO . 

AUGUST DO . 

NOVEMBER DO . 



MAN-HOURS MILLIONS 

JANUARY-MARCH DO . 

APRIL-JUNE DO . 

JULY-SEPTEMBER DO . 

OCTOBER-DECEMBER. ..... DO . 



WAGES MILLION DOLLARS 



COST OF MATERIALS! ETC.! TOTAL. . . 
MATERIALS! PARTS! CONTAINERS! ETC. 

COST OF RESALES 

FUELS CONSUMED 

PURCHASED ELECTRIC ENERGY .... 



.DO 
.DO 
• DO 
.DO 
.DO 



CONTRACT WORK DO 



VALUE OF SHIPMENTS! 
VALUE OF RESALES. 



INCLUDING RESALES DO 

DO 



VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURE DO 



MANUFACTURERS' INVENTORIES! 

BEGINNING OF YEARi TOTAL DO 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO 

WORK IN PROCESS . .DO 

MATERIALS! SUPPLIES! FUEL! ETC. . DO 



END OF YEAR! TOTAL DO 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO 

WORK IN PROCESS DO 

MATERIALS! SUPPLIES! FUEL! ETC DO 



EXPENDITURES FOR PLANT AND EQUIPMENT! TOTAL . . .DO 

NEW PLANT AND EQUIPMENT! TOTAL DO 

NEW STRUCTURES AND ADDITIONS TO PLANT . . . .DO 

NEW MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT ........ .DO 

USED PLANT AND EQUIPMENT DO 



170.5 
258.1 



130.8 
130.7 
129.8 
130.8 
131.9 

274.1 
68.3 
67.6 



920.8 

13 384.3 

12.687.7 

620.8 

28.5 

28.2 

19.1 

15 576.3 
675.9 



446.1 

332.6 

39.7 

73.8 

478.0 

362.7 

38.3 

77.0 

117.3 
109.4 
45.2 
64.2 
7.4 



.96 
.46 

1 374 
814 
418 
142 

54.4 
378.4 



40.4 
39.4 
39.8 
41.3 
41.1 

84.0 
20.3 
20.6 
21.6 
21.5 



2 261.0 
1 890.0 

350.7 
7.2 
9.1 
4.0 

3 007.7 
405.3 



130.4 
85.7 
10.3 
34.3 

129.3 

83.0 

9.0 

37.3 

33.4 
30.4 

7.9 
22.5 

2.6 



.99 
.98 

843 
329 
225 
289 

85.2 
317.1 



77.7 
70.9 
73.0 
82.9 
83.9 

149.9 
32.7 
35.6 

40.9 
40.7 

263.5 

358.5 

244.5 

91.8 

6.4 

11.6 

4.2 



936, 
95, 



121.4 

95.8 

3.3 

22.3 

135.6 

104.4 

5.0 

26.2 

58.8 
57.2 
20.6 
36.7 
1.5 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping 
fractions of thousands (rather than rounding Jin computer operations. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms. 



(NA) Not available 



(D) Withheld to 



Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicabl 
avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 

1 The proportion of product shipments (both primary and secondary) of the industry represented by prima 
products . 

2 The proportion of primary products shipped by the establishments classified in the industry to total 
shipments of such products by all manufacturing establishments. 



20A-10 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



table 4 General Statistics, by Employment Size of Establishment: 1967 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Establish- 
ments 



(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



(1,000) 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 



End-of- 
year 
inven- 
tories 
(million 
dollars) 



2011 — MEATPACKING PLANTS 



ESTABLISHMENTS! TOTAL 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF 

1 TO 4 EMPLOYEES" 

5 TO 9 EMPLOYEES 6 

10 TO 19 EMPLOYEES 

20 TO 49 EMPLOYEES 

50 TO 99 EMPLOYEES 

100 TO 249 EMPLOYEES 

250 TO 499 EMPLOYEES 

500 TO 999 EMPLOYEES 

liOOO TO 2i499 EMPLOYEES . . . 
2i500 EMPLOYEES OR MORE. . . . 

ESTABS. COVERED BY AOMIN. RECORDS' 



2013— SAUSAGES AND OTHER PREPARED MEATS 



ESTABLISHMENTS? TOTAL 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OP 

1 TO 4 EMPLOYEES' 5 

5 TO 9 EMPLOYEES 6 . . 

10 TO 19 EMPLOYEES 

20 TO 49 EMPLOYEES 

50 TO 99 EMPLOYEES 

100 TO 249 EMPLOYEES ..... 

250 TO 499 EMPLOYEES 

500 TO 999 EMPLOYEES 

liOOO TO 2 .499 EMPLOYEES . . . 

ESTABS. COVEREO BY AOMIN. RECORDS 1 



2015— POULTRY DRESSING PLANTS 



ESTABLISHMENTS! TOTAL 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF 

1 TO 4 EMPLOYEES 6 

5 TO 9 EMPLOYEES 6 

10 TO 19 EMPLOYEES 

20 TO 49 EMPLOYEES 

50 TO 99 EMPLOYEES 

100 TO 249 EMPLOYEES 

250 TO 499 EMPLOYEES 

500 TO 999 EMPLOYEES 

liOOO TO 2 i 499 EMPLOYEES . . . 

ESTABS. COVERED BY ADMIN. RECORDS' 



170 

281 

291 

420 

221 

169 

84 

30 

23 



466 

181 

167 

289 

129 

104 

28 

10 

1 

442 



55 

99 

126 

192 

80 

15 

2 



1.7 
1.8 
4.1 
13.3 
15.3 
24.7 
29.6 
22.1 
31.7 
26.1 

2.1 



1.2 
2.4 
8.9 
9.1 
15.8 
9.7 
6.6 
(D) 



3.3 

9.2 
30.5 
28.3 
12.2 

(D) 

.8 



9.1 

9.9 

22.2 

80.6 

98.7 

172.2 

223.1 

170.2 

255.0 

217.2 

11.4 



1.1 

2.0 

2.9 

12.5 

33.2 

113.3 

106.1 

45.9 

(D) 

2.5 



130.8 



1.7 
1.7 
3.2 

10.1 
11.6 
19.1 
22.9 

16.4 
23.7 
20.4 

2.1 



1.1 
1.7 
6.5 
6.6 
11.5 
7.5 
4.8 
(D) 



77.7 



2.8 
3.2 
6.5 

21.1 
25.0 
41.9 
49.8 
35.2 
48.7 
40.0 

3.4 



.5 

.9 

1.1 

5.3 

15.1 

53.1 

52.0 

21.9 

(D) 

1.2 



7.1 
7.9 
16.3 
56.1 
68.2 
121.7 
163.9 
121.4 
188.6 
169.6 



2.9 
5.3 

8.7 
35.0 
40.0 
71.6 
52.1 
35.2 

(D) 

3.6 



32.5 
39.6 
56.5 
189.7 
224.5 
323.0 
412. 1 
261.2 
356.2 
325.2 

39.3 



11.1 

16.2 

26.6 

110.8 

130.9 

215.8 

139.0 

92.1 

(D) 

14.7 



74.3 

84.0 

232.4 

1 052.1 

1 506.9 

2 514.8 
2 978.0 
1 575.8 
1 888.7 
1 477.4 

91.1 



106. 
122. 

287. 
1 235. 

1 726. 

2 827. 

3 388. 

1 835. 

2 246. 
1 797. 



38 
56 

97 
427 
493 
853 
656 
385 



2 7.0 


3.2 


.9 


3.3 


2.1 


8.2 


11.4 


31.6 


8.3 


46.3 


24.1 


74.9 


16.4 


82.5 


19.0 


57.0 


13.7 


84.2 


6.4 


86.8 



2 .3 


1.5 


.5 


2.4 


1.2 


4.3 


5.5 


20.3 


5.2 


20.9 


7.4 


36.1 


5.3 


26.5 


5.1 

(D) 


17.3 
(D) 



2 4.1 

.5 

.6 

1.7 

9.7 

16.3 

17.3 

7.1 

(D) 



Note: Detailed figures may not add 
computer operations. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. 

1 Report forms were not mailed to companies that 
Actual payrolls (and sales) for 1967 were obtained 
estimated from industry averages. 

2 Includes an unspecified amount for plants unde 



totals because of independent 



independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather tha 



ounding) in 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not available. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 



aperated only one ■ 
from administrativ 



tablishment and which Social Secu 
records of the Federal Government 



■ity payrolls indicated had fewer than 10 employees. 
The other statistics for these establishments were 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



20A- 11 



table 5A Industry-Product Analysis-Industry and Primary Product Shipments; Specialization Ratios and 

Coverage Ratios: 1967 and 1963 



An establishment is assigned to an industry based on the shipment values of products representing 
the largest amount considered as primary to an industry. Frequently the establishment shipments 
comprise mixtures of products assigned to an industry (primary products), those considered pri- 
mary to other industries (secondary products of a given industry) and receipts for activities such 



as merchandising or contract work. This product pattern for an industry is shown in columns A 
through D and the primary product specialization ratio in column E. The extent to which the 
given industry's primary products are shipped by establishments classified in and out of the 
given industry is summarized in columns F through H and shown as a ratio in column I. 





Industry and census year 


Value of shipments 


Value of primary product shipments 


Ind. 
code 


Total 

(million 
dollars) 


Primary 
products 

(million 
dollars) 


Secondary 
products 

(million 
dollars) 


Miscel- 
laneous 
receipts 

(million 
dollars) 


Primary 
product 
special- 
ization 
ratio 

Col. B 
Col. B+C 
(percent) 


Total, 

made in 

all 
industries 

(million 
dollars) 


Made 
in this 
industry 

(million 
dollars) 


Made in 

other 

industries 

(million 
dollars) 


Coverage 
ratio 

Col. B 

Col. F 

(percent) 




A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


1 


2011 




15,576.3 
12,435.5 

3,007.7 
2,130.3 

2,936.1 
2,240.9 


'14,619.5 
'll, 706.1 

2,500.4 
1,707.4 

2,752.4 
2,059.1 


251.0 
218.5 

2 94.4 
2 105.3 

37.2 
38.1 


705.8 
510.8 

3 412.9 
3 317.6 

146.5 
143.6 


98 
98 

96 

94 

99 
98 


'17, 248. 4 
l 13,545.7 

5,418.2 
4,285.8 

2,809.6 
2,109.6 


'14,619.5 
'11,706.1 

2,500.4 
1,707.4 

2,752.4 
2,059.1 


1 2 2,628.9 
2 1,839.6 

2,917.8 
2,578.5 

57.2 
50.5 


85 
86 

46 
40 

98 
98 


2013 


1963.. 


2015 


1963. . 
Poultry dressing plants 1967.. 




1963. . 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than 
rounding) in computer operations. 



(X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



Standard notes: - Represents zero, 
companies. 

'Includes prepared meats and natural sausage, but excludes fresh meat processed from purchased carcasses, which is classified as resales. 
Includes fresh meat products shipped from plants which did not slaughter animals. 
Includes, as part of resales, fresh meat products processed from purchased carcasses. 



table 5B Industry-Product Analysis— Shipments by Product Class and Industry: 1967 



In millions of dollars. This table shows where products of an industry (referred to as primary and 
listed in table 6A) are made and what products are made by establishments classified in an 
industry. Read down an industry column to find what products are produced in an industry. Read 
across to determine where the products of the industries in this chapter are produced. To the 



extent that some of the primary products are made by industries not included in this chapter, the 
value of such shipments is shown in the "other industries" column. The specific other industries 
are listed at the end of the table if they account for more than $2 million of the products primary 
to this chapter. 



Product 
code 



Class of products, industry, and miscellaneous receipts 



All industries 



Meatpacking 

plants 
(SIC 2011) 



Sausages 

and other 

prepared meats 

(SIC 2013) 



Poultry 

dressing 

plants 

(SIC 2015) 



Other 
industries 



2011- 
20111 
20112 
20113 
20114 
20115 
20119 
20110 

2013- 
20116 
20136 
20117 
20137 
20118 
20138 
20139 
20130 

2015- 
20151 
20153 
20154 
20155 
20156 
20150 



Total shipments and miscellaneous receipts. 



Meatpacking plants 

Beef, not canned or made into sausage 

Veal, not canned or made into sausage 

Lamb and mutton, not canned or made into sausage. 

Pork, fresh and frozen 

Lard 

Hides, skins, and pelts 

Miscellaneous byproducts of meatpacking plants... 



Sausages and other prepared meats. 
y Pork, processed or cured 



■Sausage and similiar products 

Canned meats (except dog and cat food) containing 20 

percent or more meat 

Natural sausage casings 

Meat processing plant products, n.s.k 



Poultry dressing plants 

Hens (or fowl) and chickens 

Turkeys 

Processed poultry, except soups. 
Other poultry and small game.... 
Liquid, dried, and frozen eggs.. 
Poultry dressing plant product, 



See footnotes at end of table. 



(X) 

11,830.2 
7,398.5 
307.7 
312.7 
2,791.0 
182.2 
276.3 
561.7 

5,418.2 
2,008.0 



856.4 

83.4 

183.8 

2,809.6 
1,849.5 
504.7 
141.8 
19.7 
159.6 
134.3 



15,576.3 

11,759.2 
7,380.5 
307.7 
312.4 
2,774.0 
170.0 
265.9 
548.7 

2,860.3 
1,324.0 

1,020.7 

490.4 
(20-50) 



(over 2) 
(under 2) 

(Z) 

(over 2) 



46.0 
17.3 

0.3 
17.0 
8.6 
0.6 
2.1 

2,500.4 
681.8 



314.0 

57.8 

182.8 

(5-10) 

(under 2) 

(2-5) 

(under 2) 



(under 2) 



2,936.1 
(under 2) 



(under 2) 
(under 2) 

(under 2) 
(under 2) 

(Z) 

(under 2) 

1.0 

2,752.4 

1,831.8 

491 j 

133 

(10-2(1 

151 

(100-20C 



(X) 

(20-50) 
.0.7 



3.6 

(5-10) 

(10-20) 

(50-100) 

(1-3) 

1.9 



(50-100) 
(under 2) 



46.1 
15.5 



20A-12 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



table 5B. Industry-Product Analysis— Shipments by Product Class and Industry: 1967-Continued 



Product 
code 



Class of products, industry, and miscellaneous receipts 



All industries 



Meatpacking 

plants 
(SIC 2011) 



Sausages 

and other 

prepared meats 

(SIC 2013) 



Poultry 
dressing 

plants 
(SIC 2015) 



Other 
industries 



2021- 
2023- 
2032- 
2037- 
2042- 
2051- 
2094- 
2096- 
2099- 
2891- 
3079- 



93000 
99989 
95120 
99980 



Other product shipments by 4-digit product group 

Creamery butter 

Condensed and evaporated milk 

Canned specialties 

Frozen fruits and vegetables 

Prepared feeds 

Bread, cake, and related products 

Animal and marine fats and oils 

Shortening and cooking oils 

Food preparations, n.e.c 

Adhesives and gelatin 

Miscellaneous plastic products 

Other secondary products 



Miscellaneous receipts 

Commission receipts 

Resales 

Shell egg sales 

Other miscellaneous receipts. 



Listing of the other industries with over $2 million 
shipments of the primary product 



2011- 


2094 


2011- 


2096 


2011- 


2899 


2013- 


2022 


2013- 


2032 


2013- 


2035 


2013- 


2037 


2015- 


2021 


2015- 


2032 


2015- 


2037 


2015- 


2042 



Animal and marine fats and oils 

Shortening and cooking oils 

Chemical preparations, n.e.c... 

Cheese, natural and processed 

Canned specialties 

Pickles, sauces, and salad dressing.. 

Frozen fruits and vegetables 

Creamery butter 

Canned specialties 

Frozen fruits and vegetables 

Prepared feeds for animals and fowls. 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 

(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



(z) 

(Z) 

8.4 

14.3 

180.1 

27.9 

(under 2) 

(5-10) 

(over 2) 

3.9 

705.8 

19.7 

675.9 

10.2 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



(under 2) 

15.6 

7.7 

(2-5) 

4.3 
(under 2) 
3.1 
(over 2) 
(Z) 
1.6 

412.9 

2.9 

405.3 

4.7 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



6.3 

(2-5) 

; under 2) 

6.7 

(5-10) 

(over 2) 

2.2 



146, 
11. 
95 



20.6 
18.8 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 

(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



(X) 


13.8 


(X) 


6.7 


(X) 


(over 2) 


(X) 


(over 2) 


(X) 


41.7 


(X) 


(2-5) 


(X) 


3.7 


(X) 


6.8 


(X) 


(over 2) 


(X) 


15.5 


(X) 


(5-10) 



Note: Data shown parenthetically are ranges expressed in millions of dollars. Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent 
rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) in computer operations. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 
companies. (Z) Less than $50 thousand. 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



20A-13 



table 6A Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Shipments by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963 

(Includes quantity and value of the products reported not only by establishments classified in this industry, but also by establishments classified in other industries, and shipping these products 

as " secondary" products. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms, " Value of shipments") 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total shipments including interplant transfers 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



(mill 



Value 
ion dollars) 



MEATPACKING PLANT PRODUCTS, TOTAL 1 . 
Beef , not canned or made into sausage. , 



Million lbs. 



Whole carcass beef 

Primal and fabricated cuts 

Boneless beef, including hamburger 

Variety meats (edible organs ) 

Other edible beef including corned beef 

Beef, not canned or made into sausage, n.s.k. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Veal, not canned or made into sausage. 



Whole carcass veal 

Primal cuts fabricated cuts and boneless veal. 
Other edible veal including edible organs..... 
Veal, not canned or made into sausage, n.s.k.. 



.do. 
.do. 



Lamb and mutton, not canned or made into sausage. 



Whole carcass lamb and mutton 

Primal cuts and all other edible lamb and mutton, except canned 
meats and sausage 

Lamb and mutton, not canned or made into sausage, n.s.k 



Pork, fresh and frozen. 



Wliole carcass pork 

Primal cuts, including trimmings.... 
Variety meats (fresh edible organs). 
Pork, fresh and frozen, n.s.k 



Lard 4 . 



Consumer sizes (containers of 3 lbs. or less)..., 
Commercial sizes (containers of more than 3 lbs. 
Lard, n.s.k 



Hides, skins, and pelts 

Cattle 

Calf 

Sheep and lamb 

Pig.. 

Other hides, skins, and pelts. 
Hides, n.s.k 



Other meatpacking products, except sausage casings. 



Fresh and frozen meats, such as horse meat, goat meat, etc. 

Pulled wool 5 

Edible tallow and stearin 4 

Glue stock (semimanufactured material to be made into glue) 
Killing floor offal, scrap, and bones 



Meatpacking plant products, n.s.k. (For companies with 10 or more 
employees. See Note. ) 

Meatpacking plant products, n.s.k. (For companies with less 
than 10 employees . See Note. ) 



MEAT PROCESSING PLANT PRODUCTS, TOTAL 1 . 



rPork, processed or cured (not canned or made into sausage) 



Made in slaughtering plants. 
Made elsewhere 



} 



Sweet pickled or dry cured (not smoked or cooked). 
Dry s al t pork 



Smoked pork (not otherwise cooked): 
Hams and picnics, except canned.. 

Slab bacon 

Sliced bacon 

Other smoked pork 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



. . .do. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 



. . .do. 

. ..do. 
...do. 



1,000 units. 

. . .do 

. ..do 

. ..do 

. ..do 

. . .do 

...do 



Million lbs. 

.. .do 

. . .do 



Million lbs. . . 



...do. 

.. .do. 



...do. 

...do. 



...do. 

. . .do. 
...do. 
...do. 



(X) 

17,866.5 

13,158.3 

2,310.9 

1,060.3 

771.4 

85.9 

3 479.7 

634.8 

476.8 

128.1 

25.6 

3 4.3 

689.5 

534.5 

150.4 
3 4.6 

7,950.1 

1,523.9 

5,745.3 

549.0 

3 131.9 

1,848.9 

483.5 

1,353.8 

11.6 

58.4 

33.3 
6.1 

11.5 
2.5 
4.5 

3 0.5 

(X) 

13.5 

345.4 

585.1 

(X) 

(X) 



(X) 
(X) 

(x) 



2,668.2 
1 , 294 . 9 



337.9 
155.9 

1,349.7 
373.9 

1,163.1 
283.3 



7,398.5 

5,379.9 

1,079.7 

526.2 

169.8 

44.3 

198.6 

307.7 

220.1 

71.1 

14.2 

2.3 

312.7 

250.8 

59.6 
2.3 

2,791.0 

468.6 

2,174.4 

101.3 

46.7 

182.2 

57.7 

123.5 

1.0 

276.3 

222.3 

25.4 

20.0 

2.7 

4.0 

1.9 

100.7 

3.1 
8.6 

43.5 
1.2 

44.3 



330.7 

130.3 

s 5,418.2 

2,008.0 

1,324.0 
684.0 

142.4 
33.9 

705.2 
168.4 
615.1 
134.1 



(X) 

14,754.7 

10,636.8 

2,123.7 

909.4 

593.6 

94.4 

3 396.8 

727.2 



504 


6 


135 


8 


47 





3 39 


8 


786 


7 


608 


6 


148 


2 


3 29 


9 



7,487.2 

1,121.1 

5,699.7 

467.8 

3 198.5 

2,313.7 

484.8 

1,816.0 

3 12.8 

58.3 

26.2 
5.9 

17.8 
(X) 
7.5 

3 0.9 

(X) 

18.4 

(D) 

542.4 

(X) 
(X) 



(X) 



3,974.9 

2,951.3 
1,023.6 



306.0 
219.5 

1,363.0 

347.0 

1,115.0 

268.2 



2 9,259.8 

5,707.8 

4,098.4 
910. 1 
377.8 
120.9 
47.1 
153.5 



310.8 

204.9 
67.4 
21.6 
17.0 

300.1 



56.5 

11.4 

2,202.5 

280.2 

1,787.0 
76.9 
58.4 

223.6 

56.0 

166.4 

1.2 

223.4 

156.4 

22.3 

36.1 

(X) 

5.0 

3.6 

87.8 

3.3 

(D) 

40.9 

CD) 

32.1 



203.8 



6 4,285.8 



1,634.7 

1,176.1 
458.6 



103.8 
37.1 

594.1 
120.0 
466.0 
111.4 



See footnotes at end of ta"ble . 



20A-14 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



table 6A. Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Shipments by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Product 
code 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total shipments including interplant transfers 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



MEAT PROCESSING PLANT PRODUCTS — Continued 



20116 


— 


20136 


— 


20116 


61 


20136 


61 


20116 


00 


20136 


00 


20117 





20137 


— 


20117 


— 


20137 


~ 


20117 


11 


20137 


11 


20117 


17 


20137 


17 


20117 


21 


20137 


21 


20117 


35 


20137 


35 


20117 


91 


20137 


91 


20117 


00 


20137 


00 


20118 





20138 


— 


20118 





20138 


— 



Lpork, processed or cured (not canned or made into sausage) — Con. 



Boiled ham, barbecue pork and other cooked pork, except canned 
meat and sausage 



20139 


11 


20139 


31 


20139 


51 


20139 


61 


20139 


00 


20130 


00 


20130 


02 


2015- 


— 


20151 


- 


20151 


11 


20151 


15 



20151 


31 


20151 


35 


20151 


00 


20153 


-- 


20153 


12 



20153 13 
20153 16 



> Pork processed or cured, n.s.k 

f Sausage and similar products (not canned). 



Million lbs. 
...do 



Made in slaughtering plants. 
Made elsewhere 



.. .do. 



. . .do. 
...do. 



Fresh sausage, pork sausage, breakfast links, etc 

Dry and semidry (salami, cervelat, pepperoni, summer sausage, 
pork roll, etc.) 

Frankfurters and weiners 



...do. 

.. .do. 



Other sausage, smoked or cooked (bologna, liverwurst, Polish 
sausage, packaged luncheon meats, minced roll, smoked pork 
sausage, etc. ) 

Jellied goods and similar preparations, not canned (head cheese, 
meat loaves, scrapple, puddings, chili con carne, imitation 
sausage, etc. ) 

Sausage and similar products, n.s.k 



.do. 
.do. 



_Canned meats (except dog and cat food) containing 20 percent or 
more meat 7 



Made in slaughtering plants. 
Made elsewhere 



...do. 
...do. 



Natural sausage casings. 



Beef sausage casings 

Hog sausage casings 

Sheep and lamb sausage casings. 
Other animal casings 

Natural sausage casings, n.s.k. 



Processed meat, n.s.k. (For companies with 10 or more employees. 

See Note. ) 

Processed meat, n.s.k. (For companies with less than 10 employees. 

See Note. ) 



POULTRY DRESSING PLANT PRODUCTS, TOTAL 8 . 
Hens (or fowl) and chickens 



Million lbs. . . 



Hens (or fowl) and chickens, other than young chickens: 

New York dressed (dressed weight ) 

Eviscerated or drawn (eviscerated weight) 



. .do. 
..do. 



Young chickens (including commercial broilers, fryers, roasters, 
and capons) : 

New York dressed ( dressed wei ght ) 

Eviscerated or drawn (eviscerated weight) including sectioned. 



.do. 
.do. 



Hens (or fowl) and other chickens, n.s.k. 
Turkeys 



Fryer-roaster turkeys (usually under 16 weeks of age) (dressed 
weight) 

Young turkeys (mature) (usually 5 to 7 months of age): 

New York dressed (dressed weight) 

Eviscerated or drawn (eviscerated weight) including sectioned. 



• do. 
.do. 



Old turkeys (breeders) (usually over 25 months of age) (dressed 

weight ) 

Turkeys , n.s.k 



20153 18 
20153 00 

See footnotes at end of table 



.do. 
.do. 



158.7 
3 140.6 



2,078.8 
2,175.8 



254.6 
1,158.8 

1,649.8 

227.1 
3 243.8 

1,700.8 

869.5 
831.3 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(X) 
(X) 

(X) 
7,170.3 

9 1, 115.1 

9 5,593.7 

3 461.5 

1,564.1 

52.6 



} *■ 



,415.9 



33.7 
3 61.9 



137.6 
71.3 



1,020.7 
1,265.9 



189.8 
574.6 



118.8 
130.9 



490.4 
366.0 

83.4 

29.6 

24.5 

12.2 

10.3 

6.8 



139.9 
43.9 

2,809.6 
1,849.5 



} 



9.3 
20.0 



156.4 
3 200.0 



1,876.1 
1,809.7 



226.9 
1,112.5 

1,451.3 

206.0 
3 128.3 

1,521.2 

966.6 
554.6 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(X) 

(X) 
5,717.8 



316.1 
588.2 



295.1 
4,710.4 

3 347.9 

1,138.2 

55.1 



57.4 
942.2 



34.9 
3 48.5 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



20A-15 



table 6A Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Shipments by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963 



Product 
code 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total shipments including interplant transfers 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



2015- 


— 


20154 


- 


20154 


13 


20154 


15 


20154 


19 


20154 


25 


20154 


00 



POULTRY DRESSING PLANT PRODUCTS, TOTAL— Continued 
Processed poultry , except soups 



Canned poultry: 
10 oz. and under. 



40.1 oz. to 60 oz. 
Other sizes 



1,000 cases. . . 



1,000 cases of 
48 

1,000 cases of 
12 

1,000 cases. . . 



(X) 



Smoked or cooked poultry, including deboned. 
Processed poultry , n.s.k 



Million lbs. 



Other poultry and small game. 



20155 13 
20155 15 



20155 00 

20156 — 



20156 11 
20156 13 
20156 15 
20156 17 



20156 51 
20156 53 
20156 55 
20156 57 

Z0156 00 

20150 00 

20150 02 



Ducks (dressed weight) 

Other poultry and small game killed in this establishment 

(geese, rabbits, etc.) (dressed weight) 

Other poultry and small game, n.s.k 



Million lbs. . . 
. ..do 



Liquid, dried, and frozen eggs. 

Eggs, dried: 

Whites 

Yolks 

Whole 

Mixed 



...do 

...do 





566 


9 


2 


057 


1 


10 164 


7 




(X) 




46 


5 




34 


3 




3 







3 9 


2 



5.3 
15.4 



''lOO.S 
3.8 



19.7 
13.8 



2.0 
3.9 



Million lbs. . . 

...do 

. ..do 

...do 



(X) 



Eggs, frozen or liquid: 

Whites 

Yolks 

Whole 

Mixed 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



11 


8 


12 


7 


20 


4 


12 


9 


96 


2 


33 


9 


92 





102 


6 



12 


1 


12 


7 


19 


7 


10 


3 


15 


5 


12 


8 


23 





33 






(X) 



1,075 

681 
1,091 

(HA) 

(X) 

40.9 

36.9 

2.8 
3 1.3 

(X) 



11.0 
8.3 

17.9 
7.1 



6.4 
10.0 

(na) 

10.1 
14.3 
12.3 

1.5 

0.4 



11.3 

8.6 

17.3 

6.6 



Liquid, dried, and frozen eggs, n.s.k. 



Poultry dressing plant products, 
more employees. See Note) 

Poultry dressing plant products, 
than 10 employees. See Note).. 



n.s.k. (For companies with 10 or 
n.s.k. (For companies with less 



(X) 

(X) 
(X) 



20.5 

104.7 
29.6 



(X] 



(X) 



Note: In the 1967 Census of Manufactures, data for establishments of small companies, typically those with fewer than 10 employees, were estimated 
from administrative records rather than collected from respondents. These estimated shipments which are further discussed in the text are included in 
the code ending with "002." Such establishments were usually mailed a "short form" in the 1963 Census of Manufactures. These short forms typically 
provided for coding products to the product class level (5 digits) followed by "00" rather than only to the 4-digit level followed by "000." 
Therefore, the 1963 "n.s.k." ( 000 ) figure is not strictly comparable to the total of the two "n.s.k." (000 and 002)' figures in 1967. In addition to 
the 1967 n.s.k. (code 002) resulting from the above, in both the 1967 and 1963 censuses of manufactures, products which were not completely 
identified on the standard forms were coded to the appropriate product class code (5 digits) followed by "00," or in some cases to the appropriate 
product group code (4 digits) followed by "000." 

Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) 
in computer operations. 



Standard notes: 



Represents zero. 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not available. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



Substantial quantities of these products are produced at nonmanuf acturing establishments and' are not included in these data. 

2 Excludes prepared meats made in slaughtering plants. 

3 Quantity estimated based on quantity-value relationship reported for other products. 

4 In the Census Current Industrial Reports Series M20K, "Fats and Oils", data are published for the production of various fats and oils. The 
production of lard as shown in this report amounted to 2,077.0 million pounds in 1967 and 2,473.0 million pounds in 1963. These data are compiled by 
the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The production of edible tallow shown in the M20K report was 577.8 million pounds for 1967 and 496.4 million 
pounds for 1963. 

5 Data represent the output of establishments classified in Industries 2011 and 2013. Detailed information was not obtained from establishments 
engaged primarily in wool pulling and classified in industry 3999, Manufactures, N.E.C. 

e Includes prepared meats made in slaughtering plants. 

'Canned meat products containing less than 20 percent meat are included in the report for industry 2032, Canned Specialties. 

Substantial quantities of poultry and small game are killed and dressed for commercial markets, on farms, and at retail and wholesale establish- 
ments and are not included in these data. 

9 In 1967, a substantial number of poultry dressing plants reported their shipments of eviscerated poultry as New York dressed. As a result separate 
data are not available. 

10 A large number of firms reported their shipments in thousand pounds rather than 1,000 cases as originally requested. Those reporting in units of 
1,000 cases, which accounted for approximately 15 percent, have been adjusted to million pounds based on the industry average for reporting mills. 
11 Prior to 1967, data were not collected separately for product code 2015425, Smoked or cooked poultry, including deboned. A review of similar 
reports filed in the 1963 census, and the annual survey of manufactures (ASM) for 1964-66 shows that the figures for a large number of establishments 
in 1963 were included in product code 2015100, Hens (or fowl) and chickens, n.s.k., and product code 2015300, Turkeys, n.s.k. Subsequently, data in 
the ASM for 1964-66 were shown in product class 20151 and 20154. A review of reports filed in the 1966 ASM for these same establishments shows that 
approximately $34 million was included in product class 20151 and $36 million in product class 20153. Data for prior years are not available. 



20A-16 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



table 6B Product Classes-Value Shipped by All Manufacturing Establishments, 

by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963 



In millions of dollars. Statistics are shown for selected product classes which are economically 
significant and which have production that is geographically dispersed, provided that the disper- 
sion is not approximated by the data in the geographic table for the industry (table 2) and they are 



not miscellaneous or "not specified by type" classes. Product class values for some States are 
withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. Such States are shown with a value 
range. 



Product class and 
hie area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



BEEF, NOT CANNED OR MADE 
INTO SAUSAGE (20111) 



United States . . 
Northeast Region. 



New England Div . 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Connecticut 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. . . . 

East North Central Div... 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central Div., 

Minnesota 

Iowa. . . . 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central Div. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central Div. 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



West Region. 



Mountain Div. 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California. . . . 
Hawaii 



29.7 
BB 
EE 
AA 
CC 
CC 

374 .1 

55.8 

133 .8 

184.5 

4,420.7 

1 , 096 . 9 
284 .4 
127.2 
302.4 
128.5 
254.4 

3,328.8 

4 09.3 

1,001.8 

397.3 

FF 

GG 

943.9 

370.1 

938.6 

204.9 
26.3 
30.9 
10.9 
18.0 
10.9 
39.0 
69.0 

239.4 
39.2 

108.3 
41.7 
50.2 

494 .2 
17.9 
17.8 
77.0 

381.5 



691.4 

43.0 

60.3 

6.2 

410.9 
59.9 
50.6 
60.5 

944.2 

140.1 

FF 

743.8 

EE 



5,707.8 

419.1 

39.9 
2.8 

(') 

13.1 
11.7 

379.2 

63.1 

115.8 

200.4 

3,310.9 

973.8 
260.5 
156.3 
269.7 

121.1 
166.2 

2,337.1 
323.0 
793.2 
279.7 

C 1 ) 

(') 

515.9 

274.1 

730.9 

207.7 
30.7 
33.3 

C) 

18.3 
12.1 
41.8 
61.2 

184.2 
34.6 
78.9 
35.9 
35.0 

339.0 
19.6 
16.6 
51.1 

251.8 



477.6 
16.7 
45.1 

t 1 ) 

293.1 

28.3 

40.4 

45.3 

769.4 
99.4 

(') 
620.7 

(') 



VEAL, NOT CANNED OR MADE 
INTO SAUSAGE (20112) 



United States . . 
Northeast Region. 



New England Div. 
Vermont 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Maryland 

Virginia 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central Div. 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central Div. 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



West Region. 
Mountain Div. . 



Pacific Div. 
California. . . . 



LAMB AND MUTTON, NOT 
CANNED OR MADE INTO 
SAUSAGE (20113) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

Middle Atlantic Div.... 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Michigan 



2.3 

AA 

54 .5 

15.1 

7 .3 

32 .1 

86.6 

53.9 
BB 
BB 

16.4 
8.1 

22.8 

32.7 
CC 
EE 
4.4 
BB 
AA 
BB 

147.4 

55.1 
1.3 
EE 
EE 
BB 
EE 

29.1 
EE 
CC 

EE 

63.2 
5.2 
3.2 

54.8 

17.0 

1 .1 

15.9 
14.4 



312.7 



FF 
1.1 

FF 
3.6 

111.1 

32.6 
5.3 

19.5 
7.1 



310.8 

58.9 

4.1 
1.4 

54.8 
20.2 
15.9 
18.7 

106.1 

69.1 
6.1 
7.0 
15.6 
15.4 
25.0 

37.0 

(') 
t 1 ) 
4.1 
(D) 
1.4 
7.6 



40.9 
2.5 

t 1 ) 
(') 
6.7 
8.3 

20.0 
8.8 
3.7 
7.0 

65.0 
8.7 
5.4 

49.8 

19.8 

1.4 

18.4 
15.0 



300.1 

(D) 

43.1 

(') 
22.8 

(*) 

144.0 

35.3 
2.4 



LAMB AND MUTTON, NOT 
CANNED OR MADE INTO 
SAUSAGE ( 20113 )--Con. 

North Central Region- 
Con. 

West North Central Div 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div.... 
Virginia 

East South Central Div 
Kentucky 

West South Central Div 
Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Colorado 

Utah 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

PORK, FRESH AND FROZEN 
(20114) 

United States 

Northeast Region. . . . 

New England Div 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Middle Atlantic Div... 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div, 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



78.5 
17.3 
EE 
CC 
BB 
EE 
18.5 
CC 

FF 



BB 
BB 

FF 
26.9 

131.6 

66.6 

FF 
FF 

65.0 
EE 
BB 

51.2 



FF 
EE 
BB 

GG 

FF 

EE 

155.2 

1,965.4 

599.0 

129.8 

82 .5 

210.3 

85.0 

91.3 

1,366.4 
194.4 

748.2 
104.4 

BB 

93.9 

143.0 

GG 

455.7 

212.0 
EE 

86.0 
BB 

52.7 
EE 

36.8 

10.2 



See footnotes at end of table. 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



20A-17 



table 6B. Product Classes-Value Shipped by All Manufacturing Establishments, 
by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



PORK, FRESH AND FROZEN 
(20114)— Con. 

South Region — Con. 

East South Central Div.... 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central Div.... 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Montana 

Idaho 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

LARD (20115) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region.... 

East North Central Div.... 

Ohio 

Indi ana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div.... 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

East South Central Div.... 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central Div.... 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Colorado 



157.7 


122.0 


35.5 


32.1 


77.3 


60.6 


19.9 


13.2 


25.0 


16.1 


86.0 


62.3 


9.3 


7.3 


3.6 


3.2 


18.9 


13.4 


54.2 


38.4 



50.9 

9.9 

2.3 

FF 

2.4 

BB 

CC 

87.6 

18.8 

CC 

60.8 



12.1 

EE 
2.3 

BB 
5.7 

118.3 

40.6 
8.4 
7.4 

EE 
1.6 

EE 

77.7 

16.5 

30.4 

6.7 

CC 

9.6 

CC 

37.5 

13.7 
BB 

5.1 
BB 

2.6 

14.7 
3.7 
7.7 
1.5 

1.7 

9.1 

AA 
CC 

14 .2 



111.6 

40.9 
7.0 
2.5 

17.5 
1.9 
(D) 
6.6 

70.7 
19.4 

n 

41.7 



223.6 

30.7 

30.7 
4.3 

7.6 

139.1 

52.4 

8.3 

12.5 

19.6 

i 1 ) 



86.7 

16.3 

31.3 

9.9 

t 1 ) 
11.8 

n 

37.6 

15.9 
3.2 
6.1 
1.4 
3.0 

12.9 
3.9 

5.9 
1.6 
1.6 

8.8 
1.9 
6.5 

16.2 

5.1 
2.4 



LARD (20115) — Con. 

West Region — Con. 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

California 

PORK PROCESSING PLANTS 
(20116 and 20136) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

New Hampshire 

Massachusetts 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region.. 

East North Central Div.. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div.. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina. , 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central Div.. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central Div.. 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Mon tana 

I daho 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

SAUSAGES (20117 and 20137) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Maine 

New Hampshire 



2,008.0 
360.1 

75.1 
CC 
GG 

284 .9 
112.6 
43.6 
128.7 

927 .7 

420.6 

137.8 

64 .6 

123.1 

46 .0 

49.0 

507 .0 

105.1 

204.3 

54.8 

CC 

FF 

64.2 

47.7 

475.7 

222.1 
34.3 
59.8 
AA 
35.0 
11.1 
40.2 
39.7 

141.5 
31.3 
62 .9 
22.6 
24.7 

112.1 

8.6 

5.3 

17.7 

80.4 

244.6 

49.1 

7.9 

3.4 

22.8 

2.1 

CC 

CC 

195.4 
23.4 
10.1 

161.7 



2,287 .0 

54 9.0 

104 .2 

CC 

3.1 



11.1 
2.3 
8.1 



1,634.7 
265.6 

60.9 

(M 

54.4 

204.7 
97.2 
33.0 
74.4 

814.0 

362.4 
98.4 
72.0 

110.6 
42.9 
38.5 

451.6 

80.9 

165.7 

( l ) 
(D) 

n 

(D) 
'57.2 

375.0 

167.1 
28.4 
45.6 

o 

14.7 
11.9 
33.7 
30.5 

102.1 
20.9 
41.3 
21.7 

18.1 

105.8 

5.0 

5.0 

18.7 

77.1 

180.2 

41.1 
5.1 
2.7 

18.4 
2.2 

C 1 ) 
C 1 ) 

139.1 
23.3 

(D) 
105.0 



1,756.2 

422.0 

88.0 
3.4 
3.9 



SAUSAGES (20117 and 20137)- 
Con. 

Northeast Region--Con. 



New England Div. — Con. 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic Div... 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region 

East North Central Div 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div.... 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central Div 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central Div 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Montana 

Idaho 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon 

California , 

Hawaii 



CANNED MEATS (20118 and 
20138) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Massachusetts 



84.1 


66 


8 


1.6 


1 


9 


CC 


12 





444 .7 


334 





208.2 


166 


6 


64.8 


47 


5 


171.7 


120 






660.1 


490.2 


149.4 


105.0 


67.7 


61.0 


223.2 


157.8 


103.1 


79.8 


116.6 


86.7 


338.4 


284.1 


81.6 


72.9 


104.7 


77.4 


49.4 


42.2 


AA 


n 


FF 


n 


41.0 


35.2 


FF 


37.5 



221.1 


176.5 


AA 


2.9 


59.6 


48.6 


41 .6 


29.4 


BB 


4.2 


25.2 


19.0 


14.9 


15.6 


29.8 


22.5 


42.6 


34.4 


128.7 


94.4 


27.3 


22.4 


6 - 09 


38.3 


23.4 


21.4 


17.1 


12.3 


116.3 


89.0 


5.9 


8.3 


18.2 


12.0 


16.4 


14.0 


75.7 


54.7 



44.5 


37.5 


BB 


3.5 


6.6 


6.2 


20.0 


17.0 


BB 


2.3 


4.2 


3.3 


5.3 


4.5 


228.9 


162.5 


28.0 


21.1 


6.5 


7.8 


192.3 


131.4 


2.2 


n 



83.3 

29.1 
AA 
BB 

23.5 



81.7 

27.8 

(D) 

n 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20A-18 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



table 6B Product Classes-Value Shipped by All Manufacturing Establishments, 
by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



CANNED MEATS (20118 and 
20138)--Con. 

Northeast Region — Con, 

Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York , 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania , 

North Central Region. , 

East North Central Div.. 

Ohio 

Indiana , 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wi sconsin , 

West North Central Div . . 

"Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Maryland 

Virginia 

South Carolina 

Georgi a , 

Florida 

East South Central Div.. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Mississippi 

West South Central Div . . 

Louisiana , 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Colorado 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

California 



HIDES, SKINS, AND PELTS 
(20119) 



United States. . 

Northeast Region. 

New England Div.... 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. . . , 

East North Central Div..., 

Ohio , 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan , 

Wisconsin , 



54.2 
28.1 
11.2 
14.9 

645.7 

157.6 

AA 

16.0 

89.7 

EE 

FF 

488.1 

159.0 

180.4 

62.2 

FF 

52.8 

EE 

105.9 



28.4 
BB 
CC 
BB 
8.8 
BB 

34.9 

EE 

7.4 

EE 

42.7 
BB 
CC 

33.5 

21.5 

CC 
CC 

EE 
BB 
EE 



276, 

13, 

1, 

11, 
2, 
2, 
6, 



53.9 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

557.5 

137.0 

3.3 

27.4 

83.7 

(*) 

420.5 

131.7 

136.5 

49.5 

(') 
50.5 

I 1 ) 
78.1 



20.8 
2.9 
5.4 

C) 

7.9 
(*) 

27.4 
(*) 
(*) 

29.9 

H 

( X ) 
20.4 

12.8 

2.5 
( l ) 

10.3 

i 1 ) 
(') 



223.4 

22.3 

1.2 

21.1 
6.5 
6.7 
7.9 

122.0 

39.8 

7.7 
7.0 
12.1 
7.1 
5.9 



HIDES, SKINS, AND PELTS 
(20119)— Con. 

North Central Region- 
Con. 

West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Virginia , 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central Div, 

Kentucky , 

Tennessee , 

Alabama , 

Mississippi , 

West South Central Div, 

Oklahoma , 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Montana 

I daho 

Colorado , 

New Mexico 

Ar i zona 

Utah , 

Pacific Div , 

Washington , 

Oregon 

California 

NATURAL SAUSAGE CASINGS 
(20139) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

Middle Atlantic Div... 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region 

East North Central Div 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Michigan , 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Mi ssouri 

Nebraska 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div. 
Maryland 



123.4 
18.3 
43.0 
12.9 
1.6 
5.9 
31.3 
10.4 



2.3 

10.4 
1.5 
4.5 
1.8 
2.6 



58.3 

31.9 
2.3 
1.7 

20.2 
1.8 
1.8 
3.9 

26.4 

3.7 

AA 

21.0 



83.4 
EE 



3.4 

CC 

2.2 

40.0 

25.7 
4.5 
8.9 
8.0 
4.2 

14.3 
3.7 
6.2 

AA 



82.2 
12.4 
27.9 
10.6 

C) 

(*) 

17.5 
8.3 



34.7 

10.0 
2.1 
(D) 
3.3 
1.9 

8.9 
1.6 
3.3 

1.7 
2.1 

15.8 

1.6 

12.7 

44.5 

25.5 

(D) 
1.4 
17.2 
(D) 
1.3 
2.5 

19.0 
2.0 
1.4 

15.4 



21.8 

(D) 

11.6 
2.9 

n 

44.8 

26.2 
3.3 

16.4 
3.0 
3.1 

18.6 
4.6 
6.6 
1.7 
3.5 

3.6 

(D) 
(D) 



NATURAL SAUSAGE CASINGS 
(20139)— Con. 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

New Mexico 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

California 

HENS (OR FOWL) AND CHICKENS 
(20151) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Maine 

Massachusetts 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region... 

East North Central Div... 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div... 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central Div... 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Cetnral Div... 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Montana 

Idaho 

Utah 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



19.8 
BB 



EE 

AA 

14.4 



1,849.5 



187.0 

75.1 

49.6 

FF 

CC 

111.8 

10.4 

7.1 

94.3 

111.9 

70.4 
18.6 
18.9 
EE 
19.0 

41.6 
7.7 

CC 
24.6 

BB 

1,462.4 

766.5 

66.3 

107.7 

59.7 

BB 

169.3 

FF 

291.4 

40.4 

319.9 
11.5 
33.3 

175.5 
99.6 

376.0 

210.9 

FF 

EE 

103.6 



7.4 
AA 
BB 
BB 

80.7 

20.1 

EE 

47.1 



See footnotes at end of table. 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



20A-19 



table 6B. Product Classes-Value Shipped by All Manufacturing Establishments, 
by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



TUKKEYS (20153) 

United States. . 
Northeast Region. 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region.... 

East North Central Div.... 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Wisconsin 



West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 



East South Central Div 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

West South Central Div.... 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



West Region. 



Mountain Div. 

Idaho 

Colorado 

Utah 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California. . . . 



504 


.7 


26 


.0 


25 


.2 


5 


.0 




;c 




EE 



205.8 

46.5 

EE 
18.1 
16.7 

159.3 
85.5 

34.5 

24.1 

3.9 

CC 

BB 

152.6 

GG 

BB 

32.5 

38.2 

CC 

CC 
AA 
BB 

GG 
37.6 

CC 
22.9 

120.4 

15.8 
AA 
CC 
CC 

104.6 

4.1 

CC 

GG 



371.9 

11 .5 

10.2 
4.6 

(D) 

5.6 

185.4 

43.0 

6.8 

11.2 

21.0' 

142.4 
73.0 
34.3 
13.7 

(') 
12.9 

77.6 

(D) 

1.5 
19.8 
12.2 

(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
12.5 

(*) 
16.8 

97.4 

8.6 

n 

C) 

2.9 



n 

31.5 



PROCESSED POULTRY, EXCEPT 
SOUPS (20154) 



United States.. 
Northeast Region. 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region., 

East North Central Div.. 

Indiana 

1 1 1 inoi s 

Wi scons in 



West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Nebraska 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 



West South Central Div. 

Arkansas 

Texas 



West Region. 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 
California. . . . 



OTHER POULTRY AND SMALL 
GAME (20155) 



United States. 



Northeast Region.. 

Middle Atlantic Div. 
New York 



North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 
Indiana 



141.8 

13.9 

EE 
BB 
CC 
BB 

67.0 

9.8 



57.2 
23.3 

7.1 
CC 

FF 

47.9 

39.1 

BB 

CC 

EE 

EE 
CC 



13.0 

13.0 
CC 
CC 



(D) 

n 



4.9 

(D) 
C) 
(D) 

14.9 

o 

(D) 
(D) 

GO 
(») 

n 

(D) 

3.1 

GO 
GO 

( l ) 

(D) 

(D) 
(*) 
(D) 



14.3 

(D) 
(D) 

C 1 ) 

GO 

2.8 



OTHER POULTRY AND SMALL 
GAME (20155)--Con. 



West Region. 



Pacific Div. 
California. . . . 



LIQUID, DRIED, AND FROZEN 
EGGS (20156) 



United States . . 
Northeast Region . 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Wisconsin 



West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Maryland 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central Div.. 

Kentucky 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central Div.. 
Texas 



West Region. 



Pacific Div. 
California. . . . 



6.1 
6.1 



16.2 

BB 

8.8 

AA 

110.3 

9.4 
18.8 
25.7 

CC 
30.2 

EE 

27.8 

16.3 
AA 
EE 
BB 

6.4 
AA 
BB 
AA 

5.1 
BB 



4.6 
4.6 



(D) 

(D) 
(D) 



4.4 
2.7 

n 

(D) 
(D) 

120.0 

22.2 
5.2 

12.6 
(*) 

97.8 
12.8 
20.0 
28.0 
6.7 
19.4 



6.0 
(D) 

GO 

2.7 
(D) 
GO 
GO 
1.6 
(D) 

6.6 

(D) 
(*) 



Note: Product class shipments of $1 million or more were reported but exact figures are withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 
companies. However, for such States, the values are shown in the following ranges: 



Value ranges 
(million dollars) 



Symbol 



Value ranges 
(million dollars) 



Less than $2.0 AA 

$2.0 to $5.0 BB 

$5.0 to $10.0 CC 



$10.0 to $20.0. 
$20.0 to $50.0. 
$50.0 and over. 



Symbol 



EE 
FF 
GG 



Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) 
in computer operations. See Appendix, Explanation of terms, for discussion of items. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. (x) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 
companies. 

'This State or division was not shown as a separate line in table 6D in the 1963 report for this industry. A footnote to the 1963 table 6D 
showed those States with $1 million or more reported shipments. 



20A-20 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



table 6C Product Classes-Quantity and Value Shipped by All Manufacturing Establishments: 

1947, 1954, 1958, 1963 to 1967 



Code 



Product class 



1967 



1966 1 



1965 * 



1964 1 



1963 



1958 



1954 



1947 



2011- 

20111 
20112 
20113 

20114 
20115 
20119 
20110 

2013- 



20117 
20137 



20118 

20138 

20139 
20130 

2015- 

20151 
20153 
20154 
20155 
20156 
20150 



Meatpacking plant products Million dollars. 

Beef, not canned or made into sausage do... 

Veal, not canned or made into sausage do... 

Lamb and mutton, not canned or made 

into sausage do. . . 

Pork , fresh and frozen do . . . 

Lard do . . . 

Hides, skins, and pelts do. . . 

Miscellaneous byproducts of plants, n. s.k. . .do. . . 

Meat processing plant products do. . . 

Pork, processing (not canned or sausage) 

packing plants and 
Pork (not canned or sausage), processing 
plants: 

Quantity 1,000 lbs. 

Value Million dollars. 

Sausage similar products (not canned) 

packing plants and 
Sausage, etc. (not canned) meat 
process plants: 

Quantity 1,000 lbs. 

Value Million dollars. 

Canned meats (not animal food), 

20 percent more do . . . 

Canned meats (not animal food), 

meat processing plants do. . . 

Natural sausage casings do. . . 

Meat processing plant products, n.s.k do... 

Poultry dressing plant products do... 

Hens (or fowl) and chickens do... 

Turkeys do . . . 

Processed poultry , except soups do . . . 

Other poultry and small game do. . . 

Liquid, dried, and frozen eggs do. . . 

Poultry dressing plant products, n.s.k do... 



7,398.5 
307.7 

312.7 
2,791.0 
182.2 
276.3 
561.7 

5,418.2 



3,963.1 
2,008.0 



4,287.5 
2,286.6 



83.4 
183.8 



1,849.5 
504.7 
141.8 
19.7 
159.6 
134.3 



6,899.0 
332.9 

334.7 
2,799.6 
227.3 
379.5 
324.9 



(NA) 
1,936.9 



(NA) 
2,296.0 



131.5 

(49.8) 



,799.9 

503.0 

59.7 

17.8 

170.1 

(43.0) 



6,428.6 
327.2 

308.2 
2,504.9 
254.6 
274.6 
298.3 



(NA) 
1,799.6 



(NA) 
1,983.7 



109.5 
66.3 



1,640.4 

451.1 

44.3 

16.4 

151.4 

48.5 



9,754.3 

6,018.4 
305.4 

298.3 

2,345.9 

236.8 

218.2 
331.3 

4,503.0 



(NA) 
1,675.4 



. (NA) 
1,852.4 



86.7 
74.9 

2,205.3 

1,526.0 

397.6 

44.2 

19.9 

155.9 

61.7 



5,707.8 
310.8 

300.1 
2,202.5 
223.6 
223.4 
291.6 



3,974.9 
1,634.7 



3,685.8 
1,756.2 



730.1 
164.9 



1,480.0 

371.9 

39.1 

14.3 

139.7 

64.7 



8,665.4 

5,019.4 
414.1 

305.2 

2,124.3 

332.0 

195.7 
274.9 



3,829.4 
1.821.7 



3,109.0 
1,526.2 



598.6 
139.4 



,178.4 

257.9 

25.6 

19.4 

150.7 

102.8 



3,943.1 
397.6 

298.5 
1,928.8 
383.2 
225.5 
169.5 

3,716.5 



(NA) 
1,847.3 



(NA) 
1,187.1 



583.4 
98.6 

(NA) 

899.3 

203.8 

(NA) 

21.9 

148.0 

36.7 



2 2,693.7 
2 341.6 

2 284.1 
2 1,168.5 
2 466.5 
2 330.9 
2 253.1 

2 2,939.5 



2 2, 828.0 
2 1,472.9 



2 2, 359.1 
2 961.7 



2 406.2 



(NA) 

304.4 

97.3 

(NA) 

6.9 

236.8 
11.8 



Note: See Note to table 6A for an explanation of n.s.k. product classes. Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent 
rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) in computer operations. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms. 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not available. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



Standard notes: - Represents zero, 
companies . 

1 These figures represent estimates derived from a representative sample of manufacturing establishments canvassed in the annual survey of manufac- 
tures. These estimates, therefore, may differ from the results that would have been obtained from a complete canvass of all manufacturing establish- 
ments. The standard errors associated with these estimates are published in the annual survey of manufactures volumes for this period. The figures 
shown in parentheses for the value of shipments either have associated standard errors exceeding 15 percent or are not consistent with other census 
series and related data. Thus, at the individual product level, the estimates may be of limited reliability; however, they may be combined with other 
product-class totals into broader aggregates which are of acceptable reliability. 

2 Includes shipments of sausage and other prepared meat products from manufactures' wholesale branches. 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



20A-21 



table 7A. Materials Consumed, by Kind: 1967 and 1963 

(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Description of 
materials 



1967 



Number of 
head 

(1,000) 



Quantity 

(million 
pounds) 



Delivered 

cost 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



Number of 
head 

(1,000) 



Quantity 

(million 
pounds) 



Delivered 

cost 
(million 
dollars) 



013513 
013523 
013943 
013633 



201111 
201121 
201131 
201141 

201101 
201161 
201102 

201191 



201391 
307914 



970099 
976000 



INDUSTRY 2011.— MEATPACKING PLANTS 

Materials, containers, and supplies, total 

Cattle 

Calves 

Sheep and lambs 

Hogs 

Fresh and frozen meats : 

Beef 

Veal 

Lamb 

Pork 

Meat materials for sausage and canning, not separable by species 

Processed pork — cured, smoked, etc 

Other purchased meat, materials (cured beef, cured lamb, goat 

meat , etc . ) 

Hides , skins , and pe Its purchased 

Casings : 

Animal casings purchased 

Synthetic casings 

All other materials, ingredients, containers, packaging 

materials and supplies 

Materials, etc., n.s.k 2 



(X) 

28,252.7 

4,229.9 

11,560.7 

74,579.2 



(X) 
(X) 

(x) 

(X) 

(x) 
(x) 

(x) 
(x) 



(x) 

28,972.0 

1 1,075.9 

1,130.8 

18,443.5 



701.9 
17.9- 

14.8 
828.6 

440.3 
134.4 



(X) 
(X) 



(X) 
(X) 



49.8 

(X) 



(X) 

(x) 



(x) 
(x) 



12,687.7 

6,732.0 
280.1 
245.5 

3,500.0 



285.4 
8.0 
6.5 

282.5 

146.1 
51.7 

18.5 
29.6 



(X) 

23,748.6 

4,931.4 

14,807.3 

77,425.0 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 

(X) 

(X) 
(X) 

(X) 
(X) 



(x) 

24,461.1 

971.5 

1,421.5 

18,194.9 



536.6 

25.7 

40.3 

1,239.6 

334.7 
155.2 



12.4 
26.1 



615.7 
447.6 



(X) 
(X) 



(X) 
(X) 



83.0 

(X) 



(x) 
(x) 



(x) 

(X) 



10,007.4 

4,980.8 
256.6 
284.3 

2,822.2 



192.0 
10.4 
11.9 

390.6 

112.4 
46.9 

20.8 
22.8 



14.2 
24.2 



474.8 
342.3 



Material 



1967 



Quantity 
(million pounds) 



Delivered 

cost 

(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 
(million pounds) 



Delivered 

cost 

(million dollars) 



013513 
013523 
013943 
013633 



201111 
201121 
201131 
201141 

201101 
201161 
201102 
201191 



201391 
307914 



970099 
976000 



INDUSTRY 2013.— SAUSAGES AND OTHER PREPARED MEATS 
Materials, containers, and supplies, total 



Cattle 

Calves 

Sheep and lambs. 
Hogs 



Fresh and frozen meats : 

Beef 

Veal 

Lamb 

Pork 



Meat materials for sausage and canning, not separable by species 

Processed pork — cured, smoked, etc 

Other purchased meat, materials (cured beef, cured lamb, goat meat, etc.). 
Hides, skins, and pelts purchased 



Casings ; 

Animal casings purchased. 
Synthetic casings 



All other materials, ingredients, containers, packaging materials and supplies. 
Materials, etc. , n.s.k. 2 



(X) 
(X) 

(x) 
(x) 
(x) 



819.1 

27. 1 

37.6 

1,639.9 

845.3 

291.0 

37.3 

(X) 



(x) 

(X) 



1,890.0 

C) 
( 3 ) 
( 3 ) 
( 3 ) 



328.2 

. 12.4 

13.2 

580.9 

305.4 

117.4 

13.5 

0.6 



34.0 
25.2 



257.3 
201.9 



(X) 
(X) 

(x) 
(x) 
(x) 



746.3 

36.8 

25.6 

1,480.2 



539. 

184. 

91. 

(X 



(x) 

(X) 
(X) 

(x) 



1,296.6 

( 3 ) 
( 3 ) 

C 3 ) 

( 3 ) 



251.8 

14.7 

7.3 

440.1 

147.2 
61.6 
30.2 

( 3 ) 



33.3 
23.6 



173.1 
113.8 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20A-22 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



table 7A. Materials Consumed, by Kind: 1967 and 1963-Continued 

(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Material 



Unit of measure 



1967 



Quantity 



Delivered 
cost 

(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Delivered 

cost 

(million dollars) 



013011 

013021 
013431 
013435 



201501 
013451 



9700 99 
976000 



INDUSTRY 2015.— POULTRY DRESSING PLANTS 



Materials, parts, and supplies, total. 



Poultry killed: 

Young chickens (including commercial broilers). 



Hens (or fowl ) and other chickens 

Turkeys 

Other poultry and small game (including ducks, geese, 
rabbits, etc. ) 



Live weight 
million lbs . 

. ..do 

...do 



(X) 



8,644.1 

671.6 

1,884.4 



Other materials used: 

Dressed poultry purchased as such. 



All other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies. 
All other materials, parts, and supplies, n.s.k 



Dressed weight 
million lbs . . . 

1,000 cases 
(SO doz.) 



(X) 



339.2 

15,852.6 
(X) 
(X) 



1,285.1 

69.7 

392.3 

11.7 



90.4 

117.5 

181.0 

96.8 



(X) 



6,174.8 

617.8 

1 , 1 97 . 6 



(X) 



256.3 

12,423.8 

(X) 
(X) 



946 

79 

272 



66 

109 
150 
107 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than 
rounding) in computer operations. 

Standard notes: -Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 

companies . 

'An extensive review of these data have shown that a substantial number of establishments have included "baby beef" in this category. 

2 This item represents the total cost of materials for establishments that did not report detailed materials data. Foi- 1967, this includes 
estimates for companies that were not mailed report forms. 

3 Included in All Other Materials, Code 970099. 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



20A-23 



table 7B. Fuels and Electric Energy Consumed: 1967 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Item 



Unit of 
measure 



Meatpacking 

plants 
(SIC 2011) 



Sausages and 
other prepared 

meats 
(SIC 2013) 



Poultry 

dressing 

plants 

(SIC 2015) 



Cost of purchased fuels and electric energy, total. 
Cost of purchased fuels, total 



331212 
331213 



Coal (anthracite, bituminous, and lignite): 

Quanti ty 

Cost 

Coke, screenings, and breeze: 



Quantity. 
Cost 



Fuel oil, total: 

Quantity 

Cost 



Distillate: 
Quantity. . 
Cost. .'.... 



Residual : 
Quantity. 
Cost 



131300 
331217 
331218 
291104 



291111 
960011 
960013 
960017 



Gas (natural, manufactured mixed, blast-furnace, 
coke-oven, and other gas) : 



Quantity. 
Cost 



Other fuels (gasoline, LPG, wood, etc.). 



Fuels, n.s.k. 



Purchased electric energy: 

Quantity 

Cost 



Quantity of electric energy generated less quantity 
sold 



Total energy used for heat and power 1 , 



Million dollars. 
... do 



1,000 s. tons. . . 
Million dollars. 



1,000 s. tons... 
Million dollars. 



1,000 barrels. . . 
Million dollars. 



1,000 barrels. . . 
Million dollars. 



1, 000 barrels. .. 
Million dollars. 



Million cu. ft. . 
Million dollars. 



.do. 
.do. 



Million kw.-hrs. 
Million dollars. 



Million kw.-hrs. 



Million kw.-hrs. 
equivalent 



56.7 
28.5 



562 

4.1 



1,055 
3.9 



442 
1.9 



613 
2.0 



4,391 
11.7 


3 


8 


5 





2,503 
28.2 



16.3 

7.2 



25 
0.2 



491 
1.6 



184 
0.? 



307 
0.8 



5,311 
2.8 



0.6 
2.0 



646 
9.1 



18.0 
6.4 



12 
0.1 



438 
1.9 



262 

1.4 



176 
0.5 



6,700 
2.9 



863 
11.6 



4,718 4,820 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions 
of thousands s rather than rounding Jin computer operations. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. 

1 Represents the quantity of purchansed electric energy and the kilowatt-hours equivalent of all fuels used for heat 
and power. 



20A-24 



MEAT PRODUCTS 



table 8 General Statistics for Establishments, by Industry Specialization and 
Primary Product Class Specialization: 1967 



This table presents selected statistics for establishments according to their degree ot specializa- 
tion in products primary to their industry. The measures of plant specialization shown are (1) in- 
dustry specialization-the ratio of primary product shipments to total product shipments, primary 
plus secondary, for the establishments; and (2) product class specialization-the ratio of the 
largest primary product class shipments to total product shipments, primary plus secondary, for 



the establishment. See appendix for method of computing these ratios. Statistics for establish- 
ments with specialization ratios of less than 75 percent are included in total lines but are not 
shown as separate class. In addition, data may not be shown, for some industries, product 
classes, or specialization ratios for various reasons, e.g., to avoid disclosure of individual com- 
pany data. 



Industry 
or 

product 
class 
code 



Industry or product class by 
percent of specialization 



Establish- 
ments 



(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



MEATPACKING PLANTS 



ENTIRE INDUSTRY 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION, 



BEEF. NOT CANNED OR MADE INTO SAUSAGE 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



VEALi NOT CANNED OR MADE INTO SAUSAGE 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



LAMB AND MUTTONi NOT CANNED OR MADE INTO SAUSAGE 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT) 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. , 

PORKi FRESH AND FROZEN 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT) 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 7558 OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 

LARD 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT) 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 



PORKi PROC. (NOT CANNED OR SAUSAGE). PACKING PLTS 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT) 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 



SAUSAGEt SIMILAR PROD. (NOT CANNED) i PACKING PLTS 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT) 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 



CANNED MEATS (NOT ANIMAL FOODli 20* MEAT OR MORE 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT) 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. , 



HIOESt SKINSi AND PELTS 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 

SAUSAGES AND OTHER PREPARED MEATS 



ENTIRE INDUSTRY . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



PORK (NOT CANNED OR SAUSAGE) i PROCESS PLANTS 
(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



SAUSAGEt ETC. (NOT CANNED) i MEAT PROCESS PLANTS 
(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



CANNED MEATS (NOT ANIMAL FOOD). MEAT PROC. PLAN 
(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



NATURAL SAUSAGE CASINGS 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 

POULTRY DRESSING PLANTS 



ENTIRE INDUSTRY 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



HENS (OR FOWL) AND CHICKENS 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



TURKEYS 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



PROCESSED POULTRY. EXCEPT SOUPS 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



OTHER POULTRY AND SMALL GAME 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 

LIQUID. DRIED. AND FROZEN EGGS 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



2 697 
2 633 



752 

439 



1 374 
1 347 



474 
390 



843 
829 



306 
279 



170.5 
169.4 



90.2 
26.4 



2.3 

.6 



34.6 
6.7 



(D) 
(D) 



12.6 

.1 



14.9 
1.6 



(D) 
(D) 



54.4 
50.8 



10.0 
4.0 



30.2 
20.4 



5.3 
4.1 



1.4 
(D) 



85.2 
83.6 



56.4 
51.0 



13.5 
10.7 



4.8 
4.1 



(D) 



3.9 
3.5 



1 258.1 
1 252.2 



684.5 
202.2 



13.9 
3.3 



8.5 
4.5 



264.6 

49.0 



87.3 
.7 



101.5 
9.2 



(D) 
(D) 



3.8 

2.8 



378.4 
357.3 



73.9 
29.4 



220.2 
148.9 



32.8 
26.3 



9.4 
(0) 



317.1 
311.5 



207,2 
186.7 



51.5 
40.2 



18.5 
15.9 



2.8 
(D) 



15.1 
13.9 



130.8 
129.9 



69.2 
21.0 



1.7 

.4 



26.5 
5.5 



9.5 
.1 



10.7 
1 .1 



40.4 
37.7 



7.7 
3.2 



21.3 
14.3 



4.4 
3.4 



1.0 
(□) 



77.7 
76.2 



51.2 

46.4 



12.4 
9.8 



4.4 
3.8 



(D) 



3.5 
3.2 



274.1 
272.2 



146.9 
45.5 



3.9 
.9 



1.8 
1.0 



56.0 
11.8 



20.9 
.2 



21.5 
2.2 



(D) 

(D) 



1.3 
.9 



84.0 
78.2 



17.1 
6.9 



44.4 
30.2 



9.0 
6.8 



2.0 
(0) 



149.9 
147.1 



101.4 
92.0 



22.7 
18.0 



1.0 
(0) 



6.6 

6.0 



920.8 
916.1 



504.7 
148.5 



9.3 
2.2 



6.5 
3.6 



195.8 
37.0 



ID) 
(D) 



60.8 
.6 



69.3 
5.3 



3.0 
2.2 



250.8 
235.6 



52.9 
21.3 



140.3 
92.9 



23.6 

18.6 



5.4 
(D) 



263.5 
258.6 



173.1 
156.3 



42.1 
32.9 



16.1 

13.8 



2.0 
(D) 



11.7 
10.7 



220.5 
208.4 



210.3 
495.7 



17.5 
9.9 



416.0 
97.8 



(D) 
(D) 



141.7 
1.0 



165.2 
20.1 



(D) 
(D) 



12.5 
9.5 



742.5 
698.4 



150.1 
69.1 



398.3 
285.4 



79.6 
67.3 



16.9 
(D) 



588.0 
577.1 



370.7 
334.2 



89.6 
71.5 



29.0 
25.3 



5.7 
(0) 



47.0 
43.8 



13 384.3 
13 369.2 



8 766.4 
4 714.8 



178.6 
52.5 



121.2 
64.1 



2 487.1 
777.4 



(D) 
(D) 



632.1 
7.2 



534.3 
48.5 



28.6 
23.5 



2 261.0 
2 122.8 



599.6 

304.7 



1 089.2 
731.4 



273.9 
234.9 



30.6 
(0) 



2 358.5 
2 311.6 



1 598.7 
1 461.6 



426.4 
339.0 



72.6 
52.5 



20.7 
(0) 



15 576.3 
15 549.0 



960.7 
188.4 



206, 
59, 



138.3 
73.1 



2 895.9 
868.8 



770.6 
8.3 



699.0 
68.3 



(D) 
ID) 



41.5 
33.3 



3 007.7 
2 823.4 



749.7 
373.5 



1 490.6 
1 015.5 



354.2 
301.4 



47.9 
(D) 



2 936.1 
2 879.3 



1 965.0 
1 790.0 



517.1 
409.2 



101.7 

78.2 



25.8 
(D) 



123.3 165.9 
113.5 153.2 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent 
Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) 



g or independent dropping 
ilable. (D) Withheld 



of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) in computer operati 
to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



This report shows 1967 Census of Manufactures statistics for establishments classified 
in each of the following industries: 

SIC Code and Title 

2021--Creamery Butter 
2022--Cheese, Natural and Processed 
2023- -Condensed and Evaporated Milk 
2024--Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts 
2026- -Fluid Milk 

The general statistics (employment, payrolls, value of shipments, cost of materials, 
inventories, etc.) are reported for each establishment as a whole. Aggregates of such 
data for an industry reflect not only the primary activities of the establishments in the 
industry, but also their activities in the manufacture of secondary products and, for that 
matter, their miscellaneous activities (contract work on materials owned by others, 
repair work, etc.). This fact should be taken into account in comparing industry statistics 
(tables 1 to 4) with product statistics (table 6A) showing shipments by all industries of the 
primary products of the specified industry. The extent of the "product mix" is indicated 
in table 5A which shows the value of primary and secondary products shipped by estab- 
lishments classified in the specified industry and also the value of primary products of the 
industry shipped as secondary products by establishments classified in other industries. 

Establishments in this group are primarily engaged in (1) manufacturing creamery butter; 
natural cheese and process cheese; condensed and evaporated milk; ice cream and frozen 
desserts; and (2) processing (pasteurizing, homogenizing, vitaminizing, bottling) fluid milk 
and cream for wholesale or retail distribution. Milk receiving stations primarily engaged 
in the assembly and reshipment of bulk milk for the use of manufacturing or processing 
plants are not included in this group. 

The group is characterized by a considerable overlapping of production between industries; 
for example, plants which primarily bottle and distribute fluid milk, also produce con- 
siderable quantities of ice cream and butter. 

2021--CREAMERY BUTTER 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing creamery 
butter. For a detailed list of products of industry 2021, refer to table 6A, product codes 
2021000 to 2021021. 



The code 
and 1963. 



number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 



Value of shipments and other receipts of the Creamery Butter Industry in 1967 totaled 
$958.8 million. This included shipments of creamery butter (primary products), valued 
at $628.9 million, shipments of other products (secondary products) valued at $257.2 
million, and miscellaneous receipts of $72.7 million. 

This industry's shipments of creamery butter (primary products) in 1967 represented 
71 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and secondary). 



20B-1 



The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 69 percent. Secondary products shipped by 
this industry in 1967 mainly of condensed and evaporated milk ($158.0 million), and fluid 
milk and related products ($79.0 million). 

Industry 2021 shipments of creamery butter (primary products) in 1967 represented 75 
percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $836.5 million shipped by all in- 
dustries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 77 percent. Other industries shipping creamery 
butter (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 2023, Condensed and Evaporated 
Milk,$93.1 million; industry 2026, Fluid Milk,$9 1.8 million; industry 2022, Cheese, Natural 
and Processed, $15.6 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 em- 
ployees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2021, these establishments accounted for 5 percent of payroll and 5 percent 
of value added by manufacture. 

2022--CHEESE, NATURAL AND PROCESSED 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing all types of 
natural cheese (except cottage cheese- -industry 2026), processed cheese, cheese foods, 
and cheese spreads. For a detailed list of products of industry 2022, refer to table 6A, 
product codes 2022000 to 2022219. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the Cheese, Natural and Processed, Industry in 
1967 totaled $1,707.8 million. This included shipments of cheese, natural and processed 
(primary products), valued at $1,504.0 million, shipments of other products (secondary 
products) valued at $112.7 million, and miscellaneous receipts of $91.1 million. 

This industry's shipments of cheese, natural and processed (primary products) in 1967 
represented 93 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and 
secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 93 percent. Secondary products 
shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of creamery butter ($15.6 million), 
condensed and evaporated milk ($16.9 million), fluid milk and related products ($70.6 
million). 

While the primary products of the industry represent more than one class of product, the 
establishments tend to group themselves into "subindustries" represented by each of the 
different product classes. The extent of this specialization is indicated in table 8. Ap- 
proximately 90 percent of the total industry shipments are represented by plants speciali- 
zing in product classes; 50 percent in natural cheese; and 40 percent in processed cheese 
and related products. 

Industry 2022 shipments of cheese, natural and processed (primary products) in 1967 
represented 98 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $1,533.8 million 
shipped by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 96 percent. Other industries 
shipping cheese, natural and processed (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 
2026, Fluid Milk,$16.5 million; industry 2021, Creamery Butter,$7.0 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 em- 
ployees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 



20B-2 



For industry 2022, these establishments accounted for 3 percent of payroll and percent; 
of value added by manufacture. 

2023— CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing condensed 
and evaporated milk and related products, including ice cream mix and ice milk mix made 
for sale as such and dry milk products. For a detailed list of products of industry 2023, 
refer to table 6A, product codes 2023000 to 2023412. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the Condensed and Evaporated Milk Industry in 
1967 totaled $1,263.0 million. This included shipments of condensed and evaporated milk 
(primary products), valued at $1,004.7 million, shipments of other products (secondary 
products) valued at $223.1 million, and miscellaneous receipts of $35.2 million. 

This industry's shipments of condensed and evaporated milk (primary products) in 1967 
represented 82 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and 
secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 80 percent. Secondary products 
shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of creamery butter ($93.1 million), 
fluid milk and related products ($106.4 million), food preparations, n.e.c. ($6.1 million). 

While the primary products of the industry represent more than one class of product, the 
establishments tend to group themselves into "subindustries" represented by each of the 
different product classes. The extent of this specialization is indicated in table 8. Ap- 
proximately 97 percent of the total industry shipments are represented by plants speciali- 
zing in product classes; 43 percent in dry milk products; and 42 percent in canned milk 
products (consumer type cans); 6 percent in concentrated milk (shipped in bulk); 6 percent 
in ice cream mix and ice milk mix. 

Industry 2023 shipments of condensed and evaporated milk (primary products) in 1967 
represented 71 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $1,422.7 million 
shipped by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 66 percent. Other industries 
shipping condensed and evaporated milk (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 
2026, Fluid Milk,$217.7 million; industry 2021, Creamery Butter, $158.0 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 em- 
ployees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2023, these establishments accounted for percent of payroll and percent of 
value added by manufacture. 

2024--ICE CREAM AND FROZEN DESSERTS 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing ice cream 
and other frozen desserts. For a detailed list of products of industry 2024, refer to table 
6A, product codes 2024000 to 2024093. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts Industry in 
1967 totaled $1,059.4 million. This included shipments of ice cream and frozen desserts 
(primary products) , valued at $926.2 million, shipments of other products (secondary 
products) valued at $32.5 million, and miscellaneous' receipts of $100.7 million. 



20B-3 



This industry's shipments of ice cream and frozen desserts (primary products) in 1967 
represented 97 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and 
secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 93 percent. Secondary products 
shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of condensed and evaporated milk 
($13.0 million), fluid milk and related products ($11.0 million). 

Industry 2024 shipments of ice cream and frozen desserts (primary products) in 1967 
represented 73 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $1,273.6 million 
shipped by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 74 percent. Other industries 
shipping ice cream and frozen desserts (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 
2026, Fluid Milk,$332.3 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 em- 
ployees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2024, these establishments accounted for 2 percent of payroll and 2 percent 
of value added by manufacture. 

2026— FLUID MILK 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in processing (pasteurizing, 
homogenizing, vitaminizing, bottling) and distributing fluid milk and cream, and related 
products. For a detailed list of products of industry 2026, refer to table 6A, product codes 
2026000 to 2026435. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the Fluid Milk Industry in 1967 totaled $7,826.0 
million. This included shipments of fluid milk and related products (primary products), 
valued at $6,331.6 million, shipments of other products (secondary products) valued at 
$740.4 million, and miscellaneous receipts of $754.0 million. 

This industry's shipments of fluid milk and related products (primary products) in 1967 
represented 90 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and 
secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 90 percent. Secondary products 
shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of creamery butter ($91.8 million), 
condensed and evaporated milk ($217.7 million), ice cream and frozen desserts ($332.3 
million). 

While the primary products of the industry represent more than one class of product, the 
establishments tend to group themselves into "subindustries" represented by each of the 
different product classes. The extent of this specialization is indicated in table 8. Ap- 
proximately 90 percent of the total industry shipments are represented by plants speciali- 
zing in product classes; 10 percent in bulk fluid milk and cream; and 78 percent in 
packaged fluid milk and related products; 1 percent in cottage cheese. 

Industry 2026 shipments of fluid milk and related products (primary products) in 1967 
represented 96 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $6,603.4 million shipped 
by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 95 percent. Other industries shipping 
fluid milk and related products (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 2023, 
Condensed and Evaporated Milk, $106.4 million; industry 2021, Creamery Butter, $79.0 
million; industry 2022, Cheese, Natural and Processed, $70.6 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 em- 
ployees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2026, these establishments accounted for 1 percent of payroll and 2 percent 
of value added by manufacture. 



20B-4 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



20B-5 



table ia. General Statistics: 1958 to 1967 



(See Appendix, Explanation of lertrts) 





Establishments 


All employees 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 


Cost of 
materials 

(million 
dollars) 


Value of 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 


Capital 
expend- 
itures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 


End-of- 
year 
inven- 
tories 

(million 
dollars) 


Special- 
ization 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




Year 


Total 
(number) 


With 20 
employ- 
ees 
or more 
(number) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Man-hours 
(millions) 


Wages 

(million 
dollars) 


Coverage 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




INDUSTRY 2021 . — CREAMERY BUTTER 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM' 

1965 ASM' 

1964 ASM 1 

1963 Census .... 

1962 ASM' 

1961 ASM' 

1960 ASM 1 

1959 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


3 540 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
766 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
1,058 


138 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

178 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

228 


8.7 

9.4 
10.4 
11.3 
12.0 
15.8 
16.1 
16.8 
17.3 
17.3 


45.4 

46.5 
48.5 
52.9 
52.9 
73.6 
71.0 
67.6 
66.8 
62.9 


6.4 

7.0 

7.4 

8.0 

8.6 

10.8 

10.7 

11.9 

12.5 

12.3 


13.9 

16.3 
17.3 
19.1 
19.5 
27.6 
28.0 
27.6 
27.4 
25.6 


31.3 

33.3 
34.2 
35.6 
37.0 
50.0 
48.8 
45.8 
45.2 
42.3 


113.2 

125.7 
117.1 
160.8 
132.7 
160.9 
158.4 
154.3 
151.5 
147.2 


841.4 

863.5 
822.1 
925.1 
854.6 
1,124.7 
1,062.0 
956.4 
909.7 
875.3 


958.8 

975.6 
943.0 
1,080.4 
988.8 
1,294.4 
1,218.8 
1,108.2 
1,062.6 
1,023.5 


9.5 

10.2 

9.9 

*16.1 

9.9 

*26.1 

*19.6 

*12.5 

-»16.1 

17.1 


31.8 

36.2 
24.6 
32.2 
28.2 
47.2 
39.3 
36.8 
34.0 
33.6 


71 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

69 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

70 


75 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

77 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

80 




INDUSTRY 2022.— CHEESE, NATURAL AND PROCESSED 


1967 Census 

1966 ASM' 

1965 ASM' 

1964 ASM' 

1963 Census. . . . 

1962 ASM' 

1961 ASM' 

1960 ASM' 

1959 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


1,026 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,138 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
1,310 


238 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

206 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

195 


20.0 

19.3 
18.6 
17.9 
18.0 
17.6 
18.2 
18.2 
17.1 
17.0 


103.6 

94.5 
86.5 
82.8 
78.7 
73.3 
73.0 
68.9 
63.3 
63.0 


16.6 

15.6 
15.1 
14.7 
14.9 
14.8 
15.3 
15.0 
14.2 
14.1 


33.9 

34.5 
31.9 
31.5 
31.1 
30.2 
32.0 
31. 1 
28.9 
28.5 


80.0 

72.4 
66.6 
64.3 
61.8 
56.9 
57.1 
54.1 
50.1 
49.8 


226.5 

246.0 

207.7 
190.6 
179.7 
175.0 
169.7 
161. 1 
137.7 
133.0 


1,487.4 

1,320.5 
1,125.3 
1,038.3 
995.3 
927.8 
946.0 
829.8 
755.0 
743.6 


1,707.8 

1,552.2 

1,324.7 

1,225.6 

1,170.8 

1,107.0 

1,110. 1 

994.0 

893.3 

873.6 


17.3 

13.4 
13.9 
11.8 
15.9 
12.1 
11.0 
10.2 
17.0 
13.7 


135.0 

147.5 

114.7 

114.2 

106.3 

92.6 

114.8 

101.2 

83.9 

82.0 


93 

(na) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

93 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

90 


98 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

96 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

96 




INDUSTRY 2023.— CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM 1 

1965 ASM' 

1964 ASM 1 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM' 

1961 ASM' 

1960 ASM' 

1959 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


291 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

281 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

313 


169 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

166 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

202 


13.2 

12.3 
12.5 
12.7 
12.3 
' 12.2 
13.2 
13.9 
13.3 
13.4 


83.4 

73.3 

73.1 
71.7 
67.0 
66.8 
67.9 
71.8 
63.7 
61.4 


10.0 

9.6 

9.8 

9.9 

9.5 

9.7 

10.4 

10.8 

11.1 

10.8 


20.7 

20.3 
20.8 
21.9 
20.1 
20.0 
21.3 
22.3 
23.2 
23.2 


59.3 

54.1 
53.8 
53.8 
50.4 
47.9 
48.3 
49.6 
48.4 
46.5 


373.1 

309.8 
285.1 
297.6 
236.2 
248.7 
265.4 
284.9 
217.7 
202.7 


892.5 

802.5 
755.7 
734.7 
699.4 
688.6 
756.8 
670.1 
636.2 
613.7 


1,263.0 

1.099.5 

1,050.1 

1,020.9 

937.9 

963.2 

1,036.8 

935.7 

850.7 

820.6 


20.8 

13.6 
21.2 
17.4 
12.1 
13.4 
14.3 
14.1 
13.6 
12.7 


74.8 

63.1 
50.2 
59.1 
46.8 
51.0 
58.3 
58.6 
48.6 
46.5 


82 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

80 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

84 


71 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

66 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

69 




INDUSTRY 2024. —ICE CREAM AND FROZEN DESSERTS 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM lr , . 

1965 ASM' 

1964 ASM' 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM' 

1961 ASM 1 

1960 ASM' 

1959 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


3 850 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,081 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,390 


325 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

387 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

458 


24.6 

25.3 
26. 8 
27.8 
29. 6 
32.6 

33. 7 
34.9 

34. 1 
34.8 


156.4 

153.3 
155. 6 
157.2 
162.8 
168.3 
167. 7 
163.8 
157. 9 
153. 9 


13. 8 

13.9 

14. 7 

14. 7 

15. 6 

16. 1 

16. 7 

17. 5 
18.3 

18. 7 


27. 2 

29. 5 
31. 

30. 7 
32.5 

34. 6 

35. 2 

36. 4 
38. 

37. 7 


77.2 

77. 8 
76. 6 

75. 8 

76. 6 
73.2 

72. 3 

73. 6 

74. 5 
72. 4 


403.0 

413. 6 

432. 5 
443. 1 

433. 
432.3 
427. 4 
427. 7 
408. 9 
394. 7 


658.3 

666. 8 
654.6 
648. 2 
644.6 
660.6 
658.2 
621. 6 
599. 1 
557. 3 


1,059.4 

1,078.4 
1,085. 
1,090. 1 
1,076. 5 
1,092. 7 
1,085. 8 
1,048.3 
1,006. 5 
951. 5 


26.6 

23. 8 
32. 7 

30. 6 

31. 9 
26.4 
20.2 
24.8 
23. 8 
26. 1 


66.9 

67. 1 

59. 3 
79. 3 

60. 7 
59.3 

61. 1 
61. 
59. 1 
59. 4 


97 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

93 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

94 


73 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

74 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

71 




INDUSTRY 2026.— FLUID MILK 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM 1 

1965 ASM 1 

1964 ASM 1 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM 1 

1961 ASM 1 

1960 ASM 1 

1959 ASM 1 

1958 Census 2 ... 


3,481 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

4,619 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

5,828 


1,636 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,948 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

2,239 


165.2 

169.3 
178.4 
182.9 
185.0 
196.3 
199.4 
203.9 
207.4 
212.2 


1,060.? 

1,039. 1 
1,054.0 
1,054.0 
1,032.9 
1,033.2 
1,027.6 
1.034.1 
1,108. 1 
1,009.6 


60.5 

60.8 
63.4 
68.1 
68.6 
71.3 
75.0 
80.1 
83.6 
86.3 


126.4 

129.4 
136.5 
145.9 
147.1 
143.0 
153.5 
160.2 
177.9 
182.3 


356.7 

349.3 
348.9 
361.3 
358.8 
361.1 
361.5 
365.0 
365.6 
369.3 


2,350.7 

2,232.2 
2,259.1 
2,271.7 
2,203.2 
2,265.6 
2,189.8 
2,165.4 
2,124.7 
1,998.5 


5,493.4 

5,211.4 
4,925.0 
5,031.8 
4,821.7 
4,571.9 
4,597.2 
4,580.5 
4,536.6 
4,444.5 


7,826.0 

7,434.9 
7,185.1 
7,298.8 
7,025.9 
6,888.8 
6,834.5 
6,762.6 
6,649.3 
6,412.3 


120.3 

105.2 
114.6 
139.8 
126.1 
116.7 
117.6 
120.9 
147.9 
135.7 


181.4 

151. 1_ 
14 1 . 9" 
151.6 
146.8 
176.8 
183.8 
175.2 
176.0 
152.8 


90 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

90 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

90 


96 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

95 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

95 



Note: In 1967, 1963, and 1958, the number of companies in industry 2021 was 510, 725, and 990, respectively; in industry 2022: 891, 982, and 
1,123; industry 2023: 179, 167, and 161; industry 2024: 713, 901, and 1,167; industry 2026: 2,988, 4,030, and 5,157. The 1967 company counts include 
the small companies whose data were estimated from administrative records. The number of such companies is shown in table 4. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. (x) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 
companies. *These figures either have associated standard errors exceeding 15 percent or are not consistent with other Census series and related 
data. Thus, these estimates may be of limited reliability. 

1 Based on a representative sample of establishments canvassed in the annual survey of manufactures (ASM). These estimates may differ from the 
results of a complete canvass of all manufacturing establishments. The percentage standard errors are shown in the ASM volume. 

2 Data prior to 1958 appear in Volume II, 1963 Census of Manufactures, in table 1 of the chapter devoted to this industry. 

3 Some of the small establishments in this industry may have been misclassif ied as to industry. This does not significantly affect the statistics 
other than the number of establishments or number of companies. (See paragraph in Introduction: "industry Classification of Establishments" for 
further explanation. ) 



20B-6 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



table ib Selected Operating Ratios: 1958 to 1967 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Year 



Payroll 

per 
employee 

(dollars) 



Production 


Annual 


worker as 


man-hours 


percent of 


of 


total 


production 


employment 


workers 


(percent) 


(number) 



Average 

hourly 

earnings of 

production 

workers 

(dollars) 



Cost of 

materials 

per dollar 

of shipments 

(dollars) 



Cost of 
materials and 
payrolls per 

dollar 
shipments 
(dollars) 



Value 
added per 
employee 

(dollars) 



Payrolls 

as percent 

of value 

added 

(percent) 



Value 
added per 
man-hour of 
production 

worker 
(dollars) 



1967 Census. 

1966 ASM. . . . 

1965 ASM. . . . 

1964 ASM. . . , 

1963 Census, 

1962 ASM. . . , 

1961 ASM 

1960 ASM 

1959 ASM 

1958 Census. 

1967 Census. 

1966 ASM 

1965 ASM 

1964 ASM 

1963 Census. 

1962 ASM. . . . 

1961 ASM 

1960 ASM. . . . 

1959 ASM 

1958 Census. 

1967 Census. 

1966 ASM 

1965 ASM 

1964 ASM. . . . 

1963 Census. 

1962 ASM 

1961 ASM. . . . 

1960 ASM 

1959 ASM. . . . 

1958 Census. 

1967 Census. 

1966 ASM 

1965 ASM 

1964 ASM 

1963 Census. 

1962 ASM 

1961 ASM. . . . 

1960 ASM 

1959 ASM 

1958 Census. 

1967 Census. 

1966 ASM 

1965 ASM 

1964 ASM. . . . 

1963 Census. 

1962 ASM 

1961 ASM 

1960 ASM 

1959 ASM 

1958 Census. 



5,237 
4,934 
4,668 
4,695 
4,409 
4,660 
4,403 
4,019 
3,861 
3,637 



5,176 
4,884 
4,657 
4,617 
4,382 
4,167 
4,007 
3,793 
3,704 
3,698 



6,340 
5,933 
5,839 
5,665 
5,466 
5,461 
5,146 
5,183 
4,779 
4,570 



6,359 
5,724 
5,803 
5,647 
5,505 
5,167 
4,976 
4,689 
4,628 
4,424 



6,418 
6,138 
5,908 
5,764 
5,582 
5,264 
5,153 
5,071 
5,342 
4,757 



74 
74 
72 
71 
72 
68 
66 
71 
72 
71 



76 
78 
78 
78 
78 
80 
79 
78 
83 
80 



56 
50 
55 
53 
53 
49 
50 
50 
54 
54 



37 
36 
36 
37 
37 
36 
38 
39 
40 
41 



INDUSTRY 2021. --CREAMERY BUTTER 



2,158 
2,337 
2,325 
2,389 
2,262 
2,555 
2,610 
2,325 
2,202 
2,079 



2.25 

2.05 

1.98 

1.86 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 



.92 
.93 
.92 
.91 
.92 
.93 
.93 
.92 
.92 
.92 



13,071 

13,340 

11,279 

14,286 

11,063 

10,184 

9,821 

9,181 

8,757 

8,512 



INDUSTRY 2022. --CHEESE, NATURAL AND PROCESSED 



2,039 
2,206 
2,116 
2,140 
2,087 
2,039 
2,092 
2,071 
2,028 
2,017 



.93 

.91 
.91 
.91 
.92 
.90 
.92 
.90 
.92 
.92 



.87 
.85 
.85 
.85 
.85 
.84 
.85 
.83 
.85 
.85 



11,313 

12,722 

11,188 

10,624 

10,011 

9,944 

9,313 

8,872 

8,058 

7,810 



INDUSTRY 2023. --CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK 



2,075 
2,115 
2,127 
2,207 
2,105 
2,050 
2,044 
2,071 
2,094 
2,160 



2.86 
2.67 
2.59 
2.46 
2.51 
2.40 
2.27 
2.22 
2.09 
2.00 



.77 
.80 
.79 
.79 
.82 
.78 
.80 
.79 
.82 
.82 



.71 
.73 
.72 
.72 
.75 
.71 
.73 
.72 
.75 
.75 



28,362 
25,085 
22,782 
23,513 
19,278 
20,330 
20,112 
20,570 
16,331 
15,077 



INDUSTRY 2024. --ICE CREAM AND FROZEN DESSERTS 



1,978 
2,134 
2,104 
2,092 
2,085 
2,149 
2,105 
2,080 
2,077 
2,018 



2.84 
2.65 
2.47 
2.47 
2.36 
2.12 
2.06 
2.02 
1.96 
1.92 



.77 
.77 
.75 
.74 
.75 
.76 
.76 
.75 
.75 
.75 



.62 

.63 
.60 
.59 
.60 
.60 
.61 
.59 
.60 
.59 



16,380 
15,142 
16,127 
15,920 
14,641 
13,273 
12,682 
12,247 
11,987 
11,343 



INDUSTRY 2026. --FLUID MILK 



2,090 
2,129 
2,153 
2,141 
2,146 
2,005 
2,046 
2,000 
2,127 
2,113 



2.82 
2.70 
2.56 
2.48 
2.44 
2.52 
2.35 
2.28 
2.05 
2.03 



.70 
.70 
.69 
.69 
.69 
.66 
.67 
.68 



14,226 
13,186 
12,664 
12,423 
11,906 
11,543 
10,981 
10,618 
10,243 
9,416 



40 
37 
41 
33 
40 
46 
45 
44 
44 
43 



46 
38 
42 
43 
44 
42 
43 
43 
46 
47 



22 

24 
26 
24 
28 
27 
26 
25 
29 
30 



39 
38 
36 
35 
38 
39 
39 
38 
39 
39 



45 
47 
47 
46 
47 
46 
47 
48 
52 
51 



8.14 
7.73 
6.77 
8.41 
6.81 
5.84 
5.66 
5.59 
5.53 
5.76 



6.68 
7.14 
6.52 
6.05 



18.01 
15.26 
13.71 
13.61 
11.77 
12.46 
12.47 
12.77 
9.38 
8.72 



14.82 
14.07 
13.97 
14.45 
13.33 
12.51 
12.16 
11.74 
10.76 
10.48 



18.60 
17.24 
16.55 
15.57 
14.97 
15.84 
14.26 
13.52 
11.94 
10.96 



Standard notes 
companies . 



Represents zero. 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not available. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



20B-7 



table 2. General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Industry and geographic area 



Total 

(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 
employees 



(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



2021— CREAMERY BUTTER 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . . 
NEW YORK 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA . . . 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 

SOUTH REGION 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

IDAHO 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

2022— CHEESEi NATURAL AND PROCESSED 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION 8 . . . . 
VERMONT e 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERS£Y e . . . 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI . 

NORTH DAKOTA" 8 . . . 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . . 
GEORGIA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

KENTUCKY . . . 

TENNESSEE 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 
ARKANSAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

IDAHO 

UTAH 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA 6 

See footnotes at end of table. 



540 
16 



11 
17 
57 

363 

194 
72 

8 
42 
16 
22 

9 

17 

6 

42 

27 



026 
102 

21 

8 

81 

51 

8 

22 

799 

671 
31 
10 
45 
19 

566 

12S 
18 
37 
29 
12 
14 



10 

2 

40 
15 
17 

11 
6 



138 
5 



238 
34 



152 

105 
8 
5 
15 
5 
72 

47 
10 
11 
16 
4 
2 

31 



2.3 
.2 

AA 



1.4 

5.1 
2.3 
1.2 
.3 
.5 
.3 
.3 
.2 



20.0 
2.7 



1.1 
BB 
EE 

13.9 

9.9 
.9 
.3 

1.0 
.3 

7.5 

3.9 

1.1 

.6 

1.6 

.2 

.2 

1.8 

BB 



1.2 
.6 



45.4 
1.7 



37.6 

12.8 
1.3 
(D) 
(D) 
1.5 
8.1 

24.8 
11.2 
5.6 
1.3 
2.4 
1.5 
1.6 
1.3 

2.6 

(D) 

3.5 

1.8 
1.3 



103.6 



(D) 
(Dl 

(D) 
6.0 
(Dl 
(D) 

72.6 

51.5 

4.7 
1.9 
6.1 

1.4 
37.4 

21.1 
7.2 
2.6 
8.5 



(D) 
(Dl 

(Dl 
2.3 

(D) 

(Dl 
(D) 



5.5 
3.5 

1.1 

2.8 
1.0 

1.4 



6.4 

.3 

.2 
.2 

5.5 

1.7 
.1 

(D) 

(D) 

.2 

1.0 

3.8 
1.8 
.9 
.2 
.3 
.2 
.2 
.2 



16.6 

2.1 

(D) 
(Dl 

(D) 

.9 

(D) 

(D) 

11.7 

8.5 
.7 
.2 
.8 
.2 

6.5 

3.2 

1.0 
.5 

1.2 
.2 
.2 



(D) 
(Dl 



(D) 

.4 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



1.0 
.6 
.3 



13.9 
.5 



3.5 
.3 

(D) 

(0) 
.4 

2.2 

8.5 
4.0 
2.1 



33.9 

4.2 

(0) 
(Dl 

(D) 
1.9 
(D) 
(D) 

24.2 

17.4 

1.7 

.5 

1.6 

.4 

13.1 

6.9 
2.2 

1.0 

2.5 

.3 



(0) 

(01 

(Dl 

.7 

(D) 

(Dl 
(D) 



1.9 

1.1 
.5 

.7 
.3 

.3 



31.3 
1.3 



1.3 

1.1 



8.8 
.8 
(D) 
(D) 
1.2 
5.5 

17.5 
8.2 

4.1 

1.0 

1.5 

.9 

1.0 



1.5 

(Dl 

2.2 

1.2 
.9 



80.0 

9.6 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
4.4 
(D) 
(D) 

57.1 

40.6 
3.8 
1.3 

4.2 

1.0 

30.4 

16.5 
6.2 
2.0 
6.2 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
1.7 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 



4.3 
2.8 
1.0 

2.1 

.8 

1.0 



113.2 
5.5 



5.4 
4.7 



29.8 
2.8 
(D) 
(0) 
3.1 

20.1 



63.8 
32.6 
11.5 
1.3 
5.4 
5.1 
5.6 
2.3 

6.5 

(D) 

7.5 

4.3 
3.1 



226.5 

31.1 

(D) 
(0) 

(0) 
12.8 

(Dl 
(Dl 

162.0 

122.4 
10.3 

4.1 
12.1 

2.6 
93.3 

39.6 

12.6 

5.6 

14.7 

2.5 

2.0 

16.5 

(Dl 
(D) 

(Dl 
3.8 
(D) 

(Dl 
(D) 



4.1 
1.9 

9.1 
4.2 
3.3 



841.4 

35.4 

35.1 
28. o 

715.8 

264.8 

22.3 

(D) 

(D) 

22.2 

185.3 

450.9 
241.9 
92.0 
18.1 
26.2 
23.3 
30.2 
19.2 

41.2 

(Dl 

49.1 

28.7 
24.5 



1 487.4 

162.9 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

58.8 

(Dl 

(Dl 



738.6 
35.1 
14.1 
79.6 
14.2 

595.6 

390.0 

150.9 

36.3 

163.0 

11.3 

16.0 

119.5 

(0) 
(Dl 

(01 

25.0 

(01 

(Dl 
(D) 



54.3 
36.8 



958.8 

41.3 

40.9 
33.6 

810.6 

295.5 

25.2 

(Dl 

(D) 

25.5 

205.2 

515.1 
274.3 
103.7 
19.9 
31.6 
28.3 
35.9 
21.4 

49.6 

(Dl 

57.3 

33.6 

28.2 



(0) 
(D) 

(D) 
71.9 

(D) 
(D) 



856.5 
46.0 
18.3 
92.4 
16.7 

683.1 

429.7 

165.1 

41.7 

176.7 

13.7 

17.9 

135.2 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

29.0 

(Dl 

(D) 
(D) 



63.3 
42.1 

13.7 



(D) 
(D) 



3.9 
(D) 
(D) 
(0) 
.2 
3.5 

4.5 
2.7 



.3 

(D) 
.5 



17.3 

1.8 

(0) 
(D) 

(D) 

.7 

(Dl 

(D) 

13.8 

9.5 

.4 

1.1 

.4 

.1 

7.4 

4.2 
1.3 

.8 
1.2 

.2 



(D) 
(D) 



(D) 

.1 

(Dl 



(D) 
(D) 



1.2 
1.0 



12.0 

.3 

(Dl 
3 (D) 

10.2 

3.7 
.4 
.3 
.3 
.3 

2.3 

6.5 
2.6 
1.6 
.3 
.7 
.4 
.7 
.3 

.5 

(D) 

1.0 



18.0 
2.5 



.3 

2 (D) 



2.2 
1.2 



9.4 
.8 
.4 
.9 
.2 

7.0 

3.0 

.8 

2 (D) 

1.4 

2 (d) 

2 (D) 

2.0 

(Dl 
2 (D) 

(Dl 
.5 
.5 

(Dl 
2 (D) 



.4 
2 (D) 



132.7 

4.0 

(D) 
2 (D) 

114.0 

47.6 
3.5 
2.6 
2.5 
2.5 

36.5 

66.4 
28.2 
13.7 
3.0 
7.3 
4.2 
8.7 
1.3 

4.8 

(D) 

9.9 

6.9 
5.2 



179.8 
23.4 



2 (DI 

21.3 

11.4 
1.6 
8.3 

130.3 

101.1 
8.9 
3.6 
9.4 
1.6 
77.6 

29.2 

9.9 
2 (D) 
13.5 
2 (0) 
2 (D) 

15.6 

(D) 
2 (DI 

(Dl 
6.3 

3.7 

(Dl 
2 (D) 



3.5 
2 <DI 

5.5 
1.0 
4.0 



20B-8 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



table 2. General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Industry and geographic area' 



1967 



Total 
(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Pcyroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 
employees 



(1,000) 



2023— CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN . . 

WISCONSIN. . 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . . 

MARYLAND 

VIRGINIA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

PACIFIC DIVISION ...... 

WASHINGTON 

CALIFORNIA 

2024 — ICE CREAM AND FROZEN DESSERTS 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION .... 

MASSACHUSETTS 

CONNECTICUT 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN ... 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

NEBRASKA 

SOUTH REGION ....... 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . . 
MARYLAND ........... 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA . 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

ALABAMA. ... 

MISSISSIPPI 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA e 

TEXAS 

See footnotes at end of table. 



291 

51 

46 

28 

2 

16 



101 
13 
9 
19 
16 
44 

55 

26 

14 

9 

47 

18 
4 
4 

22 
6 
10 

7 

37 



2 8 
5 
19 



850 

240 

73 
40 
12 

167 
69 
28 
70 



189 
51 
27 
44 
39 
28 

79 
19 
14 
21 

8 



169 
28 

26 

12 
2 
12 

94 

63 
9 
4 

10 
9 

31 

31 

18 

5 

6 



325 

85 

22 

15 
4 

63 
30 
11 
22 



EE 
.8 
AA 
.5 

8.6 

5.6 

.8 

CC 

CC 

1.0 

2.5 

2.9 
1.2 



1.0 
BB 
.5 

.3 

1.1 

.2 



24.6 

8.2 

2.1 

1.5 

.3 

6.1 

3.0 

.8 

2.3 

6.8 

4.7 

1.1 

.6 

1.7 



2.1 

.7 



6.8 

3.2 
.6 
.3 
.5 
.3 
AA 
.2 



2.0 
.3 

1.1 



1.7 

AA 



83.4 
9.3 

(D) 
4.7 
(D) 
2.9 

54.4 

36.8 
5.0 
(D) 
(D) 
6.7 

16.0 

17.6 
6.7 
(D) 
5.5 

11.3 

3.6 

(D) 

ID) 

5.6 

(D) 
2.7 

2.0 



7.1 
(D) 
5.7 



56.3 

13.3 

10.0 

1.9 

43.1 

21.5 

6.5 

15.0 

43.5 

30.5 
6.3 
3.5 

U.9 
6.0 
2.8 

13.0 

4.8 
(D) 

4.4 
(D) 

37.2 

16.9 
3.6 
2.0 
2.1 
1.5 
(Dl 
1.1 
3.9 

10.8 
1.6 
6.2 
1.9 
1.2 

9.5 

(D) 
(Dl 
5.7 



10.0 
1.1 

(D) 

.6 

ID) 

.4 

6.6 

4.2 
.7 

(D) 

(D) 
.8 

2.0 

2.3 

.9 

(D) 

.8 

1.4 



(D) 

(D) 



.7 
(D) 



13.8 

4.9 



1.4 
1.0 



3.5 

1.7 

.5 

1.3 

3.7 

2.7 



.5 
.2 

1.1 
.3 

(D) 

.4 

(D) 

3.3 



. 1 
.2 
(D) 
.1 
.3 



(Dl 
(D) 

.5 



20.7 
2.3 

(D) 
1.2 
(D) 



8.6 
1.4 
(D) 
(D) 
1.6 
4. 1 

5.0 
2.0 
(D) 
1.5 

2.9 



(D) 
(D) 



1.5 
(D) 



1.6 
(D) 
1.3 



1.9 
.5 

7.2 
3.5 
1.0 
2.7 

7.0 

5.1 
1.2 

.8 
1.7 
1.0 

.5 

2.0 
.5 

(D) 

.7 

ID) 

6.9 



.3 

(D) 
.2 

,7 

2.0 

.2 

1.2 



1.7 
(D) 
(D) 

1.1 



59.3 

6.2 

(D) 
3.4 
(D) 
2.0 

38.5 

25.1 
3.8 

(D) 

(D) 

4.9 

11.8 

13.4 
4.5 
(0) 
4.4 

8.1 

2.4 
(D) 
(D) 

4.2 
(D) 
2.0 

1.5 

6.6 

.9 

5.7 
(01 
4.6 



1.2 

22.6 

11.2 

3.3 

8.1 

19.8 

14.5 
3.3 
1.8 
5.5 
2.6 
1.2 

5.3 

1.5 
(D) 
1.9 
(Dl 

15.5 

7.7 

1.8 



(D) 

.4 
1.6 

4.3 

.5 

2.5 



3.5 
(D) 
(0) 
2.2 



373.1 
33.1 

(D) 

19.6 

(D) 

9.5 

270.5 

184.8 

19.7 

(D) 

(D) 

28.6 

74.2 

85.8 

14.8 

(D) 

13.8 

44.9 

9.6 

(D) 
(D) 

28.0 

(D) 
11.1 

7.3 

24.6 

7.7 

16.8 

(D) 

12.5 



403.0 

153.3 

51.0 

40.9 

5.5 

102.3 
51.0 
13.7 
37.6 

100.2 

70.8 
15.0 
10.1 
24.2 
13.9 
7.7 

29.4 

10.2 

(O) 

9.3 

(D) 

102.7 

52.9 
16.8 

5.4 
3.9 
4.5 
(Dl 
2.1 
8.7 

23.7 
2.2 

14.4 
4.8 
2.4 

26.1 

(D) 

(D) 

17.3 



892.5 
96.4 

(D) 
55.4 

(D) 
32.6 

585.5 

33B.0 

40.2 

(D) 

(□) 

48.0 

167.1 

247.5 

118.6 

(D) 

60.3 

121.3 

42.3 
(D) 

(D) 

59.7 

(D) 

24,2 

19.2 

87.3 

16.8 

70.4 

(D) 

53.9 



658.3 

217.5 

65.4 
49.4 
10.0 

152.0 
70.8 
24.2 
57.0 

182.2 

125.8 
27.1 
17.2 
42.9 
26.2 
12.4 

56.4 
17.8 

(D) 
17.5 

(D) 

158.2 

82.3 
20.9 
S.5 
7.7 
6.4 
(D) 
2.8 
16.9 

41.2 
5.6 

24.1 
8.2 
3.1 

34.7 
(D) 
(D) 

23.1 



1 263.0 
132.0 

(D) 
75.3 

(D) 
42.1 

651.2 

515.6 

59.4 

(D) 

(D) 

76.6 

240.8 

335.7 
133.6 

(D) 
76.0 

167.4 

53.2 

(Dl 
(D) 

87.8 

(D) 

35.9 

26.4 

112.3 

24.3 

86.0 

(D) 

67.1 



116.1 
90.2 
15.4 

253.7 
121.3 
37.9 
94.6 

282.1 

196.4 
42.1 
27.3 
67.0 
40.1 
20.0 

65.7 
27.9 

(D) 
26.8 

(D) 

260.4 

135.0 
37.6 
13.8 
11.7 
10.8 
(D) 
4.9 
25.7 

64.6 

8.0 

38.3 

12.9 

5.5 

60.6 
(D) 
(D) 

40.4 



(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

.2 

17.4 

12.8 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
1.0 
3.1 

4.7 

2.0 

(Dj 

.9 

1.3 

.4 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
.3 



.6 
(D) 

.4 



2.4 

1.5 

.3 

7.7 

4.3 

.9 

2.6 

7.8 

5.8 
1.0 
.5 
2.4 
1.6 



1.9 

1.1 

(0) 

.3 

(D) 

5.5 



.2 

(D) 

.1 



1.8 
.2 

1.2 
.2 
.2 

1.5 
(Dl 
(D) 
1.2 



12.3 

.9 
(D) 

Mo) 

(D) 
= (0) 

8.3 

5.5 

.9 

.2 

.9 

1.1 

2.3 

2.9 

1.5 

»(D) 

.8 

1.9 

.6 
2 (D) 
2 (D) 

1.0 

2 (D) 

.5 

.3 

1.1 
.2 



2.1 

1.4 
.2 



3.3 
1.1 
3.0 



5.9 
1.3 

.6 
2.1 
1.2 

.5 

2.3 

.6 
.5 
.6 
.2 

6.1 

(D) 
.6 
.3 

.8 

Mo) 



1.0 

(D) 
.3 

1.1 

! (D) 

.2 

2.0 

2 (D) 

.5 

1.2 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



20B-9 



table 2 General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 





1967 


1963 




Establishments 


All employees 


Production workers 


Value 

added by 


Cost of 


Value of 


Capital 
expendi- 


All 


Value 


Industry and geographic area* 
















added by 




Total 


With 20 
employees 


Number 


Payroll 


Number 


Man-hours 


Wages 


manufac- 
ture 


materials 


shipments 


tures, 
new 


employees 


manufac- 
ture 






or more 




(million 






(million 


(million 


(million 


(million 


(million 




(million 




(number) 


(number) 


(1,000) 


dollars) 


(1,000) 


(millions) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


(1,000) 


dollars) 


2024— ICE CREAM AND FROZEN DESSERTS 






























134 

47 


44 
11 


2.8 
.7 


i9.3 
3.3 


1.8 

.4 


3.4 
.7 


11.9" 
1.7 


46.7 
9.9 


100.4 
18.6 


147.2 
28.4 


3.3 

.4 


3.2 

.8 


45.3 




8.7 




12 


4 


.2 


.9 


.1 


.2 


.5 


2.5 


3.6 


6.1 


.1 


.3 


2.5 




87 


33 


2.1 


16.0 


1.5 


2.8 


10.2 


36.7 


81.9 


118.8 


2.8 


2.5 


36.7 




12 


3 


AA 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


.2 


4.3 




63 


27 


1.8 


13.0 


1.2 


2.3 


8.5 


27.2 


67.4 


94.9 


1.5 


2.0 


29.4 


2026— FLUID MILK 






























3 481 


1 636 


165.2 


1 060.5 


60.5 


126.4 


356.7 


2 350.7 


5 493.4 


7 826.0 


120.3 


185.0 


2 203.2 




1 215 


477 


41.3 


267.5 


16.6 


34.1 


96.1 


586.7 


1 361.5 


1 941.1 


29.3 


50.1 


590.9 




422 


147 


11.8 


73.7 


4.7 


9.5 


25.3 


181.9 


407.5 


588.2 


5.9 


13.3 


172.8 




52 


15 


1.2 


6.5 


.5 


1.0 


2.3 


12.6 


30.6 


43.0 


(Dl 


2 (d) 


2 (d) 




40 


12 


.8 


4.4 


.4 


.7 


1.8 


11.0 


18.3 


29.2 


(Dl 


'(d) 


2 (o) 




40 


15 


.8 


4.5 


.5 


1.0 


2.4 


12.9 


44.8 


57.5 


.5 


1.0 


11.1 




168 


60 


4.9 


29.3 


2.0 


3.9 


10.9 


82.0 


160.4 


242.0 


2.3 


5.7 


81.3 




38 


16 


1.1 


6.8 


.4 


.8 


2.1 


18.4 


27.3 


45.4 


.6 


1.2 


14.6 




84 


29 


3.1 


22.2 


1.1 


2.0 


5.6 


45.0 


126.2 


171.0 


1.1 


3.2 


44.6 


MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION .... 


793 


330 


29.6 


193.8 


11.8 


24.7 


70.8 


404.8 


953.9 


1 353.0 


23.5 


36.8 


418.2 




363 


131 


11.2 


75.4 


5.3 


11.3 


34.3 


163.0 


481.0 


641.4 


9.9 


14.5 


165.7 




89 


48 


3.4 


23.3 


1.6 


3.3 


9.6 


55.6 


131.6 


186.3 


2.4 


5.2 


66.1 




341 


151 


14.9 


95.1 


4.9 


10.1 


26*9 


186.2 


341.3 


525.3 


11.3 


17.1 


186.4 




1 119 


487 


50.4 


325.8 


18.4 


38.1 


113.9 


731.3 


1 804.7 


2 530.3 


39.5 


55.6 


670.5 


EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. , . 


682 


337 


35.8 


232,4 


12.9 


26.8 


82.3 


544.7 


1 287.8 


1 828.0 


27.0 


39.8 


483.7 




178 


101 


14.8 


87.6 


4.2 


8.8 


25.0 


190.3 


408.0 


596.3 


8.4 


15.2 


167.7 




75 


46 


4.2 


27.7 


1.7 


3.4 


9.4 


57.8 


131.4 


188.8 


2.0 


5.1 


60.5 




121 


74 


6.5 


46.9 


2.7 


5.5 


20.0 


129.2 


266.3 


394.7 


8.1 


7.3 


115.7 




144 
164 

437 


69 

47 

150 


5.8 
4.4 

14.6 


40.1 
30.2 

93.4 


2.3 

2.0 

5.5 


5.0 
4.1 

11.2 


15.5 

12.4 

31.6 


96.4 
71.1 

186.6 


255.9 
226.2 

516.9 


351.1 
297.1 

702.3 


5.6 
2.9 

12.5 


6.7 
5.5 

15.8 


83.6 




56.3 


WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 


186.7 




165 


35 


3.2 


21.7 


1.4 


2.8 


8.6 


45.0 


142.2 


186.6 


1.9 


3.6 


46.5 




109 


33 


2.9 


19.6 


.9 


2.1 


5.6 


35.4 


122.2 


157.6 


1.5 


2.9 


37.5 




47 


27 


3.8 


25.0 


1.3 


2.6 


7.9 


49.1 


109.8 


158.7 


5.0 


3.9 


44.8 




16 


5 


BB 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


.2 


2.5 




21 


11 


CC 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


(D) 


(D) 


.8 


9.8 




28 


17 


1.8 


10.5 


.6 


1.2 


3.5 


19.4 


46.0 


65.3 


1.7 


1.8 


18.1 




51 


22 


1.9 


11.2 


.8 


1.6 


3.9 


25.1 


63.1 


88.1 


1.8 


2.6 


27.4 




624 
286 


424 
195 


45.9 
22.8 


270.1 
134.9 


15.4 
7.5 


34.1 
16.6 


78.1 
38.5 


604.8 
304.6 


1 292.9 
621.6 


1 894.0 
924.4 


35.0 
17.4 


48.9 
24.3 


556.1 




270.6 




10 


4 


AA 


ID] 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


(Dl 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 




33 


23 


3.1 


21.5 


.9 


1.8 


5.1 


41.0 


89.2 


130.0 


1.7 


3.3 


41.2 




3 


3 


1.6 


12.4 


.4 


.8 


2.3 


21.2 


36.6 


57.4 


.4 


1.5 


18.1 




46 


37 


3.4 


19.5 


1.2 


2.6 


6.0 


38.5 


89.2 


127.8 


2.0 


3.3 


32.2 




30 


18 


1.2 


7.1 


.4 


.9 


1.9 


15.1 


30.3 


45.3 


1.5 


1.7 


16.7 




36 


33 


4.2 


22.1 


1.4 


3.3 


6.6 


57.9 


119.7 


177.4 


3.8 


4.5 


53.4 




24 


12 


1.3 


6.9 


.5 


1.1 


2.4 


17.4 


41.3 


58.4 


.8 


2 (D) 


2 (D) 




47 


26 


FF 


(Dl 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


(Dl 


(D) 


(Dl 


*(D) 


2 (d) 




57 


39 


4.7 


27.4 


1.5 


3.4 


8.2 


79.3 


134.8 


213.6 


4.5 


4.5 


56.1 


EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 


152 


103 


9.3 


55.4 


3.1 


6.6 


15.0 


115.5 


249.7 


364.3 


7.1 


10.2 


106.4 




43 


32 


2.4 


14.5 


.8 


1.8 


4.1 


31.7 


68.5 


100.1 


1.4 


2.5 


26.3 




36 


26 


2.2 


13.6 


.8 


1.8 


4.1 


26.7 


73.9 


100.5 


2.0 


2.9 


31.9 




38 


25 


3.4 


20.1 


.9 


1.9 


4.3 


39.9 


67.8 


107.4 


1.4 


3.4 


32.6 




35 


20 


1.3 


7.1 


.5 


1.1 


2.5 


17.1 


39.4 


56.3 


2.3 


1.5 


15.6 


WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 


186 


126 


13.8 


79.8 


4.8 


10.9 


24.6 


184.7 


421.6 


605.3 


10.5 


14.4 


179.2 




25 


12 


.8 


4.5 


.3 


.7 


1.5 


9.9 


28.1 


38.0 


.6 


.9 


11.6 




47 


28 


2.4 


14.4 


.9 


1.9 


4.4 


35.0 


73.4 


107.8 


1.1 


2.4 


30.4 




28 


19 


2.4 


13.7 


.9 


1.9 


4.5 


33.0 


64.8 


97.7 


4.4 


2.6 


29.2 




86 
523 
157 


67 

248 

69 


8.2 

27.6 

7.1 


47.1 
197.1 
40.4 


2.8 

10.1 

2.5 


6.4 

20.1 

4.8 


14.2 
68.6 

12.8 


106.7 

427.9 

89.2 


255.2 

1 034.3 

203.4 


361.8 

1 460.6 

292.1 


4.3 
16.4 
5.2 


8.6 

30.4 

3.1 


108.0 




385.6 




89.5 




27 


11 


.7 


4.6 


.3 


.6 


1.5 


9.1 


19.2 


28.4 


.6 


.8 


9.0 




19 


8 


.6 


3.4 


.3 


.5 


1.2 


6.0 


15.7 


21.7 


.3 


.6 


6.3 




11 


6 


.2 


1.3 


.1 


.2 


.4 


2.7 


7.0 


9.7 


.3 


.3 


3.7 




43 


21 


2.3 


10.5 


.7 


1.1 


3.3 


23.8 


53.2 


76.8 


1.7 


2.2 


26.9 




13 


6 


CC 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


(Dl 


(Dl 


.7 


8.5 




17 


8 


1.2 


7.0 


.5 


1.0 


2.6 


14.8 


42.7 


57.4 


1.1 


1.6 


14.9 




18 


4 


1.0 


6.3 


.3 


.6 


1.7 


16.7 


31.4 


48.3 


.5 


1.5 


16.6 




9 


5 


BB 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


(D) 


(D) 


.5 


3.7 




366 


179 


20.5 


156.7 


7.6 


15.3 


55.8 


338.7 


830.9 


1 168.5 


11.2 


22.4 


296,1 




57 


31 


3.2 


24.9 


1.3 


2.8 


10.1 


47.6 


118.6 


166.1 


1.3 


3.4 


44.7 




42 


24 


1.9 


13.8 


.7 


1.4 


5.1 


32.7 


64.0 


96.1 


1.1 


2.2 


26.2 




254 


118 


14.7 


113.4 


5.3 


10.8 


39.1 


249.2 


626.4 


875.2 


8.6 


16.0 


216.6 




4 


2 


AA 


ID] 


(Dl 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


2 (Dl 


2 (D) 




9 


4 


CC 


ID] 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


ID) 


(Dl 


(Dl 


2 <D) 


2(D) 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands t,rather tnan rounding.) in computer operations. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. (x) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. For 1967, over 30 percent 
of the data for this line was estimated. (Z) Under $50 thousand (or under 50 employees). 

1 General statistics for some producing States have to be withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. However, for such States, the number of establishments is 
shown and the employment size range is indicated by one of the following symbols: 



AA - less than 250 employees 
BB - 250 to 499 employees 



CC - 500 to 999 employees 

EE - 1,000 to 2,499 employees 



FF - 2,500 employees and over 



2 This State or division was not shown as a separate line in table 2 in the 1963 report for this industry. A footnote to table 2 in the 1963 report showed the number of establishments 
and total employment (either actual or in size ranges for such States. 



20B-10 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



table 3 Detailed Statistics: 1967 



Creamery 

butter 
(SIC 2021) 



Cheese, 

natural 

and 

processed 

(SIC 2022) 



evaporated 

milk 
(SIC 2023) 



Ice cream 

and 

frozen 

desserts 

(SIC 2024) 



Fluid 

milk 

(SIC 2026) 



PRIMARY PRODUCT SPECIALIZATION RATIO 1 

COVERAGE RATIO 2 

ESTABLISHMENTS! TOTAL NUMBER 

WITH 1 TO 19 EMPLOYEES DO . 

WITH 20 TO 99 EMPLOYEES • • .DO . 

WITH 100 EMPLOYEES OR MORE DO . 

ALL EMPLOYEES) AVERAGE FOR YEAR 1.000 

PAYROLL FOR YEARt ALL EMPLOYEES . . . MILLION DOLLARS 

PRODUCTION WORKERSI 

AVERAGE FOR YEAR. . 1.000 

MARCH DO . 

MAY DO . 

AUGUST .DO . 

NOVEMBER DO . 

MAN-HOURS MILLIONS 

JANUARY-MARCH DO . 

APRIL-JUNE .DO . 

JULY-SEPTEMBER DO . 

OCTOBER-DECEMBER DO . 

WAGES ..... MILLION DOLLARS 

COST OF MATERIALS! ETC.. TOTAL DO . 

MATERIALS. PARTS. CONTAINERS. ETC. CONSUMED . .DO . 

COST OF RESALES DO . 

FUELS CONSUMED DO . 

PURCHASED ELECTRIC ENERGY DO . 

CONTRACT WORK DO . 

VALUE OF SHIPMENTS. INCLUDING RESALES DO . 

VALUE OF RESALES DO . 

VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURE DO . 

MANUFACTURERS' INVENTORIES' 

BEGINNING OF YEAR. TOTAL DO . 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO . 

WORK IN PROCESS DO . 

MATERIALS. SUPPLIES. FUEL" ETC DO . 

END OF YEAR. TOTAL DO . 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO . 

WORK IN PROCESS • DO . 

MATERIALS. SUPPLIES. FUEL. ETC. . DO . 

EXPENDITURES FOR PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, TOTAL . . .DO . 

NEW PLANT AND EQUIPMENT. TOTAL DO . 

NEW STRUCTURES AND ADDITIONS TO PLANT . . . .DO . 

NEW MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT DO . 

USED PLANT AND EQUIPMENT DO . 



540 
402 
129 



8.7 
45.4 



6.4 
6.3 
6.5 
6.6 
6.3 

13.9 
3.4 
3.6 
3.6 

3.4 

31.3 

841.4 

773.0 

57.5 

6.7 

3.7 



958.8 
64.9 



34.9 
28.2 



31.8 
23.9 



2.0 
7.4 
1.2 



.93 

.98 

1 026 

788 

206 

32 

20.0 
103.6 



16.6 
16.2 
17.0 

17.1 
16.3 

33.9 

8.3 
8.7 
8.7 
8.2 

80.0 

487.4 

391.5 

81.6 

7.3 

5.0 

1.9 

707.8 
87.1 



142.4 

85.4 

3.8 

53.2 

135.0 

90.1 

5.0 

39.9 

19.9 
17.3 

5.2 
12.1 

2.4 



.82 

.71 

291 

122 

138 

31 

13.2 
83.4 



10.4 

10.4 

9.4 

20.7 
5.0 
5.5 
5.4 
4.9 

59.3 

892.5 

836.3 

33.6 

10.4 

4.8 
7.5 

1 263.0 

34.2 



69.3 

48.6 

2.1 

18.5 

74.8 
49.3 

4.1 
21.4 

22.7 
20.8 

8.2 
12.6 

1.9 



.97 

.73 

850 

525 

261 

64 

24.6 

156.4 



13.8 
12.9 
14.2 
15.6 
12.3 

27.2 
6.0 
7.2 
7.9 
6.1 

77.2 

658.3 

564.9 

77.8 

2.8 

9.5 

3.2 

059.4 
99.3 



64.4 

27.1 

1.2 

36.0 

66.9 

28.7 

1.5 

36.7 

28.1 
26.6 

5.7 
20.9 

1.3 



.90 
.96 

3 481 

1 845 

1 146 

490 

165.2 
060.5 



60.5 
60.9 
60.6 
61.4 
58.9 

126.4 
31.0 
31.9 
32.5 
31.0 

356.7 

493.4 

817.5 

595.7 

27.2 

39.3 

13.7 



7 826.0 
705.2 



152.1 

65.9 

6.0 

80.1 

181.4 

81.2 

8.8 

91.4 

132.5 

120.3 

30.2 

90.0 

11.8 



Note: Detailed figures may no 
thousands (rather than rounding) 



computer oper 



(X) Not 



aus< 


! of i 


ndependent 


rour 


ding ( 


>r independent 


dropping 


ons 


See 


Appendix, 


Expl 


anati( 


m of Terms. 




ppl 


cable 


(NA) 


Not 


available. (D) 


Withheld 



id disrlo 



Standard notes: - Represents zer 
figures for individual companies. 

1 The proportion of product shipments (both primary and secondary) of the industry represented by primary products. 

2 The proportion of primary products shipped by the establishments classified in the industry to total shipments of such 
products by all manufacturing establishments. 



ng 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



20B-11 



table 4 General Statistics, by Employment Size of Establishment: 1967 



(See Appendix, Explanation ol Terms) 







All employees 


Production workers 


























Value 






Capital 


End-of- 
















Establish- 












added by 


Cost of 


Value of 


expendi- 


year 


Item 


ments 


Number 


Payroll 


Number 


Man-hours 


Wages 


manufac- 
ture 


materials 


shipments 


tures, 
new 


inven- 
tories 








(million 






(million 


(million 


(million 


(million 


(million 


(million 




(number) 


(1,000) 


dollars) 


(1,000) 


(millions) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


2021— CREAMERY BUTTER 


























540 


8.7 


45.4 


6.4 


13.9 


31.3 


113.2 


841.4 


958.8 


9.5 


31.8 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 


























214 


.5 


2.2 


.4 


.8 


1.7 


5.9 


36.0 


41.9 


.2 


1.0 




116 


.8 


3.5 


.6 


1.3 


2.6 


7.1 


61.3 


68,2 


.4 


1.8 




72 


1.0 


4.7 


.7 


1.6 


3.3 


11.2 


90.7 


102.0 


.5 


3.0 




96 


3.0 


16.7 


2.2 


4.9 


11.5 


50.6 


346.5 


398.2 


2.9 


13.4 




33 


2.2 


11.9 


1.6 


3.6 


8.1 


27.2 


217.9 


247,8 


2.5 


8.4 




9 


1.2 


6.4 


.9 


1.8 


4.2 


11.2 


89.1 


100.6 


3.0 


4.2 


ESTABS. COVERED BY ADMIN. RECORDS 1 * 


183 


.5 


2.1 


.4 


.7 


1.6 


5.2 


23.7 


28.9 


.2 


.9 


2022 — CHEESE i NATURAL AND PROCESSED 


























1 026 


20.0 


103.6 


16.6 


33.9 


80.0 


226.5 


1 487.4 


1 707.8 


17.3 


135.0 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 




















' 






440 


.8 


3.6 


.8 


1.5 


3.1 


11.2 


62.1 


73.2 


.7 


2.8 




172 


1.2 


5.2 


1.0 


2.0 


4.3 


12.9 


78.6 


90.9 


1.0 


3.1 




176 


2.5 


11.8 


2.0 


4.1 


9.1 


28.8 


133.2 


162.7 


1.7 


6.5 




148 


4.5 


21.7 


3.6 


7.6 


16.2 


40.9 


240.8 


283.3 


4.2 


14.3 




58 


3.9 


19.6 


3.2 


6.5 


14.9 


43.6 


235.3 


277.2 


4.3 


28.0 




25 


4.3 


23.3 


3.4 


7.0 


17.0 


57.2 


338.5 


389.3 


3.3 


30.4 




6 


2.9 


18.4 


2.6 


5.3 


15.4 


32.0 


398.8 


431.4 


2.1 


49.9 




1 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D)" 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


ESTABS. COVERED BY ADMIN. RECOROS 1 6 


372 


.7 


3.0 


.7 


1.3 


2.5 


9.0 


42.2 


51.3 


.6 


2.6 


2023 — CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK 


























291 


13.2 


83.4 


10.0 


20.7 


59.3 


373.1 


892.5 


1 263.0 


20.8 


74.8 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 


























40 


.1 


.5 


.1 


.1 


.4 


1.7 


4.0 


5.8 


; 4.1 


.3 




34 


.2 


1.5 


.2 


.4 


1.0 


3.9 


8.0 


12.0 


(01 


.7 




48 


.7 


3.6 


.4 


1.0 


2.3 


10.0 


32.4 


42.4 


IDI 


1.7 




75 


2.3 


13.8 


1.7 


3.8 


9.7 


45.4 


185.7 


231.8 


3.1 


12.0 




63 


4.3 


27.5 


3.3 


6.8 


20.1 


97.6 


320.8 


420.7 


4.0 


22.6 




25 


3.6 


22.5 


2.8 


5.5 


16.2 


108.9 


221.4 


331.8 


3.5 


20.8 




6 


1.9 


13.9 


1.5 


3.1 


9.7 


105.6 


120.0 


218.5 


6.0 


16.7 


ESTABS. COVERED BY ADMIN. RECORDS 1 . 


24 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(0) 


(01 


(D) 


ID) 


2024 — ICE CREAM AND FROZEN DESSERTS 


























850 


24.6 


156.4 


13.8 


27.2 


77.2 


403.0 


658.3 


1 059.4 


26.6 


66.9 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 


























292 


.5 


2.6 


.5 


.6 


1.5 


7.5 


11.1 


18.7 


.7 


1.2 




97 


.7 


3.6 


.4 


.8 


1.9 


10.7 


15.2 


25.9 


.6 


1.7 




136 


1.9 


9.9 


1.1 


2.0 


5.0 


22.0 


39.0 


60.9 


1.5 


4.1 




181 


5.8 


35.1 


3.2 


6.5 


17.6 


94.0 


179.1 


272.9 


5.5 


16.4 




80 


5.6 


36.3 


3.1 


6.4 


17.5 


94.1 


166.0 


259.3 


7.7 


16.2 




56 


7.7 


52.5 


4.2 


8.7 


25.8 


137.5 


193.4 


330.9 


5.9 


21.6 




8 


2.4 


16.4 


1.2 


2.3 


8.0 


37.1 


54.5 


90.9 


4.7 


5.7 


ESTABS. COVERED BY ADMIN. RECORDS 16 


266 


.5 


2.6 


.5 


.6 


1.4 


6.8 


10.0 


16.8 


.5 


1.2 


2026— FLUID MILK 


























3 481 


165.2 


1 060.5 


60.5 


126.4 


356.7 


2 350.7 


5 493.4 


7 826.0 


120.3 


181.4 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 


























987 


1.7 


8.8 


1.6 


1.9 


4.4 


24.7 


60.2 


84.8 


2 7.1 


2.4 




354 


2.4 


12.3 


1.2 


2.6 


6.3 


27.9 


96.8 


124.3 


2.2 


2.7 




504 


7.2 


39.0 


3.3 


7.0 


17.3 


88.4 


230.0 


316.7 


5.0 


9.3 




703 


22.4 


132.3 


9.4 


19.7 


53.5 


302.7 


808.9 


1 107.2 


16.7 


30.1 




443 


30.8 


197.9 


12.4 


26.1 


74.7 


441.0 


1 128.7 


1 565.8 


25.8 


36.3 




391 


59.8 


397.4 


20.7 


44.8 


125.8 


872.5 


1 986.4 


2 855.4 


38.1 


62.0 




85 


28.2 


199.1 


8.5 


18.0 


55.8 


424.2 


903.9 


1 325.3 


18,9 


27.1 




13 


12.9 


73.6 


3.3 


6.5 


19.0 


169.4 


278.5 


446.5 


6.5 


11.6 




1 


(D) 


(D) 


ID) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


ESTABS. COVERED BY ADM IN. RECORDS 1 


926 


2.0 


10.2 


1.6 


2.1 


5.0 


38.7 


55.9 


94.6 


2.3 


2.9 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) in 

computer operations. 

Standard notes: (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. Data for this item are included in the underscored figures above. 
- Represents zero. fX) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. e Over 30 percent of the data for this line was estimated. 

l Report forms were not mailed to companies that operated only one establishment and which Social Security payrolls indicated had fewer than 10 employees. 
Actual payrolls (and sales) for 1967 we re obtained from administrative records of the Federal Government. The other statistics for these establishments 
were estimated from industry averages. 

2 Includes an unspecified amount for plants under construction but not in operation. 



20B-12 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



table 5A Industry-Product Analysis— Industry and Primary Product Shipments; Specialization Ratios and 

Coverage Ratios: 1967 and 1963 



An establishment is assigned to an industry based on the shipment values of products representing 
the largest amount considered as primary to an industry. Frequently the establishment shipments 
comprise mixtures of products assigned to an industry (primary products), those considered pri- 
mary to other industries (secondary products of a given industry) and receipts for activities such 



as merchandising or contract work. This product pattern for an industry is shown in columns A 
through D and the primary product specialization ratio in column E. The extent to which the 
given industry's primary products are shipped by establishments classified in and out of the 
given industry is summarized in columns F through H and shown as a ratio in column I. 



Ind. 
code 



Industry and census year 



Value of shipments 



Total 



(million 
dollars) 



Primary 
products 



(million 
dollars) 



Secondary 
products 



(million 
dollars) 



Miscel- 
laneous 
receipts 



(million 
dollars) 



Primary 
product 
special- 
ization 
ratio 

Col. B 

Col. BfC 
(percent) 



Value of primary product shipments 



Total, 
made in 

all 
industries 

(million 
dollars) 



Made 
in this 
industry 



(million 
dollars) 



Made in 

other 

industries 



(million 
dollars) 



Coverage 
ratio 



Col. B 

Col. F 

(percent) 



Creamery butter 1967. 

1963. 

Cheese, natural and processed 1967. 

1963. 

Condensed and evaporated milk 1967. 

1963. 

Ice cream and frozen desserts 1967. 

1963. 

Fluid milk 1967. 

1963. 



958.8 
988.8 

1,707.8 
1,170.8 

1,263.0 
937.9 

1,059.4 
1,076.5 

7,826.0 
7,025.9 



628.9 
630.6 

1,504.0 
1,028.0 

1,004.7 
728.9 

926.2 
892.4 

6,331.6 
5,717.1 



257.2 
283.5 



112.7 
81.6 



223.1 
181.6 



32.5 
71.1 



740.4 
662.9 



72.7 
74.7 



91.1 
61.2 



35.2 
27.4 



100.7 
113.0 



754.0 
645.9 



836.5 
820.4 

1,533.8 
1,070.0 

1,422.7 
1,104.5 

1,273.6 
1,210.0 

6,603.4 
6,016.6 



628.9 
630.5 

1,504.0 
1,028.0 

1,004.7 
728.9 

926.2 
892.4 

6,331.6 
5,717.1 



207.6 
189.9 



29.8 
42.0 



418.0 
375.6 



347.4 
317.6 



271.8 
299.5 



75 
77 



98 
96 



71 
66 



73 

74 



96 
95 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than 
rounding) in computer operations. See Appendix, Explanation of terms, for discussion of items. 



Standard notes: - Represents zero, 
companies. 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not available. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



20B-13 



table 5B. Industry-Product Analysis— Shipments by Product Class and Industry: 1967 



In millions of dollars . This table shows where products of an industry (referred to as primary and 
listed in table 6A) are made and what products are made by establishments classified in an 
industry. Read down an industry column to find what products are produced in an industry. Read 
across to determine where the products of the industries in this chapter are produced. To the 



extent that some of the primary products are made by industries not included in this chapter, the 
value of such shipments is shown in the "other industries" column. The specific other industries 
are listed at the end of the table if they account for more than $2 million of the products primary 
to this chapter. 



Product 
code 



Industry, class of products ; and miscellaneous receipts 



All 
industries 



Creamery 

butter 
(SIC 2021) 



Cheese, 

natural and 
processed 
(SIC 2022) 



Condensed 

and 
evaporated 

milk 
(SIC 2023) 



Ice cream 

and frozen 

desserts 

(SIC 2024) 



Fluid 

milk 

(SIC 2026) 



Other 
industries 



2022- 
20221 
20222 
20220 

2023- 
20231 
20232 
20233 
20234 
20230 

20240 

2026- 
20261 
20262 
20263 

20264 



2013- 
2015- 
2032- 
2033- 
2051- 
2086- 
2099- 



93000 
99989 
95120 
99980 



2021- 
2022- 
2023- 
2023- 



Total shipments and miscellaneous receipts. 



Creamery butter. 



Cheese, natural and processed 

Natural cheese, except cottage cheese. 
Process cheese and related products... 
Natural and processed cheese, n.s.k... 



Condensed and evaporated milk 

Dry milk products 

Canned milk products (consumer type) 
Concentrated milk, shipped in bulk... 

Ice cream mix and ice milk mix 

Condensed and evaporated milk, n.s.k. 



Ice cream and frozen desserts. 



Fluid milk and related products 

Bulk fluid milk and cream 

Packaged fluid milk and related products 

Cottage cheese (including bakers' cheese, pot cheese, 

farmers ' cheese 

Buttermilk, chocolate drink, and other flavored milk 

products 

Fluid milk and related products, n.s.k 



Other product shipments by 4-digit product group 



Meat processing plant products.... 
Poultry dressing plant products... 

Canned specialties 

Canned fruits and vegetables 

Bread, cake, and related products. 
Bottled and canned soft drinks.... 

Food preparations, n.e.c 

Other secondary products 



Miscellaneous receipts 

Commission receipts 

Resales 

Shell egg sales 

Other miscellaneous receipts. 



Listing of the other industries with over $2 million 
shipments of the primary products 



2015 Poultry dressing plants 

2025 Pickles, sauces, and salad dressings. 

2015 Poultry dressing plants 

2099 Food preparations, n.e.c 



836.5 

1,533.8 
829.2 
562.5 
142.1 

1,422.7 
632.0 

475.5 
79.3 

201.1 
34.8 

1,273.6 

6,603.4 

923.5 

4,454.9 

218.0 

286.0 
721.0 



(X) 
(X) 

(x) 

(X) 
(X) 

(x) 

(X) 
(X) 

(x) 

(X) 
(X) 
(X) 

(x) 



(x) 
(x) 

(X) 

(x) 



958.8 
628.9 

7.0 

(2-5) 
(2-5) 



158.0 

144.9 

3.9 

5.5 

3.7 



5.4 

79.0 

67.4 

9.9 

1.2 



6.8 

(Z) 
(Z) 
1.0 

72.7 
0.9 

64.9 
5.7 
1.2 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



1,707.8 

15.6 

1,504.0 
808.3 
553.6 
142.1 

16.9 

14.1 

(under 2) 

(2-5) 

(Z) 



0.8 

70.6 

61.6 

7.2 

1.6 

0.2 



(over 2) 



(Z) 
(Z) 

(2-5) 
0.7 

91.1 
(under 2 ) 

87.1 

(under 2 ) 

2.0 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



1,263.0 

93.1 

1.0 
( under 2 ) 
(under 2 ) 



1,004.7 

400.2 

455.6 

43.5 

70.6 

34.8 

5.3 

106.4 

90.8 

7.7 



(2-5) 
( under 2 ) 



(under 2 ) 

(over 2) 
(under 2) 

-(under 2 ) 
6.1 
5.3 

35.2 
0.8 

34.2 
(Z) 
0.2, 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 

(x) 



1,059.4 

(under 2) 

0.7 
0.7 



13.0 

(Z) 

(Z) 
12.9 



926.2 

11.0 

(under 2) 

9.3 

( under 2 ) 

(under 2) 



(under 2 ) 

( under 2 ) 
5.3 
1.0 

100.7 

0.1 

99.3 

0.2 

1.1 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



332.3 

6,331.6 

701.5 
4,419.7 

207.5 

(200-500) 
(500-1,000) 



( under 2) 

22.5 

10.6 

(20-50) 

5.3 

2.1 

754.0 
13.9 

705.2 

29.1 

5.8 



(5-10) 



16 


5 


4.6 


14 


.2 


(under 2) 


2 


.3 


(2-5) 


217 


7 


12.4 


64 


2 


8.5 


15 


.4 


(under 2 ) 


26 


3 


(under 2) 


111 


8 


2.1 



3.6 

4.8 

(under 2 ) 

1.1 

( under 2 J 

( under 2 ) 



(x) 

(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 

(x) 

(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



(X) 


6.3 


(X) 


(over 2) 


(X) 


(2-5) 


(X) 


(5-10) 



Note: Data shown parenthetically are ranges expressed in millions of dollars. 



Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent 
in computer operations. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. (x) Not applicable. (NA) Not available, 

companies. (Z) Under 50 thousand (or under 50 employees.) 



dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) 
(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



20B-14 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



table 6A Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Shipments by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963 

(Includes quantity and value of the products reported not only by establishments classified in this industry, but also by establishments classified in other industries, and shipping these products 

as " secondary' products. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms, "Value of shipments") 



Product 
code 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total shipments including interplant transfers 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 

(million dollars) 



2021- 


— 


20210 


13 


20210 


15 


20210 


21 


20210 


00 


20210 


02 


2022- 


~ 


20221 


01 


20222 


— 


20222 


11 


20222 


13 


20222 


15 


20222 


19 


20222 


00 


20220 


00 


20220 


02 


2023- 


— 


20231 


~ 


20231 


31 


20231 


11 


20231 


21 


20231 


23 


20231 


28 



20231 42 
20231 43 

20231 44 

20231 45 

20231 00 

20232 — 

20232 12 
20232 16 



20232 21 
20232 23 

20232 25 
20232 29 

20232 00 

20233 — 



20233 12 
20233 16 



20234 12 
20230 00 



CREAMERY BUTTER, TOTAL. 



Million lbs. 



Shipped in bulk (containers over 3 pounds) 

Shipped in consumer packages (containers 3 pounds or less) 

Anhydrous butterf at 

Butter and related products, n.s.k. (For companies with 10 or 

more employees . See Note. ) 

Butter and related products, n.s.k. (For companies with less than 

10 employees. See Note.) 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 

.do. 

.do. 



CHEESE, NATURAL AND PROCESSED, TOTAL. 



Natural cheese (Italian, grated Cheddar, brick, cream, Swiss, 
etc . ) 



Million lbs. 



Process cheese and related products. 



Process cheese 

Cheese food 

Cheese spread 

Other related cheese products 

Process cheese and related products, n.s.k 

Natural and process cheese and related products, n.s.k. (For 

companies with 10 or more employees. See Note.) 

Natural and process cheese and related products, n.s.k. (For 
companies with less than 10 employees. See Note.) 



million lbs. 

. . .do 

. . .do 

...do 



CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK, TOTAL. 
Dry milk products 



Million pounds. 



Shipped in consumer type packages (containers 3 pounds or less): 

Nonfat dry milk 

Malted milk products 

Infants' dietary supplements, dry milk base 

Powdered cream and cream substitutes 

Other dry milk products (instant chocolate milk, weight 
control products, whole milk powder, etc.) 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Shipped in bulk (containers larger than 3 pounds): 

Food grade (bakeries, confectioners, meatpackers, etc.); 

Dry whole milk 

Dry skim milk 



Other food grade dry milk products 

Feed grade (dry milk, dry buttermilk, dry whey, etc. 

Dry milk products and mixtures, n.s.k 

Canned milk products (consumer type cans) 



Evaporated milk. 
Condensed milk. . 



.do. 
.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 
.do. 



Canned dietary supplements, weight control products: 

Dairy base 

Nondairy base 



Infants' formulas, liquid 

Other canned milk products, including canned whole milk. 
Canned milk products, n.s.k 



.do. 
.do. 

.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Concentrated milk, shipped in bulk. 



Condensed and evaporated milk products, other than ice cream mix 
and ice milk mix: 

Feed grade, including concentrated whey and buttermilk 

Food grade (bakeries, confectioners, etc.) 



Million pounds. 
. . .do 



Concentrated milk shipped in bulk, n.s.k. 



Ice cream mix, ice milk mix, milkshake mix, sherbet mix, etc.... 
Condensed and evaporated milk, n.s.k. (For companies with 10 or 

more employees. See Note. ) 

Condensed and evaporated milk, n.s.k. (For companies with less 

than 10 employees. See Note. ) 



. . .do 

Million gal . . 



1,235.5 

780.8 

270.0 

12.2 

'129.8 

'42.7 

(X) 

1,726.8 

(X) 

669.9 
86.9 

163.7 
83.0 

(X) 

(X) 

(x) 
(x) 

2,852.9 



561.9 

(D) 

(D) 

80.7 

109 .8 



133.1 

1,126.1 

327.2 
400.9 
'77. 7 

(NA) 

1,618.2 
206.6 



(NA) 

154.4 
233.5 

(NA) 

(X) 



660.1 
456.0 

(X) 

194.4 

(X) 
(X) 



836.5 

522.0 

188.6 

10.0 

87.0 

28.9 

1,533.8 

829.2 

562.5 

426.5 

39.5 

58.4 

32.5 

5.7 

90.8 

51.3 

1,422.7 

632.0 



136.7 

(D) 

(D) 

53.1 

71.1 



} 



34 


2 


224 





51 


9 


24 


1 


17 


5 


475 


5 


255 





42 


5 



61.8 

25.0 

0.2 

79.3 



27 


9 


47 


8 


3 


6 


201 


1 


31 


6 


3 


2 



1,396.6 

962.6 

312.3 

13.1 



'ios.s 

(X) 

1,781.3 

(X) 

611.7 

120.1 

103.8 

17.0 



(X) 



3,212.3 



574.5 
26.2 
18.7 
13.2 

129.4 



211.5 

1,897.0 

( 2 ) 
281.3 

^o.e 

2,566.7 

2,014.4 
79.1 



384.4 
2 11.3 

(X) 

650.3 
579.7 

(X) 

154.9 

(X) 



820.4 

554.8 

191.6 

10.3 



324.4 

241.2 

38.0 

37.2 

8.0 



1,104.5 
504.4 



84.1 

10.5 

13.1 

7.1 

44.0 



47.0 
273.2 

( 2 ) 

15.9 

9.5 

363.0 

262.7 
24.1 



63.2 
1.6 



19.0 
50.3 

6.0 

157.8 

3.9 



See footnotes at end of table. 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



20B-15 



table 6A Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Shipments by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Product 
code 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total shipments including inteiplant transfers 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



2024 

20240 13 
20240 51 
20240 71 

20240 93 
20240 00 



2026- — 

20261 — 

20261 12 

20261 15 

20261 17 

20261 18 

20261 00 



20262 12 
20262 23 

20262 25 
20262 32 

20262 43 

20262 45 
20262 52 
20262 63 

20262 00 

20263 — 



20263 13 
20263 16 
20263 18 

20263 00 

20264 — 

20264 33 

20264 35 
20264 00 

20260 00 

20260 02 



ICE CREAM AND FROZEN DESSERTS, TOTAL. 



Ice cream, including custards 

Water ices 

Mellorine and similar frozen desserts containing fat other than 
butterf at 

Other frozen dairy foods (sherbet, ice milk, etc . ) 

Ice cream and frozen desserts, n.s.k. (For companies with 10 or 
more employees . See Note . ) 

Ice cream and frozen desserts, n.s.k. (For companies with less 
than 10 employees . See Note. ) 



FLUID MILK AND RELATED PRODUCTS, TOTAL. 
Bulk fluid milk, and cream 



Fluid whole milk, bulk sales 

Fluid skim milk, bulk sales 

Fluid cream, bulk sales 

Fluid butter milk, bulk sales..,. 
Bulk fluid milk and cream, n.s.k. 



Packaged fluid milk and related products, total. 



Packaged fluid milk and related products, including bulk cans 
for hotels, restaurants or institutions: 

Fluid whole milk packaged 

Partially skim milk, packaged (approximatley 2 percent 

butterf at ) 

Skim milk, packaged 

Cream, heavy (whipping cream) containing 30 percent or more 

milk f at ) 

Cream, light (coffee cream containing less than 30 percent 

milk fat) 

Cream , sour 

Half and half 

Whipped topping, packaged in same plant, with a butterf at base 
Packaged milk and related products, n.s.k 

Cottage cheese (including bakers* cheese, pot cheese, farmers' 
cheese) 



Manufactured and creamed in the same plant 

Manufactured in the same plant, sold as curd (not creamed) 

Creamed in the same plant from purchased curd 

Cottage cheese, n.s.k 



Buttermilk, chocolate drink, and other flavored milk products. 



Buttermilk and related milk products (yogurt, acidophilous 

milk, etc.) 

Flavored milk drinks (chocolate milk, chocolate drinks, etc.).. 
Buttermilk, chocolate drink, and other dairy drinks, n.s.k 

Fluid milk and related products, n.s.k. (For companies with 10 
or more employees. See Note.) 

Fluid milk and related products, n. s . k. (For companies with less 
than 10 employees . See Note. ) 



Million gal. 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



. . .do. 
. . .do. 



Million lbs. 



. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 



Million qts . . . 



.do. 
.do. 



. .do. 
. .do. 

.do. 

.do. 
. .do. 



Million lbs. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Million qts . . 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



715.5 

34.7 

47.8 
113.3 

1 72.6 

'13.1 

(X) 

15,830.3 

11,689.7 

2,640.8 

711.7 

e 513.4 

1 274.7 

19,290.8 



16,342.7 

1,346.5 
685.3 

62.9 

53.1 

79.7 

283.6 

24.1 

'412.9 



593.4 

57.3 

251.7 

x 24.1 

1,214.9 



638.7 
563.9 
'12.3 



(X) 
(X) 



956.7 
41.3 

40.4 
125.4 

93.0 

16.8 

6,603.4 

923.5 

607.9 
46.5 

238.4 

4.8 

25.9 

4,454.9 



263.5 
130.6 

67.3 

34.5 
63.7 
137.7 
15.6 
83.6 



218.0 

141.6 

10.6 

60.0 

5.8 

286.0 



138.7 
142.3 

5.0 



641.4 
79.6 



684 


6 


36 


5 


45 


4 


131 


7 



21 


816 


3 


13 


885 


6 


6 


185 


8 


1 


025 


5 




719 


4 


19 


565 


4 



566.3 
668.6 

77.2 

74.6 

73.1 

290.7 

13.0 



946.2 

661.5 
102.4 
164.2 
'18.1 

1,191.4 



544.2 
597.2 
*50.0 



(X) 



1,210.0 



918 


2 


43 


6 


36 


5 


138 


7 



73.0 

6,016.6 

950.5 

562.1 

61.5 

295.5 

31.4 

4,285.1 

3,590.1 

99.6 
118.0 

77.4 

48.3 
53.0 

139.1 
13.6 

145.8 

189.1 

136.5 

13.9 

35.0 

3.6 

252.7 



100.0 

142.2 

10.6 



Note: In the 1967 Census of Manufactures, data for establishments of small companies, typically those with fewer than 10 employees, were estimated 
from administrative records rather than collected from respondents. These estimated shipments which are further discussed in the text are included in 
the code ending with "002." Such establishments were usually mailed a "short form" in the 1963 Census of Manufactures. These short forms typically 
provided for coding products to the product class level (5 digits) followed by "00" rather than only to the 4-digit level followed by "000." 
Therefore, the 1963 "n.s.k." ( 000 ) figure is not strictly comparable to the total of the two "n.s.k." (000 and 002) figures in 1967. In addition to 
the 1967 "n.s.k." (code 002) resulting from the above, in both the 1967 and 1963 censuses of manufactures, products which were not completely 
identified on the standard forms were coded to the appropriate product class code (5 digits) followed by "00," or in some cases to the appropriate 
product group code (4 digits) followed by "000." 

Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) 
in computer operations. 



Standard notes: 



Represents zero. 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not available. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



Quantity estimated based on the quantity-value relationship for other products in the product class. 
2 Included under code 20231 00 in 1963. 



20B-16 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



table 6B. Product Classes-Value Shipped by All Manufacturing Establishments, 

by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963 



In millions of dollars. Statistics are shown for selected product classes which are economically 
significant and which have production that is geographically dispersed, provided that the disper- 
sion is not approximated by the data in the geographic table for the industry (table 2) and they are 



not miscellaneous or "not specified by type" classes. Product class values for some States are 
withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. Such States are shown with a value 
range. 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



NATURAL CHEESE, EXCEPT 
COTTAGE CHEESE (20221) 



United States. . 
Northeast Region. 



New England Div. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska. 

Kans as 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Virginia 

North Carolina 

Georgia 



East South Central Div. 

Kent uc ky 

Tennessee 

Mississippi 



West South Central Div. 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 



West Region. 



Mountain Div. 

Idaho 

Colorado 

Utah 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California. . . . 



PROCESS CHEESE AND RELATED 
PRODUCTS ( 20222 ) 



United States. . 
Northeast Region. 



New England Div. 
Vermont 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



9.0 
CC 
AA 

91.6 

47.8 

2.4 

41.5 

594.7 

430.2 
16.9 
15.1 
58.5 
12.4 

327.3 

164.5 

43.0 

26.9 

63.5 

4.4 

13.2 

5.1 

8.3 

74.0 

EE 
AA 
AA 
CC 

GG 

24.1 

21.2 

4.9 

EE 

CC 

2.6 



562.5 

39.5 

AA 
AA 

FF 

3.0 

CC 

FF 



85.9 

7.9 
6.3 

(D) 

78.0 

46.6 

1.2 

30.2 

479.0 

370.7 

24.2 
16.5 
43.1 
12.6 
274.3 

108.4 

23.4 

18.9 

49.6 

4.2 

6.9 

2.1 

3.2 

67.6 

(D) 
(M 
(D) 



(D) 
24.5 
18.2 

4.4 

(D) 

C 1 ) 

3.2 
48.9 



44.7 


31.1 


32.8 


24.7 


BB 


(D) 


CC 


3.9 


15.1 


17.8 


2.8 


2.1 


7.0 


7.7 


5.3 


7.9 



388.5 
41.9 

3.1 

(D) 

37.8 
7.0 
8.1 

23.8 



PROCESS CHEESE AND RELATED 
PRODUCTS (20222)— Con. 

North Central Region.. 

East North Central Div.. 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div.. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Georgia 

East South Central Div.. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

West South Central Div.. 
Texas 

West Region 

Mount ain Div 

Idaho 

Utah 

Pacific Div , 

California , 

DRY MILK PRODUCTS (20231) 

United States , 

Northeast Region , 

New England Div 

Ve rmont 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region... 

East North Central Div... 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div. . . 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kans as 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Mary 1 and o 

Virginia 



462.3 

252.1 

EE 

14.6 

AA 

217.3 

210.2 

GG 

3.3 

96.1 

AA 

49.1 

FF 
FF 

CC 

AA 
CC 



CC 
CC 

FF 

37.5 

AA 

CC 

518.5 

247.8 

13.2 

4.8 

17.6 

25.7 

186.5 

270.7 

122.7 

118.5 

7.5 

BB 

7.3 

9.4 

BB 

22.3 

CC 

BB 

1.1 



297.2 

154.9 

5.7 

10.7 

(D) 

137.5 

142.3 

(M 

2.6 

(') 

(D) 
39.6 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 
(') 

(D) 

(D) 



(D) 

(D) 

(D) 
5.2 



4.8 

t 1 ) 

45.8 

33.6 

.9 

11.4 

410.6 

217.9 

16.7 

6.5 

21.1 

32.6 

141.0 

192.7 

107.3 

65.6 

6.2 

(') 
5.7 

(') 

3.7 
13.6 

3.9 

2.7 



DRY MILK PRODUCTS (20231) — 
Con. 

South Region — Con. 



East South Central Div. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 



West South Central Div. 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



West Region. 



Mountain Div. 

Idaho 

Utah 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California. . . . 



CANNED MILK PRODUCTS 
(CONSUMER TYPE CANS) (20232 



United States. . 
Northeast Region. 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central Div. 

Missouri 

South Dakota 

Kansas 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 



East South Central Div. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Mississippi 



West South Central Div. 

Arkansas 

Texas 



West Region. 



Mountain Div. 

Idaho 

Colorado 

Utah 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 
California. . . . 



7.2 
2.7 
3.7 

EE 
AA 
CC 

35.9 

13.2 
10.5 

AA 

22.7 
3.3 
2.0 

17.4 



40.4 

40.4 
19.9 
20.6 

255.6 

190.9 

51.2 

GG 

23.8 

37.6 

EE 

64.8 

GG 
EE 
BB 



FF 
CC 
12.4 
BB 
BB 
BB 

72.8 

FF 
28.0 

EE 

EE 
CC 
CC 

63.7 

21.0 
CC 
BB 
CC 

42.7 
EE 
FF 



See footnotes at end of table. 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



20B-17 



table 6B. Product Classes-Value Shipped by All Manufacturing Establishments, 
by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class ana 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



CONCENTRATED MILK, SHIPPED 
IN BULK (20233) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region... 

East North Central Div... 

Ohio 

Indiana 

I llinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div... 

Minnesota 

Kans as 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Maryland 

Virginia 

East South Central Div... 
Mississippi 

West Region 

Pacific Div 

Oregon 

California 



ICE CREAM MIX AND ICE MILK 
MIX (20234) 



United States. 



Northeast Region. 



New England Div. 

Maine 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Connecticut 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



1.7 

12.2 
6.9 
5.3 

48.8 

43.3 
4.0 
2.4 
4.5 
8.2 

24.1 

5.5 
BB 

AA 

9.7 

CC 

BB 

1.0 

BB 

AA 

6.9 

CC 

AA 

4.2 



56.0 

12.7 

1.6 

AA 

4.9 

BB 

43.3 
17.4 



63.1 

42.9 

12.3 

4.0 

9.2 

10.3 

7.1 

20.2 

10.0 
3.6 
2.3 
2.0 
1.7 

41.1 

20.9 
5.9 
6.2 
1.8 
2.3 
3.7 



75.3 
23.7 

(D) 

(D) 
12.9 

(') 

33.7 

28.7 

4.2 
2.4 
4.6 
1.3 
16.2 

5.0 
2.3 
1.3 

13.5 

6.2 

(M 

(D) 
5.9 

C 1 ) 

4.4 

(D) 
(D) 
3.5 



38.7 

6.4 
(D) 
(D) 
3.8 
1.9 

32.4 

21.5 

2.3 

8.6 

59.3 

44.5 

9.0 

4.2 

11.3 

13.9 

6.1 

14.8 
5.6 
2.6 
1.8 
1.0 
2.0 

34.0 

17.5 
6.2 
4.4 

(D) 

2.5 
2.3 



ICE CREAM MIX AND ICE MILK 
MIX (20234) — Con. 



South Region — Con. 

East South Central Div 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama. 

Mississippi 

West South Central Div 

Arkans as 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Mont ana 

Colorado 

Arizona 

Utah 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



BULK FLUID MILK AND CREAM 
(20261) 



United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic Div.... 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region. 

East North Central Div 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakot a 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina. 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



10.7 
1.9 
4.7 
2.2 
2.0 

9.5 
1.8 
1.3 
2.2 
4.3 

40.9 

7.4 
AA 
AA 
AA 

2.0 

33.5 
6.6 
5.0 

21.1 



923.5 
240.4 

92.8 
BB 
AA 

25.2 

6.2 
BB 
GG 

147.6 
84.0 

14.5 
49.1 

439.8 

263.8 
61.4 
13.2 
22.6 
31.3 

135.3 

176.0 

88.2 

44.9 

21.4 

2.1 

5.2 

3.4 

10.8 

112.8 

51.0 

AA 

12.5 

15.8 

1.2 

5.8 

BB 

4.1 

6.1 



7.0 
2.1 
3.4 
(D) 

(D) 

9.5 
1.9 
(D) 
2.6 
4.2 

25.7 

4.8 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
1.2 

20.9 
4.4 
2.0 

14.0 



950.5 

279.6 

85.0 
( a ) 
(') 
27.3 
11.5 
(D) 
C 1 ) 

194.5 

101.7 

29.1 

63.8 

417.3 

245.3 
50.4 
20.4 
29.7 
29.5 

115.2 

172.0 

85.9 

41.6 

20.0 

1.5 

7.6 

2.4 

13.0 

104.3 

44.0 
(D) 
13.6 
11.8 
(D) 
4.5 
4.4 
2.5 
4.1 



BULK FLUID MILK AND CREAM 
(20261)— Con. 

East South Central Div.. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee. 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central Div. . 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Idaho 

Colorado 

Utah 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



PACKAGED FLUID MILK AND 
RELATED PRODUCTS (20262) 



United States. 



Northeast Region. 



New England Div. 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Mass achusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kans as 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



31.7 

10.7 
9.5 
3.1 
8.4 

30.1 
2.1 
3.8 
6.4 

17.8 

130.4 

9.6 

BB 

2.0 

3.2 

120.8 
22.5 
10.7 
87.1 



4,454.9 
1,166.2 

351.5 
25.7 
15.6 
16.0 

175.2 
28.9 
90.1 



814.7 
371.7 
131.6 
311.3 

1,364.9 

1,010.8 
292.9 
120.5 
280.0 
213.6 
103.8 



354.1 
88.1 
65.6 

103.1 

10.4 

6.8 

35.9 

44.1 



1,173.4 



589.5 

2.4 

83.2 

FF 

73.5 

FF 

105.0 

41.9 

72.5 

143.0 



35.6 
8.7 

15.9 
5.1 
5.9 

24.8 

2.8 

6.3 

5.3 

10.4 

149.3 

19.6 

(D) 
2.8 
5.1 

129.7 
12.8 
17.2 
98.9 



4,285.1 



364.5 
23.5 
17.8 
18.3 

183.1 
29.7 
92.0 

870.3 
392.6 
158.5 

319.1 

1,258.5 

914.3 
274.8 
107.9 
246.2 
187.6 
97.7 



344.3 
87.2 
59.5 
89.1 
8.8 
14.3 
36.2 
49.2 



533.0 
7.9 
77.0 
38.1 
66.8 
31.3 
89.8 
30.7 
63.8 

127.7 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20B-18 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



table 6B. Product Classes-Value Shipped by All Manufacturing Establishments, 
by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



Product class and 
geographic area 



PACKAGED FLUID MILK AND RE- 
LATED PRODUCTS (20262)--Con. 



South Region — Con. 



East South Central Div. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central Div. 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



West Region. 

Mountain Div. . 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California. . . . 

Alaska 

Hawaii 



COTTAGE, BAKERS', POT, AND 
FARMERS' CHEESE (20263) 



United States. 



Northeast Region. 



New England Div. 

Maine 

Vermont 

Connecticut 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. 

East North Central Div.. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



Value of shipments 



1967 



228.7 
57.5 
67.6 
72.6 
31.0 

355.2 
24.2 
68.8 
55.8 

206.4 

750.5 

159.4 
15.9 
14.0 
5.4 
45.8 
16.4 
21.6 
27.8 
12.4 

591.0 

86.4 

49.6 

435.0 

BB 

EE 



7.5 
BB 
BB 

1.0 

39.5 
29.3 

CC 

78.7 

59.3 

16.2 

6.4 

17.6 

9.7 

9.5 



1963 



207.7 
53.7 
64.2 
59.2 
30.7 

347.1 
25.6 
59.5 
50.0 

212.1 

703.9 

161.0 
15.5 
12.8 
7.7 
46.3 
16.4 
24.4 
28.3 
9.6 

542.9 
78.2 
44.0 

400.1 
(*) 



40.0 
5.7 

(*) 

2.0 
1.7 

34.2 
25.2 

8.7 

71.1 

50.4 
14.9 

5.5 
11.6 

8.4 
10.1 



Product class and 
geographic area 



COTTAGE, BAKERS ' , POT, AND 
FARMERS' CHEESE (20263) 

North Central Region-- 
Con. 

West North Central Div... 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Kans as 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central Div. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 



West South Central Div 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



West Region. 



Mountain Div. 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California. . . . 



BUTTERMILK, CHOCOLATE, OTHER 
FLAVORED MILK PRODUCTS 
(20264) 



United States. . 
Northeast Region. 



New England Div. 

Massachusetts 

Connecticut 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



Value of shipments 



1967 



19.4 
4.2 
3.0 
6.4 
BB 
3.2 

29.6 

11.0 
3.3 

1.2 
AA 

1.3 
AA 

2.4 

5.1 

AA 

2.5 



3.0 
7.2 

62.7 

9.1 
3.1 

AA 

AA 

1.3 



45.3 

7.5 
3.0 
2.3 

37.8 

20.2 

2.2 

15.4 



1963 



20.7 
4.1 
2.9 
5.3 
2.0 
5.0 

27.3 

10.9 
3.6 
1.3 

(D) 
2.4 
(D) 
1.4 

4.5 
1.7 
2.2 

12.0 
2.0 
3.2 
6.5 

50.7 

7.4 
2.2 
(D) 
(D) 
1.6 

43.3 
5.5 
2.7 

34.6 



252.7 

42.9 

7.2 
3.5 
1.8 

35.7 

16.7 

4.3 

14.7 



Product class and 
geographic area 



BUTTERMILK, CHOCOLATE, OTHER 
FLAVORED MILK PRODUCTS 
(20264)— Con. 



North Central Region. 



East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Kans as 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central Vi\ 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central Div. 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



West Region. 



Mountain Div. 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California. . . . 
Hawaii 



Value of shipments 



1967 



65.7 
19.6 
11.6 
18.7 
9.0 
6.8 

15.3 
2.6 
3.4 
5.6 
1.3 
1.8 



116.1 

49.0 

4.6 

AA 

7.2 

2.5 

12.4 
4.6 
7.3 



31.3 
5.7 
8.8 

11.9 
4.9 

35.8 
3.9 
3.8 
4.8 

23.3 

43.5 

7.2 
2.4 
1.1 
1.5 



1.1 
29.6 

AA 



1963 



59.7 

18.0 

8.9 

16.9 

9.7 

6.2 

17.1 
2.3 
2.9 
6.9 
1.4 
2.0 



47.6 
3.7 

(') 
6.0 
2.5 
12.6 
3.8 
8.6 
8.1 

25.0 
3.9 
7.6 
8.6 
5.2 

34.1 
2.2 
3.2 
4.0 

24.8 

26.0 

6.8 
1.9 
1.2 
1.5 

19.3 
2.2 
1.2 

14.5 

(M 



Note: Product class shipments of $1 million or more were reported but exact figures are withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 
companies. However, for such States, the values are shown in the following ranges: 



Value ranges 
(million dollars) 



Less than $2.0. 
$2.0 to $5.0. . . 
$5.0 to $10.0. . 



Symbol 



AA 
BB 
CC 



Value ranges 
(million dollars) 



$10.0 to $20.0. 
$20.0 to $50.0. 
$50.0 and over. 



EE 
FF 
GG 



Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) 
in computer operations. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms. 



Standard notes: 



Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



companies. 

'This State or division was not shown as a separate line in table 6D in the 1963 report for this industry. A footnote to the 1963 table 6D showed 
those States with $1 million or more reported shipments. 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



20B-19 



table 6C Product Classes-Value Shipped by All Manufacturing Establishments: 

1947, 1954, 1958, 1963 to 1967 



In million of dollars) 



Code 



Product class 



1967 



1966 1 



1965 1 



1964 1 



1963 



1958 



1954 



1947 



2022- 

20221 
20222 
20220 

2023- 

20231 
20232 
20233 
20234 
20230 

20240 

2026- 

20261 
20262 
20263 

20264 

20260 



Creamery butter 

Cheese, natural and processed. 



Natural cheese, except cottage cheese. 
Processed cheese and related products. 
Cheese, natural and processed, n.s.k.. 



Condensed and evaporated milk, 



Dry milk products 

Canned milk products (consumer type cans) 

Concentrated milk, shipped in bulk 

Ice cream mix and ice milk mix 

Condensed and evaporated milk, n.s.k 



Ice cream and ices 

Fluid milk and related products. 



Bulk fluid milk and cream 

Packaged fluid milk and related products 

Cottage, cheese (include bakers cheese, pot cheese, 

and farmers ' cheese) 

Buttermilk, chocolate, and other flavored milk 

products 

Fluid milk and related products, n.s.k 



836.5 

1,533.8 

829.2 
562.5 
142.1 



632.0 
475.5 

79.3 
201.1 

34.8 

1,273.6 

6,603.4 

923.5 
4,454.9 



286.0 
721.0 



740.6 
1,395.8 



920.1 
475.7 



573.4 

420.1 

96.8 

163.1 

5.0 

1,330.5 

6,434.3 

1,102.5 
4,599.4 



280.9 
245.5 



768.4 
1,172.0 



765.6 
406.4 



548. 

394. 

83. 

155. 

3. 

1,264. 

6,155. 

962. 
4,432. 



266 
300 



866.4 
1,123.0 



707.4 
415.6 



564.1 

386.8 

73.9 

147.9 

4.4 

1,270.6 

6,188.8 

1,013.3 
4,357.6 



270.8 
355.0 



820.4 
1,070.0 



681.5 
388.5 



504.4 

363.0 

75.3 

157.8 

3.9 

1,210.0 

6,016.6 

950.5 
4,285.1 



252.7 
339.2 



802.3 
761.9 



515.8 
246.0 



977.9 

421 .1 

352.1 

84.2 

118.5 

2.0 

1,137.7 

5,577.0 

817.5 
4,110.3 

185.3 

213.0 
250.9 



858.5 
702.2 



462.6 
239.6 



317.4 

341.2 

91.1 

119.5 

8.0 

954.3 

1,314.6 

715.6 
8,102.8 



178.0 
167.6 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
427.9 
157.5 
115.2 



802.0 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than 
rounding) in computer operations. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms, for discussion of items. 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not available. 



(d) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



Standard notes: - Represents zero, 
companies . 

1 These figures represent estimates derived from a representative sample of manufacturing establishments canvassed in the annual survey of manu- 
factures. These estimates, therefore, may differ from the results that would have been obtained from a complete canvass of all manufacturing estab- 
lishments. The standard errors associated with these estimates are published in the annual survey of manufactures volumes for this period. The 
figures shown in parentheses either have associated standard errors exceeding 15 percent or are not consistent with other census series and related 
data . 



table 6D. Wholesale and Retail Sales of Bottled Milk and Related Products, 
by Type of Container: 1967 and 1963 



Type of container 



Total shipments including intetplant transfers 
(millions dollars) 



Total 



1967 



1963 



Retail 1 



1967 



1963 



Wholesale 2 



1967 



1963 



Total 3 . 



Paperboard, including containers with plastic linings. 
Glass 



Plastic (sizes up to 1 gallon).... 
Dispenser cans and dispenser bags. 
Other containers 



4,725.3 

3,2193. 

923.3 

304.8 

208.9 

69.0 



4,524.1 

2,888.2 
1,411.2 

( 4 ) 

166.4 

58.3 



465.2 

593.8 

43.3 

29.5 

10.4 



1,404.0 

437.5 

945.0 

( 4 ) 

12.4 

9.0 



2,754, 
329, 
261, 
179, 



3,120.1 

2,450.6 
466.2 

( 4 ) 

154.1 

49.3 



Note: Figures are based on reports from the larger plants, which accounted for approximately 85 percent of total sales 
in 1963 and 92 percent in 1967. The reported figures are inflated to product totals. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid 
disclosing figures for individual companies. 

includes home delivery. 

2 Includes sales to independent distributors, subdealers, wholesalers, retail dairy and grocery stores, restaurants, 
hotels, schools, and other institutions. Also includes transfers to retail stores operated by the same company, which 
operated the milk plant. 

3 Includes shipments and interplant transfers of the following product codes listed in table 6A: 



Product 
code 


Product 


Product 
code 


Product 


20262 12 
20262 23 
20262 25 
20262 32 
20262 43 
20262 45 
20262 52 


Whole milk, packaged 
Partial skim milk 
Skim milk, packaged 
Cream, heavy 
Cream, light 
Cream, sour 
Half and half 


20262 00 

20264 33 
20264 35 
20264 00 


Packaged milk and related products, 

n.s.k. 
Buttermilk and related products 
Flavored milk drinks 
Buttermilk, chocolate drink and other 

dairy drinks, n.s.k. 



4 Included with "other containers. 



20B-20 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



table 7A. Materials Consumed, by Kind: 1967 and 1963 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Material 



Unit of measure 



1967 



Quantity 



Delivered 
cost 

(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Delivered 

cost 

(million dollars) 



013205 
202612 
202613 
202101 
202401 
206011 
202210 
202301 
202311 
970099 
976000 



013205 
202612 
202613 
202101 
202301 
202311 
202210 
202401 
206011 
970099 
976000 



013205 
202612 
202613 
202101 
202301 
202311 
202210 
202401 
206011 
970099 
976000 



013205 
202612 
202613 
202101 
202401 
206011 
202210 
202301 
202311 
970099 

976000 



013205 
202612 
202613 
202101 
202401 
206011 
202210 
202301 
202311 
970099 

976000 



INDUSTRY 2021. — CREAMERY BUTTER 

Materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies consumed, 
total 



Whole milk 

Fluid skim milk. 
Cream 



Butter 

Ice cream mix, sherbet mix, and ice milk mix 

Sugar (cane and beet) in terms of sugar solids 

Natural cheese other than cottage 

Condensed and evaporated milk 

Dr i ed mi Ik 

All other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies. 
Materials, n.s.k. 1 



INDUSTRY 2022. --CHEESE, NATURAL AND PROCESSED 



Materials, containers, and supplies, total. 



Whole milk 

Fluid skim milk. 
Cream 



Butter 

Condensed and evaporated milk 

Dried milk 

Natural cheese, other than cottage cheese 

Ice cream mix, sherbet mix, and ice milk mix 

Sugar (cane and beet) in terms of sugar solids 

All other materials and components, containers, and supplies. 
Materials, containers, and supplies, n.s.k. 1 



INDUSTRY 2023. — CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK 



aterials, containers, and supplies, total. 



Whole milk 

Fluid skim milk 

Cream 

Butter 

Condensed and evaporated mi Ik 

Dried milk 

Natural cheese, other than cottage cheese 

Ice cream mix, sherbet mix, and ice milk mix 

Sugar (cane and beet) in terms of sugar solids 

All other materials and components, containers, and supplies. 
Materials, containers, and supplies, n.s.k. 1 



INDUSTRY 2024.— ICE CREAM AND FROZEN DESSERTS 



Materials, containers, and supplies, total. 



Whole milk 

Fluid skim milk. 
Cream 



Butter 

Ice cream mix, sherbet mix and ice milk mix 

Sugar (cane and beet) in terms of sugar solids 

Natural cheese, other than cottage 

Condensed and evaporated milk 

Dried milk 

All other materials and components, parts, containers and 

suppl i es 

Materials, containers, and supplies, n.s.k. 1 



INDUSTRY 2026.— FLUID MILK 
Materials, containers, and supplies, total. 



Whole milk 

Fluid skim milk 

Cream 

Butter 

Ice cream mix, sherbet mix, and ice milk mix 

Sugar (cane and beet) in terms of sugar solids 

Natural cheese, other than cottage 

Condensed and evaporated milk 

Dried milk 

All other materials and components, parts, containers, and 

suppl i es 

Materials, containers, and supplies, n.s.k. 1 



Million cwt . 

...do 

...do 

Million lbs. 
1,000 gals.. 
1 , 000 cwt . . . 
Million lbs. 

.. .do 

.. .do 



Million cwt. 

...do 

...do 



Million lbs. 

...do 

...do 

...do 

1,000 gals. . 
1 , 000 cwt . . . 



1 1 i on cwt . 

.do 

.do 

llion lbs. 

.do 

.do 

.do 

llion gals 
000 cwt. . . 



llion cwt . . 

.do 

.do 

llion lbs., 
llion gals. 
000 cwt 
llion lbs.. 

.do 

.do 



Million cwt. . 

...do 

...do 

Million lbs.. 
Million gals. 
1,000 cwt. . .. 
Million lbs. . 

...do 

...do 



(X) 



(X) 



(X) 

97.1 

26.4 

0.8 

13.5 

237.1 

239.8 

5.3 

1.3 

2,503.0 

(X) 

(X) 



(x) 

5.7 

1.3 

3.2 

28.5 

61.9 

4,023.5 

365.0 
60.8 



(X) 
(X) 



(X) 

614.4 

21.1 

4.3 

56.4 

36.7 

4,119.3 

7.7 

139.1 

176.0 

(X) 
(X) 



1,391.5 



836.3 

412.5 

39.6 

26.9 

9.6 

19.3 

49.6 

2.5 

1.5 

26.2 

208.2 

40.4 



564.9 

27.5 
4.4 
106.4 
15.3 
55.8 
37.2 

46.0 
11.3 

200.0 
61.0 



4,817.5 

3,454.7 
51.8 
132.7 
38.6 
37.6 
42.0 
3.6 
12.6 
36.2 

607.9 
399.8 



(X) 



110.5 


452.6 


145.7 


7.8 


11.6 


14.4 


4.7 


154.8 


7.6 


47.5 


32.7 


25.9 


(D) 


(D) 


94.5 


(X) 


( 3 ) 


757.4 


(D) 


(D) 


3.5 


6.0 


0.6 


38.9 


15.8 


3.2 


8.4 


(X) 


39.7 


(X) 


(X) 


76.2 


(X) 



(X) 



133.2 


551.7 


122.9 


3.9 


5.7 


5.4 


1.0 


32.9 


1.1 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


13.6 


0.9 


14.0 


28.3 


5.2 


12.6 


1,258.2 


574.3 


848.3 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


27.3 


0.3 


54.4 


(X) 


122.3 


(X) 


(X) 


95.6 


(X) 



(x) 

100.8 

48.5 

0.7 

(D) 

165.2 

260.1 

(D) 

(D) 

1,492.3 

(X) 

(X) 



(x) 

12.6 

1.3 

3.5 

(D) 

62.0 

3,879.7 

(D) 

439.6 

56.2 



(X) 
(X) 



(x) 

631.6 

25.3 

4.9 

(D) 

44.2 

3,419.2 

(D) 

156.0 

108.6 



(X) 

(x) 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than 
rounding) in computer operations. 



784.0 

475.7 

14.6 

161.1 

13.3 

1.0 

8.0 

1.2 

JL- 4 
1.2 

35.2 
71.3 



932.4 

403.9 

5.5 

30.9 

(D) 

0.6 

2.0 

312.0 

(D) 

0.6 

78.4 

97.1 



657.4 

341.5 

39.0 

21.3 

(D) 

10.3 

41.4 

(D) 

(D) 

14.5 

153.5 

27.2 



538.9 

48.9 

2.3 
103.1 

(D) 
55.1 
39.5 

(D) 
45.2 

8.3 

176.0 
53.2 



4,232.1 

2,970.5 

32.0 

130.1 

(D) 
37.9 
35.7 

(D) 

8.9 

17.5 

543.4 
456.2 



Standard notes: 
companies. 



Represents zero. 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not available. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



•This item represents the total cost of materials for establishments that did not report detailed materials data. For 1967, this includes estimates 
for companies that were not mailed report forms. 

2 Cost of delivered butter for Industry 2021, Creamery Butter, probably should have been reported by respondents as part of their cost of resales. 

'Included with material code 970099. 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



20B-21 



table 7B Fuels and Electric Energy Consumed: 1967 

(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Item 



Unit of 
measure 



Creamery 

butter 
(SIC 2021) 



Cheese, 

natural 

and 

processed 

(SIC 2022) 



Condensed and 
evaporated 

milk 
(SIC 2023) 



Fluid 

milk 

(SIC 2026) 



Cost of purchased fuels and electric energy, total. 
Cost of purchased fuels, total 



-lillion dollars. 
...do 



121005 



331212 
331213 



Coal (anthracite, bituminous, and lignite) 

Quantity 

Cost 



Coke, screenings, and breeze: 



Quantity. 
Cost 



Fuel oil, total: 

Quantity 

Cost 



Distillate : 
Quantity. 
Cost 



Residual : 
Quantity. 
Cost 



131300 
331217 
331218 
291104 



291111 
960011 
960013 
960017 



Gas (natural, manufactured mixed, blast-furnace, 
coke-oven, and other gas): 



Quantity. 
Cost 



1,000 short tons 
Million dollars. 



1,000 short tons 
Million dollars. 



1,000 barrels. . . 
Million dollars. 



1,000 barrels.. . 
Million dollars. 



1,000 barrels. . . 
Million dollars. 



Million cu. ft.. 
Million dollars. 



Other fuels (gasoline, LPG, wood, etc.). 



Fuels, n.s.k. 



Purchased electric energy: 

Quantity 

Cost , 



Quantity of electric energy generated less quantity 
sold 



Total energy used for heat and power 1 . 



Mi 1 1 i on kw . -hr s . 
Million dollars. 



Million kw.-hrs. 



Million kw.-hrs. 
equiv 



10.4 
6.7 



22.0 
0.3 



261.8 
0.9 



75.6 
0.3 



186.2 
0.6 



8,495.1 
3.5 



2.0 



217.9 
3.7 



4,725.1 



12.3 

7.3 



78.0 
0.8 



382.7 
1.7 



201.2 
1.0 



181.5 
0.7 



6,142.7 
2.7 



330.6 
5.0 



2,962.8 



15.2 

10.4 



273.8 
2.4 



329.4 
1.1 



160.4 
0.6 



169.0 
0.5 



11,435.7 
4.7 



331.3 
4.8 



7,903.8 



66.5 
27.2 



91.1 

0.8 



1,323.0 
5.1 



811.4 
3.5 



511.6 
1.6 



0.2 
12.3 



2,509.4 
39.3 



18,789.4 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than 
rounding) in computer operations. 



Standard notes: - Represents zero. (x) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid dis 
companies. 

Represents the quantity of purchased electric energy and the kilowatt hours equivalent of all fuels used for hea 



closing figures for individual 
t and power . 



20B-22 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



table 8. General Statistics for Establishments, by Industry Specialization and 
Primary Product Class Specialization: 1967 



This table presents selected statistics for establishments according to their degree of specializa- 
tion in products primary to their industry. The measures of plant specialization shown are (1) in- 
dustry specialization— the tatro of piimary product shipments to total product shipments, primary 
plus secondary, for the establishments; and (2) product class specialization— the ratio of the 
largest primary product class shipments to total product shipments, primary plus secondary, for 



the establishment. See appendix for method of computing these ratios. Statistics for establish- 
ments with specialization ratios of less than 75 percent are included in total lines but are not 
shown as separate class. In addition, data may not be shown, for some industries, product 
classes, or specialization ratios for various reasons, e.g., to avoid disclosure of individual com- 
pany data. 





Industry or product class by 
percent of specialization 


Establish- 
ments 


All employees 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 


Cost Of 
materials 


Value of 
shipments 




Industry 
or 

product 
class 
code 


Number 


Payroll 


Number 


Man-hours 


Wages 


expendi- 
tures, 
new 




(number) 


(1,000) 


(million 
dollars) 


(1,000) 


(millions) 


(million 
dollars) 


(million 
dollars) 


(million 
dollars) 


(million 
dollars) 


(million 
dollars) 


2021 


CREAMERY BUTTER 
























ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 


540 
371 


8.7 
3.6 


45.4 
18.4 


6.4 
2.7 


13.9 
5.5 


31.3 

12.4 


113.2 
47.6 


841.4 
326.4 


958.8 
375.4 


9.5 
2.4 


2022 


CHEESE i NATURAL AND PROCESSED 


























1 026 
970 


20.0 
18.1 


103.6 
93.6 


16.6 

15.1 


33.9 

30.8 


80.0 
72.9 


226.5 
204.9 


1 487.4 
1 358.2 


1 707.8 
1 557.5 


17.3 




ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 


15.9 


20221 


NATURAL CHEESE. EXCEPT COTTAGE CHEESE 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 


465 
403 


11.9 
9.2 


59.9 
46.8 


9.8 
7.7 


20.4 
15.9 


46.7 
36.6 


119.4 
90.4 


739.1 
589.5 


858.9 
682.7 


10.1 
7.9 


20222 


PROCESS CHEESE AND RELATED PRODUCTS 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 


58 
48 


5.4 
3.6 


31.2 
20.8 


4.4 
3.0 


8.9 
6.2 


23.7 
16.0 


74.2 
52.9 


612.1 
420.7 


680.3 
466.9 


5.5 
4.2 


2023 


CONDENSED AND EVAPORATED MILK 


























291 
220 


13.2 
9.3 


83.4 

59.0 


10.0 
7.2 


20.7 
14.7 


59.3 
42.7 


373.1 
310.2 


892.5 
544.1 


1 263.0 
849.7 


20.8 




ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 


12.7 


20231 


DRY MILK PRODUCTS 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 


104 
60 


5.6 

2.7 


34.9 
17.0 


4.4 
2.3 


9.2 

4.7 


26.1 
13.8 


165.2 
109.2 


374.2 
135.0 


539.8 
244.8 


7.4 
2.5 


20232 


CANNED MILK PRODUCTS (CONSUMER TYPE CANS) 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 


64 
49 


5.1 
3.8 


33.4 

24.6 


4.0 
3.0 


8.2 
6.1 


23.7 
17.7 


167.4 
146.7 


362.6 
261.8 


531.5 
408.5 


7.7 
6.4 


20233 


CONCENTRATED MILK. SHIPPED IN BULK 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 


25 
18 


.6 
.2 


3.9 

1.2 


.4 
.2 


.9 

.4 


2.7 
.9 


7.3 
2.4 


62.3 

11.3 


70.0 
13.6 


.6 
.2 


20234 


ICE CREAM MIX AND ICE MILK MIX 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 


47 
28 


1.2 
.6 


7.5 
3.5 


.7 
.3 


1.3 
.6 


4.0 
1.7 


18. 1 
9.5 


62.1 
20.8 


80.3 

30.3 


1.2 
.7 


2024 


ICE CREAM AND FROZEN DESSERTS 


























850 
817 


24.6 
23.4 


156.4 
149.0 


13.8 
13.0 


27.2 
25.8 


77.2 
73.6 


403.0 
379.5 


658.3 
620.7 


1 059.4 
998.4 


26.6 




ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 


25.1 


2026 


FLUID MILK 


























3 481 
3 249 


165.2 

142.0 


1 060.5 
919.4 


60.5 

51.6 


126.4 
107.1 


356.7 
302.2 


2 350.7 
2 002.5 


5 493.4 
4 614.5 


7 826.0 
6 601.0 


120.3 




ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 


97.3 


20261 


BULK FLUID MILK AND CREAM 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 


203 

102 


7.3 

2.4 


44.4 
14.0 


4.3 
1.5 


9.5 
3.2 


25.9 
7.9 


113.7 
31.8 


681.8 
258.7 


794.1 
289.5 


6.7 
1.6 


20262 


PACKAGED FLUID MILK AND RELATED PRODUCTS 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 


1 721 
1 301 


133.9 
87.8 


881.5 
593.2 


43.5 
28.1 


92.7 
59.6 


271.7 
178.1 


1 933.8 
1 268.6 


4 217.9 

2 807.4 


6 135.9 
4 062.9 


91.3 
59.1 


20263 


COTTAGE. BAKERS'. POT. AND FARMERS' CHEESE 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 


37 
15 


1.7 
.5 


11.5 
3.6 


1.2 
.3 


2.7 
.6 


7.5 
1.9 


26.7 
6.2 


83.1 
23.8 


109.8 
30.0 


1.3 
.3 


20264 


BUTTERMILK. CHOCOLATE. OTHER FLAVORED MILK PROD. 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 


12 

10 


.3 

(D) 


2.6 

(D) 


.2 
(D) 


.4 
(0) 


1.1 
ID) 


8.9 
(D) 


10.7 
(D) 


19.5 
(0) 


.7 
(0) 



2: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of indepe: 
ndard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. 



Ldent rounding or independent dropping of 
(NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to a 



actions of thousands {rathe 
id disclosing figures for i 



■ than rounding) in compu 
idividual companies. 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



This report shows 1967 Census of Manufactures statistics for establishments classified in 
each of the following industries: 

SIC Code and Title 

2031--Canned and Cured Fish and Seafoods 

2032--Canned Specialties 

2033--Canned Fruits, Vegetables, Preserves, Jams, and Jellies 

2034- -Dried and Dehydrated Fruits and Vegetables 

2035--Pickled Fruits and Vegetables; Vegetable Sauces and Seasonings; Salad 

Dressings 
2036- -Fresh or Frozen Packaged Fish and Seafoods 
2037-- Frozen Fruits, Fruit Juices, Vegetables, and Specialties 

The general statistics (employment, payrolls, value of shipments, cost of materials, 
inventories, etc.) are reported for each establishment as a whole. Aggregates of such 
data for an industry reflect not only the primary activities of the establishments in the 
industry, but also their activities in the manufacture of secondary products and, for that 
matter, their miscellaneous activites (contract work on materials owned by others, repair 
work, etc.). This fact should be taken into account in comparing industry statistics (tables 
1 to 4) with product statistics (table 6A) showing shipments by all industries of the primary 
products of the specified industry. The extent of the "product mix" is indicated in table 5A 
which shows the value of primary and secondary products shipped by establishments classi- 
fied in the specified industry and also the value of primary products of the industry shipped 
as secondary products by establishments classified in other industries. 

2031--CANNED AND CURED FISH AND SEAFOODS 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in cooking and canning fish, 
shrimps, oysters, clams, crabs, and other seafoods; and those engaged in smoking, salting, 
drying or otherwise curing fish for the trade. Establishments primarily engaged in 
shucking and packing fresh oysters in nonsealed containers, or freezing and packaging 
fresh fish, are classified in industry 2036. For a detailed list of products of industry 2031, 
refer to table 6A, product codes 2031000 to 2031085. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of production and other receipts of the Canned and Cured Seafoods Industry in 1967 
totaled $523.1 million. This included production of canned and cured seafoods (primary 
products), valued at $401.9 million, production of other products (secondary products) 
valued at $33.4 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract work on materials 
owned by others) of $87.8 million. 



20C-1 



This industry's production of canned and cured seafoods (primary products) in 1967 
represented 92 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and 
secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 92 percent. Secondary products 
shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of fresh or frozen packaged fish 
($10.1 million), and prepared feeds for animals and fowls ($14.9 million). 

Industry 2031 production of canned and cured seafoods (primary products) in 1967 rep- 
resented 95 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $421.1 million shipped by 
all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 95 percent. Other industries producing 
canned and cured seafood (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 2036, Fresh 
or Frozen Packaged Fish, $6. 2 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 em- 
ployees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2031, these establishments accounted for 1.9 percent of payroll and 1.7 
percent of value added by manufacture. 

2032--CANNED SPECIALTIES 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in canning specialty products, 
such as baby foods, "native foods," health foods, and soups except seafood. Establish- 
ments primarily engaged in canning seafood soup are classified in industry 2031, and 
those primarily engaged in quick freezing canned specialties in industry 2037. For a 
detailed list of products of industry 2032, refer to table 6A, product codes 2032111 to 
2032498. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of production and other receipts of the Canned Specialties Industry in 1967 totaled 
$1,361.9 million. This included production of canned specialties (primary products), 
valued at $1,078.1 million, production of other products (secondary products) valued at 
$233.8 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract work on materials owned by 
others) of $50.0 million. 

This industry's production of canned specialties (primary products) in 1967 represented 
82 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and secondary). 
The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 80 percent. Secondary products shipped by 
this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of canned fruits and vegetables ($92.8 million), 
and sausages and other prepared meats ($41.7 million). 

Industry 2032 production of canned specialties (primary products) in 1967 represented 
91 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $1,090.7 million produced by all 
industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 91 percent. Other industries producing canned 
specialties (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 2033, Canned Fruits and 
Vegetables, $64.0 million; industry 2035, Pickled Fruits and Vegetables; Vegetable Sauces 
and Seasonings; and Salad Dressings, $9.4 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 em- 
ployees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2032, these establishments accounted for 0.3 percent of payroll and 0.2 
percent of value added by manufacture. 



20C-2 



2033-CANNED FRUITS, VEGETABLES, PRESERVES, JAMS, AND JELLIES 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in canning fruits and vege- 
tables, and fruit and vegetable juices; and in manufacturing catsup and similar tomato 
sauces, preserves, jams, and jellies. Establishments primarily engaged in canning 
seafood soups are classified in industry 2031; and soups, except seafood, and baby foods 
in industry 2032. For a detailed list of products of industry 2033, refer to table 6A, 
product codes 2033000 to 2033861. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of production and other receipts of the Canned Fruits and Vegetables Industry in 
1967 totaled $3,467.8 million. This included production of canned fruits and vegetables 
(primary products), valued at $2,987.4 million, production of other products (secondary 
products) valued at $346.3 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract work on 
materials owned by others) of $134.1 million. 

This industry's production of canned fruits and vegetables (primary products) in 1967 
represented 90 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and 
secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 89 percent. Secondary prod- 
ucts shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of canned specialties ($64.0 
million), and frozen fruits and vegetables ($108.7 million). 

Industry 2033 production of canned fruits and vegetables (primary products) in 1967 
represented 93 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $3,222.3 million 
produced by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 91 percent. Other industries 
producing canned fruits and vegetables (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 
2032, Canned Specialties, $92.8 million; industry 2037, Frozen Fruits and Vegetables, 
$47.2 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 em- 
ployees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2033, these establishments accounted for 0.5 percent of payroll and 0.5 
percent of value added by manufacture. 

2034— DRIED AND DEHYDRATED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in sun drying or artificially 
dehydrating fruits, vegetables, and nuts, or in manufacturing packaged soup mixes from 
dehydrated ingredients. Establishments primarily engaged in the grading and marketing 
of farm dried fruits, such as prunes and raisins, are classified in industry 5049. For a 
detailed list of products of industry 2034, refer to table 6A, product codes 2034000 to 
2034211. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the Dehydrated Food Products Industry in 1967 
totaled $420.8 million. This included shipments of dehydrated fruits, vegetables, and 
soup mixes (primary products), valued at $389.3 million, shipments of other products 
(secondary products) valued at $25.3 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract 
work on materials owned by others) of $6.2 million. 

This industry's shipments of dehydrated food products (primary products) in 1967 repre- 
sented 94 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and 
secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 96 percent. 



20C-3 



This industry's shipments of dehydrated food products (primary products) in 1967 repre- 
sented 94 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and 
secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 96 percent. 

Industry 2034 shipments of dehydrated fruits, vegetables, and soup mixes (primary 
products) in 1967 represented 86 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at 
$450.9 shipped by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 89 percent. Other 
industries shipping dehydrated food products (primary products) consisted mainly of 
industry 2033, Canned Fruits and Vegetables, $5.8 million; industry 2037, Frozen Fruits 
and Vegetables, $11.1 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 em- 
ployees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2034, these establishments accounted for 1.0 of payroll and 1.0 percent 
of value added by manufacture. 

2035--PICKLED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES; VEGETABLE SAUCES AND SEASONINGS; 
AND SALAD DRESSINGS 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in pickling and brining fruits 
and vegetables, and in manufacturing salad dressings, vegetable relishes, sauces, and 
seasonings. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing catsup and similar 
tomato sauces are classified in industry 2033, and those packing purchased pickles and 
olives in trade industries. For a detailed list of products of industry 2035, refer to 
table 6A, product codes 2035000 to 2035439. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of production and other receipts of the Pickles, Sauces, and Salad Dressings Industry 
in 1967 totaled $818.9 million. This included production of pickles, sauces, and salad 
dressings (primary products), valued at $634.2 million, production of other products 
(secondary products) valued at $153.6 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly 
contract work on materials owned by others) of $31.1 million. 

This industry's production of pickled fruits and vegetables, sauces, and salad dressing 
(primary products) in 1967 represented 81 percent (specialization ratio) of its total 
product shipments (primary and secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 
was 79 percent. Secondary products shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly 
of shortening and cooking oils ($48.9 million), and food preparations, n.e.c. ($32.6 
million). 

Industry 2035 production of pickled fruits and vegetables, sauces, and salad dressing 
(primary products) in 1967 represented 80 percent (coverage ratio) of these products 
valued at $792.9 million produced by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 82 
percent. Other industries producing pickles, sauces, and salad dressings (primary 
products) consisted mainly of industry 2033, Canned Fruits and Vegetables, $45.0 million; 
industry 2096, Shortening and Cooking Oils, $64.1 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 
employees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2035, these establishments accounted for 1.2 percent of payroll and 1.2 
percent of value added by manufacture. 



20C-4 



2036--FRESH OR FROZEN PACKAGED FISH AND SEAFOODS 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in preparing fresh and raw 
or cooked frozen packaged fish and other seafood. This industry also includes estab- 
lishments primarily engaged in the shucking and packing of fresh oysters in nonsealed 
containers. For a detailed list of products of industry 2036, refer to table 6A, product 
codes 2036000 to 2036215. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of production and other receipts of the Fresh or Frozen Packaged Fish Industry in 
1967 totaled $557.4 million. This includes production of fresh or frozen packaged fish 
(primary products), valued at $500.3 million, production of other products (secondary 
products) valued at $14.1 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract work on 
materials owned by others) of $43.0 million. 

This industry's production of fresh or frozen packaged fish (primary products) in 1967 
represented 97 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and 
secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 95 percent. Secondary prod- 
ucts shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of canned and cured seafoods 
($6.2 million). 

Industry 2036 production of fresh or frozen packaged fish (primary products) in 1967 
represented 94 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $529.7 million 
produced by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 94 percent. Other industries 
producing fresh or frozen packaged fish (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 
2031, Canned and Cured Seafoods, $10.1 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 em- 
ployees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2036, these establishments accounted for 3.4 percent of payroll and 3.8 
percent of value added by manufacture. 

2037--FROZEN FRUITS, FRUIT JUICES, VEGETABLES, AND SPECIALTIES 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in quick freezing and cold 
packing (freezing) fruits, fruit juices, vegetables, and specialties. For a detailed list of 
products of industry 2037, refer to table 6A, product codes 2037000 to 2037398. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of production and other receipts of the Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Industry in 
1967 totaled $2,066.8 million. This included production of frozen fruits and vegetables 
(primary products), valued at $1,817.6 million, production of other products (secondary 
products) valued at $162.8 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract work on 
materials owned by others) of $86.4 million. 



20C-5 



This industry's production of frozen fruits and vegetables (primary products) in 1967 
represented 92 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and 
secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 89 percent. Secondary prod- 
ucts shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of canned fruits and vegetables 
($47.2 million), and dehydrated food products ($11.1 million). 

While the primary products of the industry represent more than one class of product, 
the establishments tend to group themselves into "subindustries" represented by each 
of the different product classes. The extent of this specialization is indicated in table 8. 
Approximately 30 percent of the total industry shipments are represented by plants 
specializing in product classes 20372; and 43 percent in 20373. 

Industry 2037 production of frozen fruits and vegetables (primary products) in 1967 
represented 90 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $2,035.5 million 
produced by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 89 percent. Other industries 
producing frozen fruits and vegetables (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 
2033, Canned Fruits and Vegetables, $108.7 million; industry 2051, Bread, Cake, and 
Related Products, $32.6 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 em- 
ployees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2037, these establishments accounted for 0.5 percent of payroll and 0.3 
percent of value added by manufacture. 



20C-6 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-7 



table ia. General Statistics: 1958 to 1967 















(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 
















Establishments 


All employees 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 4 

(million 
dollars) 


Cost of 
materials 

(million 
dollars) 


Value of 
production 

(million 
dollars) 


Capital 
expend- 
itures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 


End-of- 
year 
inven- 
tories 

(million 
dollars) 


Special- 
ization 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




Year 


Total 
(number) 


With 20 
employ- 
ees 
or more 
(number) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Man-hours 
(millions) 


Wages 

(million 
dollars) 


Coverage 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




INDUSTRY 2031. — CANNED AND CURED SEAFOODS 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM' 

1965 ASM' 

1964 ASM' 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM' 

1961 ASM' 

1960 ASM' 

1959 ASM 1 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


3 320 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

405 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

411 


161 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

196 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

210 


15.8 

16.7 

16.1 

15.7 

17.3 

*16.5 

*16.5 

*17.2 

*15.4 

17.1 


69.1 

70.6 

66.5 

60.8 

66.2 

*61.9 

*59.1 

*61.5 

*51.9 

58.1 


14.0 

14.8 

14.4 

14.0 

15.5 

*14.8 

*15.0 

*15.4 

*13.9 

15.4 


23.6 

24.9 

24.6 

23.3 

25.5 

*25.1 

*24.7 

*26.0 

*23.3 

25.1 


54.8 

55.7 

53.2 

46.8 

52.6 

*48.4 

*46.9 

*50.1 

*41.4 

47.5 


181.0 

204.0 

190.8 

166.0 

174.6 

*157.4 

*147.6 

*142.8 

*119.3 

130.6 


342.0 

344.6 

300.7 

278.7 

277.8 

*274.9 

*257.8 

*261.0 

*236.4 

258.1 


523.1 

548.1 

492.4 

444.5 

452.5 

*428.9 

*401.7 

*400 . 9 

*352.5 

388.6 


9.4 

6.6 

6.3 

6.0 

6.3 

*9.0 

*7.8 

*6.8 

*7.7 

3.5 


129.1 

120.4 
95.3 
96.9 
88.7 

*97.6 
*101.1 

*94.0 

*90 . 9 
88.1 


92 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

92 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

. (NA) 

95 


r 

95 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

95 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

93 




INDUSTRY 2032.— CANNED SPECIALTIES 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM' 

1965 ASM' 

1964 ASM' 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM' 

1961 ASM 1 

1960 ASM' 

1959 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


175 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

173 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

107 


83 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

77 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

69 


27.2 

28.9 

27.4 
25.7 
25.2 
25.3 
25. 1 
25.1 
24.4 
24.2 


157.3 

156.8 
146.5 
135.0 
127.2 
126.8 
123.4 
116.1 
108.5 
109.5 


22.4 

23.7 
22.4 
20.8 
20.4 
20.3 
20.2 
20.3 
19.7 
19.5 


45.0 

47.2 
45.4 
41.6 
40.7 
40.4 
40.7 
40.2 
39.4 
41.6 


115.1 

114.9 
107.3 
97.5 
92.3 
90.6 
87.8 
83.3 
79.7 
81.4 


602.1 

645.3 
613.2 
564.9 
540.8 
473.0 
469.8 
428.7 
346.6 
340.8 


760.5 

811.2 
755.8 
664.0 
627.5 
612.2 
588.9 
560.9 
514.0 
507.0 


1,361.9 

1,456.9 

1,368.1 

1,230.6 

1,169.3 

1,085.8 

1,057.9 

989.2 

861.4 

846.9 


28. 1 

40.8 
30.7 
24.0 
25.6 
23.8 
20.1 
14.2 
17.3 
16.5 


248.3 

240.2 
226.1 
203.7 
223.4 
213.8 
203.0 
195.4 
182.4 
176.4 


82 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

80 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

86 


91 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

91 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

83 




INDUSTRY 2033 — CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM' 

1965 ASM' 

1964 ASM' 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM' 

1961 ASM' 

1960 ASM' 

1959 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 .. . 


1,223 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,430 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,630 


732 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

836 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

923 


100.1 

101.0 
100.6 
102.3 
102.4 
104.1 
106.6 
103.7 
107.0 
108.4 


473.8 

433.9 
407.1 
404.5 
382.1 
385.9 
373.7 
359.7 
354.9 
340.3 


88.9 

88.4 
88.1 

89.8 
90.7 
93.4 
95.7 
92.8 
95.6 
95.8 


174.0 

167.6 
166.1 
168.9 
168.2 
184.0 
183.2 
181.2 
183.6 
180.4 


376.0 

341.1 
317.8 
320.3 
303.5 
304.8 
290.5 
282.6 
282.1 
269.9 


1,413.3 

1,285.6 

1,179.2 

1,113.2 

1,029.5 

971 .0 

1,000.1 

988.2 

888.6 

849.9 


2,065.4 

1,932.9 
1,811.7 
1,847.6 
1,707.3 
1,676.8 
1,630.8 
1,548.8 
1,456.7 
1,485.6 


3,467.8 

3,215.8 
2,982.0 
2,966.3 
2,742.8 
2,626.5 
2,626.1 
2,515.9 
2,335.5 
2,333.9 


101.9 

84.8 
74.5 
78.3 
66.6 
72.8 
54.7 
46.3 
43.5 
43.7 


1,085.9 

957.7 
922.4 
1,002.9 
954.0 
974.5 
903.9 
838.0 
772.8 
806.9 


90 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

89 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

89 


93 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

91 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

91 




INDUSTRY 2034. — DEHYDRATED FOOD PRODUCTS 


1967 Census 

1966 ASM 1 

1965 ASM 1 

1964 ASM 1 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM 1 

1961 ASM 1 

1960 ASM 1 

1959 ASM 1 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


178 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

176 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

161 


81 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

80 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

67 


11.1 

10. 1 
9. 8 
9.2 
9.2 

*9. 2 
9.3 
8. 6 
8. 
7. 6 


58.0 

49. 
46. 3 
42. 5 
41.6 
*41. 2 
38.4 
36.2 
30.9 
28.3 


9.4 

8. 6 
8.4 
7. 8 

7. 8 
*7. 9 

8. 1 
7.4 
6.8 
6.6 


18.1 

16. 9 
16.1 
15.2 
15. 3 
*14. 8 
15. 2 
14. 8 
13.2 
12. 8 


44.0 

37. 8 
35. 
32. 1 
31.2 
*30. 3 
29. 2 
27. 
23.2 
21.8 


167.7 

161. 7 

130. 7 

127. 6 

115.8 

<125. 3 

103. 8 

97. 9 

79.4 

75. 5 


255.2 

246.2 
230. 5 
203. 
208.9 
*208. 8 
208.1 
200.6 
186. 7 
188.2 


5 420.8. 

5 395. 2 
5 363. 7 
5 321. 2 
5 318. 7 
5 320. 1 
5 304.4 
5 288. 7 
5 263. 9 
5 273.3 


14.6 

14. 1 
11. 
10. 4 
16. 2 
9.8 

7. 2 

8. 
7. 8 
6. 7 


108.6 

100. 2 
85. 8 
91. 6 
89. 8 
85. 
70.3 
65. 5 
53. 7 
49. 8 


94 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

96 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

97 


86 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

89 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

93 




INDUSTRY 2035.— PICKLES, SAUCES, AND SALAD DRESSINGS 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM 1 

1965 ASM 1 

1964 ASM 1 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM 1 

1961 ASM 1 

1960 ASM 1 

1959 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 .. . 


3 527 

(NA) 
(NA) 
*(NA) 
588 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
619 


182 

(NA) 

(NA) 

*(NA) 

184 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

205 


19.8 

21.1 
19.7 
*18.7 
19.0 
21.5 
21.7 
21.8 
19.4 
19.5 


100.5 

101.1 
91.1 

*87.7 
83.7 
93.2 
92.1 
89.7 
77.1 
70.5 


16.2 

16.9 
15.9 
*14.9 
15.4 
17.5 
17.3 
17.0 
15.2 
15.6 


31.7 

33.5 
31.1 
*29.8 
29.9 
33.7 
33.7 
32.7 
29.2 
29.8 


72.0 

68.2 
61.7 
*60.4 
58.3 
68.2 
63.1 
59.0 
51.5 
48.5 


295.5 

273.0 
280.3 
*255.1 
249.4 
243.2 
237.2 
221.0 
181.4 
164.6 


526.6 

546.3 
503.3 
*470.6 
427.6 
448.5 
452.6 
403.6 
378.0 
361.5 


818.9 

817.5 
784.0 
*726.4 
677.3 
695.9 
692.5 
630.2 
564.4 
525.3 


14.9 

14.4 

11.0 

*16.9 

11.0 

13.3 

*12.5 

*13.7 

13.1 

11.2 


153.2 

134.1 

120.4 

*113.8 

110.4 

104.1 

104.5 

87.5 

78.3 

85.2 


81 

(NA) 

(NA) 

*(NA) 

79 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

81 


80 

(NA) 

(NA) 

*(NA) 

82 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

82 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20C-8 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table ia General Statistics: 1958 to 1967-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 





Establishments 


All employees 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 


Cost of 
materials 

(million 
dollars) 


Value of 
production 

(million 
dollars) 


Capital 
expend- 
itures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 


End-of- 
year 
inven- 
tories 

(million 
dollars) 


Special- 
ization 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




Year 


Total 
(number) 


With 20 
employ- 
ees 
or more 
(number) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Man-hours 
(millions) 


Wages 

(million 
dollars) 


Coverage 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




INDUSTRY 2036. — FRESH OR FROZEN PACKAGED FISH 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM' 

1965 ASM' 

1964 ASM' 

1963 Census .... 

1962 ASM' 

1961 ASM' 

1960 ASM 1 

1959 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


3 497 

(NA) 

(na) 

(NA) 
547 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
446 


241 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA 

255 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

226 


21.4 

19.2 
18.7 
20.6 
20.1 
16.0 
17.2 
18.8 
18.0 
17.6 


77.2 

65 .5 
62.0 
60.2 
56.5 
45.3 
43.9 
45.1 
42.7 
41.4 


19.4 

16.9 
16.9 
18.6 
17.9 
14.5 
15.3 
16.9 
15.9 
15.6 


32.8 

29.1 
29.7 
32.9 
32.1 
26.5 
28.4 
32.6 
30.2 
26.2 


60.0 

48.8 
47.2 
46.3 
44.6 
35.0 
33.7 
34.7 
32.8 
32.3 


164.9 

151.7 
138.3 
128.1 
118.5 
101 .3 
101.5 
100.3 
89.7 
83.5 


393.8 

341.5 
326.1 
301 .2 
272.7 
234.5 
221.7 
219.9 
225.2 
226.9 


557.4 

492.7 
464.2 
428.2 
391.2 
344.5 
332.3 
328.3 
317.0 
310.1 


8.7 

9.4 

6.2 

5.4 

6.1 

10.0 

*3.4 

*4.0 

*6.9 

3.7 


75.2 

70.8 
59.8 
63.5 
53.9 
44.9 
40.4 
43.2 
36.9 
39.5 


97 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

95 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

93 


94 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

94 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

96 




INDUSTRY 2037.— FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM' 

1965 ASM' 

1964 ASM' 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM' 

1961 ASM' 

1960 ASM 1 

1959 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


3 607 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

650 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

426 


362 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

346 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

263 


64.3 

62.3 
58.8 
53.6 
51.7 
45.4 
45.1 
43.8 
41.9 
39.5 


293.9 

265.6 
245.1 
218.5 
202.4 
175.1 
164.7 
154.5 
140.8 
126.8 


56.2 

54.6 
50.8 
46.3 
44.7 
38.6 
38.8 
37.8 
36.0 
34.1 


110.3 

105.9 
100.2 
91.4 
86.7 
77.4 
77.1 
75.8 
71.3 
66.3 


229.1 

208.3 
189.9 
168.8 

154.4 
133.0 
126.3 
119.9 
107.3 
96.9 


759.3 

679.0 
627.0 
560.5 
550.2 
428.8 
403.0 
402.0 
346.0 
323.8 


1,306.5 

1,207.5 
1,186.9 
1,095.8 ' 
999.5 
897.9 
879.4 
801.9 
763.0 
702.9 


2,066.8 

1,884.6 
1,816.0 
1,651.6 
1,548.7 
1,323.7 
1,274.6 
1,206.6 
1,111.8 
1,025.9 


75.1 

81.9 
62.9 
50.0 
44.6 
40.1 
28.4 
28.7 
23.1 
21.0 


361.3 

347.3 
315.4 
319.6 
295.8 
247.9 
235.1 
221.3 
219.9 
200.7 


92 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

89 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

87 


90 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

89 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

91 



Note: In 1967, 1963, and 1958, the number of companies in industry 2031 was 
93; industry 2033: 930, 1,135, and 1,315; industry 2034 : 134, 126, and 130; 
the small companies whose data were estimated from administrative records. The 

Standard notes: -Represents zero. (X ) Not applicable. (NA ) Not a 
individual companies . 

(■*/ These figures either have associated standard errors exceeding 15 percent 
Thus, these estimates may be of limited reliability. 

: Based on a representative sample of establishments canvassed in the annual s 
results of a complete canvass of all manufacturing establishments. The percenta 

2 Data prior to 1958 appear in Volume II, 1963 Census of Manufactures, in tabl 

3 Some of the small establishments in this industry may have been misclassifie 
statistics other than the number of establishments or number of companies. (See 
Establishments" for further explanation. ) 

4 Only work-in-process inventories are used in the calculation for the value o 

5 Figures relate to value of shipments rather than value of production. 



268, 345, and 303, respectively; in industry 2032; 150, 154, and 
industry 2035 : 479, 541, and 566. The 1967 company counts include 
number of such companies is shown in table 4. 
vailable. (D ) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for 

or are not consistent with other Census series and related data. 

urvey of manufactures (ASM). These estimates may differ from the 
ge standard errors are shown in the ASM volume . 
e 1 of the chapter devoted to this industry, 
d as to industry. This does not significantly affect the 
paragraph in Introduction:, "industry Classification of 

f production industries. 



table ib. Selected Operating Ratios: 1958 to 1967 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Year 



Payroll 

per 
employee 

(dollars) 



Production 


Annual 


worker as 


man-hours 


percent of 


of 


total 


production 


employment 


workers 


(percent) 


(number) 



Average 

hourly 

earnings of 

production 

workers 

(dollars) 



Cost of 

materials 

per dollar 

of production* 

(dollars) 



Cost of 
materials and 
payiolls per 

dollar 
of production 1 

(dollars) 



Value 
added per 
employee 

(dollars) 



Payrolls 

as percent 

of value 

added 

(percent) 



Value 
added per 
man-hour of 
production 
workei 
(dollars) 



1967 Census 

1966 ASM. . . 

1965 ASM. . . 

1964 ASM. . . 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM... 

1961 ASM. . . 

1960 ASM. . . 
195 9 ASM. . . 
1958 Census 

1967 Census 

1966 ASM. . . 

1965 ASM.. . 

1964 ASM. . . 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM. . . 

1961 ASM... 
1960 ASM. . . 
195 9 ASM. . . 
1958 Census 



4 


377 


4 


234 


4 


139 


3 


87 9 


3 


835 


3 


763 


3 


580 


3 


574 


3 


372 


3 


386 



775 
434 
348 
245 
055 
016 
915 
632 
448 
527 



INDUSTRY 2031. --CANNED AND CURED SEAFOODS 



,683 
,683 
,713 
,671 
,652 
,687 
,648 
,689 
,668 
,627 



2.32 
2.24 
2.16 
2.01 
2.06 



.79 
.76 
.75 
.76 
.76 
.79 
.79 
.80 
.82 
.81 



11 


461 


12 


241 


11 


876 


10 


586 


10 


111 


9 


559 


8 


939 


8 


305 


7 


750 


7 


620 



INDUSTRY 2032. --CANNED SPECIALTIES 



,009 
,994 
,028 
,997 
,997 
,991 
,015 
,979 
,997 
,132 



2.56 
2.43 
2.36 
2.34 
2.27 
2.24 
2.16 
2.07 
2.02 
1.96 



.67 
.66 
.66 
.65 
.65 
.68 
.67 
.68 
.72 
.73 



22 


,100 


22 


360 


22 


390 


21 


950 


21 


499 


18 


719 


18 


707 


17 


101 


14 


203 


14 


093 



38 
35 
35 
37 
38 
39 
40 
43 
44 
44 



26 
24 
24 
24 
24 
27 
26 
27 
31 
32 



7.68 
8.18 
7.75 
7.12 
6.84 
6.28 
5.98 
5.48 
5.13 
5 .21 



13.37 
13.67 
13.51 
13.58 
13.29 
11.70 
11.55 
10.68 
8.80 
8.20 



See footnotes at end of table. 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-9 



table ib Selected Operating Ratios: 1958 to 1967-Continued 









(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 












Year 


Payroll 

per 
employee 

(dollars) 


Production 

worker as 

percent of 

total 

employment 
(percent) 


Annual 
man-hours 

of 
production 
workers 
(number) 


Average 

hourly 

earnings of 

production 

workers 

(dollars) 


Cost Of 

materials 

per dollar 

of production 1 

(dollars) 


Cost of 
materials and 
payrolls per 

dollar 
production 1 
(dollars) 


Value 
added per 
employee 

(dollars) 


Payrolls 

as percent 

of value 

added 

(percent) 


Value 
added per 
man-hour of 
production 

worker 
(dollars) 




INDUSTRY 2033.— CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 




4,732 
4,298 
4,046 
3,954 
3,731 
3,70 9 
3,505 
3,468 
3,317 
3,139 


89 
88 
88 
88 
89 
90 
90 
89 
89 
88 


1,956 
1,896 
1,884 
1,881 
1,853 
1,970 
1,914 
1,954 
1,921 
1,882 


2.16 
2.03 
1.91 
1.90 
1 .80 
1.66 
1 .59 
1.56 
1.54 
1.50 


.60 
.60 
.61 
.62 
.62 
.64 
.62 
.62 
.62 
.64 


.73 
.74 
.74 
.76 
.76 
.79 
.76 
.76 
.78 
.78 


14,113 

12,732 

11,719 

10,882 

10,055 

9,331 

9,381 

9,528 

8,303 

7,839 


34 
34 
35 
36 
37 
40 
37 
36 
40 
40 


8.12 


1966 ASM 

1 965 ASM 


7 .67 
7.10 


1964 ASM 


6.59 




6.12 


1962 ASM 

1961 ASM 

1960 ASM 


5.28 
5.46 
5.45 


1959 ASM 


4.84 
4.71 








INDUSTRY 20 34. --DEHYDRATED FOOD PRODUCTS 


1967 Census 


5,245 

4,868 
4,729 
4,638 
4,551 
4,469 
4,113 
4,198 
3,868 
3,729 


85 
86 
86 
85 
86 
86 
87 
86 
86 
87 


1,912 
1,960 
1,920 
1,946 
1,955 
1,879 
1,869 
1,990 
1,928 
1,925 


2.43 
2.24 
2.17 
2.11 
2.04 
2.04 
1.93 
1.83 
1.76 
1 .70 


.61 
.62 
.63 
.63 
.66 
.65 
.68 
.69 
.71 
.69 


.74 
.75 
.76 
.76 
.79 
.78 
.81 
.82 
.82 
.79 


15,154 
16,066 
13,362 
13,921 
12,652 
13,587 
11,132 
11,352 
9,955 
9,939 


35 
30 
35 
33 
36 
33 
37 
37 
39 
38 


9.29 


1966 ASM 


9.58 


1 965 ASM 


8.10 


1964 ASM 


8.40 




7.55 


1962 ASM 


8.44 


1961 ASM 

1 960 ASM 

1959 ASM 

1958 Census 


6.85 
6.63 

6.02 
5 .91 








INDUSTRY 2035.— PICKLES, SAUCES, AND SALAD DRESSINGS 


1 967 Census 


5,066 
4,796 
4,616 
4,679 
4,396 
4,344 
4,250 
4,105 
3,969 
3,615 


82 
80 
80 
79 
81 
82 
80 
78 
78 
80 


1,956 
1,984 
1,963 
2,001 
1,938 
1,923 
1,952 
1,023 
1,930 
1,907 


2.27 
2.04 
1.98 
2.03 
1.95 
2.03 
1.87 
1.81 
1.76 
1.63 


.64 
.67 
.64 
.65 
.63 
.64 
.65 
.64 
.67 
.69 


.77 
.79 
.76 
.77 
.76 
.78 
.79 
.78 
.81 
.82 


14,891 
12,956 
14,201 
13,611 
13,098 
11,335 
10,949 
10,116 
9,339 
8,442 


34 
37 
33 
34 
34 
38 
39 
41 
43 
43 


9.31 


1966 ASM 

1965 ASM 

1964 ASM 


8.15 
9.00 
8.56 


1963 Census 


8.34 


1962 ASM 

1961 ASM 

1960 ASM 


7.22 
7.03 
6.76 


195 9 Census 


6.20 




5 .53 










INDUSTRY 2036.— FRESH OR FROZEN PACKAGED FISH 


1967 Census 


3,607 
3,413 
3,308 
2,916 
2,814 
2,822 
2,561 
2,401 
2,376 
2,35 2 


91 
88 
90 
90 
89 
90 
89 
90 
88 
88 


1,693 
1,724 
1,759 
1,772 
1,792 
1,836 
1,857 
1,925 
1,903 
1,680 


1 .83 
1.68 
1.59 
1.40 
1.39 
1.32 
1.19 
1 .07 
1.09 
1 .24 


.71 
.69 
.70 
.70 
.70 
.68 
.67 
.67 
.71 
.73 


81 


7,702 
7,906 
7,380 
6,206 
5,903 
6,315 
5,913 
5,338 
4,990 
4,741 


47 
43 
45 
47 
48 
45 
43 
45 
48 
50 


5 .03 


1966 ASM 

1965 ASM 

1964 ASM 




83 
84 
84 
84 
81 
80 
81 
85 
87 


5.21 
4.66 
3.89 


1 963 Census 


3.68 


1962 ASM 

1961 ASM 


3.82 
3.58 
3.08 
2.97 


1960 ASM 


1 95 9 ASM 


1958 Census 


3.19 










INDUSTRY 2037. --FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 


1 967 Census 


4,571 
4,265 
4,169 
4,079 
3,911 
3,857 
3,649 
3,527 
3,359 
3,208 


87 
88 
86 
86 
86 
85 
86 
86 
86 
86 


1,963 
1,937 
1,973 
1,976 
1,939 
2,007 
1,984 
2,006 
1,978 
1,941 


2.08 
1.97 
1 .90 
1.85 
1.78 
1.72 
1.64 
1.58 
1 .51 
1 .46 


.63 
.64 
.65 
.66 
.65 
.68 
.69 
.66 
.69 
.69 


.77 
.78 
.79 
.80 
.78 
.81 
.82 
.79 
.81 
.81 


11,809 

10,903 

10,662 

10,467 

10,632 

9,445 

8,928 

9,176 

8,253 

8,191 


39 
39 
39 
39 
37 
41 
41 
38 
41 
39 


6.88 


1966 ASM 

1965 ASM 

1964 ASM 


6.41 
6.26 
6.13 




6.35 


1962 ASM 

1961 ASM 

1960 ASM 

1959 ASM 

1958 Census 


5.54 
5.23 
5.31 
4.85 
4.89 











Standard notes: - Represents zero. 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not available. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



companies. 

x For industry 2034 figures relate to value of shipments rather than value of production. 



V 



20C- 10 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 2. General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Teems) 



Industry and geographic area 1 



Establishments 



Total 

(number) 



With 20 

employees 

or more 

(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
production 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 
employees 

(1,000) 



2031— CANNED AND CURED SEAFOODS 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION .... 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION . . . 

MAINE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 
ILLINOIS 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . 

DELAWARE 

MARYLAND 

VIRGINIA 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 
MISSISSIPPI 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 
LOUISIANA 

WEST REGION 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA . 

ALASKA 

HAWAII 

2032 — CANNED SPECIALTIES 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION .... 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION . . . 
MAINE 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . 

NEW YORK ... 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

MINNESOTA. 

IOWA ..... 

KANSAS • 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . 

MARYLAND 

NORTH CAROLINA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 
TENNESSEE 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

ARKANSAS 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

CALIFORNIA 

See footnotes at end of table. 



320 
76 



141 
42 
10 
19 



175 
50 

12 



161 
50 



15.8 

3.3 

1.5 
1.3 
.2 

1.8 
CC 

cc 

.4 



3.3 

2.1 



4.5 
2.4 



27.2 
10.4 



FF 
2.1 



7.4 

EE 
EE 



1.0 

CC 
AA 
BB 



EE 
CC 
BB 

EE 

EE 

2.6 
CC 
1.9 



69.1 

14.6 

5.7 
4.6 
1.1 

8.9 
ID) 
(D) 



(D) 
1.0 



5.5 
(D) 
2.2 



2.8 

2.7 

43.6 

43.6 

(D) 

3.4 

22.4 

13.8 

(D) 



157.3 

62.4 

(D) 
(D) 

(Dl 

10.9 

(D) 

(D) 

49.3 

43.8 
(0) 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 

5.5 
(0) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

12.3 
(D) 
9.5 



(D) 
24.0 



14.0 

3.0 

1.4 

1.2 

.2 

1.6 

(Dl 
(D) 

.3 

(Dl 



1.9 

(D) 

.7 

.3 

(D) 

.3 



7.7 
(D) 
.8 
4.0 
2.1 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
1.7 
(Dl 
(Dl 

6.7 

6.0 
(D) 
(Dl 
(Dl 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(Dl 

2.0 
(D) 
1.6 



(D) 
2.9 



23.6 
5.3 



2.4 
2.1 



3.0 

(Dl 
(D) 



(D) 
.4 



2.9 
(0) 
1.2 

.4 
(Dl 

.3 



1.4 
1.3 

13.0 

13.0 

(D) 
1.4 
6.6 
3.7 
(0) 



45.0 

17.7 

(Dl 
(D) 

(D) 
3.5 

(D) 
(D) 

13.9 

12.3 

(D) 
<D) 
(D) 
(D) 

1.5 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(Dl 
(Dl 

(D) 
(D) 

4.3 
(D) 
3.3 



(D) 
5.6 



54.8 

11.3 



4.5 
3.7 



6.8 
(D) 
(D) 

1.2 

(D) 



4.5 
(Dl 



.6 

(D) 

2.1 
2.0 

35.1 

35.1 

(Dl 

2.7 

17.7 

11.5 

(D) 



115.1 

49.1 

(D) 
(01 

(D) 
8.4 
(D) 
(D) 

34.2 

31.5 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 
(0) 

2.7 
(D) 
ID) 
(D) 



(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 
(D) 

8.4 
(D) 
6.4 



(0) 
17.1 



181.0 

34.8 

11.1 
9.2 
1.9 

23.7 

(Dl 
(D) 



(D) 
2.1 

22.4 

9.9 

(D) 
2.6 
1.7 
(D) 
1.3 

2.4 

(D) 

10.1 
9.9 



120.1 

(D) 

8.1 

64.7 

36.8 

!D) 



602.1 
257.4 

(0) 

(Dl 

(D) 
57.2 

(D) 
(D) 

174.5 

159.6 

(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 

14.9 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

87.8 

(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 

(Dl 
(D) 

55.9 

(D) 
38.8 



(D) 

31.4 



342.0 

53.1 

15.0 
11.0 
4.0 

38.1 
(D) 

(D) 



(Dl 
5.9 



18.2 

(D) 

10.8 

.9 

(D) 

1.6 

4.4 
(D) 

11.4 
11.1 

245.4 

245.4 

(Dl 

26.1 

150.7 

48.1 

(D) 



(Dl 
(D) 

ID) 
(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 

247.5 

228.1 
(D) 

(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 

19.4 
(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 

122.4 

(Dl 
(D) 
(D) 

(Dl 
(01 

76.6 

(Dl 

53.9 



(D) 
104.6 



523.1 
87.8 

26.0 

20.2 

5.9 

61.8 

(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
7.9 

56.4 

28.0 

(D) 
13.4 
2.6 
(D) 
2.9 

6.8 
(D) 

21.5 
20.9 

365.6 

365.6 

(D) 

34.2 

215.4 

84.8 

(D) 



1 361.9 

539.8 

(D) 
(Dl 

(D) 

111.4 

(D) 

(Dl 

422.0 

387.8 

(Dl 
(D) 
(Dl 
(Dl 

34.2 
(Dl 
(Dl 
(Dl 

210.0 

(D) 
(Dl 



(D) 
(D) 

132.4 

(D) 

92.8 



(D) 
185.8 



9.4 


17.3 


1.1 


(D) 


.4 


(0) 


.3 


1.4 


.1 


.3 


.6 


(D) 


(D) 


.7 


(Dl 


.9 


.2 


(D) 


ID) 


(D) 


.2 


.3 


1.6 


4.2 


1.3 


(Dl 


(Dl 


(Dl 


1.0 


1.0 


(21 


'(D) 


(Dl 


.2 


(Zl 


.2 


.1 


(0) 


(D) 


(01 


.2 


(Dl 


(Dl 


1.3 


6.5 


(Dl 


6.5 


9.3 


(D) 


2 (D) 


(D) 


.7 


1.3 


5.2 


3.1 


2.1 


(D) 


2 (DI 



28.1 

7.3 

(D) 
(01 

(D) 
1. 1 
(Dl 
(Dl 

7.6 

6.6 
(01 
(D) 
(D) 
(0) 

1.0 

(Dl 
(0) 
(Dl 



(Dl 
IDI 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 

3.9 
(Dl 
3.6 



(D) 
(D) 



25.1 
10.3 

.7 

2 (D) 

9.6 
' (Dl 
2 (DI 
2 (D) 

9.4 

7.9 
2 (DI 

1.8 
2 (D) 
2 (D) 

1.5 
' (D) 
2 (D) 
2 (D) 



(Dl 
2 (D) 

2 (D) 

(D) 
2 (D) 

(D) 

2 (D) 

.5 



3.3 
3.3 



CANNED. CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C- 11 



table 2 General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 





1967 


1963 




Establishments 


All employees 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 


Cost Of 
materials 

(million 
dollars) 


Value of 

production 

(million 

dollars) 


Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 


All 

employees 

(1.000) 


Value 


Industry and geographic area 1 


Total 
(number) 


With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Man-hours 
(millions) 


Wages 

(million 
dollars) 


added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 


2033 — CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 


1 223 

248 

48 
19 
18 

200 

106 

35 

59 

341 

299 

58 
49 
48 
53 
91 

42 

24 

9 

336 

238 
15 
65 
40 
7 
17 
17 
69 

16 
2 
8 
5 
1 

82 
15 
19 
12 

36 

298 

36 
8 
10 
11 

262 
35 
35 

170 
18 

178 

20 

18 
13 

15 

11 
6 

4 

2 

7 

3 

2 

136 

12 
11 

124 

10 

6 

107 


732 

140 

16 
7 
7 

124 
63 
21 
40 

222 

193 
27 
29 
27 
33 
77 

29 

21 
4 

181 

123 
15 
34 
14 
3 
7 
10 
39 

9 

2 
3 
3 
1 

49 
12 
12 
7 
18 

189 

16 
3 
1 

7 

173 
21 
25 

116 
8 

81 

5 

5 
3 

8 

5 
3 

3 
2 

4 

2 
1 

64 

8 
8 

56 
8 
2 

46 


100.1 

14.9 

1.2 
BB 
.6 

13.7 
6.7 
2.4 

4.6 

21.8 

17.9 
2.9 
2.3 
3.1 
2.7 
6.9 

3.8 

3.0 

CC 

23.7 

17.0 

2.2 

2.7 

1.7 

CC 

.7 

EE 

7.7 

1.2 
BB 
.2 
CC 
AA 

5.4 
1.2 
1.7 
.6 
2.0 

39.8 

1.5 
.5 
.4 
.4 

38.3 

3.3 

FF 

24.1 
6.8 

11.1 

.8 

CC 

CC 

.9 

CC 

BB 

BB 
AA 

.3 

AA 
AA 

9.0 

2.1 

EE 

6.9 
.6 
AA 

6.0 


473.8 

71.1 

5.3 
(D) 
3.3 

65.8 
33.0 
12.3 
20.6 

101.8 

84.7 
15.7 
10.2 
15.2 
12.0 
31.5 

17.1 
13.2 

(Dl 

84.6 

62.7 
7.2 
7.6 
7.2 
(Dl 
2.0 
(Dl 

32.0 

4.1 
ID) 
.7 
(Dl 
(Dl 

17.8 
4.0 
5.0 
1.9 
6.9 

216.3 

6.1 
1.9 
1.9 
1.9 

210.2 

18.4 

(D) 

146.0 
26.8 

58.0 

4.3 

(D) 
(Dl 

5.2 

(Dl 
(D) 

(Dl 

(Dl 

1.4 

(D) 
(D) 

47.1 

10.4 
(Dl 

36.7 
3.1 
(D) 

32.4 


88.9 

12.9 

.9 

(Dl 

.3 

12.0 
6.0 
2.0 

4.0 

19.4 

15.9 
2.4 
2.1 
2.7 
2.4 
6.3 

3.4 
2.7 
(Dl 

21.0 

15.2 
2.1 
2.5 
1.5 
(Dl 
.6 
(Dl 
6.8 

1.0 
(D) 
.2 
(Dl 
(Dl 

4.8 
1.0 
1.5 
.5 
1.7 

35.7 

1.3 
.5 
.3 
.3 

34.4 
3.0 
(Dl 

21.4 
6.1 

9.4 

.7 

(0) 
(D) 

.7 

(D) 

(Dl 

(D) 

(Dl 

.3 

(D) 
(D) 

7.8 

1.9 
ID) 

5.9 

.6 

(D) 

5.2 


174.0 

26.8 

1.6 
(Dl 

.7 

25.2 

13.3 
4.2 
7.7 

41.2 

33.9 
5.5 
4.2 
6.0 
4.6 

13.7 

7.3 

5.9 
(D) 

38.3 

27.9 
3.6 
3.8 
3.0 
(D) 
1.0 
(D) 

13.4 

1.8 
(D) 
.4 
(D) 
(Dl 

8.7 
2.0 
2.8 
.8 
3.1 

67.7 

2.4 
.8 
.7 
.8 

65.3 

6.2 

(D) 

41.0 

11.1 

18.1 
1.4 

(Dl 

(D) 

1.4 

(D) 
(D) 

(Dl 
(Dl 

.5 

(D) 
(0) 

14.8 

3.6 
(Dl 

11.2 

1.1 
(D) 
9.6 


376.0 

53.2 

3.2 

(Dl 
1.7 

50.0 

26.4 

8.9 

14.7 

80.4 

66.8 
12.1 
8.0 
12.0 

8.7 
26.1 

13.6 

10.4 

(Dl 

65.8 

49.1 
5.8 
6.0 
5.4 
(Dl 
1.6 
(D) 

25.0 

2.9 
(D) 
.6 
(D) 
(D) 

13.8 
3.3 

4.0 
1.3 
5.3 

176.6 

4.6 
1.5 
1.3 
1.5 

172.0 

15.1 

(D) 

119.8 
20.8 

44.0 

3.3 

(D) 
(D) 

3.3 

(D) 
(Dl 

(D) 
(D) 

1.0 

(D) 
(Dl 

36.4 

8.0 
(0) 

28.3 

2.4 

(Dl 

24.9 


1 413.3 

228.0 

15.6 
(D) 

11.1 

212.4 
98.7 
34.5 
79.3 

354.9 

278.5 
64.7 
26.3 
59.7 
34.5 
93.4 

76.4 

62.1 

(D) 

224.1 

169.4 
21.5 
17.9 

17.3 
(Dl 
4.5 
(D) 

88.8 

11.1 
(D) 
1.6 
(D) 
(D) 

43.5 
7.6 

11.5 
4.2 

20.3 

606.3 

21.2 
8.5 
5.1 
7.3 

585.1 

54.2 

(0) 

409.1 
67.2 

167.7 

30.3 

(Dl 
(Dl 

15.2 

(D) 
(D) 

(Dl 
(Dl 

2.8 

(D) 
(Dl 

119.4 

22.5 
(D) 

96.9 

9.4 

(Dl 

83.4 


2 065.4 

354.9 

25.3 

(D) 

18.2 

329.5 
171.8 
63.1 
94.6 

464.8 

384.6 
93.4 
42.7 
71.8 
60.8 

116.1 

80.1 

62.0 

(Dl 

353.9 

255.3 
25.5 
25.6 

24.5 

(0) 

5.8 

(D) 

144.8 

20.1 
(D) 
1.9 
(D) 
(D) 

78.5 
24.8 
16.0 
8.5 
29.2 

891.9 

25.9 
6.9 
7.8 

10.0 

866.0 

70.9 

(0) 

664.1 
70.0 

255.2 

21.1 

(D) 
(D) 

18.1 

(Dl 
(D) 

(D) 
(Dl 

6.6 

(D) 
(Dl 

209.1 

29.1 
(D) 

180.0 

16.1 

(D) 

158.2 


3 167.8 

581.0 

40.9 

(D! 

29.3 

540.0 

269.9 

97.0 

173.1 

818.4 

661.9 
157.1 

68.9 
131.5 

95.5 
208.8 

156.5 

124.1 

(D) 

577.4 

424.3 

47.0 

43.5 

41.8 

(D) 

10.6 

(D) 

233.0 

31.0 
(Dl 
3.5 
(Dl 
(D) 

122.1 

32.4 
27.5 
12.7 
49.5 

1 191.0 

47.5 
15.4 
12.9 
17.3 

1 443.5 

125.0 

(Dl 

1 066.1 
137.2 

420.8 

51.3 

(D) 
(0) 

33.9 

(Dl 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 

9.3 

(Dl 
(D) 

326.3 

52.0 
(D) 

274.3 

23.9 

(D) 

241.2 


101.9 

15.6 

,3 

(Dl 
.2 

15.4 
9.1 
1.6 
4.7 

31.3 

22.3 
4.0 
1.9 
3.2 
3.9 
9.2 

9.1 
8.8 
(Dl 

14.6 

11.9 
2.5 

1.3 
.7 

(D) 
.2 

(Dl 

6.5 

.6 

(D) 
.1 
(01 
(Dl 

2.1 
.5 

.4 
.3 

.9 

40.3 

1.7 

1.0 

.4 

.2 

38.6 
4.0 
(Dl 

29.5 

3.1 

14.6 

1.6 

(D) 
(D) 

.4 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 

1.1 

(D) 
(D) 

11.5 

3.0 
(D) 

8.5 
(D) 
(D) 
6.3 


102.4 

15.6 

1.8 
.6 
.9 

13.7 
7.0 
2.5 

4.2 

22.5 

19.1 
2.3 

3.4 
3.0 
3.2 
7.1 

3.5 

2.6 

.6 

23.0 

16.1 

2 (o) 

4.0 
2.1 
2 (D) 
.4 
1.0 
6.2 

1.6 

2 (D) 

.9 

2 (D) 

2 (D) 

5.4 
1.1 
1.6 
.6 
2.1 

41.3 

2.0 
.5 
.9 
.5 

39.3 

3.1 

3.8 

25.1 

2 (D) 

9.2 

(D) 

2 (D) 
2 (D) 

(D) 

2 (D) 
2 (D) 

2 (D) 
2 (D) 

.3 

2 (D) 
2 (D) 

7.8 

2 (D) 
(D) 

(D) 

.4 

2 (D) 

6.4 


029.5 

160.4 

17.3 
4.2 




11.4 


MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION .... 


143.1 
66.4 




27.6 




49.1 


EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 


218.4 

179.0 

29,8 




22.4 




40.8 




23.4 




62.5 


WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 


39.4 
8.9 




179.5 




125.7 




126.3 

2 (D) 




17.2 




13.4 




2 (D> 
2.1 




6.8 




70.4 


EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 


12.7 
2 (D) 




5.6 




2 (D) 


WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 


2 (D) 

41.1 
6.8 




13.4 




2.7 




18.3 




471.1 




17.0 

5.8 
4.4 
5.7 




454.1 
37.0 




34.5 




321.6 




2 (D) 


2034 — DEHYDRATED FOOD PRODUCTS 3 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION .... 


115.8 

(D) 

2 (D) 
2 (0) 


EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 


(D) 
(D) 


WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 


2 (D) 
2 (DI 




1.4 


WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 


2 (D) 
2 (D) 




87.1 




(D) 
2 (D) 




(D) 
3.4 
2 (D) 




67.0 



20C- 12 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 2 General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms} 



Industry and geographic area' 



1967 



Establishments 



Total 

(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 

materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
production 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 



All 
employees 



(1,000) 



2035 — PICKLES i SAUCES* 4 SALAD DRESSINGS 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION 

MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . . . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION .... 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN ....... 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 

MINNESOTA 

MISSOURI 

SOUTH REGION ........ 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . . . 

MARYLAND 

NORTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 

KENTUCKY 

ALABAMA 

MISSISSIPPI 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 

ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

COLORADO 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON 

CALIFORNIA 

2036 — FRESH OR FROZEN PACKAGED FISH 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION 

MAINE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . . . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY . . 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION .... 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 
OHIO 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 
MISSOURI 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . . . 

MARYLAND 

VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 1 * 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . 

LOUISIANA 

TEXAS. . 

See footnotes at end of table. 



527 
128 

24 
14 

104 
61 
22 
21 

174 

132 

26 

8 

33 

45 
20 

42 
10 
12 

109 

54 
15 
11 
3 
11 

17 
3 
5 

2 



22 

116 



497 

101 



275 

218 
52 
80 
28 
12 
36 

8 

49 
27 
22 



182 
31 



23 
12 

5 



241 
53 
35 

a 

23 



98 

23 

35 

6 

9 

17 



19.8 

3.2 

.6 
.5 

2.6 

1.5 
.6 
.5 

6.9 

6.3 



1.0 
2.6 
1.1 



3.0 

.6 



1.0 
1.1 



.4 
1.0 

3.8 

.5 
.4 

3.3 

.6 
2.5 



21.4 

4.8 

3.3 
.7 

2.4 

1.5 
.4 
CC 
CC 



AA 

12.7 

9.3 
1.7 
2.1 
BB 
2.3 
2.7 



100.5 
17.4 



2.7 

2.0 



8.1 
3.7 
2.9 

33.7 

30.5 
4.7 
4.6 
5.7 

U.l 
4.5 

3.2 

(D) 
(D) 

26.6 

12.8 
2.5 

4.0 
(D) 
4.2 

5.3 
(D) 
1.6 
(Dl 

8.5 
ID) 
2.1 
4.9 



21.0 

4.2 
15.7 



77.2 

23.3 

16.1 
2.9 
12.6 

7.3 

1.9 
(01 
(0) 



(D) 
(D) 



37.0 

27.5 

4.2 
5.7 
(D) 
6.9 
9.4 



(D) 
1.6 

(D) 



16.2 
2.7 



2.1 
1.2 



5.9 

5.5 

.7 

.7 

.8 

2.3 

1.0 

.5 

(D) 
(D) 



2.5 
.5 



(D) 
.9 



(D) 
.3 

(D) 

1.5 
(D) 
.3 



19.4 

4.0 

2.8 

.7 

2.1 

1.2 

.4 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
ID) 

11.8 

8.6 
1.6 
2.0 
(D) 
2.1 
2.5 

(Dl 

(D) 
.5 
(D) 



31.7 

5.3 

1.1 
.9 

4.2 

2.4 
.9 



11.1 

10.3 

1.4 
1.3 
1.6 
4.3 
1.7 



(D) 
(0) 

9.8 

5.0 
.9 
1.6 
(D) 
1.6 

1.7 

(D) 

.6 

(D) 

3.2 

(D) 

.6 

1.9 

5.6 

.9 
.7 

4.7 

.6 

3.7 



5.3 

1.1 
4.1 

2.2 

.7 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 

19.4 

14.0 
2.1 
2.9 
(D) 
3.5 
4.8 

(D) 

(D) 

.8 

(D) 



72.0 
13.6 

2.3 

1.7 

11.3 
6.4 
2.8 
2.2 

25.0 

23.2 
3.4 
3.1 
4.5 
8.7 
3.4 



(D) 
(D) 



2.7 
(D) 
3.2 

3.1 

(D) 
1.0 
(D) 

6.1 
(D) 
1.1 
3.9 

15.0 

1.5 
1.1 

13.5 
1.8 



60.0 

16.1 



11.7 
2.5 



4.5 

1.4 
(0) 
(D) 

1.9 

(Dl 
ID) 

(0) 
(D) 

30.3 

22.1 
3.6 
4.6 
(D) 

5.5 
7.4 

(D) 

(D) 
1.3 

(D) 



295.5 
69.3 



6.6 

55.2 
31.2 
10.0 
14.0 

103.2 



10.5 
10.9 
38.1 



23.3 

(D) 
(D) 



6.0 
8.0 

(D) 
8.9 



13.1 

(Dl 
4.6 
(D) 

16.1 
(D) 
8.2 
5.6 

64.5 



61.9 

10.4 
49.9 



164.9 

55.5 

38.1 

3.9 

32.9 

17.4 
4.9 
(D) 
(D) 

10.1 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 

68.8 

43.4 
7.2 

10.3 
(Dl 
9.9 

13.6 

(D) 

ID) 
3.4 
(Dl 



526.6 
96.2 

13.7 

10.0 

82.5 
43.1 
25.5 

13.9 

183.9 

163.5 
16.8 
28.0 
58.6 
45.4 
14.7 

20.4 
(D) 
(Dl 

143.0 

70.7 
14.0 
12.9 
(Dl 
30.3 

22.5 

10) 
9.7 
(Dl 

49.9 
(D) 
9.4 

36.0 

103.5 

6.0 
4.2 

97.4 
15.7 
77.0 



393.8 

108.8 

77.0 

5.3 

70.2 

31.8 
9.9 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



120.5 
11.1 
17.4 
(Dl 
34.3 
54.4 



818.9 
165.4 



(D) 
6.4 
ID) 



241.0 
28.1 
38.4 
69.4 
81.2 
23.8 

43.9 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
38.9 

35.3 

(D) 

14.4 

(D) 

65.9 

(D) 
17.7 

41.6 

168.3 

8.9 
6.0 

159.5 

26.1 

127.0 



557.4 

164.5 

115.2 

9.3 

103.2 

49.3 

14.8 

(D) 

(D) 

30.2 

(D) 
(Dl 

(D) 
(0) 

265.0 

163.3 
18.3 
27.6 
(D) 
43.3 
68.2 

(D) 

(D) 
9.8 
(Dl 



14.9 
2.0 

.3 

.2 

1.8 

1.0 

.3 

.5 



5.2 
1.2 



2.7 

.5 

.5 
(D) 
ID) 

3.6 

2.2 
.3 

1.2 

(0) 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

1.0 

(D) 

.2 

.7 



3.3 

.6 
2.6 



19.0 
3.3 



-(D) 

2.9 

1.3 

1.0 

.6 

6.6 

5.9 
.8 
.9 
1.0 
2.1 
1.1 



2 (D) 
.4 

5.9 

3.1 



2 (D) 
1.3 



2 (D) 
.3 

2 (D) 

1.9 

2 (D) 

.5 

1.0 



(D) 

3.0 

.3 

2.6 



8.7 


20.1 


2.5 


4.4 


1.3 
.3 

1.0 


3.3 

2 (D) 
2.6 


1.2 
.1 

(Dl 
(Dl 


1.0 
.3 

.3 

.4 


.7 


.5 


(D) 
(D) 


(Dl 
2 (D) 


(Dl 
(Dl 


(D) 
2 (D) 


4.0 


12.3 


2.9 
.5 
(D) 
(D) 
1.1 


9.3 
1.9 
2.2 

.4 
2.2 



(D) 

.2 

(D) 



2.8 

.9 

1.9 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-13 



table 2. General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Industry and geographic area 1 



1967 



Total 
(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 

(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
production 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 
(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 

employees 



(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



2Q36--FRESH OR FROZEN PACKAGED FISH--C0N 



WEST REGION, . 

PACIFIC DIVISION 
WASHINGTON • . . . 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA . . . . 
ALASKA 



2037 — FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION . . . . 

MAINE 

MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . • . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN . . 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

MINNESOTA 

MISSOURI ... 

NEBRASKA 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION. . . 

DELAWARE 

MARYLAND 

VIRGINIA 

NORTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

FLORIDA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 
TENNESSEE 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. 

ARKANSAS 

LOUISIANA 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

IDAHO. . . 

COLORADO . 

ARIZONA 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON 

OREGON 

CALIFORNIA 



108 


56 


105 


55 


34 


16 


16 


10 


29 


12 


24 


17 



607 
135 

32 

14 
14 

103 
47 
23 
33 



113 
24 
8 
36 
34 
11 

32 

7 
11 



33 

16 
9 

2 

165 
46 
33 

85 



362 

76 



62 

12 

5 

18 

20 

7 

16 
5 

7 
3 



105 
31 
22 
52 



64.3 
10.6 



BB 

7.8 
3.7 
2.2 

1.9 

14.0 

8.7 

1.5 

CC 

3.5 

EE 
.9 

5.4 

EE 
EE 
EE 

17.0 

10.7 
.5 
EE 
EE 
.2 
1.2 
5.6 

1.8 
1.6 

4.5 
EE 
AA 
BB 

1.8 

22.7 



AA 

18.1 

4.4 

FF 

9.4 



14.0 

(D) 
(D) 
1.5 
4.0 
4.5 



293.9 

50.3 

12.3 

10.0 

(D) 

38.0 

17.9 

11.4 

8.7 

66.6 

44.4 
8.1 
(D) 

19.4 
(D) 
4.5 

22.2 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

70.1 

48.5 

1.7 
(D) 
(Dl 
.4 
4.9 
28.0 



4.6 

16.2 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
6.1 

106.9 

19.9 
17,9 

(D) 
(D) 

87,0 
21.5 

(D) 
44.3 



(D) 

(D) 

.5 

.9 

.8 



56.2 

9.2 

2.5 
2.2 

(D) 

6.7 
3.2 
1.9 
1,6 

11.9 

7.0 
1.1 
(D) 
2.7 
(D) 



4,9 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

14.9 

9.3 
.5 
CD) 
ID) 
.2 
1.0 
4.8 

1,6 

1.4 

4.0 
(D) 
(D) 
<D) 
1.6 

20.3 

4.2 
3.8 
(D) 
(Dl 

16,1 



(D) 
(D) 



110.3 
18.6 

5.2 

4.5 

(D) 



3.9 

3,1 

23.9 

14,2 
2.3 

(D) 
5.5 
(D) 
1.5 

9.7 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 



18.9 

.7 

(D) 

(D) 

.2 

1.7 

10.9 

2.6 
2.3 

7.8 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
3.2 

38.5 

8.4 
7.6 
ID) 
(01 

30.1 
7.6 
(D) 

15.0 



11.6 

(D) 
(D) 
1.3 
3.3 

3.6 



229'. 1 

39.4 

9.9 
8.2 

ID) 

29.5 
13.8 



49.0 

30.1 

4.6 
(D) 
12.4 
(D) 
3.4 

18.9 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

53.4 

36.8 
1.3 
(D) 
(D) 
.3 
3.6 

21.7 

4.3 

3.7 

12.4 
(D) 
(D) 
(0) 

4.2 

87.2 

16,9 

15.4 

(D) 

(D) 

70.3 

17,9 

(D) 

35.4 



30.6 

(D) 
(D) 
2.6 
9.0 
8.7 



759.3 
142.9 

32.3 

26.4 
(D) 

110.6 
63.3 
23.7 
23.6 

191,4 

140,5 

35.1 

(D) 

62.6 

(D) 

9.0 

50,9 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

200.7 

144.1 

2.5 

(D) 

(D) 

.8 

12.7 

86.5 



44.0 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

14.7 

224.4 

46.9 
39.8 

(D) 
(D) 

177.5 

48.9 

(D) 

90.0 



67.2 

(D) 

(D) 

5.3 

18.6 

10.8 



1 306.5 

180.4 

38.7 
31.1 

(D) 

141.7 
75.3 
33.7 
32.8 

332.6 

179.2 
41.7 

(D) 
75.7 

(D) 
16.1 

153.4 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

422.4 

329.3 

4.5 
(D) 
(D) 
1.0 
18.3 
231.5 

23.6 

20.6 

69.5 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

16.7 

371.1 

59,9 

53.0 

(D) 
(D) 

311.3 
66.1 

(D) 
173.7 



97.7 

(D) 

(D) 

7.9 

27.4 

19.5 



2 066.8 

324,6 

70.9 
57.5 

(D) 

253.6 
139.9 
57.3 
56.4 

524.1 

319.9 
76.7 

(D) 

138.1 

(D) 

25.6 

204.3 
(D) 
(Dl 
(Dl 

623.3 

473.8 

7.1 
(Dl 
(Dl 
1.9 
30.9 
318.3 

36.1 
30.8 

113.5 

(Dl 

(D) 

(Dl 

31.3 

594.8 

106.8 

92.8 

(Dl 

(D) 

488.0- 

114.2 

(Dl 

263.8 



(D) 
(D) 
.1 
(D) 
(01 



75.1 

14.1 

2.6 
2.3 
(0) 

11.5 
7.6 
1.9 
1.9 

25.2 

22.4 
9.7 

(D) 

4.7 

(Dl 

.8 

2.8 
(Dl 
(Dl 
(Dl 

15.7 

12.5 

1.0 
(Dl 
(Dl 
(D) 
.8 
7.4 



,8 



1.4 
(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 
.8 



3.6 
3.2 

(D) 
(D) 

16.5 
5.1 
(Dl 
6.1 



.6 
1.0 
(D) 



52.5 

8.6 

2.4 
2.1 
2 (D> 

6.2 

(0) 

(Dj 
"(0) 

10.2 

4.9 
1.1 

2 (D) 
2.4 

2 (D) 
.2 

5.3 
1.7 
4 (D) 

2 (0I 

15.1 

10.3 

.6 

1.3 

2(D) 

2 (D) 

S (D) 
5.3 

1.5 
2 (D) 

3.4 

2(D) 

.3 

2 (D) 
1.5 

18.6 

2.9 
2.6 
2 <D> 

(Dl 

15.0 
2 (D) 
i.9 
8.1 



22jlT_ 

(D) 
11.3 
2.3 

7.2 
(D) 



550.2 

91.7 

18.9 

14.6 

(Dl 

72.8 

(D) 

2 (0) 

*(DI 

119. . 

69.2 
22.8 
2 (D) 
35.0 
2 (D) 
1.2 

48.3 
12.0 

2 (DI 
(Dl 

182.9 

150.2 

3.8 

11.7 

2 (D) 

94.0 

8.1 
2 (D) 

24.6 

2 :di 

2.0 
2 (DI 
10.7 

161.0 

21.5 
19.7 
2 (DI 
*(D) 

136.6 
2 (°) 
33.8 
76.4 



Note 



Detailed flgu 



may 



add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) in computer operations. 

'or 1967, over 30 



Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies, 
of the data for this line was estimated. (Z) Under $50 thousand (or under 50 employees). 

l General statistics for some producing States have to be withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. However, for such States, the number of establishment 
shown and the employment size range is indicated by one of the following symbols: 



AA - less than 250 employees 
BB - 250 to 499 employees 



CC - 500 to 999 employees 

EE - 1,000 to 2,499 employees 



FF - 2,500 employees and 



This State or division was not shown as a separate line in table 2 in the 1963 report for this industry. A footnote to table 2 in the 1963 report showed the number of estab- 
lishments! and total employment (either actual or in size ranges) for such States. 
3 Figures relate to value of shipments rather than value of production. 



20C-14 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 3 Detailed Statistics: 1967 



Hem 



PRIMARY PRODUCT SPECIALIZATION RATIO 1 

COVERAGE RATIO 2 

ESTABLISHMENTS" TOTAL NUMBER 

with i to 19 employees do • 

WITH 20 TO 99 EMPLOYEES DO . 

WITH 100 EMPLOYEES OR MORE DO . 

ALL EMPLOYEES! AVERAGE FOR YEAR 1.000 

PAYROLL FOR YEARi ALL EMPLOYEES . . . MILLION DOLLARS 

PRODUCTION WORKERSI 

AVERAGE FOR YEAR 1.000 

MARCH DO . 

MAY • .DO . 

AUGUST. DO . 

NOVEMBER DO . 

MAN-HOURS MILLIONS 

JANUARY-MARCH DO . 

APRIL-JUNE DO . 

JULY-SEPTEMBER DO . 

OCTOBER-DECEMBER DO . 

WAGES MILLION DOLLARS 

COST OF MATERIALS. ETC.. TOTAL DO . 

MATERIALS. PARTS. CONTAINERS. ETC. CONSUMED . .DO . 

COST OF RESALES 00 . 

FUELS CONSUMED DO . 

PURCHASED ELECTRIC ENERGY DO . 

CONTRACT WORK DO . 

VALUE OF PRODUCTION INCLUDING RESALES DO . 

VALUE OF RESALES DO . 

VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURE DO . 

MANUFACTURERS' INVENTORIES! 

BEGINNING OF YEAR. TOTAL. DO . 

FINISHED PRODUCTS ... .DO . 

WORK IN PROCESS . DO . 

MATERIALS. SUPPLIES. FUEL. ETC DO . 

ENO OF YEAR. TOTAL. DO . 

FINISHED PRODUCTS DO . 

WORK IN PROCESS DO . 

MATERIALS. SUPPLIES. FUEL. ETC DO . 

EXPENDITURES FOR PLANT AND EQUIPMENT. TOTAL . . .00 . 

NEW PLANT AND EQUIPMENT. TOTAI . .DO . 

NEW STRUCTURES AND ADDITIONS TO PLANT ... .DO . 

NEW MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT .00 . 

USEO PLANT AND EQUIPMENT DO . 



Canned 
and cured 
seafoods 
(SIC 2031) 



.92 

.95 

320 
159 
127 
34 

15.8 
69,1 



14.0 
11.4 

13.2 
19.0 

12.4 

23.6 

4.4 
5.8 
8.3 
5.1 

54.8 

342.0 

261.9 

72.8 

2.8 
1.2 
3.4 

523.1 
83.3 



116.5 

98.8 

2.0 

15.7 

129.1 

110.7 

2.0 

16.4 

9.8 
9.4 
2.3 

7.1 



Canned 
specialties 
(SIC 2032) 



175 
92 
38 

45 



27. 

157. 



22.4 
20.9 
20.8 
24.7 
23.2 

45.0 
10.6 
10.5 
12.1 
11.9 

115.1 

760.5 

709.3 

38.5 

6.3 

3.2 

3.2 

361.9 
49.3 



224.6 

172.4 

2.3 

49.8 

248.3 

183.6 

3.0 

61.7 

28.4 

28.1 

7.2 

20.9 

.3 



Canned 
fruits and 
vegetables 
(SIC 2033) 



.90 

.93 

1 223 
491 
433 
299 

100. 1 
473.8 



88.9 
54.5 
61. 1 
156.9 
83.2 

174.0 
26.5 
31.0 
72.7 
43.8 

376.0 

2 065.4 
1 925.6" 

103.9 

20.4 

11.6 

3.9 

3 467.8 
120.2 



972.6 

793.9 

44. 1 

134.6 

1 085.9 

879.3 

55.0 

151.6 

106.3 
101.9 
25.0 
76.9 
4.3 



Dehydrated 

food 
products 
(SIC 2034) 



.94 

.86 

178 
97 
46 
35 

11.1 

58.0 



102.1 
59.2 
16.9 
26.0 

108.6 
60.3 
17.9 
30.4 

14.8 
14.6 
3.4 
U.l 
.2 



Pickles, 
sauces, 
and salad 
dressings 
(SIC 2035) 



.81 

.80 

527 

345 

132 

50 

19.8 
100.5 



16.2 
13.8 
15.2 
21.9 
14.0 

31.7 
6.7 
7.5 

10.6 
7.0 

72.0 




131.8 
71.7 
16.2 
43.9 

153.2 
81.6 
19.4 
52.2 

15.8 
14.9 
4.1 
10.8 



Fresh 
or frozen 
packaged 

fish 
(SIC 2036) 



497 
256 
199 

42 

21.4 
77.2 



19.4 
19.4 
17.7 
20. 1 
20.3 

32.8 
7.9 



60.0 

393.8 

356.7 

27.5 

1.2 

2.3 

6.0 

557. 4 
37.9 



69.7 

53.5 

2.6 

13.6 

75.2 

55.7 

3.9 

15.6 

9.4 
8.7 
2.8 
5.8 
.7 



Frozen 
fruits and 
vegetables 
(SIC 2037) 



607 
245 
186 
176 

64.3 
293.9 



56.2 
51.3 
52.4 
62.7 
59.2 

110.3 
24.9 
25.9 
31.0 
28.4 

229.1 

1 306.5 

1 178.0 

54.1 

9.9 

15.5 

49.1 

2 066.8 

61.1 



351.6 

251.9 

19.3 

80.4 

361.3 

258.8 

18.2 

84.3 

78.6 
75.2 
24.7 
50.5 
3.4 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent 
g) in computer operations. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms. 



Standard notes 



Represe 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not 



independent dropping of fr 



ilable. (D) Withheld to 



nds (rather tha 



id disclosing figures 



individual 



1 The proportion of product shipments (both primary and secondary) of the industry represented by primary products, 

2 The proportion of primary products shipped by the establishments classified in the industry to total shipments of such products by all 
facturing establishments. 

3 Figures relate to value of shipments rather than value of production. 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-15 



table 4 General Statistics, by Employment Size of Establishment: 1967 



















(See Appendix 


Explanation ol Terms) 
















Establish- 
ments 


All employees 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 


Cost of 
materials 


Value ol 
production 


Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 




Item 


Number 


Payroll 


Number 


Man-hours 


Wages 


End-of- 
year 
inven- 




















new 


tories 




(number) 


(1,000) 


(million 
dollars) 


(1,000) 


(millions) 


(million 
dollars) 


(million 
dollars) 


(million 
dollars) 


(million 
dollars) 


(million 
dollars) 


(million 
dollars) 


2031 — CANNED AND CURED SEAFOODS 


























320 


15.8 


69.1 


14.0 


23.6 


54.8 


181.0 


342.0 


523.1 


9.4 


129.1 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 
























1 TO 4 EMPLOYEES 6 


84 


• 2 


.8 


.2 


.2 


.6 


3.0 


4.4 


7.4 


.2 


1.6 


5 TO 9 EMPLOYEES . . 














25 


.2 


1.0 


.1 


.2 


.7 


3.2 


5.9 


9.1 


.2 


2.6 


10 TO 19 EMPLOYEES . 














50 


.7 


3.6 


.6 


1.1 


2.6 


6.8 


13.7 


20.4 


.4 


3.6 


20 TO 49 EMPLOYEES . 














81 


2.6 


11.5 


2.3 


3.9 


8.8 


30.8 


42.0 


72.9 


1.5 


13.0 


50 TO 99 EMPLOYEES . 














46 


3.3 


15.2 


2.9 


5.0 


12.6 


34.4 


47.6 


82.0 


1.5 


13.3 


100 TO 219 EMPLOYEES 














26 


3.7 


13.7 


3.3 


5.2 


10.7 


46.0 


64.6 


110.7 


3.5 


26.2 


250 TO 499 EMPLOYEES 














4 


1.5 


5.3 


1.4 


2.6 


4.5 


10.1 


36.5 


46.6 


1.2 


11.5 


500 TO 999 EMPLOYEES 














3 


3.6 


18.2 


3.2 


5.3 


14.3 


46.7 


127. 1 


174.0 


1.0 


57.3 


liOOO TO 2.499 EMPLOYEES 










1 


(D) 


ID) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


(Dl 


(D) 


2.500 EMPLOYEES OR MORE. 










- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


" 


- 


- 


ESTABS. COVERED BY ADMIN. RECORDS* e 


72 


.3 


1.3 


.3 


.5 


1.0 


3.1 


4.5 


7.6 


.1 


1.7 


2032 — CANNED SPECIALTIES 


























175 


27.2 


157.3 


22.4 


45.0 


115.1 


602.1 


760.5 


1 361.9 


28.1 


248.3 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 


























53 


.1 


.4 


■ 1 


.1 


.3 


1.0 


1.3 


2.3 


(Zl 


.4 




19 


.1 


.6 


.1 


.2 


.4 


1.6 


2.7 


4.4 


.2 


.7 




20 


.3 


1.5 


.2 


.4 


.9 


3.6 


5.0 


8.6 


.3 


1.4 




23 


.7 


3.1 


.6 


1.2 


2.3 


11.2 


15.2 


26.4 


.4 


3.6 




15 


1.1 


5.5 


1.0 


2.0 


4.1 


11.7 


21.3 


33.1 


.6 


6.4 




21 


3.5 


18.5 


2.8 


5.8 


12.2 


64.1 


95.8 


159.8 


3.6 


31.4 




9 


3.3 


17.5 


2.8 


5.7 


13.6 


89.7 


97.4 


187.1 


2.1 


42.6 




8 


5.0 


26.8 


4.2 


8.6 


19.3 


92.1 


129.4 


221.2 


6.3 


48.2 


1.000 TO 2.499 EMPLOYEES .... 


6 


13.0 


83.5 


10.6 


20.9 


62.0 


327.0 


392.3 


7 19.0 


14.7 


U3.5 




1 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


(Dl 


(D) 


(Dl 


(D) 


ESTABS. COVERED BY ADMIN. RECORDS 1 e 


47 


.1 


.4 


.1 


.2 


.3 


1.1 


1.5 


2.6 


.1 


.5 


2033 — CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 


























1 223 


100. 1 


473.8 


88.9 


174.0 


37 6.0 


1 413.3 


2 065.4 


3 467.8 


101.9 


1 085.9 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 
























1 TO 4 EMPLOYEES' 2 . . . . 




281 


.5 


2.4 


.5 


.9 


1.8 


7.2 


10.0 


17.2 


1.1 


5.2 


5 TO 9 EMPLOYEES . . . 














94 


.7 


3.3 


.6 


1.2 


2.5 


9.6 


13.3 


22.8 


.4 


5.3 


10 TO 19 EMPLOYEES . 














116 


1.6 


8.0 


1.4 


2.6 


5.7 


22.5 


32.4 


54.9 


1.1 


14.1 


20 TO 49 EMPLOYEES . 














233 


7.4 


33.0 


6.3 


12.3 


24.2 


97.2 


146.6 


242.4 


7.5 


63.7 


50 TO 99 EMPLOYEES . 














200 


14.6 


61.7 


12.8 


24.9 


47.5 


174.6 


259.8 


434.4 


15.0 


131.7 


100 TO 249 EMPLOYEES 














208 


32.7 


152.6 


29.0 


57.9 


119. 6 


481.0 


700.6 


1 179.6 


37.5 


37 7. 1 


250 TO 499 EMPLOYEES 














65 


21.5 


112.9 


19.4 


38.3 


94.0 


339.7 


531.5 


866.9 


21.6 


295.4 


500 TO 999 EMPLOYEES 














24 


21.0 


99.8 


19. 1 


35.9 


30.7 


281.5 


37 1.4 


649.6 


17.7 


193.6 


1.000 TO 2.499 EMPLOYEES 










1 


(D) 


IDI 


<DJ 


ID) 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


(Dl 


(D) 


(Dl 


2.500 EMPLOYEES OR MORE. 










1 


(Dl 


ID) 


(D) 


(D 1 


ID) 


(Dl 


(D) 


(D 1 


(Dl 


(Dl 


ESTABS. COVERED BY ADM IN. RECORDS 1 e 


251 


.7 


2.5 


.7 


1.1 


1.9 


6.4 


10.2 


16.6 


.2 


6.3 


2034 — DEHYDRATED FOOD PRODUCTS 


























178 


11.1 


58.0 


9.4 


18.1 


44.0 


167.7 


255.2 


J 420.8 


14.6 


108.6 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 
























1 TO 4 EMPLOYEES' 2 . . . . 








51 


.1 


.7 


.1 


.2 


.6 


.7 


1.4 


2.9 


= .1 


.7 


5 TO 9 EMPLOYEES . . 














22 


.1 


.8 


.1 


.2 


.7 


1.9 


2.4 


4.4 


.2 


.6 


10 TO 19 EMPLOYEES . 














24 


.3 


1.6 


.3 


.5 


1.2 


5.2 


6.6 


11.6 


.1 


2.4 


20 TO 49 EMPLOYEES . 














32 


1.1 


5.2 


.9 


1.7 


4.0 


15.2 


34.1 


50.7 


1.1 


14.9 


50 TO 99 EMPLOYEES . 














14 


1.0 


4.9 


.9 


1.6 


3.9 


12.7 


17.2 


28.4 


.8 


9.8 


100 TO 249 EMPLOYEES 














22 


3.6 


17.7 


3.1 


5.9 


13.9 


45.3 


88.9 


130.3 


7.2 


41.2 


250 TO 499 EMPLOYEES 














11 


4.9 


27.2 


4. 1 


i.0 


19.8 


86.6 


104.6 


192.6 


4.9 


39. 1 


500 TO 999 EMPLOYEES 














2 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


ID) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(Dl 


(ni 


1.000 TO 2.499 EMPLOYEES 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.500 EMPLOYEES OR MORE. 










- 


" 


- 


- 


" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


ESTABS. COVERED BY ADMIN. RECORDS 1 e 


45 


.1 


.6 


.1 


.2 


.5 


1.6 


1.9 


3.5 


.2 


1.0 


2035 — PICKLES. SAUCES. & SALAD DRESSINGS 


























527 


19.8 


100.5 


16.2 


31.7 


72.0 


295.5 


526.6 


818.9 


14.9 


xj3.2 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 
























1 TO 4 EMPLOYEES' 1 ' 


202 


.3 


1.4 


.3 


.5 


1.3 


4.3 


6.2 


10.5 


.5 


2.1 


5 TO 9 EMPLOYEES . . 














55 


.4 


1.7 


.3 


.6 


1.4 


4.5 


7.5 


12.1 


.3 


1.6 


10 TO 19 EMPLOYEES . 














88 


1.2 


5.5 


.9 


1.8 


4.0 


15.8 


27.4 


43.9 


1.1 


4.3 


20 TO 49 EMPLOYEES . 














85 


2.7 


12.1 


2.1 


3.9 


8.1 


38.7 


54.5 


93.1 


2.1 


13.5 


50 TO 99 EMPLOYEES . 














47 


3.3 


15.2 


2.6 


5.2 


10.7 


61.0 


78.6 


139.6 


2.1 


18.3 


100 TO 249 EMPLOYEES 














32 


5.6 


27.6 


4.7 


9.3 


19.9 


72.3 


146.5 


217.9 


4.1 


47.1 


250 TO 499 EMPLOYEES 














16 


6.4 


36.9 


5.3 


10.4 


26.5 


99.0 


205.9 


301.9 


4.7 


66.4 


500 TO 999 EMPLOYEES 














2 


(D) 


(D 1 


ID 1 


(Dl 


(Dl 


(Dl 


(Dl 


(D) 


(Dl 


(D) 


1.000 TO 2.499 EMPLOYEES 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


. 


. 


. 


2.500 EMPLOYEES OR MORE. 










- 


- 


- 


- 


" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


ESTABS. COVERED BY ADMIt 


U 


RE 


CO 


RD 


S 1 


e 


173 


.3 


1.2 


.3 


.4 


1.1 


3.5 


5.4 


8.9 


.1 


1.9 



end of table. 



20C- 16 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 4 General Statistics, by Employment Size of Establishment: 1967-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 







All employees 


Production workers 


























Value 






Capital 
expendi- 


End-of- 




Establisn- 












added by 


Cost of 


Valued 


year 


Item 


ments 


Number 


Payroll 


Number 


Man-hours 


Wages 


manufac- 
ture 


materials 


production 


tures, 
new 


inven- 
tories 








(million 






(million 


(million 


(million 


(million 


(million 


(million 




(number) 


(1,000) 


dollars) 


(1,000) 


(millions) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


dollars) 


2036 — FRESH OR FROZEN PACKAGED FISH 
























ESTABLISHMENTS. TOTAL 


497 


21.4 


77.2 


19.4 


32.8 


60.0 


164.9 


393.8 


557.4 


8.7 


75.2 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 




















a , 


.7 


1 TO 4 EMPLOYEES' 5 ........ 


123 


.2 


.8 


.2 


.4 


.7 


3.0 


4.8 


7.7 


■ 1 


5 TO 9 EMPLOYEES 6 . . . 














54 


.4 


1.4 


.4 


.6 


1.2 


2.7 


5.5 


8.2 


• 2 


■ 6 


10 TO 19 EMPLOYEES . . 














79 


1.2 


4.6 


1.1 


1.8 


3.7 


10.0 


19.7 


29.6 


.6 


2.5 


20 TO 49 EMPLOYEES . . 














134 


4.4 


15. 8 


4.0 


6.2 


12.7 


33.1 


71.9 


104.9 


2.2 


8.4 


50 TO 99 EMPLOYEES . . 














65 


4.5 


15.3 


4.2 


6.2 


12.3 


33.7 


64.4 


98.0 


2.2 


10.2 


100 TO 249 EMPLOYEES . 














25 


3.5 


11.4 


3.2 


5.2 


9.1 


26.3 


55.9 


82.3 


.9 


6.1 


250 TO 499 EMPLOYEES 














11 


3.5 


13.6 


2.9 


6.0 


9.8 


34.7 


77.9 


111.6 


.9 


20.7 


500 TO 999 EMPLOYEES 














6 


3.8 


14.3 


3.4 


6.6 


10.6 


21.5 


93.6 


115.1 


1.6 


26.0 


ltOOO TO 2.499 EMPLOYEES 










- 


- 


- 


- 


■ 


~ 


~ 


™ 








2.500 EMPLOYEES OR MORE. 










- 


- 


" 


- 


~ 


~ 


" 










ESTABS. COVERED BY ADMIN. RECORDS 1 e 


153 


.8 


2.6 


.8 


1.3 


2.1 


6.3 


9.8 


16.1 


.3 


1.6 


2037 — FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 


























607 


64.3 


293.9 


56.2 


110.3 


229.1 


7 59.3 


1 306.5 


2 066.8 


75. 1 


361.3 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH AN AVERAGE OF- 
1 TO 4 EMPLOYEES 6 • 


135 


.3 


1.2 


.2 


.5 


.9 


3.5 


6.8 


10.3 


2 7.8 


1.9 


5 TO 9 EMPLOYEES . . 














50 


.3 


1.9 


.3 


.6 


1.3 


4.5 


8.5 


13.0 


.2 


1.9 


10 TO 19 EMPLOYEES . 














60 


.8 


4.2 


.7 


1.3 


3.1 


10.7 


17.2 


27.9 


• 6 


3. 1 


20 TO 19 EMPLOYEES . 
50 TO 99 EMPLOYEES . 
100 TO 249 EMPLOYEES 
250 TO 499 EMPLOYEES 














102 

84 
107 
40 


3.3 

6.1 

16. a 

14.0 


17.1 
28.5 
76.2 

60.5 


2.7 

5.1 

14.8 

12.5 


5.6 
10.3 
28.2 
24.1 


12.1 
21.0 
60.3 
49.0 


45.7 
71.1 
197.2 
154.3 


67.6 
137.1 
370.4 
244.9 


113.1 
208.2 
568.9 
399.2 


2.3 

5.5 
17.9 
16.7 


13.1 
33.0 
106.3 
78.4 
82.9 


500 TO 999 EMPLOYEES 














22 


14.1 


63.6 


12.7 


26.2 


52.5 


159.6 


292.5 


452.0 


16.7 


liOOO TO 2 .499 EMPLOYEES 










7 


8.5 


40.8 


7.1 


13.7 


29.0 


112.7 


161.6 


274.2 


7.4 


41.0 


2.500 EMPLOYEES OR MORE. 










- 


- 


- 


- 


™ 


" 


" 


" 








ESTABS. COVERED BY ADMI 


>J. 


RE 


CO 


RD 


s' 


e 


113 


.3 


1.4 


.3 


.5 


1.0 


6.1 


5.6 


11.7 


.3 


2.1 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) in computer 



opcrat i 



underscored figures abov 



Standard notes: (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. Data for this item are included i 
resents zero. f X ) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. Over 30 percent of the data for this line was estimated. 

'Report forms were not mailed to companies that operated only one establishment and which Social Security payrolls indicated had fewer than 10 employees 
al payrolls {and sales) for 1967 were obtained from administrative records of the Federal Government. The other statistics for these establishments 
re estimated from industry averages. 
2 May include an unspecified amount for plants under construction but not in operation. 
'Figures relate to value of shipments rather than value of production. 



Actu 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-17 



table 5A Industry-Product Analysis— Industry and Primary Product Production; Specialization Ratios and 

Coverage Ratios: 1967 and 1963 



An establishment is assigned to an industry based on the shipment values of products representing 
the largest amount considered as primary to an industry. Frequently the establishment shipments 
comprise mixtures of products assigned to an industry (primary products), those considered pri- 
mary to other industries (secondary products of a given industry) and receipts for activities such 



as merchandising or contract work. This product pattern for an industry is shown in columns A 
through D and the primary product specialization ratio in column E. The extent to which the 
given industry's primary products are shipped by establishments classified in and out of the 
given industry is summarized in columns F through H and shown as a ratio in column I. 



Ind. 
code 



Industry and census year 



Value of production 1 



Total 



(million 
dollars) 



Primary 
products 



(million 
dollars) 



Secondary 
products 



(million 
dollars) 



Miscel- 
laneous 
receipts 



(million 
dollars) 



Primary 
product 
special- 
ization 
ratio 

Col. B 
Col. B^C 
(percent) 



Value of primary product shipments 



Total, 
made in 

all 
industries 

(million 
dollars) 



Made 
in this 
industry 



(million 
dollars) 



Made in 

other 

industries 



(million 
dollars) 



Coverage 
ratio 



Col. B 

Col. F 

(percent) 



Canned and cured seafoods 1967 . 

1963. 

Canned specialties 1967. 

1963. 

Canned fruits and vegetables 1967. 

1963. 

Dehydrated food products 1967 . 

1963. 

Pickles, sauces, and salad dressing 1967. 

1963. 

Fresh or frozen packaged fish 1967. 

1963. 

Frozen fruits and vegetables 1967. 

1963. 



523.1 
452.5 



1,361.9 
1,169.3 



3,467.8 
2.742.8 



420.8 
318.7 



818.9 
677.3 



557.4 
391.2 



2,066.8 
1,548.7 



401.9 
366.2 



1,078.1 
865.8 



2,987.4 
2,356.5 



389.3 
297.0 



634.2 
508.7 



500.3 
340.6 



1,817.6 
1,304.1 



33.4 
32.4 



233.8 
213.7 



346.3 
292.2 



25.3 

13.1 



153.6 
138.3 



14.1 
16.8 



162.8 
156.7 



87.8 
53.8 



50.0 
89.8 



134.1 
94.1 



6.2 
8.6 



31.1 
30.2 



43.0 
33.8 



86.4 
87.9 



421 
384 



1,190 
946 



3,222. 
2,583. 



450 
334 



7 92 
619 



529 
362 



2,020. 
1,460. 



401.9 
366.1 



1,078.1 
865.8 



2,987.4 
2,356.5 



389.3 
297.0 



634.2 
508.7 



500.3 
340.6 



1,817.6 
1.304.1 



19.2 
18.3 



112.6 
80.8 



234.9 
227.3 



61.6 
37.9 



158.7 
110.3 



29.4 
22.2 



203.1 
156.7 



95 
95 



91 
91 



93 
91 



86 
89 



80 
82 



94 
94 



90 
89 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than round- 
ing) in computer operations. See appendix, Explanation of Terms, for discussion of items. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 

companies . 

'For industry 2034, figures relate to value of shipments rather than value of production. 



20C-18 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 5B Industry-Product Analysis— Production by Product Class and Industry: 1967 



In millions of dollars. This table shows where products of an industry (referred to as primary and 
listed in table 6A) are made and what products are made by establishments classified in an 
industry. Read down an industry column to find what products are produced in an industry. Read 
across to determine where the products of the industries in this chapter are produced. To the 



extent that some of the primary products are made by industries not included in this chapter, the 
value of such shipments is shown in the "other industries" column. The specific other industries 
are listed at the end of the table if they account for more than $2 million of the products primary 
to this chapter. 



Product 
code 



Class of products, industry, 
and miscellaneous receipts 



All 

industries 



Canned 

and 

cured 

seafoods 

(SIC 2031) 



Canned 
specialties 
(SIC 2032) 



Canned 

fruits 

and 

vegetables 

(SIC 2033) 



Dehydrated 

food 

products 

(SIC 2034) 



Pickles, 
sauces, and 
salad dress- 
ing (SIC 2035) 



Fresh or 

frozen 

packaged 

fish 
(SIC 2036) 



Frozen 
fruits and 
vegetables 
(SIC 2037) 



Other 
industries 



2031- 
2032- 
20321 
20323 
20322 
20324 
20320 

2033- 
20331 
20332 

20333 
20334 

20335 
20336 
20338 
20330 



2034- 
20341 
20342 
20340 

2035- 
20352 
20353 
20354 

20350 



2036- 
20361 



20360 

2037- 
20371 
20372 
20373 
20370 



2013- 
2015- 
2022- 
204 2- 
2043- 
2045- 
2051- 
2071- 
2086- 
2087- 
2094- 
2096- 
2099- 
2899- 



93000 
99989 
99980 



Total shipments and miscellaneous receipts 



Canned and cured seafoods 

Canned specialties 

Canned baby foods (except meat ] 
Canned dry beans 



} 



Soups and other canned specialties and 
canned nationality foods, n.s.k 



Canned fruits and vegetables 

Canned fruits ( except baby foods ) 

Canned vegetables (except hominy and 

mushrooms J 

Canned hominy and mushrooms 

Canned fruit juices, nectars, and 

concentrates 

Canned vegetable juices 

Catsup and other tomato sauces 

Jams, jellies, and preserves 

Canned fruits and vegetables, preserves, 

jams and jellies, n.s.k 



Dehydrated fruits, vegetables and soup mixes. 
Dried fruits and vegetables, except soups.. 

Soup mixes, dried 

Dried and dehydrated food products, n.s.k.. 



Pickles, sauces, and salad dressing 

Pickles and other pickled products 

Meat sauces ( except tomato ) 

Mayonnaise, salad dressings, and sandwich 

spreads 

Pickled fruits and vegetables, sauces, and 

salad dressing products, n.s.k 



Fresh or frozen packaged fish 

Frozen packaged fish and other seafood, 

including soup 

Fresh packaged fish and other seafood, 

n.s.k 

Fresh or frozen packaged fish, n.s.k.... 

Frozen fruits and vegetables 

Frozen fruits, juices, and ades 

Frozen vegetables 

Frozen specialties 

Frozen fruits, fruit juices, vegetables, 
and specialties, n.s.k 



Other product shipments by 4-digit 
product group 



Meat processing plant products 

Poultry dressing plants products 

Cheese, natural and processed 

Prepared feeds 

Cereal preparations 

Blended and prepared flour 

Bread, cake, and related products. . . . 

Confectionery products 

Bottled and canned soft drinks 

Flavoring extracts and sirups, n.e.c. 

Animal and marine fats and oils 

Shortening and cooking oils 

Food preparations, n.e.c 

Chemical preparations, n.e.c 

Other secondary products 



Miscellaneous receipts 

Commission receipts 

Resales 

Other miscellaneous receipts. 



(X) 

421.1 

1,190.7 

246.3 

246 . 1 

698.3 



124.3 

450.9 

344.9 

76.4 

29.6 

792.9 

260.6 

98.5 

373.9 

59.9 

5 29.7 

383.9 

66.6 
79.2 

2,020.7 
419.5 
579.9 
889.4 

131.9 



(X) 
(X) 

(x) 

(X) 
(X) 

(x) 

(X) 

(x) 
(x) 
(x) 
(x) 
(x) 
(x) 
(x) 

(X) 
(X) 

(x) 
(x) 

(X) 



523.1 

401.9 

2.6 

(under 2) 



(2-5) 



3,222.3 


(under 2) 


818.3 


(under 2) 


957.5 


_ 


51.6 


- 


413.5 


_ 


104.2 


- 


507.7 


- 


245.2 


- 



(under 2) 
(under 2) 

10.1 

(5-10) 
(2-5) 



3.8 
(under 2) 



87.8 
4.1 

83.3 
0.4 



1,361.9 

(10-20) 

1,071.8 

227.9 

189.8 



92.8 

(2-5) 

24.5 

(2-5) 

(under 2) 

(20-50) 

27.3 

(under 2) 



1.4 
(under 2) 
(under 2) 



18.0 

(under 2) 

17.4 

(under 2) 

(under 2) 

(over 2) 

( over 2 ) 



41.7 
( over 2 ) 

(under 2) 
(10-20) 
(20-50) 



(2-5) 
(Z) 



13.0 

(under 2) 

0.5 

50.0 
0.4 

49.3 
0.3 



3,467.8 

(under 2) 
64.0 
12.2 
39.8 

12.0 

2,987.4 
805.5 

916.1 
47.8 

344.5 

69.6 

469.4 

211.3 

123.2 

5.8 
5.8 



45.0 

18.6 

6.6 

19.8 



108.7 

83.4 

15.8 

9.4 

0.1 



(under 2) 

(under 2) 

(Z) 

9.5 

(over 2) 

(under 2) 

(under 2) 

7.4 

34.3 

12.8 

(under 2) 

42.7 

(5-10) 

1.2 

134.1 

10.8 

120.2 

3.1 



420.8 

(under 2) 
(under 2) 

(under 2) 

(under 2) 
(under 2) 



389.3 

311.9 

51.1 

26.3 

0.4 

( under 2 ) 

(under 2) 



(over 2) 

( over 2 ) 
( over 2 ) 



(under 2) 

(under 2) 

(under 2) 

(over 2) 

(2-5) 

(under 2) 

6.2 
1.6 
3.7 
0.9 



(over 2) 
9.4 



(5-10) 

4.4 



20.1 

(under 2) 



(under 2) 

(under 2) 

(2-5) 

14.5 

(under 2) 

(10-20) 

(5-10) 

(10-20) 



634.2 

237.2 

67.6 

269.9 



(Z) 



(2-5) 

(under 2) 

(over 2) 

(over 2) 



(2-5) 

(under 2) 

6.7 

(under 2) 

48.9 

32.6 

6.8 

31.1 
(Z) 

28.9 
2.2 



557.4 
6.2 



(under 2) 
(under 2) 



(under 2) 
(under 2) 



500.3 
362.0 



59.2 
79.1 



(under 2) 



(under 2) 
(under 2) 



(z) 
(z) 
(z) 



(over 2) 

1.0 

(under 2) 

0.7 

43.0 
4.2 

37.9 
0.9 



2,066.8 

(over 2) 

(5-10) 

( over 2 ) 

(2-5) 

47.2 
3.8 



33.7 
(under 2) 
(under 2) 
( under 2 ) 

(under 2) 

11.1 
11.1 



(under 2) 
(under 2) 
(under 2) 

(z) 

(under 2) 

(10-20) 

10.6 

(over 2) 



1,817.6 
331.5 
554.3 
800.2 

131.6 



3.7 
15.5 

8.0 

(2-5) 

5.1 

over 2) 

11.5 

(5-10) 

over 2) 



(10-20) 
4.1 
2.6 

86.4 

21 .3 

61.1 

4.0 



(X) 

1.4 
27.6 

(5-10) 
(10-10) 

14.0 

71.2 
3.9 

6.9 
(under 2) 

32.2 
0.8 
8.5 

18.4 

(under 2) 

24.6 

10.3 

11.0 

3.3 

94.5 

(2-5) 
6.5 

83.5 

(under 2) 

0.1 



0.1 

(50-100) 
4.6 

(5-10) 
60.2 

0.2 



(X) 

(x) 
(x) 
(x) 
(x) 

(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 
(X) 

(X) 
(X) 

(x) 
(x) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-19 



table 5B Industry-Product Analysis— Production by Product Class and Industry: 1967-Continued 



Code 


Class of products, industry, 
and miscellaneous receipts 


Other 
industries 


Code 


Class of products, industry, 
and miscellaneous receipts 


Other 
industries 


2032- 


Listing of the other industries with 

over $2 million shipments of the 

primary products 


15.6 

(over 2) 

(5-10) 

22.5 
3.4 

13.1 
9.6 
7.5 
6.8 

3.3 

4.5 
(over 2) 


2034- 
2034- 
2034- 
2035- 
2035- 
2035- 

2037- 
2037- 
2037- 
2037- 
2037- 
2037- 
2037- 


Listing of the other industries with 

over ■I*' 2 million shipments of the 

primary products — Continued 

2095 Roasted coffee 


3.4 


2032- 




6.1 


2032- 




2095 Roasted coffee 


4.8 
7.0 


2033- 




64.1 


2033- 




15 .8 


2033- 
2033- 


2095 Roasted coffee 


8.4 


2033- 




7.7 


2033- 






6.7 






(2-5) 


2034- 




32.6 


2034- 




(2 5) 


2034- 




(5-10) 









Note: Data shown parenthetically above are expressed in millions of dollars. Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent 
rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) in computer operations. 



Standard notes: 
companies . 



Represents zero. 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NAJ Not available. 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



20C-20 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 6A. Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Production by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963 

(Includes quantity and value of the products reported not only by establishments classified in this industry, but also by establishments classified in other industries, and shipping these products 

as "secondary" products. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms, "Value of shipments") 



Product 
code 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total production (pack) 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
[million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



20310 11 
20310 31 
20310 00 
20310 02 



CANNED AND CURED SEAFOODS, TOTAL. 



Million lbs. 



Canned seafood: 

As reported in the census of manufactures. 



Canned fish and other seafood, except soups, stews, and 

chowders, total 

Canned seafood soups, stews, and chowders (turtle soup, 

oyster stew, clam chowder, etc.) 

Canned seafood, n.s.k. (For companies with 10 or more 

employees. See Note. ) 

Canned seafood, n.s.k. (For companies with less than 10 

employees. See Note.) 



. . .do. 

. . .do. 
. . .do. 
... do . 



As reported in "Canned Fishery Products, 1967" collected by the 
Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior 1 



.do. 



Finf ish, total 

Salmon 

Sardines ( Maine and Pacific ) , 

Tuna (solid, chunks, flakes and grated) and tuna specialties. 

Mackerel 

Gef ilte fish 

Fish roe and caviar 

Fishcakes (principally ground fish) 

Other finf ish 



.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 



Shellfish, total 

Crabmeat and crabmeat specialties 

Shrimp and shrimp specialties (drained weight) 

Oyster and oyster specialties (drained weight) 

Clams (whole, minced, chowder, juice) (drained weight' 
Other shellfish 



.do. . . 

.do. . . 
.do. . . 
.do. . . 
.do. . , 
.do. . , 
.do. . , 



20310 51 
20310 71 



20310 81 
20310 85 



2032- — 

20321 — 

20321 11 

20321 31 
20321 51 

20321 61 
20321 65 
20321 98 



20323 71 

20323 72 
20323 73 

20323 74 
20323 75 
20323 76 
20323 79 



20323 82 
20323 84 
See fo 



Cured fish and other seafood 

Smoked salmon 

Other smoked fish (herring, whitefish, chub, Cisco, etc. 

Salted and pickled fish (including sun-dried): 

Sold for further processing 

Sold as finished products ready for consumption 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



. .do. 
, .do. 



CANNED SPECIALTIES, TOTAL 

Canned baby foods (except meat), total 1 
Fruits 



Vegetables 

Desserts (including dessert-fruit combinations). 

Juices : 

4.1 oz . to 7 oz 



Million pounds 
net weight . . . 

...do 

...do 



Other sizes. 



Other canned baby foods, except meat, cereal, and biscuits, 
including vegetable and vegetable meat soups, etc 



Million cases 

of 24 

...do 



Canned dry beans, total. 



Beans with pork, including baked: . 

7.1 oz. to 10 oz. (8 oz. short, 8 oz . tall, etc.). 



10.1 oz. to 13 oz. (No. 1 picnic, etc.) 

13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc.). 



Million pounds 
net weight . . . 

Million cases. 

Million cases 
of 48 

...do 

Million cases 
of 24 



18.1 oz. to 22 oz. (No. 2, etc.) 

22.1 oz. to 27 oz. (Jumbo, etc.) 

27.1 oz. to 40 oz . (No. 2-1/2, quart glass, etc. 
Other sizes 



.do. 



Beans with sauce, vegetarian style, including baked: 
13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc.) 



Other sizes 

otnotes at end of table. 



...do 

...do 

Million cases . 



Million cases 

of 24 

Million cases. 



(X) 
(NA) 

(na) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

698.7 

5.68.3 
99.5 
29.3 



392 

12 

14 

2 



130.5 
11.0 
17.8 
16.3 
65.7 
19.6 

42.8 
7.1 



11.4 
15.5 



(X) 



157.1 
149.1 
169.6 



284.0 
69.9 



3 


.0 


1 


2 


16 


9 


6. 


7 


7 





4 


3 



7.5 
1.1 



421.1 

386.7 

307.6 

22 .4 

49.1 

7.6 

445.7 

368.8 
76.1 
13.9 
263.0 
2.4 
4.8 
3.5 

5.3 

76.9 
16.6 
24.7 
10.1 
21.7 
3.7 

34.4 
10.9 

7.4 



7.6 
8.5 



1,190.7 
246.3 



47.9 
35.3 
50.4 



93.0 
246.1 



12 


.1 


6 


1 


48 


3 


28 





31 


3 


16 


7 



20.4 
4.5 



523 .5 
90.4 



725.5 

617.7 

157.9 

40.9 

329.0 

57.4 

15.0 

2.6 

2.4 

12 .6 

107.8 
7.9 
16.3 
14.5 
57.6 
11.4 

98.7 

8.6 

20.9 



39.8 
29.5 



(X) 
(X) 



'268.5 
r 103.1 
r 88.4 



322.7 
63.9 



2.2 
0.9 

18.6 
4.8 
0.8 
7.1 
3.9 



2.9 
2.3 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-21 



table 6A. Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Production by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 

Includes quantity and value of the products reported not only by establishments classified in this industry, but also by establishments classified in other industries, and shipping these products 

as " secondary" products. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms, "Value of shipments") 



Product 
code 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total production (pack) 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



2032- 


— 


20323 


- 


20323 


86 


20323 


91 


20323 


00 


20322 





20324 


— 


20320 


— 


20322 


53 


20322 


55 


20322 


59 


20324 


25 


20324 


29 


20324 


32 


20324 


33 


20324 


34 


20324 


68 


20324 


91 


20324 


93 


20324 


94 


20324 


95 


20324 


98 


2033- 


— 


20331 


~ 


20331 


12 


20331 


13 


20331 


14 



20331 15 
20331 18 

20331 22 



20331 24 

20331 25 

20331 26 

20331 27 

20331 31 



20331 32 
20331 33 



CANNED SPECIALITIES--Contlnued 

CANNED DRY BEANS--Continued 

Beans, all other dry varieties, including chili con carne: 
13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc.) 



Other sizes 

Canned dry beans, n.s.k. 



Soups and other canned specialties and canned nationality 
foods n.s.k., total 



Canned soups: 

9 oz . and under. 



9.1 oz. to 13 oz. 



Other sizes. 



Spaghetti with meat: 

13.1 oz. to 17 oz. (no. 300, etc.). 



Other sizes. 



Spaghetti without meat: 

13 oz. and under (No. 1 picnic, etc.). 

13.1 oz. to 17 oz. (no. 300, etc.).... 



Other sizes 

Chinese foods (bean sprouts, chop suey, etc.) 

Mincemeat 

Spanish foods (Mexican rice, tortillas, enchiladas) 

Ravioli 

Macaroni and spaghetti dinners made from purchased noodle 

produc ts 

Other canned specialities (other than canned meats) 



CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, TOTAL*. 
Canned fruits (except baby foods), total. 

Apples, excluding pie mix 

Applesauce 5 



13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc. 



Other sizes . . . 

8Z 

No. 2-1/2. . . 

No. 10 

Other sizes. 



Apricots 

Berries, except cranberries 

Cherries, red pitted, excluding pie mix 5 

No. 2 

No . 300 

No. 10 

Other sizes 



Sweet cherries. 



Cranberries and cranberry sauce: 

13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc.). 
Other sizes 

Figs 

Grapefruit segments 5 

No . 2 

No . 8Z short and tall 

No . 303 

No . 3 cyl inder 

Other sizes 



Fruit cocktail 5 

13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc.). 



Other sizes 

No. 2-1/2 

No. 8Z short and tall. 

No . 2 

No. 10 

Other sizes 



Million cases 

of 24 

Million cases. . . 

. . .do 



Million cases 
of 48 

Million cases 
of 24 

Million cases . . 



Million cases 

of 24 

Million cases . . . 



Million cases 
of 48 

Million cases 
of 24 

Million cases . . 



. . .do 

Million pounds.. 
Million cases . . . 

. . .do 



. .do. 
. . . do . 



1,000 cases. 
... do 



. . .do 

1,000 cases of 24 

1,000 cases 

. .do 

. . do 

. . do 

. .do 



. .do. 
. .do. 

. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 



. .do. 
. .do. 



.do. 

.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



1,000 cases of 24 



1,000 cases. 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 



13.4 
6.7 

3 2.1 



(X) 



(NA) 



(X) 

161,123 

5,269 

26,538 
10,652 

15,886 

1,061 

( 6 ) 

3,462 

11,183 

5,229 
892 

1,118 

616 

502 

1,614 

(D) 

(D) 

588 
4,898 

243 

3,735 

920 

20,779 
11,784 

8,995 
4,483 
2,099 
170 
2,209 
34 



41.3 
30.0 



3,253.3 

818.3 

28.5 

95.9 
35.9 

60.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
25.1 
5.7 

11.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

12.5 

(D) 
(D) 

2.7 

22.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

109.9 
58.2 

51.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



13.8 
5.4 



(X) 



3.1 

1.2 



(Z) 



(X) 



(X) 

156,152 

4,034 

20,949 
12,011 

8,938 

661 

482 

2,217 

5,577 

5,725 
936 

1,771 

1,015 

730 

26 

1,006 



609 
4,392 

184 
3,733 

475 

19,022 
10,604 

8,418 
4,756 
1,599 
219 
1,776 
68 



34.9 
18.5 

3.1 



15.2 
5.9 



1.4 



5.5 


14.4 


2.7 


10.5 


6.0 


23.5 


16.0 


4.6 



721.7 



66.3 
36.8 

29.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

29.1 
6.2 

10.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

5.4 



27.4 



17.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

92.0 
44.8 

47.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20C-22 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 6A Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Production by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 

(Includes quantity and value of the products reported not only by establishments classified in this industry, but also by establishments classified in other industries, and shipping these products 

as " secondary" products. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms, "Value of shipments") 



Product 
code 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total shipments including interplant transfers 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



20331 — 
20331 34 



20331 41 
20331 43 
20331 45 



20331 47 
20331 49 



20331 52 
20331 53 



20331 54 
20331 57 



20331 61 
20331 63 
20331 65 
20331 69 

20331 98 
20331 00 



20332 01 
20332 02 



20332 04 
20332 05 



20332 08 
20332 09 



20332 11 
20332 12 



20332 21 
20332 22 



20332 25 
20332 26 



20332 36 
20332 37 



CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES--Continued 

Fruits for salads, including mixed fruits other than fruit 
cocktail 



Olives, ripe and green ripe, including stuffed: 

5 oz. or less (4 oz., etc.) 

5.1 oz. to 15 oz. (No. 303, pint glass, No. 1 tall, etc. 
Other sizes 



Peaches, including spiced, excluding pie mix 5 

27.1 oz. to 40 oz. (No. 2-1/2, quart glass, etc. 

Other sizes 

8Z short and tall 

No. 303, 300 and No. 1 tall 

No. 10 

Other sizes 



Pears, including spiced: 

27.1 oz. to 40 oz. (No. 2-1/2 quart glass, etc.). 
Other sizes 



Plums (purple and other types, excluding canned dried 

prunes ) 

Pineapple (all styles) 



Canned fruit pie mixes: 

Apple 

Cherry 

Peaches 

Other fruit pie mixes. 



Other canned fruit... 
Canned fruits, n.s.k. 



Canned vegetables (except hominy and mushrooms) total. 

Asparagus 5 

13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc.) 



Other sizes 

No . 2 

8Z tall 

No. 1 picnic and 211 cylinder. 

300 x 509 

No . 5 squat 

No. 10 

Other si zes 



Beans, fresh lima 

Beans, green and wax (except Blue Lake): 
13.1 oz.to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc. 
Other sizes 



Beans, Blue Lake: 

13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc' 
Other sizes 



Beets: 

13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc. 
Other sizes 



Carrots . 



Sweet corn, whole kernel: 

13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc.). 
Other s i zes 



Sweet corn, cream style: 

13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc.). 
Other sizes 



Vegetable combinations (mixed vegetables, succotash, carrots 
and peas, vegetable salad, etc. and other combinations) 



Green peas 5 

13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (No. 300, No. 303, etc.). 



Other sizes . . . . 
8Z 

No. 1 picnic . 

No. 10 

Other sizes . . 



1,000 cases. 



1,000 cases of 48 

. . .do 

1,000 cases 



. . .do 

1,000 cases of 24 

1,000 cases 

. . .do 

. . .do 

. . .do 

. ..do 



1,000 cases of 24 
1,000 cases 



.do. 
.do. 



1,000 cases. 

. . .do 

. . .do 

. . .do 



. . .do. 
. . .do. 



1,000 cases 

. ..do 

1,000 cases of 24 

1,000 cases 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 



.do. 



1,000 cases of 24 
1,000 cases 



1,000 cases of 24 
1,000 cases 



1,000 cases of 24 
1,000 cases 



1,000 cases of 24 
1,000 cases 



1,000 cases of 24 
1,000 cases 



1,000 cases of 24 



1,000 cases. 

. . .do 

. . .do 

. . .do 

. . .do 



3,461 

(NA) 
2,144 



31,956 
18,547 

13,409 

1,670 

6,385 

5,403 

191 



4,419 
4,319 



2,019 
18,417 



1,326 

2,604 

746 

3,039 

2,984 
3 3.940 

243,164 
7,518 
4„ 994 

2,214 
170 
327 
576 
74 
269 
380 
418 

4,338 

22,305 
4,664 



11,583 
5,382 



8,191 
2,917 



6,540 



15,777 
13,972 



15,588 
3,313 



7,280 

34,870 
27,569 

7,066 
3,121 

3,618 
327 



5.2 

23.3 

7.2 

166.9 
101.3 

65.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



29.6 
25.8 



8.3 
99.4 



5.8 
16.0 

3.9 
15.1 

12.1 
19.9 

957.5 
58.3 
38.1 

17.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

20.7 

74 .3 
17.5 



46.1 
25.3 



22.7 
8.9 



62.7 
64.6 



61.2 
14.2 



137.2 
108.0 

29.2 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,041 
2,353 
1,408 

36,429 
24,176 

12,253 

1,360 

6,262 

4,472 

159 



4,069 
3,674 



1,268 
19,224 



1,612 
3,211 
1,945 
2,770 

5,866 
3 1,965 

233,203 
8,988 
5,749 

3,239 

542 
340 
1,005 
256 
185 
427 
484 

3,153 

15,567 
4,932 



10,591 
3,723 



3,535 
4,394 



7 22,433 
4,899 



7 15,576 
2,239 



7,240 



34 


565 


26 


833 


7 


732 


3 


580 


4 


036 




166 



24.7 
10.3 

162.8 
115.7 

47.1 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



26.1 
19.9 



5.2 
94.7 



5.9 
12.8 

8.6 
13.6 

20.2 
9.1 

767.6 
55.8 
33.6 

22.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

10.8 



47 





16 


8 


42 





15 





22 


8 


8 


9 



11.4 



65.8 
14.9 



39.8 
6.2 



117.5 
90.3 

27.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



CANNED. CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-23 



table 6A Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Production by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 

(Includes quantity and value of the products repotted not only by establishments classified in this industry, but also by establishments classified in other industries, and shipping these products 

as "secondary" products. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms, " Value of shipments") 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total shipments including interplant transfers 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES —Continued 

Canned vegetables — Continued 

Other peas (blackeye, crowder, purple hull, field, etc. 

Pumpkin and squash pie mix 

Pumpkin and squash, except pie mix 



Spinach 5 

8Z 

No, 1 picnic 
No. 303 and 300. 

No. 2-1/2 

No. 10 

Other sizes 



Other leafy greens (turnip, kale, mustard, etc. 

No . 303 and 300 

No. 2-1/2 

No. 10 



Tomatoes 

13.1 oz. to 18 oz. 
Other sizes 

No . 2 

8Z 

No. 1 picnic. . . . 

No. 2-1/2 

No. 10 

Other sizes 



(No. 300, No. 303, etc.). 



Pimentos 

Sweet potatoes.. 
White potatoes. . ^^^ 



Sauerkraut 5 . 
No . 2 



No. 300. 
No. 303. 



2-1/2. 
10. . . . 



No. 

No. 

Other sizes. 



Other canned vegetables.. 
Canned vegetables, n.s.k. 



Canned hominy and mushrooms, total. 



Hominy . 



Mushrooms : 5 

4 oz. or less (2Z, etc.).... 
4.1 oz. to 8 oz. (4Z, etc.). 
8.1 oz. to 17 oz. (8Z, etc.) 
Other sizes 



Canned hominy and mushrooms, n.s.k. 



Canned fruit juices, nectars, and concentrates, total. 



Apple juice 5 

No. 211 cylinder. 
No. 3 cylinder. . . 

24-26Z glass 

32Z glass 

64Z glass 

1 gallon jug 

Other sizes 



Grape juice: 

22.1 oz. to 27 oz. (24 oz. glass, etc. 

Other sizes, including glass gallons.. 
Pineapple juice 



Grapefruit juice 5 ... 
Individual-5Z, 6Z. 

No . 2 

No. 211 cylinder.. 
No. 3 cylinder. . . . 

No. 10 

Other sizes 



1,000 cases. 

. . .do 

. . . do 



. . .do. 
, . .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

..do. 

. .do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



. . .do 

1,000 cases of 24 
1,000 cases 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



.do. 

.do. 

-..do. 



1,000 cases. 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 



.do. 
.do. 



1,000 cases of 48 

. ..do 

... do 

... do 

. . .do 



1,000 cases. 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 

.do 



1,000 cases of 12 



1,000 cases. 



. . .do 

1,000 cases of 48 
1,000 cases of 24 

. ..do 

1,000 cases of 12 
1,000 cases of 6. 
1,000 cases 



2,610 

995 

2,627 

6,993 

505 

68 

3,989 
954 

1,477 



3,021 

1,934 

261 

826 

29,821 

16,346 

13,457 

123 

423 

515 

4,893 

7,406 

97 

1,872 
8,208 
5,010 

6,865 

( 8 ) 

348 

2,139 

1,634 

947 

1,797 

8,364 
3 3,300 

7,547 
2,473 



2,255 
1,137 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(X) 

9,358 

28 

2,751 

51 

3,853 

619 

759 

1,297 



11,960 

14,763 

2,434 

1,443 

106 

10,673 

107 



7.8 
3.1 
8.2 

20.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



8.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

125.8 
60.9 
64.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

9.0 
36.6 
15.4 

25.1 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

30.7 
13.2 



19.1 

13.7 

2.7 

10.8 



413.5 

27.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



26.5 

39.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



2,123 

554 

2,433 

6,558 

413 

151 

3,987 

1,076 



2,760 

1,921 

212 

627 

24,566 

12,649 

11,917 

227 

310 

501 

4,706 

5,958 

215 

1,352 
8,020 
4,078 

7,524 
308 
625 
2,784 
2,084 
865 
858 

9,825 
3 11,767 

5,358 
2,577 



1,394 
586 

142 
582 

3 77 

(X) 

8,031 
44 

2,619 
107 

2,821 
449 
688 

1,085 

7 205 

(NA) 

11,919 

8,828 

1,213 

1,563 

33 

5,900 

67 

52 



6.1 
1.8 
6.7 

18.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

5.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

86.9 
39.9 

47.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

5.9 

35.6 

9.8 

19.6 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

35.2 
38.7 



12.4 
6.4 
3.4 

10.6 

0.6 

380.5 

18.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

13.8 
11.9 

24.9 

25.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20C-24 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 6A. Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Production by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 

(Includes quantity and value of the products reported not only by establishments classified in this industry, but also by establishments classified in other industries, and shipping these products 

as "secondary" products. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms, "Value of shipments") 



Product 
code 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total shipments including interplant transfers 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



2033- 
20334 

20334 
20334 - 



20334 
20334 



20334 


75 


20334 


76 


20334 


77 


20334 


79 


20334 


85 


20334 


89 


20334 


91 


20334 


00 


20335 






20335 
20335 



20335 
20335 



20336 


13 


20336 


19 


20336 


33 


20336 


39 



CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES . —Continued 
Canned fruit juices, nectars, and concentrates — Continued 



Orange juice, single strength 5 

40.1 oz. to 60 oz. (No. 3 cylinder, etc. 



Other sizes 

4Z 

Individual 5Z, 6Z. 
No. 211 cylinder.. 

No . 2 

No. 10 

Other sizes 



Grapeiruit-orange juice blend 5 

Individual 5-6Z 

No . 2 

No. 3 cylinder 

No. 211 cylinder 

Other sizes 



Grapefruit-pineapple juice blend. 



Prune juice: 
Quart glass. 
Other sizes. 



Other whole fruit juices and mixtures of whole fruit juices. 



•Nectars : 

4.1 oz. to 7 oz. (6Z., etc.) 

7.1 oz. to 13 oz. (No. 12 cylinder, 12Z., etc. 

40.1 oz. to 60 oz. (No. 3 cylinder) 

Other sizes 



Fruit juices, concentrated, hot pack: 

4.1 oz. to 7 oz 

Other sizes and bulk 



Fruit juices, fresh, to be kept under refrigeration 

(orange, grape, etc.) 

Canned fruit juices, n.s.k 



Canned vegetable juices, total 

Tomato juice (including combinations containing 70 percent 
or more tomato juice ) 5 



40.1 oz. to 60 oz. (No. 3 cylinder, etc. 



Other sizes 

Individual 5Z, 6Z 

8Z 

No. 211 cylinder 

No. 300 and 303 and 303x500 (17-1/2) 

No . 2 

No. 10 

Other tin and other glass 



Other vegetable juices 

Canned vegetable juices, n.s.k. 



Catsup and other tomato sauces, total. 



Tomato sauce, except catsup and chili sauce (excluding pulp, 
puree, or paste): 

7.1 oz. to 10 oz. (8 oz. short, 8 oz. tall, etc.) 

Other sizes 

Catsup 5 

13.1 oz. to 18 oz. (14 oz. glass bottle, etc.) 



Other sizes 

12 oz. glass 

18, 20, and 24 oz. glass. 
Other sizes 



Chili sauce 5 . . . 
12 oz. glass. 
No. 10 tin. . . 
Other sizes . . 



1,000 cases. . . 
1,000 cases of 12 



1,000 cases. . . 
1,000 cases of 24 

. . .do 

. . .do 

. . .do 

1,000 cases of 6 
1,000 cases of 12 



1,000 cases. . . 
1,000 cases of 24 

. . .do 

1,000 cases of 12 
1,000 cases of 24 
1,000 cases. . . 



.do. 



1,000 cases of 12 
1,000 cases. . . 



1,000 cases of 48 
. . .do 

1,000 cases of 12 
1,000 cases 



1,000 cases of 48 
1,000 gallons. . . . 



. . .do. 



1,000 cases 

. . .do 

1,000 cases of 12 



1,000 cases. 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 

. .do 



. .do. 

. .do. 



1,000 cases of 72 
1,000 cases 



. .do 

1,000 cases of 24 



1,000 cases. 

. . .do 

. . .do 

. . .do 



. . .do. 
. . .do. 
... do . 
.. .do. 



18,288 
8,845 

9,447 
4,450 
2,708 
266 
1,774 

249 

2,839 

43 

274 

2,508 

14 



6,562 



4,690 
4,028 



1,182 

1,143 
999 



12,457 

15 9,304 

(X) 

32,875 

31,681 

17,835 

13,846 

6,247 

1,258 
1,491 
1,016 
256 
3,578 

847 
3 347 



11,355 
13,842 

42,134 
18,246 

23,5 98 

792 

15,985 

6,821 

2,758 

1,918 

569 

271 



( 



48.5 
25.8 

22.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

7.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

17.4 



20.0 
20.3 



3.6 
2.6 



119.2 
12.4 

104.2 

100.8 

53.1 

47.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

2.3 
1.1 



63.4 
67.8 

200.7 

84.1 

115.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

11.8 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



17,164 
8,825 

8,937 

5,058 

1,349 

89 

2,368 

18 

55 

2,122 

22 

266 

1,585 

9 

240 

8,004 



5,438 
3,460 

8,928 



524 

871 

1,076 

1,334 



375 

19,678 



50,700 

(X) 

34,854 

33,331 

19,334 

13,977 
4,276 

109 
1,414 
2,324 
2,324 

294 
3,127 

1,125 
3 398 

72,340 



8,783 
10,558 

33,313 
20,448 

12,865 
1,194 
8,657 
3,014 

2,900 

2,280 

496 

124 



See footnotes at end of table. 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-25 



table 6A Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Production by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 

Includes quantity and value of the products reported not only by establishments classified in this industry, but also by establishments classified in other industries, and shipping these products 

as "secondary* products. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms, 'Value of shipments") 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total shipments including interplant transfers 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 

(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES — Con. 
Catsup and other tomato sauces — Con. 
Tomato paste: 



4.1 oz. to 7 oz. (6 i 
100.1 oz. to 115 oz. 
Other sizes 



z. , etc. ) . 
(No. 10).. 



Tomato pulp and puree: 5 

13 oz. and under (No. 1 picnic, etc.)... 
13.1 oz. to 27 oz. (No. 303, No. 2, etc. 

27.1 oz. to 31 oz. (No. 2-1/2, etc.) 

100.1 oz. to 115 oz. (No. 10) 

Other sizes 



Barbecue sauce: 
7.1 oz. to 10 oz. 
Other sizes 



Catsup and other tomato sauces, n.s.k. 



Jams, jellies, and preserves. 
Jams and preserves, pure: 

Strawberry 

Other 



Jellies, pure: 

Grape 

Other 



Imitation jellies, jams and preserves 

Marmalades 

Fruit butter 

Maraschino cherries (excluding glace and candied) 
Jams, jellies, and preserves, n.s.k 



Canned fruits and vegetables, preserves, jams, and jellies, 
n.s.k., (For companies with 10 or more employees. See Note). 

Canned fruits and vegetables, preserves, jams, and jellies, 
n.s.k., (For companies with less than 10 employees. See Note 



DEHYDRATED FRUITS, VEGETABLES, AND SOUP MIXES, TOTAL 4 . 
Dried fruits and vegetables, except soup mixes 



Fruits, dried and dehydrated: 

Raisins 

Prunes 

Figs 

Dates 

Apples 

Other dried and dehydrated fruits. 



Vegetables, dried and dehydrated: 
Potatoes : 

Consumer sizes (1 pound and under). 
Connnercial sizes (over 1 pound).... 



Other dried and dehydrated vegetables. 



Dried or dehydrated fruit and vegetables and freeze-dried 
products (except soups), n.s.k 



Soup mixes (dried and dehydrated ) 

Dried and dehydrated foods products, n.s.k. (For companies 

with 10 or more employees. See Note. ) 

Dried and dehydrated foods products, n.s.k. (For companies with 

less than 10 employees. See Note.) 



1,000 cases of 4S 
1,000 cases of 6. 
1,000 cases 



1,000 cases of 48 
1,000 cases of 24 

. . .do 

1,000 cases of 6. 
1,000 cases 



. . .do. 
. . .do. 



} 



Million 
. . .do. . 


pounds . . . 


. . .do 


. . .do 


. . .do 


. . .do 


. . .do 


Million 


gallons . . 



Million pounds. 
. . .do 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



. .do. 
. .do. 



. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 



3,768 
2,304 
7,627 



484 

540 

1,473 

4,405 

331 



(X) 

(x) 

118.5 
289.7 



166.8 
146.6 

40.0 

14.8 

42.7 

4.9 

(X) 



(X) 
(X) 

1,442.2 
1,268.8 



402. 2 

288.3 

21. 4 

( 9 ) 
33.1 
9 50.8 



110.6 
211. 8 

136.0 

3 14.6 

79. 2 

3 83.3 

3 10.9 



23.3 
22.7 
55.1 



2.3 

2.4 



25.8 
1.7 



4.4 
245.2 



35.1 
81.7 



38.8 
40.0 

6.0 

3.8 

6.9 

21.7 

11.2 



107.8 
16.5 



} 



450 


9 


344 


9 


75 

64 

4 

( 


9 
9 
3 

') 


16 
9 28 


9 

1 



38. 2 

41. 6 

71. 

4. 
76. 4 
26.1 

3 



:: 



4,183 
1,939 
4,416 



432 

920 

1,068 

2,426 

966 



C) 

( 8 ) 

3 436 

(X) 

125.5 
293.1 



129.2 
173.1 

25.9 

22,1 

52.5 

5.6 

(X) 



(X) 

1,191.6 
1,124.2 



373.1 

329.3 

32.6 

( 9 ) 
33.2 
9 82.5 



57.5 
109.7 

95.3 

3 10.9 

46.5 

3 20.9 



17.4 
13.2 
26.2 



1.8 
3.3 
4.9 
9.5 
4.3 



1.8 
227.3 



35.7 
71.9 



29.1 
38.9 

3.9 

4.5 

7.8 

19.4 

16.0 



334.9 
284.5 



67.3 

69.0 

6.5 

( 9 ) 

10.5 

9 32.5 



18.7 
23.8 

53.4 

2.8 
44.5 

5.9 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20C-26 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 6A. Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Production by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 

(Includes quantity and value of the products reported not only by establishments classified in this industry, but also by establishments classified in other industries, and shipping these products 

as "secondary products. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms, "Value of shipments") 



Product 
code 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total production (pack) 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



20352 11 

20352 13 

20352 15 

20352 17 



20352 71 
20352 75 
20352 98 

20352 00 

20353 — 

20353 11 
20353 53 
20353 55 

20353 00 

20354 — 



20354 11 
20354 23 
20354 25 
20354 27 
20354 29 



20354 31 
20354 33 
20354 35 
20354 37 
20354 39 

20350 00 



2036- 


— 


20361 


- 


20361 


11 


20361 


12 


20361 


14 


20361 


16 


20361 


17 


20361 


19 


20361 


00 


20362 


- 


20362 


13 


20362 


15 


20362 


00 


20360 


00 


20360 


02 



PICKLED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, SAUCES AND SALAD DRESSING, 
TOTAL . . . 



Pickles and other pickled products. 



Million gallons 
...do.......... 



Finished pickles: 
Cucumber: 

Dill 

Sour. 

Sweet. ........ 

Fresh pack. . . . 



.do. 

.do. 
.do. 
• do. 



Other finished pickles and pickle products, including mixes, 
relishes, etc. 



Unfinished pickled products: 

Unfinished pickles ( salt stock) , 

Brined cherries 

Other bulk pickled products such as mushrooms, sauerkraut, etc, 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Pickles and other pickled products, n.s.k. 
Meat sauces (except tomato) 



Prepared mustard 

Other sauces for meat (worchestershire, and similar types) 

Soy sauces. 

Meat sauces (except tomato, n.s.k.),......... 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



Salad dressings, mayonnaise, and sandwich spread with salad dress- 
ing base: 

As reported in the census of manufactures , 

As reported on Census annual Form MA-20F , 



.do. 
.do. 



Dressing base: 
Spoon-type: 

Salad dressing 

Mayonnaise 

Sandwich spread. 

Refrigerated dressing 

All other spoon-type dressing. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Pourable dressings: 

French dressing. 

Oil and vinegar dressing.. 

Cheese dressing. 

Low calorie and dietetic dressing. 
Other pourable-type dressing 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



Pickled fruits and vegetables, sauces, and salad dressing products, 

n.s.k. (For companies with 10 employees. See Note.) 

Pickled fruits and vegetables, sauces, and salad dressing products, 

n.s.k. (For companies with less than 10 employees. See Note.).... 



FRESH OR FROZEN PACKAGED FISH, TOTAL 

Frozen packaged fish and other seafood, including soup. 

Frozen packaged fish, excluding shellfish: 

Fillets and steaks 

Fish sticks.... 

Fish portions 



Million pounds 
...do 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Frozen packaged shellfish: 

Shrimp 

Other shellfish (oyster, crab, etc.). 



.do. 
.do. 



Other frozen seafoods (soups, stews, chowders, dinners, pies, 

etc.) 

Frozen packaged fish and other seafood, n.s.k.. 



.do. 
.do. 



Fresh packaged fish and other seafood, total. 



Fresh packaged fish, excluding shellfish 

Fresh packaged shellfish............. 

Fresh packaged fish and other seafood, n.s.k. 



.do. 
.do. 



Fresh or frozen packaged fish, n.s.k. (For companies with 10 or 
more employees. See Note.) 

Fresh or frozen packaged fish, n.s.k. (For companies with less 
than 10 employees. See Note. ) 



513.8 
207.4 



49.1 

8.1 

27.3 

52.4 



21 .7 
0.8 
5.6 

3 4.6 

59.1 

36.6 

20.1 

1.6 

3 0.8 



207.3 
191.0 



69.4 

79.0 

7.5 

2.2 

5.4 



10.8 
6.0 
1.4 
2.6 
6.7 



3 33.1 
6.9 



861 .3 
597.2 



e 136.7 
e 69.5 
102.8 



166.0 
61.3 



51.9 
3 9.0 

136.4 

e 81.0 

S 51.5 

3 3.9 



'lOl^ 
3 26.0 



792.9 
260.6 



63.9 

9.1 

48.2 

63.8 



8.5 
2.2 
5.6 

5.6 

98.5 

39.4 

54 .8 

3.1 

1.2 



373.9 
345.0 



86.6 

146.7 

14.2 

6.8 

12.4 



22.9 

21.3 

5.1 

7.1 

22.0 



529.7 
383.9 



52.2 
28.9 
51.5 



165.6 
52.0 



27.9 
5.8 



30 


2 


34 


5 


1 


9 


63 


1 


16 


1 



415.9 
178.1 



38.2 

6.4 

25.2 

41.8 



27.4 

r 19.6 
19.5 

60.3 

24.4 

28.4 

7.5 



160.2 
160.3 



62.7 

66.3 

6.9 

1.2 

3.3 



10.4 
4.5 
0.8 
1.3 
2.9 



697 


.2 


517 


.1 


95 


.4 


89 


.9 


101 


,8 


113 


.6 


33 


.3 


44 


4 


3 38 


7 



143.3 

76.1 
43.2 
3 24.0 



See footnotes at end of table . 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-27 



table 6A Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Production by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 

Includes quantity and value of the products reported not only by establishments classified in this industry, but also by establishments classified in other industries, and shipping these products 

as J secondary" products. See Appendix, Explanation of Terms, "Value of shipments") 



Product 
code 



Product 



Unit of 
measure 



Total shipments including interplant transfers 



1967 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Value 
(million dollars) 



20371 35 
20371 41 
20371 51 
20371 55 
20371 69 



20371 81 
20371 82 
20371 83 

20371 85 
20371 86 
20371 87 

20371 91 
20371 92 
20371 93 

20371 95 

20371 00 

20372 — 

20372 11 
20372 15 
20372 21 
20372 25 
20372 31 
20372 33 
20372 35 
20372 41 
20372 42 
20372 43 
20372 44 
20372 46 

20372 47 

20372 51 
20372 98 

20372 00 



20373 11 
20373 15 

20373 25 
20373 31 
20373 35 
20373 44 
20373 98 

20373 00 

20370 00 

20370 02 



FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, TOTAL. 



Frozen fruits, juices, and ades. 



Frozen fruits and berries: 

Strawberries 

Red sour cherries 

Peaches. „ 

Apples and applesauce 

Other frozen fruits and berries. 



Frozen fruit and berry juices, concentrated: 
Orange juice: 

4.1 oz. to 7 oz 

10.1 oz. to 13 oz 

Other sizes 



Lemonade: 

4.1 oz. to 7 oz. . . 
10.1 oz. to 13 oz. 
Other sizes 



Grape juice: 

4.1 oz. to 7 oz. . • 
10.1 oz. to 13 oz. 
Other sizes 



Other frozen fruit and berry juices, concentrated. 
Other frozen fruits, juices, and ades, n.s.k 



Frozen vegetables. 



Asparagus 

Beans, green and wax , 

Beans, fresh lima 

Broccoli 

Brussels sprouts 

Carrots 

Cauliflower ....... » ... . 

Green peas 

Spinach 

Succotash 

Peas and carrots 

Other vegetable combinations (mixed vegetables, peas and 

onions, etc. ) 

Potatoes and potato products ( f rench fried, patties, puffs, 

etc. 



.)• 



Sweet corn, cut 

Other frozen vegetables.. 
Frozen vegetables, n.s.k. 



Frozen specialties. 



Frozen pies (fruit and custard)..... 

Other frozen baked goods (waffles, cookies, cakes, pastries, 

etc. ) excluding bread and rolls 

Frozen dinners. 

Frozen beef and pork pies... 

Frozen poultry pies 

Frozen nationality foods (Chinese, Mexican, Italian, etc. J... 
Other frozen specialities, except seafood, including soups, 

etc 

Frozen prepared foods and soups, n.s.k 



Frozen fruits, fruit juices, vegetables and specialties, n.s.k. 

(For companies with 10 or more employees. See Note.) 

Frozen fruits, fruit juices, vegetables, and specialties, n.s.k. 

(For companies with less than 10 employees. See Note.) 



Million lbs. 

...do 

...do 

...do....... 

...do 



Mil. cases of 48 
Mil. cases of 24 
Mil. cases 



Mil. cases of 48, 
Mil. cases of 24, 
Mil. cases , 



Mil. cases of 48 
Mil. cases of 24 
Mil. cases 



.do. 



Million lbs. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



(X) 
(X) 

152.2 
50.9 
37.3 
66.8 

134.8 



19. 

10. 

7. 

2. 
1. 
3, 



2.1 
2.1 
(D) 

10.2 
(X) 

(x) 

28.2 

243.8 

159.4 

153.5 

36. 7 

94.3 

45.4 

383.5 

156.1 

(D) 

30.3 

108.3 

1,507.6 
327.8 
392.7 

(X) 

2,369.8 

402.0 

224.0 
397.9 
125.4 
193.8 
329.4 

552.6 
3 144.7 



(X) 
(X) 



2,020.7 
419.5 



38.6 

14.5 

5.8 

9.0 

30.5 



109.3 
58.9 
45.2 



3.2 

7.3 



12.3 
D 10.2 



39.0 
10 27.2 

579.9 

14.8 
49.3 
31.5 
35.3 
12.0 
9.6 
11.5 
53.8 
17.9 

(") 
4.6 

22.1 

186.2 
56.3 
61.9 
13.1 



12 



889.4 

101.5 

107.4 

217.3 

44.4 

45.0 

126.4 

192.4 
55 .0 



124.0 
7.9 



IX) 
(X) 



212.6 
51.6 
58.2 
95.3 

111.0 



12.8 
7.2 



2.1 
1.1 
0.6 

10.9 

(X) 

(X) 

27.0 
194.9 
123.2 
136.4 

46.7 

(") 

38.2 
317.9 
109.6 

(") 

( J1 ) 

(") 

906.9 

169.6 

2 586.2 

13.1 

1,697.1 

401.1 

281.9 
274.0 

290.1 

394.0 
56.1 



1,460.8 
436.3 



44.6 

8.8 

7.9 

10.8 

20.4 



124.8 
67.8 
39.2 

20.1 
3.7 
3.3 

13.0 
6.9 

4.4 

42.6 
18.1 

396.0 

11.3 
38.8 
22.2 

27.5 
13.0 

(") 

8.2 
50.1 
14.0 

(") 

(") 

108.0 
25.8 

2 75.0 
2.0 

608.1 

84.9 

93.4 
133.5 

121.6 

154.4 
20.1 



Note: In the 1967 Census of Manufactures, data for establishments of small companies, typically those with less than 10 employees, were estimated 
from administrative records rather than collected from respondents. These estimated shipments are included in the code ending with "002" and is 
further discussed in the text. Such establishments were usually mailed a "short form" in the 1963 Census of Manufactures, These short forms 
typically provided for coding products to the product class level (5 digits) followed by "00" rather than only to the 4-digit level followed by "000." 
Therefore, the 1963 "n.s.k." (000) figure is not strictly comparable to the total of the two "n.s.k." (000 and 002) figures in 1967. 

In addition to the 1967 'n.s.k. "(code 002) resulting from the above, in both the 1967 and 1963 censuses of manufactures, products which were 
not completely identified on the standard forms were coded to the appropriate product class code (5 digits) followed by "00, or in some cases to the 
appropriate product group code (4 digits) followed by "000." 

Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands ^rather than rounding) in 
computer operations. 

Footnotes continued on next page. 



20C-28 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 6A Products and Product Classes-Quantity and Value of Production by All Producers: 

1967 and 1963-Continued 



Footnotes for table 6A-20C-Continued 



Standard notes: -Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 
companies. In some cases figures which are otherwise publishable are withheld to avoid indirect disclosure by subtraction from higher level 
totals or from related figures. e From 10 to 30 percent of this figure was estimated. r Revised. (z) Under $50 thousand. 

1 Since the Fish and Wildlife Service collected detailed information on commercial fisheries and fish processors, only limited product information 
was collected in the census of manufactures. 

Comparison of the report submitted in both 1967 and 1963 for individual companies indicated that a number of establishments were reporting on a 
gross weight rather than net weight basis in 1963. The corrected figures shown for 1963 have been adjusted to reflect this change; revised data for 
previous census years are not available. 

3 Quantity estimated based on quantity-value relationship for other products. 

4 For 1967^ respondents were asked to report production of dietetic fruits, juices, vegetables, jams, jellies, and preserves separately. These 
data are included in the totals as shown in this table: 





Product 


Unit 

oi 

Measure 


Total Production 


Code 


Quantity 


Value 
(Million dollars) 


6015 
6031 






5,588.9 
550.3 

417.4 

8.5 

814.9 


24.9 
2.1 


6056 




. . .do 


1.5 


6072 

6080 


Dietetic jams, jellies, and preserves.. 


1,000 cases 


3.8 
3.4 









5 For both 1967 and 1963, quantity and value data were collected for two categories: The largest can size and all other can sizes combined. The 
quantity data for "All other can sizes are further allocated by sizes based on percentages supplied by the National Canners Association. For 
such categories, the value data are not available. 

6 Included with other sizes. 

7 Data for 1963, includes an undetermined number of 12Z vacuum si ze containers . For 1967 , this product is included with other sizes . 
8 Data were not collected separately in 1963. 

9 Data for product code 2034118 included with 2034129 to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 

10 Product code 20371 93 included with product code 20371 00. 

i: In 1963, codes, 20372 33, 20372 43, 20372 44, 20372 46 were not collected separately, but were included in 20372 98, other frozen vegetables. 

12 Product code 20372 43 included with product code 20372 00. 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-29 



table 6B Product Classes-Value of Production by All Manufacturing Establishments, 

by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963 



In millions of dollars. Statistics ate shown for selected product classes which are economically 
significant and which have production that is geographically dispersed, provided that the disper- 
sion is not approximated by the data in the geographic table for the industry (table 2) and they are 



not miscellaneous or "not specified by type" classes. Product class values for some States are 
withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. Such States aie shown with a value 
range. 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



CANNED BABY FOODS (EXCEPT 
MEAT) (20321) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region.... 

East North Central Div.... 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Mary 1 and 

North Carolina 

Florida 

East South Central Div.... 
Al abama 

West South Central Div.... 
Arkansas 

West Region 

Pacific Div 

California 



CANNED SOUPS (EXCEPT FROZEN 
AND SEAFOOD), OTHER CANNED 
SPECIALTIES AND CANNED 
SPECIALTIES, N.S.K. (20322, 
20324, 20320) 



United States . . 
Northeast Region. 



New England Div. 

Maine 

New Hampshire 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region.. 

East North Central Div.. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 



West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div 

Mary 1 and 

Georgia 



246.3 

115.3 

115.3 
GG 
FF 

FF 

FF 
BB 
AA 

FF 

GG 

30.8 

BB 

FF 

4.9 

BB 
BB 

FF 
FF 



East South Central Div.... 
Kentucky 



698.3 

265.1 

4.4 
AA 
AA 

260.7 

21.9 

GG 

GG 

245.7 

221.2 

GG 

9.0 

GG 

BB 

24.4 
EE 
AA 
BB 
AA 

GG 



13.9 

EE 
AA 

AA 
AA 



230.8 
111.0 
111.0 

C) 



(D) 
(') 
(D) 
(*) 



27.2 

(D) 
(') 
C) 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 



(D) 



515.5 

177.1 

3.0 
(D) 

C) 

174.1 

12.6 

(*) 

(*) 

243.4 

(D) 
(*) 
7.4 

C 1 ) 

(D) 

(D) 
(*) 

(') 

C) 

(D) 



(D) 
2.6 



(D) 
(D) 



CANNED SOUPS (EXCEPT FROZEN 
AND SEAFOOD), OTHER CANNED 
SPECIALTIES AND CANNED 
SPECIALTIES, N.S.K. (20322, 
20324, 20320)— Con. 



South Region — Con. 

West South Central Div, 

Louisiana 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Colorado 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

California 

CANNED DRY BEANS (20323) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Maine 

Massachusetts 

Middle Atlantic Div.... 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div. 

I owa 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Maryland 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

East South Central Div. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

West South Central Div. 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Arizona 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



1.7 
AA 

GG 

(M 

96.4 



EE 
EE 
BB 

FF 

CC 

21 .5 

14.4 

89.0 

71.4 
16.5 
31.2 
21.4 
BB 

17.6 
BB 
BB 
CC 

57.2 

11.2 
BB 
BB 

AA 

EE 
AA 
EE 

FF 

5.9 

AA 

18.5 

37.3 

4.0 
BB 

33.3 
BB 
AA 
FF 



(D) 
(D) 
2.1 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(*) 
(') 



(D) 

(') 
(D) 

(D) 

(?) 

19.3 

15.6 



78.4 

62.4 
14.1 
26.3 
21.4 
(D) 

16.0 

C 1 ) 

C 1 ) 
(*) 

43.7 

9.9 
C 1 ) 

(') 
(D) 

15.6 

(') 



18.2 

(') 

2.7 

11.4 

24.8 

2.2 
C) 

22.6 

(') 
(D) 

C) 



CANNED FRUITS (EXCEPT BABY 
FOODS) (20331) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Maine 

Massachusetts 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region.. 

East North Central Div.. 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div.. 

Minnesota 

Missouri 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

Georgia 

Florida 

West South Central Div . . 
Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon. ; 

California 

Hawaii 

CANNED VEGETABLES (EXCEPT 
HOMINY AND MUSHROOMS) 
(20332) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Maine 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region.. 

East North Central Div.. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div.. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 



818.3 

122.7 

14.5 
BB 
EE 

108.2 

53.3 

FF 

FF 

68.9 

GG 
BB 

EE 

34.1 

4.0 

EE 
EE 
AA 

72.9 

GG 

1.8 

16.2 

EE 

2.0 

34.5 

BB 
2.6 

553.9 

2.1 

551.8 
45.3 
27.9 

380.4 
98.3 



957.5 

76.9 

3.2 
BB 

73.7 

53.0 

8.5 

12.2 

400.6 

300.7 
10.7 
20.7 
77.5 
13.6 

178.2 

100.0 

96.7 

BB 



721.7 

101.6 

14.4 

3.7 

10.4 

87.3 
45.2 

o 

51.5 

(D) 
(*) 

7.4 
27.2 
4.1 

(D) 
(') 
(D) 

72.7 

(D) 

1.9 

14.0 

t 1 ) 

5.3 

35.2 

CD) 
3.3 

495.8 

2.6 

493.2 
24.9 
18.8 

356.9 
92.4 



4.0 
(') 
71 .9 
47.2 
12.8 
11.9 

289.7 

230.8 

9.2 

20.2 

57.2 

14.4 

129.8 

58.8 

55.9 

(*) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20C-30 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 6B Product Classes-Value of Production by All Manufacturing Establishments, 
by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



CANNED VEGETABLES (EXCEPT 
HOMINY AND MUSHROOMS ) 
(20332)— Con. 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central Div. 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central Div. 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



West Region. 



Mountain Div. 

Idaho 

Colorado 

Utah 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

Cal if ornia. . . . 



CANNED HOMINY AND MUSHROOMS 
(20333) 



United States . . 
Northeast Region. 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. . . 

East North Central Div.., 

Ohio 

Michigan 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 
Delaware 



East South Central Div.. 
Tennessee 



West South Central Div. 
West Region 



Pacific Div. 
Oregon 



CANNED FRUIT JUICES, 
NECTARS, AND CONCENTRATES 
( 20334 ) 



United States. . 

Northeast Region. 

New England Div. . . . 

New Hampshire 

Massachusetts 



191.8 

106.8 
32.9 
29.4 
7.8 
8.8 
14.1 
12.8 

13.7 

10.0 

AA 

AA 

71.3 
16.9 
20.6 
6.1 
27.7 

288.0 



2.1 
3.6 



156.8 

75.6 

15.6 

27.3 

8.0 

3.1 

7.8 

11 .7 

15.0 

t 1 ) 



66.2 
13.7 
21 .3 

4.1 
27.0 

245.4 



29.3 


27.2 


13.3 


11.5 


4.1 


5.3 


EE 


8.7 


258.6 


218.2 


49.5 


43.6 


64.9 


53.8 


144.3 


120.8 



51.6 


39.0 


31 .6 


23.3 


31 .6 


23.3 


AA 


C 1 ) 


FF 


(M 


8.2 


4.5 


7.8 


(D) 


BB 


(D) 


BB 


(") 



7.3 

(D) 
(*) 

(D) 

C 1 ) 

(D) 

4.0 

(D) 
(D) 



413.5 


380 


5 


88.1 


97 





4.8 


11 


7 


AA 


( 


) 


2.5 


8 


4 



CANNED FRUIT JUICES, 
NECTARS, AND CONCENTRATES 
( 20334 )--Con. 



Northeast Region- -Con 

Middle Atlantic Div.... 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div. 
Missouri 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Del aware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

Florida 

East South Central Div. 
Kentucky 

West South Central Div. 

Arkansas 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

Hawaii 

CANNED VEGETABLE JUICES 
(20335) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

Middle Atlantic Div. . . . 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Maryl and 

Virginia 

West Region 

Pacific Div 

California 



83.2 


85.3 


41.3 


45.3 


6.6 


(*) 


35.4 


C) 


30.9 


38.9 


28.8 


37.7 


BB 


C) 


2.6 


5.8 


7.4 


16.0 


10.9 


11.0 


BB 


n 


2.1 


1.2 


AA 


(') 


180.7 


146.6 


170.3 


135.7 


BB 


(*■) 


1.9 


3.1 


2.6 


2.1 


BB 


(*) 


159.7 


124.2 


2.7 


2.7 


AA 


(') 


7.7 


8.2 


BB 


(*) 


BB 


(*) 


113.9 


98.0 


1.4 


2.2 


112.5 


95.9 


11.5 


8.9 


1.7 


i 1 ) 


69.8 


56.5 


29.6 


29.7 



104.2 


91.1 


14.8 


16.7 


14.8 


16.7 


BB 


2.8 


CC 


9.6 


3.2 


4.3 



38.4 


36.9 


22. 8 


16.9 


8.3 


10.5 


5.0 


5.1 


BB 


(*) 



4.0 

BB 

1.3 

BB 



46.4 
FF 



(D) 
(D) 



33.5 



CATSUP AND OTHER TOMATO 
SAUCES (20336) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region.... 

East North Central Div. . . . 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

West North Central Div.... 
Iowa 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West South Central Div.... 
Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Utah 

Pacific Div 

California 

JAMS, JELLIES, AND PRESERVES 
(20338) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Massachusetts 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region. . . . 

East North Central Div.... 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div .... 
Minnesota 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Maryland 

Virginia 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central Div.... 

Kentucky 

Al abama 

West South Central Div.... 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



507.6 


297.9 


92.1 


52.9 


GG 


(D) 


26.8 


12.4 


44.2 


29.5 


20.4 


10.1 



GG 


(D) 


69.4 


23.3 


16.7 


19.3 


9.0 


(') 


EE 


(D) 


EE 


C 1 ) 



3.6 

1.2 

AA 


(D) 
(D) 
(D) 


BB 
2.8 


2.1 

(D) 


296.3 


181.5 


4.2 
BB 


4.1 

C 1 ) 


292.1 
292.1 


177.4 

C 1 ) 



245.2 


227.3 


68.5 


62.6 


5.9 


8.9 


CC 


(') 


62.6 


53.6 


36.5 


29.8 


7.0 


7.0 


19.2 


16.8 



73.2 



66.0 


67.7 


FF 


(') 


CC 


t 1 ) 


16.8 


17.6 


10.7 


9.6 


AA 


1.9 


5.4 


5.5 


BB 


(*) 



EE 


16.0 


AA 


(M 


CC 


C 1 ) 


3.9 


4.9 


3.6 


3.5 


EE 


11.4 


BB 


(') 


EE 


C 1 ) 


22.6 


23.3 


BB 


(') 


3.7 


5.3 


BB 


(') 


11.6 


10.7 



See footnotes at end of table. 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-31 



table 6B Product Classes-Value of Production by All Manufacturing Establishments, 
by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



JAMS, JELLIES, AND PRESERVES 
(20338) — Con. 



West Region. 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California. . . . 



DRIED FRUITS AMD VEGETABLES, 
EXCEPT SOUPS ( 20341 ) 



United States. . 
Northeast Region. 



Middle Atlantic Div. 
New York 



North Central Region. . . . 

East North Central Div..., 
Illinois 

West North Central Div.... 

Minnesota 

North Dakota 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Georgia 

Florida 



West South Central Div.... 
West Region 



Mountain Div. 
Idaho 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California. . . . 



SOUP MIXES, DRIED (2034 2) 

United States 

Northeast Region 



New England Div. 
Connecticut 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region.. 

East North Central Div.. 

Ohio 

Illinois 



West Region. 



Pacific Div. 
California. . . . 



PICKLES AND OTHER PICKLED 
PRODUCTS (20352) 



United States. . 
Northeast Region. 



New England Div. 
Massachusetts 



GG 


(D) 


5.0 


(*) 


CC 


4.6 


40.2 


30.3 



44.9 


284.5 


10.3 


12.0 


CC 


(D) 


8.8 


10.0 


13.2 


10.0 


5.5 


(D) 


BB 


(*) 


7.7 


(D) 


AA 


(D) 



7.7 

6.5 
AA 
BB 

1.2 

313.6 

55.0 
GG 

258.6 
FF 
AA 

234.2 



76.4 

55.6 

BB 
BB 

GG 
FF 
BB 

EE 

EE 

AA 

14.7 



(D) 
(*) 
CD) 

(D) 

258.1 

32.0 
(*) 

226.0 
9.2 

(*) 

215.1 



44.5 
29.9 



(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

12.9 



(D) 
(D) 



60.6 


220.5 


30.4 


28.4 


7.1 


6.7 


CC 


(') 



PICKLES AND OTHER PICKLED 
PRODUCTS (20352)— Con. 

Northeast Region — Con . 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region. . 

East North Central Div.. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div.. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Delaware 

Maryl and 

Virginia 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central Div.. 

Kentucky 

Al abama 

Mississippi 

West South Central Div.. 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Colorado 

Arizona 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

MEAT SAUCES (EXCEPT TOMATO 
(20353) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region.. 

East North Central Div.. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Georgia 



23.3 

13.6 
4.9 
4.8 

107.3 

95.2 

1.8 

6 1 

4.8 

66.3 

16.2 

12.1 
BB 
BB 
BB 

73.9 

36.4 

AA 

7.4 

BB 

14.7 

CC 

1.3 

16.5 
CC 
BB 



14 


.4 


49 


.0 


7 


.4 


5 


.7 


AA 


41 


.6 


CC 




;i; 


30 


.5 



98.5 

56.1 

CC 
CC 

FF 

EE 

13.5 

19.1 

19.6 

EE 
7.6 
1.0 
7.0 
2.1 

17.3 

5.1 
2.7 



21.7 

10.8 
5.1 
5.8 

96.5 

87.2 
9.0 
3.6 
11.4 
48.6 
14.6 

9.3 

C) 
C) 

3.1 
62.8 

32.0 
1.2 
8.1 
(') 

12.1 



19.1 

( 1 ) 

( 1 ) 

13.5 

40.4 

5.4 
(*) 
(D) 

35.0 

(') 

2.9 

26.5 



94.4 

51.2 

(D) 

n 

(D) 

(') 
c 1 ) 

17.0 

20.8 

19.0 
6.9 
1.8 
6.6 
2.0 

13.3 

(D) 
2.0 



MEAT SAUCES (EXCEPT TOMATO J 
(20353)— Con. 

South Region--Con. 

East South Central Div... 
Tennessee 

West South Central Div... 

Louisiana 

Texas 

West Region 

Pacific Div 

California 

MAYONNAISE, SALAD DRESSINGS 
SANDWICH SPREADS (20354) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Massachusetts 

Middle Atlantic Div 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Region. . . 

East North Central Div... 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central Div... 

Iowa 

Missouri 

South Region 

South Atlantic Div 

Maryl and 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central Div... 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

West South Central Div... 

Louisiana 

Okl ahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Pacific Div 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

FROZEN PACKAGED FISH, SEA- 
FOOD, AND SOUP ( 20361 ) 

United States 

Northeast Region 

New England Div 

Maine 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 



1.9 


(D) 


AA 


(D) 


10.4 


(D) 


6.4 


3.8 


BB 


2.3 



CC 
4.2 



7.3 
CC 

64.3 

EE 

FF 

3.6 

124.6 



(D) 
6.7 



5 

f 





46 





( 

( 


) 
') 


1 


5 



92.7 


67 





11.9 


9 


6 


13.3 


15 





62.3 


37 





AA 


( 


l ) 


BB 


( 


) 


31.9 


20 


6 


AA 


( 


) 


FF 


( 


) 



49.5 


41 .2 


EE 


10.1 


AA 


(D) 


CC 


C) 


22.3 


21.3 


BB 


(') 


16.4 


9.9 


AA 


(*) 


BB 


C 1 ) 


10.7 


6.2 


35.0 


26.9 


CC 


C) 


BB 


(*) 


25.4 


20.2 



GG 


(D) 


9.4 


6.8 


AA 


(D) 


65.5 


53.7 



90.1 


69.0 


5.2 


4.2 


83.1 


63.0 


AA 


(') 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20C-32 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 6B Product Classes-Value of Production by All Manufacturing Establishments, 
by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



Product class and 
geographic area 



Value of shipments 



1967 



1963 



FROZEN PACKAGED PISH, SEA- 
FOOD, AND SOUP ( 20361 ) — Con. 
Northeast Region — Con. 



Middle Atlantic Div . 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Michigan 



West North Central Div. 

Missouri 

Nebraska 



South Region 

South Atlantic Div. 

Maryland 

Virginia 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central Div.. 
Alabama 



West South Central Div. 

Louisiana 

Texas 



West Region. 

Pacific Div . . . 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

Alaska 



FRESH PACKAGED FISH AND 
OTHER SEAFOOD (20362) 



United States. 



Northeast Region. 



New England Div. 
Maine 

Massachusetts 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 



North Central Region..., 

East North Central Div..., 
Michigan 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Maryland 

Virginia 

Florida 



East South Central Div. 
Alabama 



West South Central Div., 

Louisiana 

Texas 



West Region. 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California. . . . 



39.4 

10.6 

BB 

FF 

19.8 

12.6 
CC 
AA 
AA 

7.2 
CC 
AA 

177.5 

106.3 

6.8 

7.6 

26.2 

64.5 

3.0 
BB 

68.2 

6.2 

62.0 

57.0 

GG 
22.6 

BB 
15.4 
15.6 



20.5 

11.3 
AA 
CC 

9.2 
CC 
BB 

AA 

AA 
AA 



18 


.1 


5 


.5 


8 


.3 


3 


.4 




SB 




BB 


8 


.8 


1 


.0 


7 


.7 



EE 

14.1 
8.6 
2.1 
3.4 



4.0 

( X ) 

20.3 

(D) 

1.4 

(D) 

(D) 

(*) 



107.7 

69.6 

5.0 

4.5 

30.8 

27.2 

4.1 
2.6 

34.1 

5.5 

28.6 

42.3 

(D) 
17.7 

(*) 
16.7 

5.4 



19.3 

11.7 

(D) 

11.1 

7.5 
4.3 
(') 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

35.3 

14.0 

13.3 

4.6 

(D) 
t 1 ) 
2.9 
1 .1 
1.8 

(D) 

16.9 
6.3 
6.3 
4.0 



FROZEN FRUITS, JUICES, AND 
ADES ( 20371 ) 

United States 



Northeast Region. 



New England. Div. 

Maine 

Massachusetts 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region.... 

East North Central Div.... 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

North Carolina 

Florida 



East South Central Div... 
Tennessee 



West South Central Div. 

Arkansas 

Texas 



West Region. 

Pacific Div . . . 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

Hawaii 



FROZEN VEGETABLES (20372) 

United States 

Northeast Region 



New England Div. 

Maine 

Massachusetts 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. . . 

East North Central Div... 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Nebraska 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central Div., 
Tennessee 



30.8 

3.6 
BB 
AA 

27.2 

17.2 

CC 

27.4 

FF 

24.9 

2.1 

242.4 

FF 

AA 

235.9 

AA 
AA 

4.1 
BB 

AA 

118.7 

FF 
22.4 
31.8 
60.7 

BB 



579.9 
113.8 

48.3 

FF 
AA 

65.5 

33.0 

FF 

CC 

62.7 

41.9 
CC 
EE 

13.6 
8.7 

20.8 

EE 
AA 

51.4 

28.1 
6.3 
BB 
BB 
EE 
BB 

12.9 
12.9 



4.4 
(') 

C) 

22.4 

18.6 

(') 

23.3 

(D) 

16.5 

1.0 

273.2 

(D) 

(D) 

257.5 

(D) 
(') 

(D) 
2.2 

(') 
113.0 

(D) 
20.9 
21 .7 
65.1 



396.0 
85.5 
33.7 



51.8 
30.9 

(*) 

C 1 ) 

25 .7 

9.5 

(D) 
5.8 
1.7 

(') 

16.2 

(') 

(D) 

42.8 

26.0 
6.3 
6.0 
(*) 

(*) 



7.3 



FROZEN VEGETABLES (20372J- 
Con. 

South Region--Con. 



West South Central Div.. 

Arkansas 

Okl ahoma 

Texas 



West Region. 



Mountain Div. 
I daho 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California . . . . 



FROZEN SPECIALTIES ( 20373 ) 

United States 

Northeast Region 



New England Div. 

Massachusetts 

Connecticut 



Middle Atlantic Div. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



North Central Region. 

East North Central Div. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central Div. 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Nebraska 



South Region. 



South Atlantic Div. 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central Div.. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 



West South Central Div.. 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

West Region 

Mountain Div 

Colorado 

Arizona 



Pacific Div. 
Washington. . . . 

Oregon 

California. . . . 



10.3 
BB 
BB 
BB 

352.1 

83.1 
GG 

269.0 
91 .2 
69.8 

108.0 



889.4 
165.3 



11.8 

CC 



153.5 
58.7 
27.4 
67.4 

403.2 

208.6 
65.1 
16.1 

104.8 

15.9 

6.7 

194.6 

28.1 

CC 

GG 

FF 

230.1 

132.8 

FF 
GG 
BB 
2.2 
BB 
16.2 
CC 

15.9 
AA 
EE 

81.4 
GG 
BB 

EE 

91 .0 

9.2 
CC 
BB 

81.8 
1 .1 
3.0 

77.7 



9.4 

(') 

(') 
(*) 

241.9 
43.4 

(') 

198.6 
60.9 
61 .6 
76.2 



608.1 

100.9 

10.6 



90.3 
32.2 

15.4 
42.7 

261.1 

117.8 

31.7 

5.0 

69.7 

9.5 

1.9 

143.3 
16.0 
27.3 



175.4 
120.8 

(*) 

(*) 

(D) 
14.3 
13.6 

13.6 

C) 

(') 

41.0 

A 1 ) 

3.3 

22.7 

70.7 
3.7 

(D) 
(') 

67.0 
1.4 
4.2 

61.3 



Note: Product class shipments of $1 million or more were reported but exact figures are withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 
companies. However, for such States, the values are shown in the following ranges: 

Value ranges Symbol Value ranges Symbol 

(million dollars) (million dollars) 

Less than $2.0 AA $10.0 to $20.0 EE 

$2.0 to $5.0 BB $20.0 to $50.0 FF 

$5.0 to $10.0 CC $50.0 and over GG 

Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) 
in computer operations. See Appendix, Explanation of terms, for discussion of items. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 
companies . 

1 This State or division was not shown as a separate line in table 6D in the 1963 report for this industry. A footnote to the 1963 table 6D showed 
those States with $1 million or more reported shipments. 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-33 



table 6C. Product Classes-Value of Production by All Manufacturing Establishments: 

1947, 1954, 1958, 1963 to 1967 



(In millions of dollars) 



Code 



Product class 



1967 



1966 1 



1965 x 



1964 1 



1963 



1958 



1954 



1947' 



2032- 

20321 
20323 
20322 
20324 
20320 

2033- 

20331 
20332 
20333 
20334 
20335 
20336 
20338 
20330 

2034- 

20341 
20342 
20340 

2035- 

20352 
20353 
20354 
20350 

2036- 

20361 
20362 
20360 

2037- 
20371 
20372 
20373 
20370 



Canned and cured seafood, soup (not frozen). 



Canned specialties. 



} 



Canned baby foods ; except meat ) 

Canned dry beans 

Canned soups (except frozen or seafood); 

canned specialties and Nationality foods; 

canned specialties, n.s.k 



Canned fruits and vegetables. 



Canned fruits (except baby foods ) 

Canned vegetables (except hominy and mushrooms). 

Canned hominy and mushrooms 

Canned fruit juices, nectars, and concentrates.. 

Canned vegetable juices 

Catsup and other tomato sauces 

Jams, jellies, and preserves 

Canned fruits and vegetables, n.s.k 



Dehydrated fruits, vegetables, and soup mixes 



Dried fruits and vegetables, except soup 

Soup mixes , dried 3 

Dehydrated food products, n.s.k. 3 



Pickles, sauces, and salad dressings. 



Pickles and other pickled products 

Meat sauces (except tomato ) 

Mayonnaise, salad dressings, and sandwich spreads. 
Pickles, sauces, and salad dressings, n.s.k 



Fresh or frozen packaged fish. 



Frozen packaged fish, seafood and soup. 
Fresh packaged fish and other seafood.. 
Fresh or frozen packaged fish, n.s.k... 



Frozen fruits and vegetables 

Frozen fruits, juices, and ades 

Frozen vegetables 

Frozen specialties 

Frozen fruits and vegetables, n.s.k. 



421.1 
1,190.7 



246.3 

246.1 



818.3 
957.5 
51.6 
413.5 
104.2 
507.7 
245.2 
124.3 

450.9 

344.9 
76.4 
29.6 

792.9 

260.6 

98.5 

373.9 

59.9 

529.7 

383.9 

66.6 
79.2 

2,020.7 
419.5 

579.9 
889.4 
131.9 



470.3 
1,165.9 



237.5 
255.9 



3,022.1 

823.8 
882.8 

43.5 
443.6 

94.8 
449.8 
250.9 
(32.8) 

434.6 

365.6 
64.1 

(4.9) 

767.7 

261.0 
111.4 
386.9 

(8.3) 

445.1 

332.6 

100.8 
(11.7 

1,842.2 
421.4 
564.8 
837.5 

(18.6) 



418.6 
1 , 104 . 2 



245.6 
245.8 



2,797.7 

767.8 
827.2 

42.1 
397.4 

97.5 
391.1 
236.7 
(37.9) 

384.7 

328.0 

51.2 

(5.4) 

702.1 

238.4 

107.4 
348.4 

(8.0) 

429.0 

326.5 
88.7 
13.7 

1,709.1 
413.8 
511.7 
765.0 
(18.6) 



378.6 
996.7 



232.3 
216.2 



823.2 
762.0 

44.3 
417.2 

99.9 
342.4 
243.7 

46.6 

337.3 

281.9 
49.9 

5.4 

657.2 

233.0 
100.5 
304.5 

(19.1) 

396.4 

287.6 
86.2 
22.6 



,559, 

449, 

439, 

646, 

25, 



384.4 
946.6 



230.8 
200.3 



2,583.8 

721.7 
767.6 

39.0 
380.5 

91.1 
297.9 
227.3 

58.5 

334.9 

284.5 

44.5 
5.9 

619.0 

228.1 

94.4 
278.6 

(18.0) 

362.8 

267.0 

76.6 
19.2 

1,460.8 

436.3 

396.0 

608.1 

20.5 



367.0 
827.6 



185.2 
166.9 



2,191.5 

639.7 
638.6 

34.8 
294.2 

93.3 
245.6 
197.9 

47.4 

276.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

496.1 

170.1 
67.6 

240.5 
17.9 

274.1 

203.3 

58.4 
12.5 

916.3 
358.0 
231.2 
318.8 
8.6 



277.6 

(NA) 

148.7 
131.1 

(NA) 
1,646.0 



467.9 
559.7 

24.5 
196.1 

64.5 
155.7 
160.0 

17.6 



185.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

402.8 

135.6 

56.9 

201.7 

8.6 

158.0 

104.0 
53.6 

0.5 

551.6 
256.5 
168.2 
120.3 
6.6 



251.4 

(NA) 

71.1 
116.3 

(NA) 

1,154.3 

368.6 
308.1 

15.0 
108.2 

39.1 
147.0 
152.6 

15.6 

52.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

337.6 

88.9 

21.9 

202.0 

4 24.8 

(NA) 

30.9 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
55.5 
68.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 



Note: See "Note" to table 6A for an explanation of "n.s.k." product classes. Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent round- 
ing or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than rounding) in computer operations. 



Standard 

applicable. 

'These £ 

manufacture 

ments. The 

The figures 

and related 

2 Exclude 

3 Figures 

4 In 1947 



notes: - Represents zero. 



id) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 



(NA) Not available. 



;x) Not 



igures represent estimates derived from a representative sample of manufacturing establishments canvassed in the annual survey of 

These estimates may differ from the results that would have been obtained from a complete canvass of all manufacturing establish- 
standard errors associated with these estimates are published in the annual survey of manufactures volumes for this period, 
shown in parentheses either have associated standard errors exceeding 15 percent or are not consistent with other census series 
data, 
s data for Alaska and Hawaii, 
relate to value of shipments rather than value of production, 
unfinished pickles were excluded from product class 20353 and included in product class 20350. 



20C-34 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 7A. Materials Consumed, by Kind: 1967 and 1963 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Material 



Unit of measure 



1967 



Quantity 



Delivered 

cost 

'million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Delivered 

cost 

(million dollars) 



091211 
091311 
209006 
260091 
340001 
970099 

976000 



012311 
011951 
012341 
012331 
012321 
012391 



203413 
206011 
209006 
203411 
201013 
204110 
201501 
203348 



265011 
341101 
322102 

970099 

976000 



012231 
012211 
012221 
012241 
012261 
012271 
012273 
012281 
012291 



012351 
012311 
011951 
012341 
012331 
012321 
012391 



203413 
206011 
209006 
203411 
201013 
204110 
201501 
203348 



INDUSTRY 2031.— CANNED AND CURED SEAFOODS 

Materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies consumed, 
total 

Finf ish , round 

Shellfish 

Fats and oils, all types (purchased as such) 

Paper and paperboard containers 

Metal containers 

All other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies 

consumed 

Materials, n.s.k. 1 

INDUSTRY 2032.— CANNED SPECIALTIES 

Materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies consumed 
total 

Fresh fruit 

Fresh vegetables: 

Green peas 

Irish potatoes 

Tomatoes 

Sweet corn 

Snap or wax beans 

Other fresh vegetables 

Other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies: 

Dried beans 

Sugar (cane and beet) 

Fats and oils, all types 

Dried fruit 

Fresh and prepared meats, other than poultry 

Wheat flour 

Dressed poultry 

Concentrated fruit juices ■ 

Containers : 

Paperboard containers 

Metal cans 

Glass containers 

All other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies, 

consumed 

Material, n.s.k 1 

INDUSTRY 2033.— CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies consumed, 
total 

Fresh fruit: 

Oranges 

Apples 

Apricots 

Grapes 

Peaches 

Pears 

Pineapples 

Strawberries 

Other fresh fruits 

Fresh vegetables: 

Cucumbers 

Green peas 

Irish pot atoes 

Tomatoes 

Sweet corn 

Snap or wax beans 

Other fresh vegetables 

Other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies: 

Dried beans 

Sugar (cane and beet ) 

Fats and oils, all types 

Dried fruit 

Fresh and prepared meats, other than poultry 

Wheat flour 

Dressed poultry 

Concentrated fruit juices 



1,000 short tons 
...do 

million pounds.. 



1,000 short tons. 



. . .dc 

. ..do 

...do 

. . .do 

. . .do 

. . .do 

.. .do 

1,000 cwt 

Million pounds.. 
1,000 short tons 
Million pounds.. 

1,000 cwt 

Million pounds.. 
1,000 gallons. . . 



,000 short tons 

, .do 

, .do 

. .do 

. .do 

, .do 

. .do 

, .do 

. .do 



. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 
. .do. 



. . .do 

1,000 cwt 

million lbs 

1,000 short tons 

million lbs 

1,000 cwt 

million lbs 

million gals. . . . 



(X) 

402.8 

125.5 

25.7 

(X) 
(X) 

(x) 

(X) 



(X) 
129.1 



7.0 

58.7 

543.6 

67.9 

19.5 

(X) 



182.7 

1,286.3 

52.9 

2.8 

178.8 

2,077.5 

34.5 

0.3 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



(x) 
(x) 



(x) 



1,820.1 
704.7 
101.3 
249.1 
682.2 
249.4 
994.2 
21.3 



(X) 



27.7 

343.3 

134.9 

4,439.4 

1,399.2 

373.9 

(X) 



43.4 

11,377.2 

68.5 

39.3 

7.9 

( 2 ) 

( 2 ) 

8.5 



137 


6 


37 


.2 


3 


4 


3 


4 


29 


4 


25 


4 


25 


5 



709.3 
9.8 



0.8 
2.8 

22.5 
1.9 
1.8 

26.8 



31.3 

12.5 

8.2 

1.2 

69.8 

15.4 

10.9 

0.8 



22.8 

153.2 

89.7 



195.5 
31.8 



1,925.6 



66.2 
43.2 
14.0 
22.3 
67.4 
41.4 
33.1 
6.8 
97.7 



2.7 
34.7 
4.3 
185.8 
32.5 
37.8 
80.3 



110.8 

8.6 

14.8 

1.9 

( 2 ) 

( 2 ) 

16.7 



(X) 

476.8 
76.6 
36.7 

(X) 
(X) 

(X) 
(X) 



(X) 
122.7 



5.0 

49.6 

636.2 

( 2 ) 
13.8 

(X) 



191.8 

1,710.1 

54.6 

2.0 

141.3 

1,479.4 

166.3 

(X) 



(x) 

(X) 

(x) 



(x) 

(X) 



(x) 



886.6 
601.9 
119.1 
242.9 
829.0 
254.4 
,101 .6 
26.7 
(X) 



25.7 

352.7 

199.7 

3,376.9 

1,334 .7 

275.2 

(X) 



53.2 

12,211.7 

53.6 

42.0 

4.6 

( 2 ) 
( 2 ) 
( 3 ) 



228.8 

126.9 

23 .1 

4.9 

4.3 

34.0 

21.2 
14.3 



566.8 
8.1 



0.8 

2.1 

20.5 

( 2 ) 

1.5 

20.2 



32.4 

16.8 

7.5 

0.8 

50.3 

10.4 

64.5 

(X) 



17.8 

135.7 

62.0 



1,599.2 



62.1 
29.6 
11.6 
25.8 
59.9 
29.9 
33.3 
7.5 
65.6 



2.2 
32.8 

6.4 

104.9 

26.7 

26.5 

75.5 



9.2 
117.8 
5.2 
14.8 
1.5 
( 2 ) 
( 2 ) 
(M 



See footnotes at end of table. 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-35 



table 7A. Materials Consumed, by Kind: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Material 



Unit of measure 



1967 



Quantity 



Delivered 
cost 

(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Delivered 
cost 

(million dollars) 



265011 
341101 
322102 

970099 



CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES— Con . 

Other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies — Con. 

Containers: 

Paperboard containers 

Metal cans 

Glass containers 



All other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies, 

consumed 

Materials, n.s.k. 1 

INDUSTRY 2034. — DEHYDRATED FOOD PRODUCTS 

Materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies consumed, 
total 



012301 
012203 
203411 
206011 
970099 

976000 



Fresh vegetables . . ......... . , 

Fresh fruits . . , 

Dried fruits * . . ................ 

Sugar (cane and beet) 

All other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies 

consumed 

Materials, n.s.k 1 



1,000 short tons. 

...do 

...do 

1,000 cwt........ 



INDUSTRY 2035.— PICKLES, SAUCES, AND SALAD DRESSINGS 

Materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies consumed, 
total 



012351 
012301 
012203 
203411 
204110 
204602 
206011 
209006 
322101 
970099 

976000 



Cucumbers 

Other fresh vegetables 

Fresh fruits 

Dried fruits 

Wheat flour 

Corn sirup 

Sugar ( cane and beet) 

Fats and oils, all types 

Glass containers 

All other materials, ingredients, containers and supplies 

consumed 

Materials, n.s.k. 1 



1,000 short tons. 

...do 

...do 

...do..... 

1,000 cwt 

Million lbs 

...do 

Million lbs 

1,000 gross 



INDUSTRY 2036.— FRESH OR FROZEN PACKAGED FISH 

Materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies consumed, 
total.. 



091211 
091311 
209006 
340001 
970099 

976000 



Finfish, round. 

Shellfish.............. .........!!!.!!! 

Fats and oils, all types (purchased as such)..... 

Metal containers 

All other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies 
consumed ••■•... ...... ....................... ........ 

Materials, n.s.k. 1 .. 



1,000 short tons. 
...do 



Million lbs. 



INDUSTRY 2037.— FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies consumed, 
total 



012231 
012211 
012221 
012241 
012261 
012271 
012273 
012281 
012291 



Fresh fruit: 

Oranges 

Apples 

Apricots 

Grapes 

Peaches 

Pears 

Pineapples. . . 
Strawberries. 



Other fresh fruits I. ..do. 



1,000 short tons. 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

do 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



(X) 
(X) 



(X) 

1,322.6 
299.4 
360.2 
279.8 



(X) 
(X) 



(X) 

570.9 

75.9 

6.1 

0.4 

16.9 

37.7 

2,293.6 

727.7 

12,571.7 

(X) 
(X) 



(x) 

^302.8 

"265.2 

19.1 

(X) 

(X) 

(x) 



(X) 



2,937.6 
102.1 

( 2 ) 
( 2 ) 

26.7 
( 2 ) 
( 2 ) 

66.6 
(X) 



48.0 
419.0 
127.7 



298.1 
100.7 



50 


7 


12 


3 


103 


9 


2 


9 


59 


2 


16 


1 



500.5 

58.9 
5.9 
1.3 
0.2 
0.1 
2.4 
23.2 
92.1 



188.3 
39.3 



356.7 

102.8 

155.5 

3.0 

(Z) 

"31.4 
64.0 



,178 


.0 


101 





7 




1 


('■ 


) 


3. 

f 2 


4 

) 


( 2 


) 


20. 


2 


38. 


5 



(x) 
(x) 
(x) 



(x) 
(x) 



(x) 

735.0 

(x) 

399.6 
166.7 

(X) 
(X) 



(X) 

472.3 
(X) 
(X) 

( 2 ) 
( 2 ) 
( 2 ) 

2,666.1 
836.3 

(X) 

(X) 
(X) 



(x) 

246.3 

140.2 

20.0 

(X) 

(X) 
(X) 



(X) 



1,783.2 
112.1 

( 2 ) 

( 2 ) 

34.5 

( 2 ) 

( 2 ) 

83.1 

(X) 



42.6 
389.5 
101.3 



234.0 
82.8 



200.2 

26.6 

3.0 

122.0 

1.6 

39.2 

7.8 



32 


3 


( 2 ) 




) 
) 

1 


( 2 


) 


26 


7 


95 


1 


77 


5 


132 


5 


38, 


7 



242.4 

86.2 

88.0 

3.0 

3.8 

31.0 
30.3 



917.7 



146.1 
6.5 
( 2 ) 
( 2 ) 
2.9 

( 2 ) 

( 2 ) 

19.9 

38.2 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20C-36 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 7A. Materials Consumed, by Kind: 1967 and 1963-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Material 



Unit of measure 



1967 



Quantity 



Delivered 
cost 

(million dollars) 



1963 



Quantity 



Delivered 

cost 

(million dollars) 



012351 
012311 
011951 
012341 
012331 
012321 
012391 



203413 
206011 
209006 
203411 
201013 
204110 
201501 
203348 



265011 
341101 
322101 

970099 

976000 



INDUSTRY 2037 — FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES — Con. 

Fresh vegetables: 

Cucumbers 

Green peas ■> 

Irish potatoes ... 

Tomatoes 

Sweet corn 

Snap or wax beans 

Other fresh vegetables 



...do. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 
...do. 



Other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies: 

Dried beans 

Sugar (cane and beet) 

Fats and oils, all types 

Dried fruit 

Fresh and prepared meats, other than poultry 

Wheat flour 

Dressed poultry . 

Concentrated fruit juices . 



Containers: 

Paperboard containers. 

Metal cans 

Glass containers 



...do 

1,000 cwt 

Million lbs 

1,000 short tons. 
Million lbs. ..... 

1,000 cwt 

Million lbs 

Million gals 



(X) 

221.4 

1,500.4 

( 2 ) 
659.2 
137.7 

(X) 



2,933.4 
217.6 

( 2 ) 

239.0 

2,520.0 

165.4 

( 2 ) 



All other materials, ingredients, containers, and supplies, 

consumed 

Materials, n.s.k 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



(X) 
(X) 



(X) 
25.4 
46.5 

( 2 ) 
20.5 
16.2 
77.9 



( 2 ) 
29.0 
31.4 

( 2 ) 

105.3 

15.4 

52.7 

( 2 ) 



115.0 
59.6 



316.0 
97.0 



(X) 

201.0 

1,015.4 

( 2 ) 
331.5 
106.1 

(X) 



( 2 ) 

2,408.5 

135.2 

( 2 ) 

135.7 

2,877.6 

101.7 

( 2 ) 



(X) 
(X) 
(X) 



(X) 
(X) 



21. 


4 


29. 


4 


( 2 


1 


9. 





13. 





58 


7 


( 2 


) 


24 


4 


18 





( 2 ) 


53 


9 


16 


1 


30 


7 


( 2 ) 


89 


.7 


50 


.6 


1 


.8 


247 


.0 


40 


.4 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions of thousands (rather than 
rounding) in computer operations. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. |X ) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 
companies. (Z ) Under $50 thousand. From 10 to 30 percent of this item was estimated. 

'This item represents the total cost of materials for establishments that did not report detailed materials data. For 1967, this includes estimates 
for companies that were not mailed report forms. 

2 Included with material code 970099. 

3 Not collected separately in 1963. 

4 Includes material code 340001. 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-37 



table 7B. Fuels and Electric Energy Consumed: 1967 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Code 



Item 



Unit of 
measure 



Canned 
specialties 
(SIC 2032) 



Canned 
fruits and 
vegetables 
(SIC 2033) 



Frozen 
fruits and 
vegetables 
(SIC 2037) 



331212 
331213 



131300 
331217 
331218 
291104 



291111 
960011 
960013 
960017 



Cost of purchased fuels and electric energy, total. 



Cost of purchased fuels, total 

Coal (anthracite, bituminous, and lignite] 

Quanti ty 

Cost 



} 



Coke, screenings, and breeze: 



Quantity. 
Cost 



Fuel oil, total: 

Quantity 

Cost 



Distillate: 
Quantity. . 
Cost 



Residual : 
Quantity. 
Cost 



Gas (natural, manufactured mixed, blast-furnace, 
coke-oven, and other gas): 



Quantity. 
Cost 



Other fuels (gasoline, LPG, wood, etc. 



Fuels, n.s.k. 



Purchased electric energy: 

Quantity 

Cost 



Quantity of electric energy generated less 
quantity sold 



Total energy used for heat and power 1 . 



Million dollars. 

Million dollars. 

1,000 short tons 
Million dollars. 



1,000 short tons 
Million dollars. 



1,000 barrels.. . 
Million dollars. 



1,000 barrels.. . 
Million dollars. 



1,000 barrels. .. 
Million dollars. 



Million cu. f t . . 
Million dollars. 



Million kw.-hrs. 
Million dollars. 



Mi 11 ion kw . -hrs . 



Million hw.-hrs. 
equivalent 



9 


5 


6 


3 


26 


2 


1 


9 



(D) 
(D) 



561 

1.5 



74 
0.3 



487 
1.2 



4,008 
2.1 



(D) 
0.4 



310 
3.2 



32.0 
20.4 



148 
4.6 



713 
2.3 



768 
2.3 



23,447 
10.4 



1.2 
4.2 



863 
11.6 



25.4 
9.9 



6 
0.1 



896 

2.8 



233 

0.9 



663 
1.9 



10,319 
4.4 



1,387 
15.5 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals because of independent rounding or independent dropping of fractions 
of thousands (rather than rounding) in computer operations. 



(NA) Not available. 



(D) Withheld to avoid dis- 



Standard notes: - Represents zero. (X) Not applicable, 
closing figures for individual companies. 

Represents the quantity of purchased electric energy and the kilowatt hours equivalent of all fuels used for heat 
and power. 



20C-38 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



table 8 General Statistics for Establishments, by Industry Specialization and 
Primary Product Class Specialization: 1967 



This table presents selected statistics for establishments according to their degree of specializa- 
tion in products primacy to their industry. The measures of plant specialization shown are (1) in- 
dustry specialization— the ratio of primary product shipments to total product shipments, primary 
plus secondary, for the establishments; and (2) product class specialization-the ratio of the 
largest primary product class shipments to total product shipments, primary plus secondary, for 



the establishment. See appendix tor method of computing these ratios. Statistics for establish- 
ments with specialization ratios of less than 75 percent are included in total lines but are not 
shown as separate class. In addition, data may not be shown, for some industries, product 
classes, or specialization ratios for various reasons, e.g., to avoid disclosure of individual com- 
pany data. 



Industry 
or 

product 
class 
code 



Industry or product class by 
percent of specialization 



Establish- 
ments 



(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 



(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



(millions) 



Wages 



(million 

dollars! 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 

materials 



(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
production 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 



CANNED SPECIALTIES 



ENTIrE INDUSTRY 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION, 



20321 
20323 



CANNED BABY FOODS (EXCEPT MEAT) 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . • 

CANNED DRY BEANS 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



CANNED SPECIALTIES AND NATIONALITY FOODS 
(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . • 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 

CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 



Entire industry 

establishments with 75* or more specialization 



CANNED FRUITS (EXCEPT BABY FOODS) 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . • 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



CANNED VEGETABLES (EXCEPT HOMINY AND MUSHROOMS) 
(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). , . . 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



CANNED HOMINY AND MUSHROOMS 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT), 



20342 
2035 



CANNED FRUIT JUICESi NECTARS' AND CONCENTRATES 
(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPEC I ALIZAT ION. 



CANNEO VEGETABLE JUICES 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . • 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



CATSUP AND OTHER TOMATO SAUCES 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



JAMSi JELLIES' AND PRESERVES 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . • 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 

DEHYDRATED FOOD PRODUCTS' 



ENTIRE INDUSTRY 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION 



DRIED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES' EXCEPT SOUPS 
(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). • . • 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



SOUP MIXES' DRIED 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT) 

PICKLES' SAUCES' AND SALAD DRESSINGS 



ENTIRE INDUSTRY 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION 

PICKLES AND OTHER PICKLED PRODUCTS 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



MEAT SAUCES (EXCEPT TOMATO) 

(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). • • • 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



MAYONNAISE' SALAD DRESSINGS' SANDWICH SPREADS 
(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 

FRESH OR FROZEN PACKAGED FISH 



ENTIRE INDUSTRY i 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION! 



FROZEN PACKAGED FIsHi SEAFOOD' AND SOUP 
(PRIMARY PRODUCT CLASS OF ESTABLISHMENT). . . . 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH ?5* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 



175 
143 



1 223 

1 115 



157 
101 



363 
297 



178 
172 



102 
96 



527 

485 



147 
131 



497 
475 



157 
135 



27.2 
19.7 



5.5 
2.2 



4.3 
1.5 



100. 1 
86.5 



28.2 

18.8 



36.0 
29.1 



9.6 
3.2 



1.7 
.5 



11.3 
3.2 



5.9 
2.1 



11.1 
10.2 



8.9 

8.4 



19.8 
14.7 



1.7 
.5 



5.1 

2.4 



21.4 
20. 1 



12.9 
11.9 



157.3 

115.3 



26.7 
10.2 



25.1 
7.9 



473.81 
405.2 



136.1 

89.0 



146.4 
115.2 



47.4 
17.2 



10.0 
2.0 



70.3 
18.8 



35.1 
13.9 



58.0 
52.9 



46.5 
43.8 



100.5 
70.3 



48.9 
38.5 



10.6 
2.9 



31.9 
15.1 



77.2 
72.0 



49.5 
45.9 



22.4 
15.9 



4.7 
1.9 



3.5 

1.1 



88.9 

77.6 



25.5 
17.2 



32.8 
26.6 



7.9 

2.4 



9.9 
2.9 



4.6 
1.5 



9.4 
8.7 



7.7 
7.2 



16.2 
12.2 



9.2 
7.6 



3.9 

1.7 



19.4 
18.2 



11.4 
10.5 



45.0 
30.8 



10.0 
3.9 



7.6 
2.1 



174.0 
151.1 



48.5 
32.0 



63.3 
51.5 



15.4 
4.7 



21.5 
6.1 



9.7 
3.3 



18.1 
16,6 



14.5 
13.5 



31.7 

23.4 



17.8 
14.7 



7.7 
3.3 



32.8 
30.6 



20.3 
18.9 



115.1 

82.8 



19.6 

7.9 



17.8 
4.1 



37 6.0 
325.9 



111. 

73. 


2 
4 


119. 

94. 


9 
9 


4. 


8 


34 
10 


1 

9 


8 
1 



.6 


57 
15 


.8 
■ 6 


23 

8 


.5 
.6 



44.0 
40.4 



35.6 

33.4 



72.0 
50.2 



34.5 
28.3 



7.7 
1.8 



22.5 
9.2 



60.0 
55.6 



36.8 
■33.9 



602.1 

463.8 



66.3 
31.8 



92.9 
32.0 



1 413. 3 
1 194.7 



368 

244 


1 
9 


428 
352. 


6 

6 


23. 


1 


140 
61 


7 




22 
5 


• 4 
.1 


261 
93 


.2 

.7 


115 

38 


.8 
.2 



167.7 
154.8 



117.6 
112.6 



295.5 
196.5 



111.3 
89.4 



53.7 
19.0 



105.0 
53.8 



164. 
154. 



109.7 
101.2 



760.5 
54B.3 



139.5 
62.3 



2 065.4 
1 698.1 



556.4 
360.0 



523.4 
403.0 



254.7 
94.6 



39.5 
6.9 



346.8 
106.1 



231.1 
82.5 



255.2 
240.2 



206.9 

202.8 



526.6 

327.0 



16C.6 
128.1 



49.4 
11.3 



280.8 
109.1 



393.8 
372.5 



292.5 
269. 1 



1 361.9 

1 011.2 



205.8 
94.1 



195.2 
56.1 



3 467. 8| 
2 889.7| 



926.5 
605.3 



951.9 

755.4 



390.5 

154.1 



62.9 
14.2 



600.9 
195.9 



346.2 
121.3 



■420.8 
392.7 



321.8 
313.2 



818.9 
520.7 



268.8 
214.6 



103.0 
30.3 



386.0 
162.9 



557.4 
525.9 



401.2 
369.2 



28.1 
18.1 



5.9 

1.4 



5.7 
1.6 



101.9 
85.6 



22.5 
11.7 



36.7 

32.4 



10.0 
4.5 



1.5 
.5 



19.5 
9.1 



6.7 

3.1 



14.6 
13.9 



11.0 
10.5 



14.9 

10.7 



7.0 
5.9 



3.8 

1.8 



5.4 
5. 1 



See footnotes at end of table 



CANNED, CURED, AND FROZEN FOODS 



20C-39 



table 8. General Statistics for Establishments, by Industry Specialization and 
"Primary Product Class Specialization: 1967-Continued I 





Industry or product class by 
percent of specialization 


Establish- 
ments 

(number) 


All employees 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 


Cost of 

materials 

(million 
dollars) 


Value of 
production 

(million 

doll, ns) 


Capital 


Industry 
or 

product 
class 
code 


Number 
(1,000) 


Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Man-hours 
(millions) 


Wages 

(million 
dollars) 


expendi- 
tures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 












3.4 
2.4 

56.2 
49.5 

6.6 
3.4 

25.6 
21.5 

19.3 
15.2 


5.0 

3.3 

110.3 
96.0 

14.3 
6.8 

48.2 

40.1 

38.9 
31.0 


9.8 
6.3 

229.1 
199.1 

28.6 
13.6 

101.6 
83.8 

81.3 
64.0 


23.8 

11.8 

759.3 
642.8 

108.4 
52.8 

277.6 
221.3 

322.1 
255.8 


52.0 

27.0 

1 306.5 
1 095.0 

29C.3 
164.9 

351.2 

279.6 

577.4 
465.3 


75.7 
38.7 

2 066.8 
1 740.3 

408.4 
220.6 

628.8 
500.8 

898.9 
720.7 




20362 
2037 


FRESH PACKAGED FISH AND OTHER SEAFOOD 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 
FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 


88 

71 

607 
564 

88 
67 

121 
107 

181 
161 


3.7 
2.6 

64.3 
56.6 

7,8 

4.0 

28.2 
23.8 

23.0 
18.1 


11.8 
7.5 

293.9 

255.7 

37.4 
17.7 

122.0 
101.3 

111.9 
88.8 


1.3 
.5 


20371 
20372 
20373 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 759S OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. 
FROZEN FRUITSi JUICES, AND ADES 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 
FROZEN VEGETABLES 

ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 758S OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 
FROZEN SPECIALTIES 
ESTABLISHMENTS WITH 75* OR MORE SPECIALIZATION. . 


75.1 
50.2 

9.2 
3.6 

23.6 

17.9 

29.7 
19.3 



Note: Detailed figures may not add to totals be 
Explanation of terms, for discussion of items. 



of independent rounding or 
(X) Not applicable. (NA) Not availabl. 



Standard notes: -Represents zero 
thousand (or under 50 employees). 

1 Figures relate to value of shipments rather than value of production 



dropping of fractions 
(D) Withheld to 



of thousands (rather than rounding) in computer operations. See Appendix 



id disclosing figur 



(Z) Under 50 



GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 



This report shows 1967 Census of Manufactures statistics for establishments classified 
in each of the following industries: 

SIC Code and Title 

2041-- Flour and Other Grain Mill Products 
2042- -Prepared Feeds for Animals and Fowls 
2043--Cereal Preparations 
2044--Rice Milling 
2045--Blended and Prepared Flour 
2046- -Wet Corn Milling 

The general statistics (employment, payrolls, value of shipments, cost of materials, 
inventories, etc.) are reported for each establishment as a whole. Aggregates of such 
data for an industry reflect not only the primary activities of the establishments in the 
industry, but also their activities in the manufacture of secondary products and, for that 
matter, their miscellaneous activities (contract work on materials owned by others, 
repair work, etc.). This fact should be taken into account in comparing industry statistics 
(tables 1 to 4) with product statistics (table 6A) showing shipments by all industries 
of the primary products of the specified industry. The extent of the "product mix" is 
indicated in table 5A which shows the value of primary and secondary products shipped 
by establishments classified in the specified industry and also the value of primary 
products of the industry shipped as secondary products by establishments classified in 
other industries. 

2041--FLOUR AND OTHER GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in milling flour or meal 
from grain, except rice (industry 2044). The products of flour mills may be sold plain 
or in the form of prepared mixes for specific purposes. Establishments primarily 
engaged in manufacturing prepared flour mixes from purchased ingredients are classified 
in industry 2045. For a detailed list of products of industry 2041, refer to table 6 A, 
product codes 2041000 to 2041627. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the Flour and Other Grain Mill Products Industry 
in 1967 totaled $2,457.4 million. This included shipments of flour and other grain mill 
products (primary products), valued at 52,187.5 million, shipments of other products 
(secondary products)' valued at S153.2 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly 
contract work on materials owned by others) of SI 16.7 million. 

This industry's shipments of flour and other grain mill products (primary products) in 
1967 represented 93 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary 
and secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 94 percent. Secondary 
products shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of prepared feeds for animals 
and fowls (S70.0 million) and cereal preparations. 



20Q-1 



While the primary products of the industry represent more thanone class of product, the 
establishments tend to group themselves into "subindustries" represented by each of 
the different product classes. The extent of this specialization is indicated in table 8. 
Approximately 75 percent of the total industry shipments are represented by plants 
specializing in 20411. 

Industry 2041 shipments of flour and other grain mill products (primary products) in 
1967 represented 78 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $2,818.8 
million shipped by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 78 percent. Other 
industries shipping flour and other grain mill products (primary products) consisted 
mainly of industry 2043, Cereal Preparations, $78.3 million; industry 2045, Blended 
and Prepared Flour; industry 2042, Prepared Feeds for Animals and Fowls. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 
employees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2041, these establishments accounted for 1.4 percent of payroll and 1.2 
percent of value added by manufacture. 

2042--PREPARED FEEDS FOR ANIMALS AND FOWLS 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing prepared 
feeds for animals and fowls. Prepared feeds include poultry feed, livestock feed, dog 
food and other pet foods (canned, frozen, and dry). This industry also includes establish- 
ments primarily engaged in manufacturing certain feed ingredients and adjuncts, such 
as alfalfa meal, feed supplements, and feed concentrates. For a detailed list of products 
of industry 2042, refer to table 6A, product codes 2042000 to 2042469. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the Prepared Feeds for Animals and Fowls 
Industry in 1967 totaled $4,796.9 million. This included shipments of prepared feeds for 
animals and fowls (primary products), valued at $4,268.1 million, shipments of other 
products (secondary products) valued at $142.6 million, and miscellaneous receipts 
(mainly contract work on materials owned by others) of $386.2 million. 

This industry's shipments of prepared feeds for animals and fowls (primary products) 
in 1967 represented 97 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments 
(primary and secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 96 percent. 
Secondary products shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of flour mill and 
blended and prepared flour and cereal preparations. 

While the primary products of the industry represent more than one class of product, 
the establishments tend to group themselves into "subindustries" represented by each 
of the different product classes. The extent of this specialization is indicated in table 8. 
Approximately 31 percent of the total industry shipments are represented by plants 
specializing in 20421 and 41 percent in 20422. 

Industry 2042 shipments of prepared feeds for animals and fowls (primary products) in 
1967 represented 94 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $4,529.7 million 
shipped by all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 93 percent. Other industries 
shipping prepared feeds for animals (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 
2041, Flour and Other Grain Mill Products, $70.0 million; industry 2043, Cereal Prep- 
arations $16.3 million; and industry 2092, Soybean Oil Mills, $87.6 million. 



20D-2 



As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 
employees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2042, these establishments accounted for 1.9 percent of payroll and 1.9 
percent of value added by manufacture. 

2043--CEREAL PREPARATIONS 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing cereal 
breakfast foods and related preparations. For a detailed list of products of industry 
2043, refer to table 6A, product codes 2043000 to 2043059. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the Cereal Preparations Industry in 1967 
totaled $793.0 million. This included shipments of cereal preparations (primary products), 
valued at $587.8 million, shipments of other products (secondary products) valued at 
$139.4 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract work on materials owned by 
others) of $65.8 million. 

This industry's shipments of cereal preparations (primary products) in 1967 represented 

81 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and secondary). 
The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 80 percent. Secondary products shipped by 
this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of flour mills and blended and prepared flour 
($78.3 million), prepared feeds for animals and fowls ($16.3 million), and flavoring ex- 
tracts and sirups, n.e.c. 

Industry 2043 shipments of cereal preparations (primary products) in 1967 represented 

82 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $715.7 million shipped by all 
industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 86 percent. Other industries shipping 
cereal preparations (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 2041, Flour and Other 
Grain Mill Products; industry 2042, Prepared Feeds for Animals and Fowls; and industry 
2045, Blended and Prepared Flour. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 
employees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2043, these establishments accounted for 0.1 percent of payroll and 0.4 
percent of value added by manufacture. 

2044— RICE MILLING 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in cleaning and polishing 
rice, and in manufacturing rice flour or meal. Important products of this industry 
include brown rice, milled rice (including polished rice), rice polish, rice brar^and 
rice flour. For a detailed list of products of industry 2044, refer to table 6A, product 
codes 2044000 to 2044098. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the Rice Milling Industry in 1967 totaled $548.4 
million. This included shipments of rice milling (primary products), valued at $535.9 
million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract work on materials owned by others) 
of $12.5 million. 



20D-3 



This industry's shipments of rice milling (primary products) in 1967 represented 
100 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and secondary). 
The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 100 percent. 

Industry 2044 shipments of rice milling (primary products) in 1967 represented 98 percent 
(coverage ratio) of these products valued at $548.0 million shipped by all industries. 
In 1963, the coverage ratio was 100 percent. Other industries shipping rice milling 
(primary products) consisted mainly of industry 2095, Roasted Coffee. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 
employees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2044, these establishments accounted for 0.4 percent of payroll and 0.2 
percent of value added by manufacture. 

2045--BLENDED AND PREPARED FLOUR 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in the preparation of blended 
flours and flour mixes from purchased flour. Establishments primarily engaged in milling 
flour from grain are classified in industry 2041. For a detailed list of products of industry 
2045, refer to table 6A, product codes 2045500 to 2045579. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the Blended and Prepared Flour Industry in 
1967 totaled $547.5 million. This included shipments of blended and prepared flour (pri- 
mary products), valued at $404.8 million, shipments of other products (secondary products) 
valued at $110.9 million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract work on materials 
owned by others) of $31.8 million. 

This industry's shipments of blended and prepared flour (primary products) in 1967 
represented 78 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and 
secondary). The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 78 percent. Secondary products 
shipped by this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of food preparations, n.e.c. 

Industry 2045 shipments of blended and prepared flour (primary products) in 1967 repre- 
sented 63 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $644.9 million shipped by 
all industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 64 percent. Other industries shipping 
blended and prepared flour (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 2032, 
Canned Specialties; industry 2099, Food Preparations, N.E.C, $8.7 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 
employees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2045, these establishments accounted for 0.9 percent of payroll and 0.5 
percent of value added by manufacture. 

2046--WET CORN MILLING 

This industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in milling corn or sorghum 
grain (milo) by the wet process, and producing starch, sirup, oil, sugar, and byproducts, 
such as gluten feed and meal. Establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing starch 
from other vegetable sources (potato, wheat, etc.) are also included. Establishments pri- 
marily engaged in manufacturing table sirups from corn sirup and other ingredients, 
and those manufacturing starch base dessert powders, are classified in industry 2099. 



20D-4 



For a detailed list of products of industry 2046, refer to table 6A, product codes 2046000 
to 2046079. 

The code number as well as the definition of this industry was unchanged between 1967 
and 1963. 

Value of shipments and other receipts of the Wet Corn Milling Industry in 1967 totaled 
$751.3 million. This included shipments of wet corn milling (primary products), valued 
at $622.9 million, shipments of other products (secondary products) valued at $120.8 
million, and miscellaneous receipts (mainly contract work on materials owned by others) 
of $7.6 million. 

This industry's shipments of wet corn milling (primary products) in 1967 represented 
84 percent (specialization ratio) of its total product shipments (primary and secondary). 
The industry specialization ratio in 1963 was 83 percent. Secondary products shipped by 
this industry in 1967 consisted mainly of food preparations, n.e.c. ($41.9 million), and 
polishes and sanitation goods. ($50-$100 million) 

Industry 2046 shipments of wet corn milling (primary products) in 1967 represented 
96 percent (coverage ratio) of these products valued at $646.6 million shipped by all 
industries. In 1963, the coverage ratio was 93 percent. Other industries shipping 
wet corn milling (primary products) consisted mainly of industry 2041, Flour and 
Other Grain Mill Products, $8.2 million. 

As indicated in the introduction, small establishments generally with less than 10 
employees were excluded from the mail portion of the census. For these establishments, 
key data on payrolls and sales were obtained from administrative records of other 
Government agencies and the remaining statistics estimated from industry averages. 
For industry 2046, these establishments accounted for 0.0 percent of payroll and 0.3 
percent of value added by manufacture. 



20D-5 



20D-6 



GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 



table ia. General Statistics: 1958 to 1967 















(See Append 


ix, Explanation of Terms) 
















Establishments 


All employees 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 


Cost Of 
materials 

(million 
dollars) 


Value Of 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 


Capital 
expend- 
itures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 


End-of- 
year 
inven- 
tories 

(million 
dollars) 


Special- 
ization 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




Year 


Total 
(number) 


With 20 
employ- 
ees 
or more 
(number) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Man-hours 
(millions) 


Wages 

(million 
dollars) 


Coverage 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




INDUSTRY 2041.— FLOUR AND OTHER GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM 1 

1965 ASM 1 

1964 ASM 1 

1963 Census .... 

1962 ASM 1 

1961 ASM 1 

1960 ASM 1 

1959 ASM 1 

1958 Census 2 .. . 


3 541 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

618 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

814 


213 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

218 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

250 


20.5 

20.1 
20.7 
21.9 
22.4 
25.7 
26.6 
27.2 
28.5 
28.2 


142.9 

133.8 
133.2 
138.5 
137.7 
149.5 
151.8 
144.9 
144.0 
140.1 


14.8 

14.7 
15.1 
16.0 
16.4 
18.9 
19.4 
19.5 
20.8 
20.5 


33.2 

33.3 
34.2 
36.9 
38.4 
43.8 
44.4 
44.8 
46.5 
44.1 


95.5 

90.6 
90.7 
93.3 
94.9 
100.0 
100.7 
97.0 
98.0 
96.2 


491.3 

433.9 
405.8 
399.8 
373.1 
441.3 
447.1 
444.4 
410.9 
393.1 


1,966.0 

1,914.9 
1,739.4 
1,791.3 
1,804.0 
1,929.4 
1,891.9 
1,800.5 
1,758.8 
1,693.8 


2,457.4 

2,344.9 
2,145.5 
2,193.1 
2,176.5 
2,369.4 
2,331.4 
2,240.3 
2,166.3 
2,086.7 


26.3 

36.0 
21.9 
21.2 
23.5 
25.7 
24.1 
28.5 
31.1 
22.1 


192.4 

204.1 
190.8 
182.4 
232.2 
262.8 
253.0 
218.3 
214.4 
210.5 


93 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

94 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

93 


78 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

78 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

85 




INDUSTRY 2042. — PREPARED FEEDS FOR ANIMALS AND FOWLS 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM 1 

1965 ASM 1 

1964 ASM 1 

1963 Census .... 

1962 ASM 1 

1961 ASM 1 

1960 ASM 1 

1959 ASM 1 

1958 Census 2 .. . 


3 2,355 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

2,590 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

2,379 


721 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

711 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

715 


53.3 

51.4 
51. 2 
52.8 
54.6 
56.2 
55.8 
56.4 
56.9 
57. 3 


325.9 

298.4 
281. 9 
281. 7 

278. 7 

279. 9 
271.2 
263.2 
256. 1 
252.3 


34.6 

32. 
32. 1 
33.6 
34. 6 
36.4 
36. 4 

36. 9 

37. 3 

38. O 


75.3 

71.5 
71. 8 

74. 3 

75. 7 

79. 5 

80. 4 
80. 1 
80.6 
81.4 


187.1 

164. 5 
158.2 
159. 5 
159. 1 
159.2 
157. 1 
152. 7 
150. 7 
151.8 


1,226.8 

1,031. 9 
971.6 
978. 1 
983. 7 
881. 4 
861. 4 
807. 7 
804. 
798.9 


3,579.5 

3,411. 7 
3,015. 9 

2.892. 7 
2,903. 6 
2,772. 9 
2,611. 1 
2,446.0 
2,465.9 

2.444. 8 


4,796.9 

4,438.4 
3,987. 1 
3,869.6 
3,880. 1 
3,652.2 
3,478. 4 
3,262.4 
3,265. 
3,238.4 


75.6 

62. 1 
66.3 
50. 4 
53. 4 
56. 7 
44. 7 
49. 6 
56. 3 
55. 


277.6 

256. 1 
231. 
227.6 
231.4 
199. 5 
187. 
187.3 
209. 9 
192. 


97 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

96 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

97 


94 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

93 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

91 




INDUSTRY 2043.— CEREAL PREPARATIONS 


1967 Census. . . . 

1967 ASM 1 

1966 ASM 1 

1965 ASM 1 

1964 ASM 1 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM 1 

1961 ASM 1 

1960 ASM 1 

1959 ASM 1 

1958 Census 2 .. . 


45 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

48 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

43 


28 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

30 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

25 


12.2 

11.8 
11.9 
11.5 
11.4 
12.1 
11.6 
11.1 
11.1 
10.9 


93.8 

87.5 
84.2 
80.0 
75.1 
77.1 
73.4 
68.3 
66.0 
61.9 


10.1 

9.8 
9.9 
9.6 
9.4 
9.6 
9.0 
8.6 
8.7 
8.5 


20.2 

20.0 
19.8 
19.4 
18.8 
18.8 
18.1 
17.9 
17.5 
16.8 


71.9 

68.2 
65.8 
63.1 
59.6 
55.6 
52.3 
48.7 
47.9 
44.1 


473.3 

442.5 
415.6 
390.7 
365.0 
325.8 
283.8 
266.5 
254.8 
243.1 


322.7 

300.9 

293.8 
280.0 
264.7 
251.5 
221.3 
215.5 
206.7 
202.0 


793.0 

742.9 
707.1 
671.3 
625.1 
577.0 
503.5 
482.8 
460.5 
444.1 


18.4 

19.2 
16.2 
21.2 
15.3 
20.9 
17.5 
14.4 
21.5 
17.7 


54.7 

53.4 
55. 5 
50.7 
49.9 
44.3 
42.1 
38.5 
38.5 
36.6 


81 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

80 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

80 


82 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

86 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

81 




INDUSTRY 2044.— RICE MILLING 


1967 Census. . . . 

1966 ASM 1 

1965 ASM 1 

1964 ASM 1 

1963 Census 

1962 ASM 1 

1961 ASM 1 

1960 ASM 1 

1959 ASM 1 

1958 Census 2 ... 


68 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

74 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

72 


46 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

49 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

51 


4.2 

4.0 
4.2 
4.2 
4.3 
4.4 
3.9 
3.8 
3.6 
3.8 


24.4 

21.0 
20.7 
21.1 
20.3 
18.9 
17.2 
15.4 
14.1 
14.3 


3.2 

3.0 
3.2 
3.2 
3.2 
3.3 
2.8 
2.8 
2.7 
2.9 


7.2 

6.9 
7.5 
7.3 
7.3 
8.0 
6.4 
6.5 
5.8 
6.0 


15.0 

13.3 

13.7 

13.3 

12.7 

11.8 

9.7 

9.1 

8.5 

9.0 


103.8 

86.2 
84.5 
70.0 
80.5 
65.8 
62.8 
60.0 
52.0 
53.2 


447.2 

371.9 
375.5 
361.0 
351.1 
332.8 
275.7 
259.5 
235.7 
262.3 


548.4 

457.6 
456.6 
442.9 
423.0 
399.3 
329.4 
315.8 
293.9 
312.1 


9.8 

7.2 
5.0 
4.5 
3.3 
5.0 
*3.7 
3.0 
1.2 
1.4 


123.0 

107.1 

103.0 

102.3 

109.6 

84.7 

81.3 

70.2 

60.0 

67.2 


100 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

100 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

100 


98 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

100 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

100 




INDUSTRY 2045. — BLENDED AND PREPARED FLOUR 


1967 Census 4 . . . 

1963 Census 

1963 Census 

(old) 5 

1962 ASM 1 

1959 ASM 1 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


3 148 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

165 

144 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
117 


56 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

60 

43 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
30 


7.5 
7.3 
7.2 
7.6 

7.2 

5.4 
4.6 
5.4 
5.4 
5.3 
4.9 


55.0 
51.4 
49.7 
48.8 

45.4 

35.7 
29.7 
34.7 
34.1 
32.0 
28.4 


5.5 
5.1 
5.0 
4.9 

5.1 

3.7 
3.2 
4.1 
4.0 
3.9 
3.6 


11.3 
10.4 
10.4 
10.3 

10.7 

7.7 
6.6 
8.1 
8.3 
8.0 
7.5 


35.4 
31.7 
30.8 
28.2 

27.4 

20.2 
17.6 
21.4 
21.2 
19.3 
17.7 


233.1 
205.7 
205.4 
214.9 

177.8 

141.0 
122.7 
145.7 
142.0 
110.7 
118.1 


314.9 
298.3 
284.6 
291.3 

255.7 

191.6 
152.0 
178.2 
176.4 
169.6 
164.2 


547.5 
502.9 
488.8 
509.5 

434.0 

333.2 

273.8 
324.7 

327.9 
279.9 
279.4 


10.5 
8.9 
9.8 

*8.7 

6.1 

4.8 
4.0 
3.9 
7.7 
5.0 
8.6 


37.5 
35.8 
38.2 
33.8 

33.5 

(NA) 
23.8 
81.3 
(S) 
(S) 
67.4 


78 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

78 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
68 


63 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

62 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
50 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 



20D-7 



table ia. General Statistics: 1958 to 1967-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 





Establishments 


All employees 


Production workers 


Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 

(million 
dollars) 


Cost Of 
materials 

(million 
dollars) 


Value of 
shipments 

(million 
dollars) 


Capital 
expend- 
itures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 


End-of- 
year 
inven- 
tories 

(million 
dollars) 


Special- 
ization 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




Year 


Total 
(number) 


With 20 
employ- 
ees 
or more 
(number) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 


Number 
(1,000) 


Man-hours 
(millions) 


Wages 

(miilion 
dollars) 


Coverage 
ratio 

(per- 
cent) 




INDUSTRY 2046 .-WET CORN MILLING 


1967 Census 

1966 ASM' 

1965 ASM' 

1964 ASM' 

1963 Census. . . . 

1962 ASM' 

1961 ASM' 

1960 ASM 1 

1959 ASM' 

1958 Census 2 . . . 


45 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

60 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

59 


23 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

20 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

26 


14.1 

13.9 
12.9 
12.5 
13.2 
13.9 
13.9 
13.7 
13.3 
13.8 


116.1 

106.6 
98.4 
95.3 
89.7 
91.8 
87.4 
83.2 
79.5 
78.8 


9.8 

9.9 

9.3 

9.2 

9.8 

10.2 

10.3 

10.1 

7.9 

10.4 


20.3 

21.0 
20.4 
19.7 
20.9 
22.1 
21.8 
21.7 
21.3 
22.2 


75.2 

73.6 
70.3 
66.0 
65.3 
63.0 
60.2 
57.2 
55.6 
56.3 


353.6 

346.6 
302.7 
291.8 
290 .9 
277.1 
282.3 
277.6 
262.2 
249.4 


401.7 

417.7 
382.1 
345.1 
335.8 
321.2 
307.7 
286.3 
293.6 
282.0 


751.3 

755.2 
679.9 
629.5 
622.4 
602.0 
584.7 
566.4 
557.8 
528.5 


40.5 

43.7 
47.7 
47.9 
26.1 
28.1 
33.9 
27.0 
25.0 
18.1 


77.3 

81.6 
68.9 
65.1 
65.5 
55.0 
62.6 
53.4 
53.5 
54.0 


84 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

83 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

91 


96 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

93 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

98 



Note: In 1967, 1963, and 1958, the number of companies in industry 2041 was 438, 510, and 703, respectively; in industry 2042: 1,835, 2,150, and 
2,016; industry 2043: 30, 35, and 33; industry 2044: 54, 62, and 61; industry 2045: 126, 140, and 112; industry 2046: 32, 49, and 53. The 1967 
company counts include the small companies whose data were estimated from administrative records. The number of such companies is shown in table 4. 

Standard notes: - Represents zero. (x) Not applicable. (NA) Not available. (D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 
companies. (S ) Withheld because the estimate did not meet publication standards, either on the basis of the associated standard error of estimate 
or on the basis of a consistency review. *These figures either have associated standard errors exceeding 15 percent or are not consistent with 
other Census series and related data. Thus, these estimates may be of limited reliability. 

'Based on a representative sample of establishments canvassed in the annual survey of manufactures (ASM). These estimates may differ from the 
results of a complete canvass of all manufacturing establishments. The percentage standard errors are shown in the ASM volume. 

2 Data prior to 1958 appear in Volume II, 1963 Census of Manufactures, in table 1 of the chapter devoted to this industry. 

3 Some of the small establishments in this industry may have been misclassified as to industry. This does not significantly affect the statistics 
other than the number of establishments. (See section of text on scope and coverage for further explanation.) 

4 The data for 1967 excludes establishments producing self-rising, phosphated, and bromated flour which is now classified in industry 2041. However 
for 1963, data were included. 

5 The data for 1963 (new) includes establishments primarily producing refrigerated doughs from purchased flour. Data for 1963 (old) and earlier 
years exclude such establishments. 



table ib Selected Operating Ratios: 1958 to 1967 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Year 



Payroll 

per 
employee 

(dollars) 



Production 


Annual 


worker as 


man-hours 


percent of 


of 


total 


production 


employment 


workers 


(percent) 


(number) 



Average 

hourly 

earnings of 

production 

workers 

(dollars) 



Cost of 

materials 

per dollar 

of shipments 

(dollars) 



Cost of 
materials and 
payrolls per 

dollar 
shipments 
(dollars) 



Value 
added per 
employee 

(dollars) 



Payrolls 

as percent 

of value 

added 

(percent) 



Vah"; 
addeu per 
man-hour of 
production 
worker 
(dollars) 



1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 
1963 
1962 
1961 
1960 
1959 
1958 



Census . 

ASM 

ASM 

ASM 

Census . 
ASM. . . . 

ASM 

ASM 

ASM 

Census . 



1967 Census. 

1966 ASM 

1965 ASM 

1964 ASM. . .. 
1963 Census. 
1962 ASM. . . . 

1961 ASM 

1960 ASM 

1959 ASM 

1958 Census. 



971 
665 
419 
329 
144 
817 
713 
320 
052 
966 



,114 
,806 
,503 
,337 
,100 
,980 
,856 
,668 
,503 
,403 



72 
73 
73 
73 
73 
74 
73 
72 
73 
73 



65 
62 
63 
64 
63 
65 
65 
65 
66 
66 



INDUSTRY 2041.— FLOUR AND OTHER GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 



,243 
,271 
,268 
,321 
,338 
318 
,295 
,293 
,237 
.150 



2.88 
2.72 
2.65 
2.53 
2.47 
2.28 
2.27 
2.16 
2.11 
2.18 



.80 
.82 
.81 
.82 
.83 
.81 
.81 
.80 
.81 
.81 



23 


966 


21 


617 


19 


561 


18 


274 


16 


652 


17 


169 


16 


830 


16 


320 


14 
13 J 


416 
931 



INDUSTRY 2042.— PREPARED FEEDS FOR ANIMALS AND FOWLS 



,176 
,233 
,239 
,209 
,189 
,183 
,208 
,170 
,161 
,142 



2.48 
2.30 
2.20 
2.15 
2.10 
2.00 
1.95 
1.91 
1.87 
1.86 



.75 

.77 
.76 
.75 
.75 
.76 
.75 
.75 
.76 
.75 



.81 
.84 
.83 
.82 
.82 
.84 
.83 
.83 
.83 
.83 



23,017 
20,075 
18,969 
18,526 
18,000 
15,681 
15,425 
14,324 
14,138 
13,939 



29 
31 
33 
35 
37 
34 
34 
33 
35 
36 



26 

29 
29 
29 
28 
32 
31 
33 
32 
32 



14.80 

13.01 

11.86 

10.83 

9 .71 

10.08 

10.06 

9.92 

8.83 

8.91 



16.29 
14.44 
13.53 
13.17 
13.00 
11.09 
10.71 
10.08 
9.97 
9.81 



See footnotes at end of table. 



20D-8 



GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 



table IB Selected Operating Ratios: 1958 to 1967-Continued 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Year 



Payroll 

per 
employee 

(dollars) 



Production 


Annual 


worker as 


man-hours 


percent of 

total 

employment 

(percent) 


of 

production 

workers 

(number) 



Average 

hourly 

earnings of 

production 

workers 

(dollars) 



Cost of 

materials 

per dollar 

of shipments 

(dollars) 



Cost of 
materials and 
payrolls per 

dollar 
shipments 
(dollars) 



Value 
added per 
employee 

(dollars) 



Payrolls 

as percent 

of value 

added 

(percent) 



Value 
added per 
man-hour of 
production 

worker 
(dollars) 



1967 Census. 

1966 ASM 

1965 ASM 

1964 ASM 

1963 Census. 

1962 ASM. . . . 

1961 ASM 

1960 ASM. . . . 

1959 ASM 

1958 Census. 

1967 Census 

1966 ASM 

1965 ASM 

1964 ASM 

1963 Census, 

1962 ASM 

1961 ASM 

1960 ASM 

1959 ASM 

1958 Census, 

1967 Census : 

1966 ASM 2 .. 

1965 ASM 2 .. 

1964 ASM 2 .. 

1963 (new) 2 

1963 (old) 2 , 

1962 ASM 2 .. 
19 61 Z ASM 2 . . 

1960 ASM 2 . . , 

1959 ASM 2 .., 

1958 ASM 2 . . , 

1967 Census. 

1966 ASM 

1965 ASM. . . . 

1964 ASM. . . . 

1963 Census. 
1962 ASM 

1961 ASM 

1960 ASM. . . . 

1959 ASM 

1958 Census. 



7,688 
7,401 
7,065 
6,945 
6,612 
6,368 
6,329 
6,165 
5,923 
5,655 



,810 
,264 
,875 
,006 
,759 
,280 
,398 
,055 
,877 
,717 



333 
089 
862 
455 
305 
611 
456 
426 
315 
038 
796 



8 


234 


7 


697 


7 


619 


7 


654 


6 


780 


6 


612 


6 


298 


6 


080 


5 


9 84 



83 

83 
83 
83 
83 
79 
78 
77 
78 
78 



76 

76 
76 
77 
76 
76 
72 
72 
74 
76 



73 
71 
69 
65 
71 
67 
70 
76 
74 
74 
73 



70 
71 
72 
74 
74 
74 
74 
74 
60 
75 



INDUSTRY 2043.— CEREAL PREPARATION 



2,000 
2,033 
2,010 
2,025 
2,000 
1,971 
2,012 
2,088 
2,004 
1,979 



3.56 
3.41 
3.31 
3.26 
3.16 
2.95 
2.89 
2.72 
2.73 
2.62 



.41 
.41 
.42 
.42 
.42 
.44 
.44 
.45 
.45 
.45 



.52 

.52 
.53 
.54 
.54 
.57 
.59 
.59 
.59 
.59 



38,795 
37,444 
34,867 
33,926 
32,138 
26,900 
24,481 
24,061 
22,867 
22,247 



INDUSTRY 2044.— RICE MILLING 



,250 
,270 
,301 
,260 
,256 
,390 
,286 
,363 
,150 
,061 



2.08 
1.93 
1.83 
1 .82 
1.74 
1 .48 
1.50 
1.40 
1.48 
1.50 



24,714 
21,470 
19,928 
16,615 
18,916 
14,868 
16,051 
15,757 
14,333 
13,831 



INDUSTRY 2045.— BLENDED AND PREPARED FLOUR 



2,054 
2,033 
2,091 
2,090 
2,084 
2,081 
2,062 
1,976 
2,075 
2,051 
2,083 



3.13 
3.04 
2.96 
2.74 
2.56 
2.62 
2.67 
2.64 
2.55 
2.41 
2.36 



.58 

.59 
.58 
.57 
.59 
.58 
.56 
.55 
.54 
.61 
.59 



.68 
.70 
.68 
.67 
.69 
.68 
.66 
.66 
.64 
.72 
.69 



31,080 
28,341 
28,350 
28,446 
24,701 
26,111 
26,674 
26,981 
26,296 
20,887 
24.102 



INDUSTRY 2046. --WET CORN MILLING 



2 


071 


2 


133 


2 


197 


2 


141 


2 


130 


2 


159 


2 


107 


2 


151 


2 


685 


2 


142 



3.70 
3.50 
3.44 
3.35 
3.12 
2.85 
2.76 
2.64 
2.61 
2.53 



.53 
.55 
.56 
.55 
.54 
.53 
.53 
.51 
.53 
.53 



.69 
.69 
.71 
.70 
.68 
.69 
.68 
.65 
.67 
.68 



25 


078 


25 


016 


23 


444 


23 


425 


21 


979 


19 


946 


20 


350 


20 


278 


19 


721 


18 


085 



20 

20 
20 
20 
21 
24 
26 
26 
26 
25 



24 
25 
24 
30 
25 
29 
27 
26 
27 
27 



24 
25 
24 
23 
26 
25 
24 
24 
24 
29 
24 



33 

31 
32 
33 
31 
33 
31 
30 
30 
32 



23.43 
22.12 
20.94 
20.15 
19 .39 
17.28 
15.69 
14.89 
14.55 
14.47 



14.42 

12.49 

11.33 

9.58 

11.01 

8.25 

9 .77 

9.22 

9.01 



20.63 
19.77 
19 .69 
20.94 
16.61 
18.31 
18.59 
17.11 
17 .11 
13.83 
15.75 



17.42 
16.48 
14.84 
14.81 
13.92 
12.55 
12.97 
12.79 
12.32 
11.22 



(X) Not applicable. 



(NA) Not available. 



(D ) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual 



Standard notes: - Represents zero, 
companies . 

'The data for 1967 excludes establishments producing self-rising, phosphated, and bromated flour which is now classified in industry 2041. 
However, for 1963, data were included. 

2 The data for 1963 (new) includes establishments primarily producing refrigerated doughs from purchased flour. Data for 1963 (old) and earlier 
years exclude such establishments. 



GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 



20D-9 



table 2. General Statistics, by Geographic Areas: 1967 and 1963 



(See Appendix, Explanation of Terms) 



Industry and geographic area 1 



1967 



Establishments 



Total 
(number) 



With 20 
employees 

or more 
(number) 



All employees 



Number 
(1,000) 



Payroll 

(million 
dollars) 



Production workers 



Number 
(1,000) 



Man-hours 
(millions) 



Wages 



(million 
dollars) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



Cost of 
materials 

(million 
dollars) 



Value of 
shipments 



(million 
dollars) 



Capital 
expendi- 
tures, 
new 

(million 
dollars) 



1963 



All 
employees 



(1,000) 



Value 
added by 
manufac- 
ture 
(million 
dollars) 



2041 — FLOUR & OTHER GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 

UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . . . . 

NEW YORK 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. , . 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 

SOUTH REGION 

SOUTH ATLANTIC DIVISION 

VIRGINIA ... 

NORTH CAROLINA 

GEORGIA 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 

KENTUCKY 

TENNESSEE 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL DIVISION. . . 

OKLAHOMA 

TEXAS 

WEST REGION 

MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

MONTANA. .... 

COLORADO 

UTAH 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

WASHINGTON 

OREGON 2 

CALIFORNIA 



2042 — PREPARED FEEDS FOR ANIMALS & FOWLS 



UNITED STATES 

NORTHEAST REGION .... 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION . . . 

MAINE 

VERMONT 

MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC DIVISION . 

NEW YORK 

NEW JERSEY .... 

PENNSYLVANIA 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION . . 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

OHIO 

INDIANA 

ILLINOIS 

MICHIGAN 

WISCONSIN 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION 

MINNESOTA 

IOWA 

MISSOURI 

NORTH DAKOTA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

NEBRASKA 

KANSAS 



134 
23 
46 
36 

71 
22 
35 



60 

17 
11 
18 

212 
65 
26 

121 

907 

345 
75 
66 

104 
31 
69 

562 

86 
151 
77 
11 
19 
141 



213 
18 



102 
41 



721 

80 

21 
5 
5 
6 

59 

19 

9 

31 



119 
22 
25 
48 
6 
18 

164 
20 
60 
25 
3 
7 
32 
17 



20.5 
2.0 



5.0 
.5 

1.1 

2.1 

CC 

BB 

5.4 

1.1 

.2 

EE 
AA 
CC 



1.0 
.2 
AA 
.3 

1.9 
.8 
BB 
.7 



AA 
CC 
.5 

5.0 

2.1 

.7 

2.2 

22.6 

10.7 
1.9 
1.9 
5.1 
.6 
1.2 



4.0 
2.2 



142.9 

15.4 

15.3 

11.9 

(D) 

77.5 

37.8 
3.7 
7.7 

16.6 
(Dl 
(D) 

39,8 
8.8 
1.6 
(01 
(D) 
(Dl 

11.7 

29.0 

9.0 
1.7 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(Dl 
(Dl 
(D) 

21.0 

6.9 
1.2 
(D) 
2.6 

14.2 
5.4 



325.9 
41.7 



(D) 
(Dl 
3.3 

32.5 
13.7 



147.8 

72.0 
12.7 
11.8 
35.2 

4.1 



75.7 

10.7 

27.4 

11.7 

(D) 

(D) 

14.8 

(Dl 



14.8 

1.5 

1.5 
1.1 
(D) 



.7 
1.6 
(D) 
(D) 



.1 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
1.3 



.3 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
.3 



(D) 
.5 



34.6 

4.5 

1.0 

(Dl 

(D) 

.4 

3.5 
1.6 



14.5 

7.4 
1.4 
1.2 
3.5 



(D) 
(Dl 
1.6 
(D) 



33.2 

3.5 

3.5 
2.5 

(D) 

17.4 

8.2 
.8 
1.7 
3.6 
(Dl 
(Dl 

9.2 

1.9 

.3 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
3.0 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
(Dl 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



1.7 

.3 

(D) 



2.8 
1.1 

(D) 
1.0 



2.2 

(D) 

(D) 

.8 

7.3 

3.2 

.9 

3.3 

31.8 

15.7 
3.2 
2.5 
7.3 
1.0 
1.7 

16.2 

1.9 
4.6 
3.0 
(Dl 
(Dl 
4.0 
(D) 



11.5 
9.0 

(D) 



25.0 
2.6 

4.8 

11.5 

(D) 

(D) 

27.3 
5.9 
1.1 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
8.3 

17.3 

4.6 
1.0 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(Dl 
(0) 
(D) 



1.0 
(D) 
1.8 



(D) 
3.3 



187.1 

25.3 

5.7 
(Dl 
(D) 
2.0 

19.6 
9.3 

2.1 
8.2 

84.8 

45.9 
8.0 
7.3 

22.8 
3.1 
4.6 

38.9 
5.1 

12.0 
6.7 
(D) 
(D) 
9.0 
(D) 



491.3 

47. 8 

47.5 

39.6 

(D) 

283.7 

132.5 

14.0 

34.1 

50.2 

(Dl 

(D) 

151.2 

27,9 

5.1 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

41.0 

83.3 

18,9 

4.3 
(D) 
(D) 

(Dl 
(0) 
(D) 

(D) 
(Dl 
(D) 

76.5 

25.8 
5.6 

(D) 
9.8 

50.7 

10.2 

(D) 

28.4 



1 226.8 
138.8 

42.6 
(D) 
(D) 

17.4 

96.2 
38.1 
13.6 

44.5 

605.4 

353.5 
63.7 
35.6 

183.7 
32.5 
38.2 

251.8 
31.5 
98.1 
35.3 

(D) 

(D) 

50.2 

(D) 



1 966.0 

229.7 

229.4 
187.9 

(D) 



457.9 

78.0 

95.8 

181.4 

(Dl 

(D) 

683.2 

162.5 

32.9 

(Dl 

(D) 

(D) 

218.6 

333.5 

72.6 
12.1 

(Dl 
(D) 

(Dl 
(D) 
(0) 

(D) 
(Dl 
(Dl 



89.2 

15.8 

(D) 

35.0 

172.4 
53.9 



433.0 

142.8 

(Dl 

(D) 

33.3 

290.2 
118.2 
39.7 
132.3 



635.4 
128.4 
98.9 
303.8 
29.9 
74.4 

669.2 

105.7 

216.7 

139,9 

(D) 

(Dl 

115.9 

(D) 



2 457.4 

277.7 

277.0 

228.0 

(D) 



590.0 

92.0 

129.7 

231.0 

(D) 

(D) 

833.3 

190.5 

38.2 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

259.6 

417.9 

91.4 

16.4 

(D) 

(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(Dl 
ID) 

338.6 

115.2 
21.5 

(Dl 
44.6 

223.4 

64.2 

IDI 

107.5 



4 796.9 

570.0 

183.5 

(D) 

(D) 

49.4 

386.4 
155.9 
53.1 
177.4 



989.6 
191.7 
134.7 
488.3 
62.4 
112.6 

918.1 

136.0 

314.0 

175.0 

(Dl 

(Dl 

165.6 

(Dl 



26.3 
3.2 

3.2 

1.4 
(D) 



6.6 

.3 

2.1 

3.3 

(Dl 
(D) 

5.6 
.6 
.3 

(Dl 
(D) 
(Dl 
1.5 

4.9 



(Dl 

(D) 

(D) 
(D) 
(D) 

(D) 
(Dl 
(Dl 



2.4 
(Dl 
(D) 



3.7 
(Dl 
(□) 



2.9 
(Dl 
(D) 



9.5 

(D) 

(D) 
5.1 

33.0 

16.6 

4.0 
2.5 
7.6 
1.2 
1.2 

16.4 
2.1 
4.8 
1.8 
(D) 
(Dl 



22.4 
2.3 



(0) 
1,9 



4.8 
.5 
.9 

2.3 

2 (D) 

2 (D> 

6.7 

1.3 
.4 

1.5 
2 (D> 
2 (D) 

2.3 

5.3 

1.6 

.4 

.5 

2 (DI 

1.4 

.5 

2 (D) 

2.3 
2 <D) 
1.7 

3.2 

1.1 

.2 

2